Recent Opportunities

  • CFP: Universities Art Association of Canada Conference (Montreal, 27-30 Oct 16)

    Montreal | Dates: 03 – 24 Jun, 2016
    Proposals for papers shall not exceed 150 words and are to be submitted to the individual Session Conveners for consideration (please see below under “Conference Regulations” for further guidelines about proposals). 

    Most sessions are composed of three or four 20-minute papers. This leaves time in the 90-minute slot for formal responses or questions from the audience. Each session must have one or a maximum of two Chair(s) who are not also speaking in the session.
    Therefore, if present Session Conveners (to whom prospective participants should submit their abstracts for consideration) wish to give a paper in their session, they must find a Chair for that session. Other formats, such as roundtable discussions, must also
    have a Chair who stands outside the discussion and moderates it.

    In order to permit the widest possible variety of sessions, double sessions are not usually permitted. Decisions to permit double sessions lie with the Session Planning Committee for the conference, who will inform chairs/conveners who petition for such sessions whether or not this will be possible within the program structure.
  • CFP: Urban Studies beyond the Aestheticized Object (Chicago, 30 Mar-1 Apr 2017)

    Chicago | Dates: 01 – 04 Jun, 2016
    Sponsored by the European Architectural History Network

    Contributor: Elizabeth Merrill

    Traditionally, urban historians relied on systems and patterns to analyze cities as aesthetic constructions, parsing them in terms of morphologies and typologies. Eventually, however, cities began to be considered as embodiments and instruments of culture that communicated individual and collective identities and relationships. More recently, urban geographers, anthropologists, and theorists have modeled approaches that consider spatialized experience through the senses and body, and some envision the built realm as “more than a backdrop for action, becoming the action itself” (Bernard Tschumi, Disjunction and Architecture).

    We invite papers that propose new approaches to and readings of the experiential and sensory in respect to the early modern city. How was the city’s physical fabric experienced and perceived by locals as well as foreign travellers?  Which rhythms (e.g., day/night, canonical
    hours) defined movements of bodies through and individual experiences of the city?  How did the sensory, (e.g., concepts of hygiene and public health), guide city planning and construction? The presence of “others” in the city, whether animals, foreigners, the sick, or minority populations, might also be considered. Speakers are welcome to discuss new methodologies or techniques for studying urban history (e.g., digital mapping and visualization).

    Proposals should be submitted to Saundra Weddle (sweddle@drury.edu) and Elizabeth Merrill (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com) by June 4, 2016 with the presenter’s full name; academic affiliation/title; e-mail address; paper title (15-word maximum); abstract (150-word maximum); and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum; prose bios will not be accepted).
     
  • CFP: The Historiography of Early Modern Architecture (Chicago, 30 Mar-1 Apr 2017)

    Chicago | Dates: 01 – 04 Jun, 2016
    Renaissance Society of America (RSA) 2017 Conference, Chicago, The Palmer House Hilton

    Session Sponsored by the European Architectural History Network
    Contributor: Elizabeth Merrill

    Since the Renaissance itself, the history of early-modern architecture has been a multifaceted discipline. Antonio Manetti established the biographic format in his Life of Brunelleschi, an approach that was later developed in Vasari’s Lives.  In the same period, individuals like Giuliano da Sangallo and Francesco di Giorgio sought to elucidate architectural history through their discovery, or one might say reconstruction, of Roman antiquities. Similarly, the overwhelming interest in Vitruvius not only generated new histories of architecture, but also drove architectural practices and colored the way in which architects were perceived. The modes of scholarly inquiry initiated in the Renaissance have had long afterlives. The great interest in architectural proportions, based both on ancient models and long practiced building traditions, preoccupied theorists like Serlio and Palladio, and centuries later, was resumed by Erwin Panofsky, Rudolf Wittkower and Branko Mitrovic, among others. Correspondingly, the concern with prolonged building processes and the historical valuation of the resultant architecture has captured significant attention. The problems involved in “building-in-time” were outlined in Alberti’s theory of architecture, commented upon by Michelangelo, and in recent decades have been explored by Howard Burns and Marvin Trachtenberg.

