Opportunities


Share Your Opportunities Online

Posting an opportunity to the SAH website is free and open to members and non-members.

All posted opportunities appear on this page, the SAH homepage, and in our Weekly Opportunities Roundup email. Opportunities include awards, conferences, lectures/symposia, calls for papers/sessions, fellowships, and exhibitions. Click here to submit an opportunity.

To post a job, please visit the SAH Career Center.


  • CFP: American Association for Italian Studies 2014 Conference (May 23-25, 2014)

    Zurich | Dates: 05 Nov – 05 Dec, 2013
    The Italian-speaking regions of early modern Switzerland exported significant expertise in the building trades throughout Europe. These émigré architects, builders, and craftsmen such as stuccatori worked for courts, monasteries, and other patrons in present-day Germany, Austria, Italy, Poland, Czech Republic and elsewhere. While often well-studied by scholars in both Switzerland and the respective regions of migration, international awareness of such careers generally remains low, with notable exceptions such as Francesco Borromini. Taken collectively, though, Swiss-Italian architects and craftsmen played important roles as agents of cultural transfer with their itinerant careers in early modern Europe. These figures include Domenico Fontana, Carlo Maderno, and Carlo Fontana in Rome; Enrico Zuccalli and Giovanni Antonio Viscardi in Bavaria; and Giovanni Battista Quadro in Poland. The scholarly literature on such men is as rich yet dispersed as the architectural culture they embody. Representative publications include, in Italian, the exhibition catalogue Il giovane Borromini (1999), and books by Tommaso Manfredi (2008) and Marcello Fagiolo (ed., 2008); works in German by Sabine Heym (1984), Max Pfister (1991), and Michael Kühlenthal (ed., 1997); or several publications in Polish and Italian by Mariusz Karpowicz. Many of these studies are only available regionally. This session aims to break down these geographic and linguistic barriers and move toward a comprehensive view of the work of the "maestri ticinesi" and "magistri grigioni" with a comparative transnational approach. The session welcomes papers on any aspect of Swiss-Italian involvement in the building trades anywhere in Europe, c. 1400-1800. Preference will be given to papers highlighting ties of workers (dynasties, networks), designs, techniques, or materials to Switzerland.

    Deadline for proposals: 5 December 2013 Please send a 300-word proposal and a short CV to Susan Klaiber (sklaiber [at] bluewin [dot] ch).

    Please note: Paper presenters must be members of the American Association for Italian Studies when they register for the conference.
  • CFP: Consuming Objects (April 12, 2014)

    Wilmington | Dates: 05 Nov – 02 Dec, 2013
    The Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware invites submissions for papers to be given at the Twelfth Annual Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars.

    Deadline: Proposals must be received by 5 p.m. EST on Monday, December 2, 2013. Speakers will be notified of the vetting committee’s decision in January 2014. Confirmed speakers will be asked to provide symposium organizers with digital images for use in publicity and are required to submit a final draft of their papers by March 11, 2014.
  • CFP: Indo-Dutch International Conference 2014 (June 12-14)

    Bangalore | Dates: 05 – 15 Nov, 2013
    This conference is an outcome of a joint research project of Delft University of Technology (TUD,http://www.tudelft.nl) and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc, http://www.iisc.ernet.in/), initiated in 2009. The project, titled Technology and Human Development – A Capability Approach, was funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO, http://www.nwo.nl/). The conference covers the original topic of this research project, but also goes beyond the project to explore related issues and challenges.

    Submissions can be original work in the form of full length articles, short communications or posters. The contributions may deal with concepts, research, innovations, running experiments, applications, case studies and lessons learnt. Submissions (in English language) should be original, should not have been published earlier and not under review in any other conference or journal. All submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review. Paper contributions should fulfil the requirements of a quality research publication, suitably discussing the research methodology or theory adopted and relevant literature review with proper references and citations. Posters can deal with field experiences and/or lessons learnt with regards design problems, solutions, processes or evaluations. These should carry empirical validity with ground realities. Paper and Poster presentations would be scheduled in suitable sessions covering all the three days of the conference. All sessions are open to both academic and practitioner contributions. Submissions can be original work in the form of full length articles, short communications or posters. The contributions may deal with concepts, research, innovations, running experiments, applications, case studies and lessons learnt. Submissions (in English language) should be original, should not have been published earlier and not under review in any other conference or journal. All submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review. Paper contributions should fulfil the requirements of a quality research publication, suitably discussing the research methodology or theory adopted and relevant literature review with proper references and citations. Posters can deal with field experiences and/or lessons learnt with regards design problems, solutions, processes or evaluations. These should carry empirical validity with ground realities. Paper and Poster presentations would be scheduled in suitable sessions covering all the three days of the conference.

  • CLIR Receives Mellon Grant for Postdoctoral Fellowships in Data Curation for Early Modern Studies

    Washington | Dates: 05 Nov – 27 Dec, 2013
    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) $916,000 to support a program of Postdoctoral Fellowships in Data Curation for Early Modern Studies. The program will fund a cohort of five fellows for two years at five institutions of higher learning, starting in September 2014.

