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  • Design Knowledge: Making Urban Humanities

    Los Angeles | Dates: 14 – 15 Nov, 2014

    Can an action-oriented methodology at the nexus of the humanities, design, and urbanism transform our ability to comprehend contemporary culture and urban space? A two-day symposium will be convened to explore the possibility of a field called “Urban Humanities.” We seek not only to forge new disciplinary alliances between design and the humanities, but also to propose the imperative of designing knowledge, of critical reflection on the methods behind our knowledge production. This symposium seeks to investigate epistemologies of making and action, to reclaim the empty terms “urban” and “interdisciplinary,” and to recuperate the status of method. A set of six provisional methodological models that might orient this nascent field have been identified whose merits and potentials will be debated: critical cartography, artistic research, speculative literature, transgressing media, reconfigured participation, and operative history.

    Speakers
    Eric Cazdyn
    Lev Manovich
    Christian Philipp Müller
    John Pickles
    Sarah Whiting
    Karen Tei Yamashita

    Respondents
    Anthony Cascardi
    Jon Christensen
    Michael Dear
    Ursula Heise
    Miwon Kwon
    Peter Lunenfeld
    Jennifer Wolch
    Maite Zubiaurre

    Panelists
    Robert Chi
    Jonathan Crisman
    Dana Cuff
    Yoh Kawano
    Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris
    William Marotti
    Todd Presner
    Sarah Walsh

    To be held November 14-15 at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA. For more information, visithttp://www.urbanhumanities.ucla.edu/?/event/design-knowledge/ or register athttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/design-knowledge-making-urban-humanities-registration-12375089225

  • East West Central 03: Re-framing Identities: Architecture's Turn to History 1970-1990

    Zurich | Dates: 10 – 10 Dec, 2014
    Call for Papers Conference at ETH Zurich, 11/12 September 2015 Institute gta, Theory of Architecture, Prof. Dr. Ákos Moravánszky

    Re-framing Identities
    Architecture's Turn to History 1970-1990

    The year 1990 marked the end of Europe's political division. Looking back at the two decades before this event, this conference seeks to investigate the significance of the „historical turn“ in urban design and architecture in both East and West Europe since the beginning of the 1970s in relation to the political and socio-economic transformations of this period. Moreover, we intend to reflect on the emergence of the third category of Central Europe at that time, creating a new cultural entity in order to bridge the political divide. "Re-framing Identities" follows the two previous East West Central conferences "Re-Humanizing Architecture" in May 2014 and "Re-Scaling the Environment" in November 2014.

    Our aim is to discuss the growing interest in theory, phenomenology and meaning in architecture and urban design as well as revisionist thinking and the rise of antimodernism. This radical intellectual shift that originated in discourse of Postmodernism affected East and West equally, encouraging, for example, many East European architects to reassess attempts to engage national and regional traditions under Socialist Realism in the 1950s. During the 1970s and 1980s, the recognition of architecture’s capacity to reflect and ground identity reignited the search for local, national and regional languages. At the same time, an expanded understanding of history, freed from the notion of progressive tradition, allowed for integrating regional differences and multiple histories into a wider spectrum of "heritage". In this process alternative spatial identities were developed, which questioned the ideological and territorial divide between East and West.   

    We seek contributions that: 
    - test political concepts and terminologies such as late capitalism and late socialism, addressing the notion of crisis with regard to the post-1968 cultural landscape in East and West. 
    - investigate the mutual impact of the critique of functionalism and the „historic turn“ on urban as well as architectural developments in East and West. For example, the conflict between the intended mobilization of history for critical ends and its subsequent utilization for preserving the status quo would deserve interest. 
    - examine the fabrication of identities and the will to expression by producing mythical, national or transnational, pasts – at times valorizing history in processes of urban regeneration, preservation and commercial (e.g. touristic) image-making. 

    We will discuss attempts to establish transnational networks and institutions, publish journals and pursue projects with the participation of architects from state socialist and capitalist countries, and we plan to invite some of the protagonists. This will allow considering for the first time the complex and at times contradicting dimensions of architectural culture of the recent past in East, West and Central Europe. 

    Please send an abstract of up to 300 words and a brief biography (max. 150 words) to:professur.moravanszky@gta.arch.ethz.ch

    Abstracts can be submitted until Wednesday, December 10th, 2014. The selected participants will be informed by January 12th, 2015. Drafts to be submitted by August 2015.

    A limited number of travel allowances might be available for successful applicants. 