    This session invites papers that consider the historiography of Renaissance architecture – that is, the history of scholarly understandings of early-modern European architecture (c.1400 – 1700). 
    What are the sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches that have directed the history of Renaissance architecture and what implications do they carry? How do regional or national traditions of early-modern architectural history vary? On what are these traditions based and what are their biases? Papers might also discuss architect-historians like Inigo Jones, Christopher Wren, John Webb, Jacques-François Blondel, and Tommaso Temanza, and how they translated the history of Renaissance architecture in practice. In a similar vein, papers might reflect on how Renaissance architectural history been taught. What is the training of the architectural historian and how does this impact the discipline? 
    How have developments in digital technology redirected early-modern architectural history? And what might future developments bring?

    Paper proposals that stem from original research should be submitted as a Word document or PDF to Saundra Weddle (sweddle@drury.edu) and Elizabeth Merrill (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com) by June 4, 2016. 
    Please include the following information: presenter’s full name; academic affiliation and title; e-mail address; paper title (15-word maximum); paper abstract (150-word maximum); and a short bio (300-word maximum). For CV guidelines and models see: 
    http://www.rsa.org/page/2017Chicago.
     
  • City of the Soul: Rome and the Romantics

    New York | Dates: 17 Jun – 11 Sep, 2016
    Rome exists not only as an intensely physical place, but also as a romantic idea onto which artists, poets, and writers project their own imaginations and longings. City of the Soul examines the evolving image of Rome in art and literature with a display of books, manuscripts, prints, photographs, and drawings.

    This groundbreaking exhibition considers the ever-evolving identities of Rome during a pivotal period in the city’s history, 1770–1870, when it was transformed from a papal state to the capital of a unified, modern nation. Venerable monuments were demolished to make way for government ministries and arteries of commerce. Building projects and improvements in archaeological techniques revealed long forgotten remnants of the ancient metropolis. A tourist’s itinerary could include magnificent ruins, ecclesiastical edifices, scenic vistas, picturesque locales, fountains, gardens, and side trips to the surrounding countryside.

    The exhibition juxtaposes a century of artistic impressions of Rome through a superb selection of prints and drawings by recognized masters such as Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778), J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851), and Edward Lear (1812–1888) along with lesser known artists whose work deserves greater attention.

    The invention of photography also influenced the image of the city. Photographers consciously played on the compositions of Piranesi and earlier masters of the veduta tradition, while at the same time exploiting the expressive potential of this new medium. As the meditative, measured pace of the Grand Tour gave way to the demands of organized tourism, they supplied their new clientele with nostalgia as well as novelty in their views of the Eternal City.
  • Opening as Editor of the EAHN Journal Architectural Histories

    Dates: 01 Jun – 01 Oct, 2016
    Applications open for Editor-in-Chief and Editorial Assistant, Architectural Histories. The online open access journal of the EAHN

    Architectural Histories is the international, blind peer-reviewed, open access scholarly journal of the European Architectural History Network that creates a space where historically grounded research into all aspects of architecture and the built environment can be made public, consulted, and discussed. The journal is open to historical, historiographical, theoretical, and critical contributions that engage with architecture and the built environment from a historical perspective.

    Since the publication of the first article on 30 January 2013, Architectural Histories has published 81 articles (research articles, position papers, editorials, interviews and reviews). These publications were gathered in four open issues and three special collections. Since its start in 2013 the journal has established a growing and balanced readership. In March 2016 alone, the journal could note 7282 page views from 111 different countries worldwide.

    The journal is now seeking to appoint a new editor-in-chief and editorial assistant from 1 June 2017 for a four-year term. The new appointees will start working with the current team from 1 January 2017 and gradually take over their duties.

    Tasks and duties
    The editor-in-chief is responsible for all aspects of the journal. The editorial assistant supports the editor in these tasks, according to their mutual arrangement.
    The editor is responsible for the profile and identity of the journal, and safeguards the quality, relevance and scholarly rigor of the journal's content. Architectural Histories is edited by an international editorial board over which the editor presides.

    The editor apportions editorial duties to board-members and follows up on their execution. S/he is primary contact person between authors, reviewers and the journal, and makes the final decisions regarding articles in all stages of submission, review, editing and production, always in close concert with the editorial board.
    The editor steers the editorial board in all its tasks: editorial duties, prospection for content, setting up special collections, processing articles, and so forth.

    The editor manages the coordination between the different parties involved in the production of the journal: besides the authors and peer reviewers; the publisher, Ubiquity Press; the copy-editor; and the proofreader. The editor is the main contact between the journal and the publisher regarding all aspects of their collaboration, including process management, contract negotiations and payments.