    The fellowships are designed to help build the professional capacity needed for sound data management practice in Early Modern Studies. Fellows will be scholarly practitioners who not only understand the nature and processes of the disciplines broadly defined as the humanities, but also how research data are organized, transmitted, manipulated, reused, and sustained.

    For this program, Early Modern Studies encompasses the historical period from about 1450 to 1800, focusing on humanistic research in literary studies, history, art and architectural history, philosophy, religion, music and other performing arts, languages and linguistics, and related fields of study.

    “The Early Modern era is marked by an extraordinary complexity of human exploration, empire building, religious fluorescence, the rise of scientific methodology and empirical study, new economic models for commerce, widespread colonization, and a genuinely global exchange of culture,” said CLIR President Chuck Henry. “This explosive complexity contributes to an astonishing variety of original sources and their digital surrogates.”

    Today, Early Modern scholars collect, interlink, and manipulate digital surrogates of Early Modern texts, images, and mixed media in diverse ways. This diversity poses challenges for those who preserve and create access to these resources. Digital surrogates of analog artifacts, the metadata used to describe and bring coherence to this large set of digital objects, the algorithms, the information generated through analysis, and the resultant information that accrues from such inquiry are all aspects of research-related data and need to be organized, contextualized, made discoverable, and made secure over time.

    “Without a sustainable cohort of experts who can instantiate and evolve standards, best practices, and new approaches to the curation, preservation, and ongoing utility of the data that are integral to new methodologies, current research will be impoverished and future research seriously compromised,” said Henry.

    “We are deeply grateful to The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its ongoing commitment to data curation for scholarship, and for its support of the Data Curation Fellowship program,” said CLIR Board Chairman Herman Pabbruwe.

    This program complements the CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellowships in Data Curation for the Sciences and Social Sciences, launched in 2012 with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Postdoctoral Fellowships in Data Curation for Medieval Studies, initiated last year with funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

    Currently, CLIR is accepting proposals from institutions interested in hosting Early Modern Studies Fellows. For more information, visit http://www.clir.org/fellowships/postdoc/hosts/dc-ems. CLIR will post fellowship openings in late November at http://www.clir.org/fellowships/postdoc. The application deadline will be December 27, 2013, and awards will be announced in June 2014.

    The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.
  • Maestri ticinesi, magistri grigioni: Swiss-Italian Architects and Craftsmen in Early Modern Europe

    Zurich | Dates: 05 Nov – 02 Dec, 2013
    Organizer: Susan Klaiber, Winterthur, Switzerland Sponsor: Italian Art Society
  • Reports on CRE Trends, Constructing Healthy Communities to be Released at ULI Fall Meeting

    Chicago | Dates: 05 – 08 Nov, 2013
    Cities in the U.S. and around the world are facing 21st century challenges resulting from population and demographic shifts, new economic drivers and increasing concerns related to climate change. Rethinking urban development to meet these socioeconomic and environmental realities will be a primary focus of the 2013 Urban Land Institute (ULI) Annual Fall Meeting in Chicago.

    Set for November 5-8 at the McCormick Place Convention Center, the meeting will cover a broad range of issues, from the outlook for property fundamentals to creating healthy communities. As the largest of the institute’s events and one of the industry’s premier meetings, the annual ULI Fall Meeting routinely draws nearly 7,000 members and guests, including internationally renowned land use experts representing all land use disciplines.

    The theme for the meeting, “ULI Works,” will highlight ULI’s impact on the creation of thriving communities for the 21st century. Keynote speakers include former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and real estate icon and chairman of Equity Group Investments Sam Zell. This year’s special programming will feature sessions on technology and urbanization; coastal development and the creation of resilient communities; demand and market forces; energy and land use; connecting capital and real estate through value; and health-conscious design and development. Several new reports will be available, including ULI research on making the numbers work for affordable rental housing development and preservation; guiding principles for building places that promote healthy living choices; and trends in the commercial real estate industry, including the most promising markets for investment and development.
  • Frank Furness and Henry Holiday: A Study of Patronage, Architecture & Art

    Philadelphia | Dates: 05 Nov, 2013
    Tuesday, November 5 at 6:00pm

    Free for Phila. Chapter SAH members, $5.00 for all others. Checks payable to Phila. Chapter SAH. Please register for this event with Mary Anne Eves.
  • Subterranean Ghosts: India’s Vanishing Stepwells

    Chicago | Dates: 04 Nov, 2013

    Stepwells are a form of architecture unique to the Indian subcontinent that flourished for a thousand years. Sunk deep into the earth, these underground edifices not only harvested and preserved water, but functioned as civic centers, temples, cool retreats and caravan stops…but they are quickly disappearing from the historic record.

    Journalist Victoria Lautman is a frequent traveler to India and former contributing editor for Architectural Record, Metropolitan Home, HG, Art+Auction, and Chicago magazine. In India, she’s written for The Hindu, Architectural Digest, Vogue, and GQ, with Indian-focused articles also appearing in Town & Country, ArchDaily.com and The Huffington Post. Her long-running radio programs were heard on WFMT and WBEZ.

    What is a stepwell? See photos of these amazing structures in Victoria’s recent article on ArchDaily.

    Make your reservation for this event through the Graham Foundation.

    This event is sponsored by Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, AIA Chicago and Society of Architectural Historians

    Learning units: 1LU/HSW