    For further details and updates please visit:http://www.moravanszky.arch.ethz.ch/veranstaltungen/eastwestcentral03

    Prof. Dr. Ákos Moravánszky (chair)
    Torsten Lange (coordinator)
  • New Urbanism Film Festival

    Los Angeles | Dates: 06 – 09 Nov, 2014
    New Urbanism Film Festival returns to the heart of the city for four days of illuminating documentary films, interactive events, tours and workshops.  Set in the thriving La Brea district the festival debuts its second year November 6-9, 2014.

    Launched in 2013 the New Urbanism Film Festival is an immersive experience of documentary films, events, tours, workshops and conversations that opens a meaningful dialogue about revitalizing traditional neighborhoods and cities that are walkable, healthy, diverse, thriving places between planners, developers, architects, engineers, public officials, investors, community activists and the movie-going public audiences.

    This year’s Festival will be held over four days on November 6-9th  at Acme Theater on La Brea.  Returning with an even stronger schedule of 5-fold the film submissions over last year, the Festival is set to engage a wide-audience into participating in creating and influencing our built environment. 

    The real-life stories documented through the Festival’s films connect regular people, planners, architects, designers, artists, developers, investors and city officials in creating a better urban world for today.  The films act as moving-postcards of real-world places where children play unsupervised on narrower streets, shared with slow-moving cars and cyclists; where parks and tree-lined neighborhoods are a permanently shared presence; where the freeway is abandoned for a far more efficient public transportation system; where cities cleverly grow inside their limits maintaining the surrounding farmlands; where people of all ethnicities and social status amiably join into voicing their needs and band together until the most thriving solution is found.  From architects, designers, city officials, mayors, urban planners and urban developers to the every-day citizen, the stories showcased at the New Urbanism Film Festival showcase create a powerful merging of forces resulting into better communities, healthier cities and a livelier, far more meaningful every-day life.

    The New Urbanism Film Festival’s creators are Josh Paget and Joel Karahadian.  Paget, a comedian, and Karahadian, a musician, have produced events together before.  They discovered they are both avid fans of bicycling and public transit, and are deeply passionate by the idea of “back-to-basics” neighborhoods and cities.  The Festival sprung from a monthly meet-up they initially created, called Noodles and New Urbanism, where people discussed local issues and current events on urban planning.  Once they started a blog people began to share articles, books and video materials which led the two to create the Festival.  A simple desire for better living, through a healthy, well-knit community and city, led two people to create a Film Festival on New Urbanism where the conversation can include all types in celebrating, explaining, and inspiring quality urban design.

    In its second year, the New Urbanism Film Festival is corralling an ever increasing attention from filmmakers, civic leaders and urban thinkers.  The Festival has received more than 5 (five) times submissions than the previous year, showing that change is not just wanted, but actually happening, in many cities, around the world.

    A full schedule, complete with film introductions, is to be announced in the coming weeks.

    About New Urbanism Film Festival
    The New Urbanism Film Festival is a four day immersive experience of documentary films, events, tours, workshops and conversations that opens a meaningful dialogue, about revitalizing neighborhoods and cities into walkable, healthy, diverse, thriving places, between planners, developers, architects, engineers, public officials, investors, community activists and the general public.  The films are worldwide submissions, documenting improved urban shifts from city-wide projects to individual-sized ones.  The best films go on to win the New Urbanism Film Festival competition and are screened around the country by the Congress for New Urbanism (CNU).  This year the New Urbanism Film Festival will return to Los Angeles, November 6th through 9th, at the ACME Theater.  www.newurbanismfilmfestival.com

  • AIA Guide to Chicago at the Chicago Public Library

    Chicago | Dates: 04 Nov, 2014

    The third edition of the AIA Guide to Chicago brings readers up to date on ten years of dynamic changes with new entries on smaller projects as well as showcases like the Aqua building, Trump Tower, and Millennium Park. Four hundred photos and thirty-four specially commissioned maps make it easy to find each of the one-thousand-plus featured buildings. Laurie Petersen, Zurich Esposito, and Bill Hinchliff will show images and discuss the iconic new buildings as well as hidden gems featured in the book.

    Laurie Petersen edited the third edition of the AIA Guide to Chicago (and was the associate editor of the first two editions). Zurich Esposito is the executive vice president of AIA Chicago. Bill Hinchliff has lectured and given tours of Chicago architecture for over 30 years.

    Books will be available for purchase, and the author(s) will sign books at the program's conclusion.

    Seating in the library's Cindy Pritzker Auditorium is available first come, first served, 385 max. 