    The editor manages the finances of the journal, and actively seeks to broaden and sustain the financial basis for the journal by reaching out to the appropriate organizations and institutions.

    S/he is aware of the principles of open access publishing and participates in the debates surrounding it.

    The editor is the main contact between the journal and its parent organization, the European Architectural History Network. As such, the editor sits ex officio on the EAHN board.

    The editor chairs the editorial board meeting during the annual EAHN business meetings and at the biannual EAHN-conferences.

    The position of editor or editorial assistant is not remunerated and expenses are not covered. The editor's average workload is 4 to 8 hours per week;  the average workload of the assistant is 4 hours per week;  both are subject to fluctuation.

    Qualifications

    The editor-in-chief should have a Ph.D. in architectural history (whether from an art history department or a school of architecture).  The candidate should be an established scholar who is able to bring a broad personal network of international academic contacts to the job. Her/his own work should embody the highest standards of scholarship. The candidate should have a broad understanding of architectural history across periods and geographies, and be open to academic work from a variety of scholarly, cultural and methodological backgrounds. The candidate should have a keen understanding of the workings of scientific institutions and funding agencies in and outside of Europe.


    The candidate should have an excellent command of English, and master several other European languages. Preferably, the candidate has editorial experience.  The candidate must be dedicated to working within the constraints of a periodical: advanced planning, deadlines, and flexible solutions to crises.

    Since the editor supervises and coordinates all aspects of the journal, skills in organization, negotiation and people management, a well-developed sense of responsibility, and resistance to stress, are absolutely essential.

    The editorial assistant is a junior scholar (graduate or post-doc), who supports the editor. The assistant should have the appropriate scholarly, linguistic and organizational skills. The editor and assistant work closely together, and convene on a bi-weekly basis.

    Application
    Please submit a cover letter and CV to the Editorial Search Committee by 1 October 2016 in care of Nancy Stieber at this address:  nancy.stieber@umb.edu
     
  • Reading the Walls: From Tombstones to Public Screens

    Glasgow | Dates: 01 – 06 Jun, 2016
    From dedicatory inscriptions on Greek architectural monuments to the three-dimensional lettering affixed to the fac?ade of the Bauhaus, the neon signs of Las Vegas, and the unofficial marks left by cans of spray paint, words on buildings can both overcome and augment the limits of architecture?s ability to communicate to a broad public. Scholars working in a variety of contexts have begun to explore the ways in which text informs historical interpretations and understanding of buildings and urban spaces but typically position their analysis within the confines of relatively narrow historical and disciplinary boundaries. This session seeks to build on that body of work by exploring the relationship between architecture and its inscriptions in a variety of political, geographical, and historical contexts.

    We especially welcome papers that explore the following questions: How does epigraphy influence a building?s form and composition? What is its role within discourses of power, democratic, or totalitarian? Does it simply ?fill the gap? between intention and reception in architecture?s quest to convey meaning? What can faded, deleted, re-contextualised or overwritten inscriptions tell us of a building?s pasts, its successive uses and shifting meanings? How can it control memory as a self- conscious effort to harness the past? How did the interplay of text/abstraction vs. representation/ornament shape avant-garde modernist discourse and practice? How is its use and form related to larger cultural shifts? Can branding, advertising and public screens be considered contemporary forms of this ancient practice? And if so, how do they operate?

    Session Chairs: Flavia Marcello, Swinburne University of Technology, and Lucy Maulsby, Northeastern University

