Recent Opportunities

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CFP: Cold War Cities: Spatial Planning, Social Politics and Cultural Practices in the Era of Atomic Urbanism, 1945-65

We are seeking 10-12 thoughtful and unpublished essays that analyse a substantive thematic area and situate this empirically in a particular city case study. Essays can draw on a range of different evidential bases, archival research, visual methods, media hermeneutics, and personal histories and lived experiences. Book chapters should deploy appropriate theoretical ideas to understand the physical planning, politics and cultures of atomic era urban development. They should be accessible to readers without deep theoretical background in the particular thematic area and little knowledge of the city case study.

If you are interested in contributing, please provide a tentative title,
250 words abstract and brief bio (to be used in a formal proposal to publisher). Email to m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk>


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Co-editors:
* Richard Brook, Manchester School of Architecture. R.Brook@mmu.ac.uk<mailto:R.Brook@mmu.ac.uk>

* Martin Dodge, Department of Geography, University of Manchester.
M.Dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:M.Dodge@manchester.ac.uk>

* Jonathan Hogg, Department of History, University of Liverpool.
J.G.Hogg@liverpool.ac.uk<mailto:J.G.Hogg@liverpool.ac.uk>

Aims:
In this book we wish to explore how the real threat of nuclear attack through the 1950s and early '60s affected the spatial planning of cities, as well considering how such 'atomic urbanism' was manifest in political processes or expressed through cultural practices. The book is consciously to be based on set of case studies of specific cities, through which we seek understandings, at an urban scale, of how cold war doctrines played out in different thematic areas (e.g. architectural designs for survivable human habitation or anti-nuclear protests). There should also be scope for questioning the degree to which the historical development of individual cities was determined or shaped by atomic threats, thus problematizing 'the Cold War' as general analytical lens.  Rather than focus on the nation state or a whole continent, we believe looking at series of individual cities (or city regions) will provide a distinctive lens through which to reinterpret cold war histories.

The book is also focused in its time period on the crucial decades after the Second War World because they have interpretative coherence in cold war historiography and were key periods in urban redevelopment across much of the world (such as the rise of suburban consumerism in the West, Soviet directed socialist renewal in the East and decolonialisation in other places). However, contributors may also wish to consider the legacy of actions and decisions made in this period of atomic high tension down to the contemporary city if appropriate. The objective is to have an international set of contributors with a diversity of thematic perspectives, and deploying case study cities not only in North America and Western Europe but also in the former Eastern Bloc, the Soviet Union, the Asian region and, potentially, from the Global South.

Thematic areas could include (non-exhaustive list):

* Physical planning in the cold war city: shelters and population survivability; spatial dispersal planning; resilient infrastructures, buildings and engineering (telecommunications, transport, etc); the zoning of land for needs of military, security and the atomic state; enrolment of scientific facilities, commercial R&D and universities; planning health services, and more general welfare planning post-attack.

* Social / political issues in the cold war city: anti-nuclear protests, passive resistance, active unrest; participation in civil defence and critiques of preparation; public information, propaganda, education; work of news media; political struggles, legal structures.
* Cultural practices in the cold war city: visual arts, literary responses to nuclear threats; architectural design, landscape aesthetics; religious responses and faith perspective; popular culture and entertainment (television, radio, fiction); civic spaces and the representation of atomic age ideas; design and functioning of the domestic sphere.

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Practical details:
* Submission date: April 2017
* Length: around 7,000 words (exc. bibliography)
* Language: UK English
* Format: please try to use the Routledge style guide, esp. for citations and formatting of bibliography to facilitate production
* Figures: high-quality b/w illustrations desirable. Limited colour figures may be possible in plates section. Please ensure you have copyright or can secure copyright clearance for illustrations. Authors will be responsible for any costs of copyright licensing
* Delivery: Word document, email to m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk>

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Intellectual background:
Cities across the world were the primary target of strategic atomic weaponry in the early cold war period. Post-war urban planning, politics and cultural practice became a central part of Cold War battlefront. For instance, important mechanisms to try secure cities against atomic attack were created, and social space was re-designed to contain the threat of Communism or Capitalism, or to offer an ideologically-informed vision of the modern, high-tech and consumerist or socialist future. However, the focus of historical studies of these decades has traditionally been on international relations, continental blocs and geopolitical struggles at the global scale. While there has been some historical work published in recent years on cold war planning, politics and culture at the national level, which is often strongly urban in focus (e.g. monographs by Andrew Burtch, Jennifer Light, Matthew Grant, Matthew Farish), there has been less analysis of the context of the city as site in which physical plans, social politics and cultural practices played out in distinctive ways (exceptions include theme issue of Urban History (2015) and the May 2016 Cold War Cities workshop at the University of Sheffield). One of the major features of intellectual growth in the humanities, especially history, is interdisciplinary interest in space and place. Here, the city is viewed a significant context in which to explore place, landscape and locational attributes under a set of specific imperatives of defence from an unprecedented new threat.  This edited collection will be a unique contribution that looks at how the cold war unfolded in different cities across the world.

We intend authors to come from more than North America and Europe; they may include scholars in Japan, Russia, China and elsewhere.  Contributors will be drawn from cogent disciplinary backgrounds including, for example, architectural history, planning, history of science, economic and social history, human geography, political science, cultural studies, and other cognizant fields of scholarship.


Proposed book structure:
The volume will include an introductory overview essay by the editors and series of chapters grouped into three major sections: physical, social-political, cultural. Each chapter will tackle a substantial thematic issue and make use of a specific city for empirical evidence.  We expect that some contributions may speak across this threefold structure and will deal with this by section overviews.
 
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