    SPONSORED BY

    University of Illinois Press, Chicago Public Library, AIA Chicago

    MEMBER PRICE

    Free

    NON MEMBER PRICE

    Free
  • World Cities Day 2014: Leading Urban Tranformation

    New York | Dates: 31 Oct, 2014

    AIA CES: 2.5 LU

    When: 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM FRIDAY, ARCHTOBER 31

    Where: Offsite Public Program   

    ECOSOC Chamber, United Nations Headquarters, New York

    In 2008, for the first time in history, more than half of the world’s population was recorded to be living in towns and cities. This number is constantly on the rise and is expected to reach almost five billion by 2030 (6.3 billion by 2050).

    Cities have increasingly become concentrations of peoples with diverse backgrounds - different cultural and ethnic origins and beliefs. The challenges that this new identity anddiversity poses for countries and, more broadly, regions, are today heightened when concentrated in extremely reduced geographical spaces. Cities of all sizes often struggle to find resources and apply good practices to respond to the magnitude of this change.

    In fact, cities are faced with the end results of transnational and internal migration that further exacerbate challenges already faced by cities in providing equitable access to urban services and infrastructure, including housing, services and employment, and ensuring adequate planning for accelerated urban growth. Yet, local authorities have little if any say over international and national migration policies and have little capacity to control migratory flows into their cities.

    As urbanization develops in many parts of the world, to ensure its sustainability, balance between economic growth and social progress and harmony between man and nature have become more important. Education, employment, the social safety net, and public health services are very high on the urbanization agenda. In this regard, a more people-centred urbanization is necessary whereby social networks can be maintained and supported, and where economic development is balanced with social development and environmental protection. It is also very important for the international community to carry out urbanization cooperation, such as on improving urban and rural planning, strengthening social protection measures and promoting green cities.

    While global public debate has addressed the environmental, economic, and demographic sustainability of cities, cultural and ethnic dimensions must also be taken into consideration to preserve rights and the well-being of cities and towns. 

    National and local authorities need policies that raise urban productivity and foster economic growth, but they also increasingly need policies that manage diversity and promote cohesion among residents. Local authorities play a key role in promoting civic engagement, social cohesion, participation, and representation. It is increasingly important to make cities more socially, culturally and economically vibrant, including migrants as an integral part of their citizenry and urban wealth. Sustainable cities have the potential to empower migrants by offering equal opportunities and support for integration, broadening the horizon for all of the various groups sharing a common space. 

    On the occasion of World Cities Day, the Permanent Missions of Italy and of the People’s Republic of China to the United Nations, the Alliance of Civilizations, and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) invite you to join a dialogue between international organizations, governments, mayors, and civil society representatives on the need to pursue people-centred urbanization and manage social inclusion in today’s cities. This event also aims to contribute to the ongoing discussions on the Post-2015 development agenda.

    The event will focus on sharing experiences and ideas on how to enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization, how to empower migrants for effective integration in cities, how the international community can address common challenges, how to facilitate the exchange of best practices, and what role civil society can play in this context.

    For more information, contact Francesca De Ferrari (deferrari@un.org) and check http://unhabitat.org/wcd/.

  • Harvard xDesign Conference

    Boston | Dates: 08 Nov, 2014

    The Harvard xDesign Conference is the university’s annual exploration of all things design. Launched in 2012, the conference is a collaborative effort between student groups at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School, and Harvard College - and the only cross-school event of its kind. 

    The event brings together creative thinkers, design luminaries, experts from a variety of backgrounds, professors, and students to engage in and reinterpret the design process. The conference will take place this year on Saturday November 8, 2014.

  • Fondue Pot Stickers: Divergent Voices

    New York | Dates: 11 Nov, 2014

    AIA CES 1.5 LU

    When: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11

    Where: At The Center   

    Roots and influences – the formation, education and development of a designer based on their milieu. 
    How is milieu defined? Is it based on geographic delineation, institutional climate or professional culture?
    What are the qualifiers of NY voices abroad and world voices in the melting pot of NYC? Other cities?
    When and how do divergent voices begin to converge?

    Speakers
    Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Principal at AZPML, Visiting Professor, Princeton University
    Nader Tehrani, Principal at NADAAA, former Head of Department of Architecture, MIT
    Dan Wood, Principal, WorkAC
    Jing Liu, Principal, SO-IL

    Moderator:
    Hashim Sarkis, Dean, MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning

    about Global Dialogues ‘s (dis)covered Identities
    The AIA NY Global dialogues’ 2014 theme: (dis)covered Identities, aims to explore ways by which cultures, cities, and voices define or refine their identity through a global exchange of ideas and conversations covering multiple topics, perspectives and trends of our time.