    Deadline: June 6, 2016 at 5 pm CDT
     
  • Best of the South: Preserving Southern Architecture Award

    New Orleans | Dates: 31 May – 01 Jul, 2016
    Call for Nominations 2016 “Best of the South: Preserving Southern Architecture” Award The Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians (SESAH) seeks nominations for the “Best of the South: Preserving Southern Architecture” Award. This annual award honors a project that preserves, rehabilitates, or restores a historic property – including a building, a structure, or a complex of buildings and/or structures – in an outstanding manner and that demonstrates excellence in research, documentation, design, and execution. Projects with a public interpretation component are encouraged, but not required. Projects in the twelve-state SESAH region – Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia – that were completed in 2014 or 2015 are eligible. Criteria for consideration: Quality of the project documentation, research, and/or design plan; Importance of the property type within its particular context (national, regional, state, local); Quality of execution; Anticipated benefits; and Degree to which the project saved a historic property from likely demolition. Nominations should consist of no more than two pages of project description and be accompanied by illustrations and any other supporting material, including a project budget and timeline. A cover letter should identify the owner of the property, the historic and current use of the property, and the names and contact information of all the major participants of the project. Email the nomination as a single PDF or as a link to a single PDF posted on Google Drive/Dropbox to the 2016 “Best of the South” award committee chairperson, Susan W. Knowles at susan.knowles@mtsu.edu. Deadline: July 1, 2016. The 2016 “Best of the South” Award winner will be announced at the 2016 SESAH Annual Meeting held in New Orleans, Louisiana, from September 28-October 1. For more information about the “Best of the South: Preserving Southern Architecture” Award and SESAH, visit www.sesah.org.
  • The Medium and the Message: Re-evaluating Form and Meaning in European Architecture c. 1400-1950

    Birmingham, UK | Dates: 02 – 02 Jul, 2016
    Advertisement Dates: Friday 1 July - Saturday 2 July 2016 Location: The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TS Convenors: Dr David Hemsoll (University of Birmingham) and Professor Anthony Geraghty (University of York) Sponsors: the University of Birmingham, the University of York and the Society of Architectural Historians Great Britain About the Conference: All buildings – whether polite, vernacular or somewhere in between – were initially informed by some kind of presiding idea or set of ideas. Some of these ideas presumed an audience (and are therefore part of the building’s rhetoric and essential to its intended ‘meaning’), while others did not (in being part, for example, of a production process, or allied with social and cultural contexts, and no more than that). All such ideas should concern the architectural historian, but the most engaging and historically resonant may well belong to the first category and also be ones that can be inferred and recovered from the buildings themselves. The architectural historian may also profit from a keener understanding of how the ideas initially underpinning a building may, in time, have become modified, or even eclipsed by associations of very different kinds. The conference will investigate the ways in which ideas are conveyed by the physical and visual medium of architectural form. It will include case studies which will move us beyond explanations of architecture that borrow too liberally from literature and theory, and will thereby deepen our understanding both of the medium of architecture and of the construction and operation of architectural ‘meaning’. Moreover, by establishing or re-exploring the intellectual foundations sustaining the designs of certain key buildings, and by examining the ways in which they informed the physical realities of the buildings themselves, we hope to reinvigorate and enrich our understanding of significant moments in European architectural history. Papers, presented by leading international speakers from the UK, Europe and the United States, will explore the relationship between message and medium through detailed historical case studies. Keynote speakers are Sigrid DE JONG (University of Leiden) and Christine STEVENSON (Courtauld Institute of Art, London). Speakers will include Fabrizio BALLABIO (Architectural Association), Paul DAVIES (University of Reading), Richard HEWLINGS (Historic England): Olivia HORSFALL TURNER (V&A), Angeliki POLLALI (American College of Greece, Athens), Harald STÜHLINGER (ETH Zürich), Peter LINDFIELD (University of Stirling), Mark WILSON JONES (University of Bath). Tickets for the conference cost £10 and are purchased via an ‘online shop’: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/lcahm/departments/historyofart/events/2016/medium-message-conference.aspx Student applicants: Ten grants each of £30 are being offered by the Society of Architectural Historians Great Britain to registered students based outside Birmingham, to cover the £10 conference fee and to help defray costs; these will be awarded strictly on a ‘first come first served’ basis, and, to apply, you should contact David Hemsoll (d.e.hemsoll@bham.ac.uk) before 8 June heading your message ‘student request for conference support’. Tea and coffee (but not lunch) will be provided and the conference will include a concluding drinks reception in the foyer of the Barber Institute.
  • CFP: Architecture and the Environment (RSA Session) (30 Mar-1 Apr 17)

    Chicago | Dates: 26 May – 01 Jun, 2016
    Deforestation, air pollution, endangered species, depleted natural resources and other environmental concerns were on the mind of early modern architects, patrons, and all those concerned with the art and act of building. During the age of exploration, ports and shipyards, cities and buildings were built through the manipulation and management of natural resources. This panel invites papers that investigate new building enterprises (cities and buildings, landscape architecture, ships and ports, mines, water basins, etc.) in terms of their effects on the environment.

    Scholars working in and on any geographical region are welcome to propose a paper.