    Organized by: AIANY Global Dialogues Committee

    Price: Free

  • CFP: Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period

    Dates: 29 Oct, 2014 – 12 Jan, 2015

    Deadline: Jan 12, 2015 

    Papers are invited for a forthcoming book which will showcase new scholarship focused on the history of fine art in Ireland in the early modern period (c.1600-c.1815). Publication by Irish Academic Press is due in 2016.

     Dedicated research in the past decade into Irish fine art of this period has produced some excellent – though isolated – examples in the form of displays, publications and articles. In notable contrast are coeval fine art studies in Britain which currently enjoy a revival in research funding, museum partnerships, publishing opportunities, exhibitions, and active expertise networks, all of which provide vital scholarly momentum to the field.

    While a more sustained format for focused scholarly output in this area remains a desideratum, this project provides an opportunity to draw together and highlight substantial new work on the production and reception of fine art in Ireland in this period, and its contemporary discourse.

    Contributions are warmly welcomed from academics and graduate students working in art history and associated humanities disciplines, curators and independent scholars actively engaged in related research. Papers should engage with fine art media – painting, drawing, miniatures, sculpture, and print culture – and demonstrate original and previously unpublished research.

    Possible topics for papers include, but are not confined to, the following themes as considered in an Irish context:

    •    Artistic patrons, patronage and collecting

    •    Modes of acquisition and display

    •    The impact of contemporary politics and ethnographic change on

    artistic production and consumption

    •    Artistic networks

    •    Artistic genres

    •    Artist biographies

    •    Artistic training and education

    •    Foreign travel for formal or informal artistic education

    •    Amateur artists and artistic production

    •    Fashioning an artistic career; artists’ means of self-promotion

    and engagement with patrons and the art market

    •    Art writing, published or otherwise

    •    Art historiography of the early modern period

    Please send an abstract of your proposed paper (approx. 400 words) and a brief biographical note (max. 200 words) to IrishArtCFP@outlook.com by Monday 12 January 2015. If you have any queries please address them to the same email. Final papers will be in the region of 9,000 words, but abstracts for shorter papers are also welcome (please indicate if possible when submitting your abstract). Authors are welcome to submit more than one abstract for consideration by the editorial committee, which comprises Dr Jane Fenlon, Dr Ruth Kenny, Caroline Pegum, and Dr Brendan Rooney. Final papers will be peer-reviewed.

  • CFP: 2nd Biennial Graduate Conference on Iranian Studies (Cambridge, 8-9 Apr 15)

    Cambridge | Dates: 29 Oct – 05 Dec, 2014

    Established as the first student and early career scholar-focused forum in the field, Symposia Iranica is an unthemed, biennial international graduate conference that brings together both groups to celebrate, encourage and stimulate their interest and engagement with Iranian studies. Having inaugurated at the University of St Andrews in 2013, the Second Biennial is hosted by the University of Cambridge at Downing College, which is located in the heart of that historic city.

    We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to ancient through to contemporary history; the history of medicine; poetry and literature; economics; political science; philosophy; archaeology; religions and theology; geography, ecology and the environment; historiography; sociology; anthropology; music; art history; architecture history; social and political theory; tangible and intangible heritage; cultural heritage; conservation and heritage management; international relations; languages and linguistics; law and legal studies; Diaspora studies; new media and communication studies; film studies; and the performing arts. Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

    The abstract is the basis for judging a proposal for acceptance. All abstracts undergo double-blind peer review by a Committee comprising two-to-three academics for each subject area, while the Organisers will group individually submitted papers into panels, with the expectation that some sessions will be interdisciplinary.

    To be considered for publication, submissions must represent original contributions to existing scholarship and an indication be made on your application that you would like to be considered. The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals should be sent using the appropriate form by 23:59 GMT on Friday 05 December 2014 to:

    submissions@symposia-iranica.com


    stablished as the first student and early career scholar-focused forum in the field, Symposia Iranica is an unthemed, biennial international graduate conference that brings together both groups to celebrate, encourage and stimulate their interest and engagement with Iranian studies. Having inaugurated at the University of St Andrews in 2013, the Second Biennial is hosted by the University of Cambridge at Downing College, which is located in the heart of that historic city.

    We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to ancient through to contemporary history; the history of medicine; poetry and literature; economics; political science; philosophy; archaeology; religions and theology; geography, ecology and the environment; historiography; sociology; anthropology; music; art history; architecture history; social and political theory; tangible and intangible heritage; cultural heritage; conservation and heritage management; international relations; languages and linguistics; law and legal studies; Diaspora studies; new media and communication studies; film studies; and the performing arts. Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

    The abstract is the basis for judging a proposal for acceptance. All abstracts undergo double-blind peer review by a Committee comprising two-to-three academics for each subject area, while the Organisers will group individually submitted papers into panels, with the expectation that some sessions will be interdisciplinary.

    To be considered for publication, submissions must represent original contributions to existing scholarship and an indication be made on your application that you would like to be considered. The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals should be sent using the appropriate form by 23:59 GMT on Friday 05 December 2014 to:

    submissions@symposia-iranica.com

    stablished as the first student and early career scholar-focused forum in the field, Symposia Iranica is an unthemed, biennial international graduate conference that brings together both groups to celebrate, encourage and stimulate their interest and engagement with Iranian studies. Having inaugurated at the University of St Andrews in 2013, the Second Biennial is hosted by the University of Cambridge at Downing College, which is located in the heart of that historic city.

    We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to ancient through to contemporary history; the history of medicine; poetry and literature; economics; political science; philosophy; archaeology; religions and theology; geography, ecology and the environment; historiography; sociology; anthropology; music; art history; architecture history; social and political theory; tangible and intangible heritage; cultural heritage; conservation and heritage management; international relations; languages and linguistics; law and legal studies; Diaspora studies; new media and communication studies; film studies; and the performing arts. Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

    The abstract is the basis for judging a proposal for acceptance. All abstracts undergo double-blind peer review by a Committee comprising two-to-three academics for each subject area, while the Organisers will group individually submitted papers into panels, with the expectation that some sessions will be interdisciplinary.

    To be considered for publication, submissions must represent original contributions to existing scholarship and an indication be made on your application that you would like to be considered. The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals should be sent using the appropriate form by 23:59 GMT on Friday 05 December 2014 to:

    submissions@symposia-iranica.com

  • Lecture: Mrs. Thorne's World of Miniatures

    Chicago | Dates: 13 Nov, 2014

    Thursday November 13, 2014 at 7:00pm
    $10 per person/$8 for members
    Reservations suggested to 312-326-1480

    Narcissa Niblack Thorne began collecting miniatures as a young girl.  Her fascination grew and as an adult, she gained world-wide recognition for hundreds of miniature rooms created with such exacting detail that they became educational tools for students of architecture and interior design.  She left 68 of her rooms to the Art Institute of Chicago, when they remain on permanent exhibit in a Gallery devoted solely to Mrs. Thorne's masterpieces.  Thorne Rooms are also in the permanent collection of the Phoenix Art Museum and the Knoxville Museum of Art.  Join author Sally Sexton Kalmbach as she explores the fascinating life of this artisan, who was also a one time resident of Prairie Avenue and a member of Frances Glessner's Monday Morning Reading Class.  Copies of Kalmbach's book will be available for purchase and signing.

  • Lecture: Romancing the Spoon - The Victorian Love Affair with Silver

    Chicago | Dates: 02 Nov, 2014

    Sunday November 2, 2014 at 2:00pm
    $15 per person/$12 for members
    (includes tea and light refreshments)
    Pre-paid reservations required to 312-326-1480

    Historian and author Cynthia Ogorek will share the story of our nation's silver industry and its unique position in the economy of the post-Civil War "Gilded Age."  View and learn about pieces from the collection of the Glessners and other Prairie Avenue families and find out why etiquette required such a mind-boggling assortment of forks, knives, spoons, and serving utensils!

  • Shadows on the Street: Haunted Tours of Historic Prairie Avenue

    Chicago | Dates: 31 Oct, 2014

    Friday October 31, 2014
    Tours at 7:00 and 8:15pm
    $10 per person/$8 for members
    Pre-paid reservations strong recommended to 312-326-1480

    Tales of strange sounds, unexplained sightings, and untimely endings as you explore Prairie Avenue after dark!  Learn about the mystery surrounding the death of Marshall Field Jr., the tragic events that plagued the Philander Hanford house, the spirits that cause the windows to rattle in the William Kimball mansion, and much more!

  • Smart Growth: Planning the Future of D.C.'s Oldest Neighborhood

    Washington | Dates: 04 Nov, 2014

    Georgetown 2028, an eight-month community planning initiative, was conceived as a strategic approach to plan for the historic neighborhood’s commercial evolution over the next 15 years. Will Handsfield, transportation director of the Georgetown Business Improvement District, explains the vision to build an economically sustainable commercial district while preserving the neighborhood’s strengths.

    1.0 LU HSW (AIA) / 1.0 CM (AICP) / 1.0 PDH (LA CES)

    FREE. Pre-Registration required. Walk in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Smart Growth is generously supported by the National Association of Realtors. Additional support is provided by Smart Growth America.

    Photo: The Georgetown Circulator on M St NW.  Photo courtesy of the Georgetown Business Improvement District.

    Date: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 
    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

  • Panel Talk: Rising Waters

    Washington | Dates: 06 Nov, 2014

    The Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries share 11,000 miles of shore- and coastline. Conservative estimates by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predict an 8 inch–2 foot rise in waters in the area by the end of this century. This scenario, combined with storm surge, will have a significant impact on Chesapeake Bay coastal communities in Maryland and Virginia. Panelists discuss strategies to adapt to rising waters, including wetland and reef restoration, engineering, reducing impermeable surfaces and the role of parks and other green infrastructure.

    Mark Bryer, director, Chesapeake Bay Program, The Nature Conservancy
    Sandra Cannon-Brown, adjunct professorial lecturer, American University (moderator)
    Vicky Carrasco, coastal communities specialist, Maryland Sea Grant Extension
    Dr. Victoria Chanse, assistant professor, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland

    1.5 LU HSW (AIA) / 1.5 CM (AICP) / 1.5 PDH (LA CES)

    $12 Museum and Nature Conservancy Members; $12 Students; $20 Non-members. Prepaid registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Photo: The last house on Holland Island, MD before its collapse. Credit: Jay Fleming of the International League of Conservation Photographers.

    Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014 
    Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

  • CfP: The Third Global Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again, 12 – 13 December 2014, Florence, Italy

    Florence | Dates: 12 – 13 Dec, 2014
    CALL FOR PAPERS The Third Global Forum of Critical Studies Asking Big Questions Again 12-13 December 2014, Florence, Italy Villa Vittoria- Palazzo dei Congressi Deadline for Paper Proposals: 9th of November 2014 The Third Euroacademia Global Forum of Critical Studies aims to bring into an open floor the reflexive and questioning interaction among academics, intellectuals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. The focus of the forum is to initiate an arena where no question is misplaced and irrelevant as long as we acknowledge that evaluation, critical thinking and contestation are accessible trajectories to better understand our past, present and alternative scenarios for the future. Conference Description: Some say that the 21st Century or modernity altogether made humans more concerned with doing rather than being. As the classical Greek civilization valued the most reflexive thinking as a form of freedom from natural necessities, contemporary times profoundly involve individuals and the imaginary accompanying social practices in a restless logic of consumption, competition and engagement that profoundly - or some would say, radically – suspends or indefinitely postpones the autonomous capacity of human beings to question and reflect upon the social order and the meaning of social practices. The fast advancement of the logic of post-industrial societies, the gradual dissolution of alternative models to the capitalist logic and a multitude of other alerting factors pushed ahead a global spread culture of one-dimensional productions of meaning that advances a closure rather than a constant reflexive re-evaluation of cultural/social practices. Many alternatives at hand are often condemned to marginality or lost in the plural practices where everything goes as long as it’s part of an intellectual market. The ‘fatal strategies’ of post-industrial societies to keep individuals captive, busy and seduced by contingent social arrangements and economic practices minimized the questioning detachment required to evaluate and give meaning through reflexive criticism and unlimited interrogation. Various labels were given to our unfolding times from apocalyptic ones to some more comforting yet not by chance lacking some vital optimism. Despite a wide-spread discontent and suspicion towards the daily realities of our current societies, most of the big questions are often left outside by the self-involved active pursuit of an imagined well-being that is no longer transgressed by harsh critical evaluation of its meaning. The academic arena itself also advances, supports, integrates and promotes limited particular methodologies that generate an effect of mainstreaming and often keeps researchers or practitioners out of the battle-ground for big questions. The ongoing economic crisis made reality even harsher and pushed ahead the need for more thinking as many habitual categories lost their meaning or relevance. New ways of thinking could transgress some inappropriate conceptions or misconceptions that preserve their centrality due to the mechanics of habits. This is a time when a call to thinking is well-placed. This is a call to arms for critical studies that promotes alternative, questioning and multi-dimensional thinking. Panels: When it’s about critical thinking and critical studies there is intrinsically an unending open list of topics to be included. The Third Forum on Critical Studies proposes the 5 sections (that are by no means exclusive): • Theory/Philosophy • Politics • Cultural Studies • Political Economy • Arts and Performance Papers on the following topics (and not only) are welcomed: ~ Diagnostics of Our Times: Where Is the 21st Century Heading? ~ Our Societies Are As Good As It Gets: How to Escape the Closure of Meaning? ~ Consumerist Societies and the Captivity of Thinking ~ The Being/Doing Nexus ~ Assessing Models of Capitalism ~ Markets, Capital and Inequalities ~ The Remains of Individual Autonomy ~ How Plural Our Societies Truly Are? ~ Debating Ideal vs. Real Multiculturalism ~ Social Narcissism and Consumerism ~ The Role of Critical Thinking: Proposing Alternative Methodologies ~ Are There Any Alternatives to Capitalism Left? ~ Social Causes and the Pursuit of Social Beliefs ~ Protest and Social Change ~ Re-Thinking Revolutions ~ Hegemony and the Remaining Possibilities for Social Criticism ~ Loneliness and Isolation in the Era of Mass Communication ~ Living Low Cost: Values, Meaning and Market Exchange ~ Ideology and Other Dominant Narratives ~ Critical Economics ~ Post-Modernism and the Critique of Modernity ~ Marx and the 21st Century ~ Debating the End of Communism ~ Non-Oppositional Societies ~ Consolation, Complicity and Passivity Today ~ Who Still Waits For A Revolution? ~ C. Castoriadis and the Project of Autonomy ~ French Thinking and Alternatives for Thought ~ Eastern Europe and the Enrollment to the School of Capitalism ~ China and the Logic of Growth ~ Crises of Culture ~ Left and Right: Political Spectrums and Pluralism Re-Discussed ~ Art as an Exchange Value ~ Originality and Complacency ~ Literatures and Authors ~ Heroes and Heroines in Electronic Literature ~ Fiction and the Fictionalization of the Contemporary World ~ Film and the Persisting Hunger for Heroic Imagination ~ The Illusory Charity and Imagined forms of Contemporary Humanisms ~ The Growing Social Irrelevance of Philosophy ~ Replacement of the Logic of Becoming by the Logic of Earning ~ How Do We Look Back at Tradition? ~ Just Wars or Unjust Thinking? ~ The Myth of Cosmopolitanism ~ Facing the Self ~ Communication, Media and Simulacrum ~ Science, Pragmatics and Vocation: Who Pays What We Can’t Sell? ~ Is There Still a Postmodern or Any Other Kind of Condition? ~ Post-Marxist Way of Looking at Facts ~ The School of Suspicion and Evaluative Thinking ~ Feminist Readings of Our Contemporary World ~ Post-Colonialism and the Refurbished Other(s) ~ Theory and Power ~ Queer Theory and Living After the Sexual Revolution ~ Subaltern Theory Participant’s Profile The conference is addressed to academics, intellectuals, researchers and professionals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. As the nature of the conference is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature different academic backgrounds are equally welcomed. Post-graduate students, doctoral candidates and young researchers are equally welcomed to submit an abstract. Representatives of INGOs, NGOs, Think Tanks and activists willing to present their work, research, experiences or reflections are welcomed as well to submit the abstract of their contribution. Euroacademia does not promote the byzantine association of people with their institutions. As well the distinction between senior and junior researchers is not applied as a cleavage. Abstracts will be reviewed and the participants are selected based on the proven quality of the abstract. The submitted paper for the conference proceedings is expected to be in accordance with the lines provided in the submitted abstract. For more information see http://euroacademia.eu/conference/3rd-forum-of-critical-studies/ You can apply on-line by completing the Application Form on the conference website or by sending a 300 words abstract together with the details of contact and affiliation until 9th of November 2014 at application@euroacademia.eu
  • 2014 Design Matters Conference

    Washington | Dates: 12 – 13 Nov, 2014
    At this year's AAO Conference, we’ll take a close look at how architectural organizations can construct more effective program narratives, from easy to consume stories fit for broadcast to memorable first person appeals to enriching curator-driven museum format presentations. Learn how to better engage audiences and inspire them to share your message with others. Hear from leading practitioners whose messages consistently rise above the fray and inspire devoted followers. Leave the Conference armed with new ideas for strengthening your own organization’s programs.
  • 2015 Buell Dissertation Colloquium

    New York | Dates: 24 Oct, 2014 – 12 Jan, 2015

    Submissions due: January 12, 2015

    The Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture invites submissions for its biennial Dissertation Colloquium, to be held on May 8–9, 2015, at Columbia University. This event brings together a select group of doctoral students from diverse institutional and disciplinary backgrounds working on dissertation topics related to the history, theory, and criticism of American architecture, urbanism, and landscape.

     

    Ten to twelve students from universities worldwide will be invited to present a twenty-minute talk drawn from their dissertation research. The presentation is to be based on a self-contained chapter or portion of the student’s dissertation research, and should not be an overview or synthesis of the dissertation as a whole. “American” is construed to mean any part or aspect of the American continents, including all of North and South America. Comparative and cross-disciplinary approaches are encouraged.

    Students must be enrolled in an accredited doctoral program and have completed their coursework and at least one year of dissertation research. Submissions must include a complete draft of the intended presentation, including illustrations. Submissions must also be accompanied by the following: a cover sheet specifying the student’s institutional affiliation, postal and e-mail addresses, and phone number; a 150-word abstract describing the paper’s relationship to the overall dissertation topic; and a brief statement from the student’s principal adviser certifying the applicant’s status (stage of completion) in the doctoral program.

    Papers selected for presentation will be announced by February 4, 2015. Each participating student will receive hotel accommodation for two nights and funding toward travel expenses on an as-needed basis.  A dinner and reception with associated students and faculty will be included in the colloquium.

    For further information, contact the Program Coordinator, Jacob Moore, at jrm2031@columbia.edu, consult www.buellcenter.org, or follow us on Twitter @buellcenter. Please send electronic submissions in PDF format and no larger than 3MB, to buellcenter@arch.columbia.edu, by Monday, January 12, 2015.

  • ARIT fellowships for research in Turkey

    Philadelphia | Dates: 22 Oct – 01 Nov, 2014
    The American Research Institute in Turkey offers fellowship support for dissertation research and advanced projects in Turkey.
  • Over There: World War I Overseas Cemeteries and Memorials of the American Battle Monuments Commission

    Washington | Dates: 11 Nov, 2014
    A Lecture by Lisa Pfueller Davidson, PhD

    November 11, 2018 will mark the centennial of the Armistice ending the Great War. In its aftermath, the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) was established to enhance the overseas military cemeteries for the fallen and erect memorials to the combat accomplishments of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). Just as the events of World War I are largely forgotten by the American public, the original commemorative program of the ABMC has been overshadowed by its massive World War II American cemeteries in places like Normandy. 

    Initially the War Department established eight World War I cemeteries in France, England, and Belgium. ABMC was created in 1923 to improve these cemeteries and manage an ambitious program of overseas monument building. Paul P. Cret became their consulting architect and subsequently guided every aspect of the AMBC construction program. Cret brought in an impressive roster of his architectural contemporaries, including John Russell Pope, Ralph Adams Cram, and George Howe. The architecture and landscapes of the ABMC display a sophisticated Beaux Arts approach, with the Art Moderne, Neoclassical, or Gothic Revival details and forms that characterized some of the best civic architecture of the 1920s and 30s. This lecture will examine overseas military cemetery policy after World War I, the social and political role of the ABMC sites in creating a public memory of the war, and design practices and ideals of the time. 

    Lisa Pfueller Davidson, Ph.D., is a historian with Heritage Documentation Programs of the National Park Service. Her work on ABMC is part of a multi-year documentation effort by ABMC and the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) leading up to the World War I Centennial.

    The First Congregational United Church of Christ
    945 G Street NW, Washington, DC 20001 
    6:30 pm – reception, 7:00 pm – brief Annual Meeting and lecture
     
    Reservations are not required. $10.00 for Latrobe Chapter members, student members (full time) free with ID, $18.00 for non-members.
  • Architecture and the Arts from 1945-1968: Comparisons and Intertexts

    Rome | Dates: 29 – 31 Oct, 2014

    This scholarly conference, convened by Bruno Reichlin and Letizia Tedeschi, seeks to illuminate the complexity inherent to the notion of the “synthesis of the arts,” which emerged in the years 1945-1968 in Europe and America. This two and a half day conference will define its specific characteristics and theoretical moorings, and trace similarities and differences compared with analogous situations in the past. Soon after World War II, architects, artists and visual operators active in many different art forms, together with influential critics began to promote a new form of collaboration that affected their work on the level of programs, practices, contents, artistic languages, materials, production strategies, potential synergies and much else. Despite certain critical problems, the term that more than any other most clearly expresses this period, when viewed from this standpoint, is “synthesis of the arts,” sometimes equated with the rebirth in other forms of the “Gesamtkunstwerk” which had ushered in the art of the twentieth century. Speakers include: Yves-Alain Bois, Jean-Louis Cohen, Dietrich Neumann and Giorgio Ciucci.

    Locations of event:
    Wednesday 29 October
    American Academy in Rome

    Thursday 30 October
    American Academy in Rome

    Friday 31 October
    Istituto Svizzero
    Villa Maraini, Via Ludovisi, 48

    The event is organized in collaboration with the Archivio del Moderno at the Università della Svizzera Italiana (www.arc.usi.ch/archivio) and the Istituto Svizzero (www.istitutosvizzero.it).