    Papers might consider case studies analyzing single individuals and their ideas, for example, in 1582, Philip II, the builder of the Escorial, expressed to his government minister his concern for the conditions of the forests during his travel to central Castile. He called for the conservation of forests and voiced his fear “…that those who come after us will have much to complain of if we leave them depleted, and please God we do not see it in our time.” (Cited in Henry Kamen, The Escorial: Art and Power in the Renaissance, p. 73).

    Other topics might include eco-critical interpretations of primary documents and texts, poetry, and/or drama; re-examining architectural treatises for environmental concerns; or looking at buildings and landscapes themselves in different ways.

    Please send proposals with CV to Katie Jakobiec, katie.jakobiec@ed.ac.uk by June 1.
  • CFP: Utopia: Whither the Future? ICLS Graduate Conference (New York, 22-23 Sep 16)

    New York | Dates: 26 May – 30 Jun, 2016
    Institute for Comparative Literature and Society Graduate Conference
    Columbia University, New York
    September 22nd & 23rd, 2016

    With keynote speaker Michael Hardt, Duke University Professor and Director of the Marxism & Society Certificate Program and Bass Fellow

    What are the stakes of utopia today? How can we understand utopia in history, whether in theory or practice? Are utopias possible, or even desirable? This year's Columbia ICLS Graduate Conference will confront some of the challenges posed by various utopian visions and projects: we want to emphasize the value of comparative perspectives in thinking about utopias, whether across historical periods, societies and imaginaries, or from different academic angles.

    Those interested in participating may want to consider the following categories:

    The Past. What can we learn from historical utopias? Why have so many utopian visions produced dystopian realities? How have utopian theories related to attempts to put them into practice? To the extent that we can talk about discrete utopian models, how can we learn from them? Are they always predisposed to fail?

    The Present. From Athens to Cairo to Hong Kong to New York, discontent with the present order has been palpable. But where are the alternatives? Where are the potential, and perhaps even practicable, visions for a better world? How is our present conditioned by past visions of the future? Reflexively, what is the role of academia in utopia? Is there a tension between the rigor of academic approaches and the drives of utopian desires? 

    The Future?

    The Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS) at Columbia University invites a variety of approaches, both applied and theoretical, from the worlds of academia, art and activism for its Graduate Conference 2016. The panels will be moderated by Columbia faculty.

    Possible subjects include:
    Planetary studies; The Politics of Cosmos; Religion; Justice;
    Posthumanism; Animal Studies; Vegetable life; Ecology, Cybernetics;
    Political Economy; History of Economic Thought; Capitalism; Communism;
    Society; Empire; Commonwealth; Nationalism; Cosmopolitanism; Democracy;
    New media and technologies; Science and Technology Studies; Technophilia;
    Premodern utopias; Ancient radicals; Utopias in Antiquity; 
    The afterlife of More’s Utopia;
    Dystopia; Heterotopia;
    Human Rights; NGOs; Humanitarianism; Philanthropy; New Utilitarianism; ...

    Please send a 300-word abstract and 100-word bio to iclscolumbia2016@gmail.com by June 30, 2016. Decisions will be made and successful applicants informed by mid-July. Successful applicants will be required to submit the final draft of their papers by September 1, 2016. 
  • PhD Fellowship at ULB-Brussels

    Brussels | Dates: 26 May – 03 Jul, 2016
    1 PhD fellowship for a research project on Modernist reinventions of the rural landscape @ Université libre de Bruxelles

    Deadline: July 3rd 2016

    Morocco-1The Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) – HABITER research center at the Faculty of Architecture La Cambre-Horta is looking for highly talented and motivated candidates for 1 PhD position. The candidate will integrate the ULB team, coordinated by prof. Luisa MORETTO, and work under the supervision of Dr. Axel FISHER. He/she will focus on the Gharb plain (Morocco) case study. From a methodological point of view, the candidate will also contribute to the ULB team lead on two work packages planned in the MODSCAPES project: “documenting” agricultural development and colonization schemes; “changes and challenges” faced by modernist rural landscapes.
  • #ARCHIAFFECTS

    Dates: 26 May – 17 Jun, 2016
    An open-platform photography project exploring how architecture in Scotland affects us in our everyday lives

    Nicola Wilson, Shelly Crawford, Gemma Goodwin

    Competition open NOW til 17 June 2016
    Exhibition 08-16 July 2016

    New Glasgow Society
    1307 Argyle Street, Glasgow G3 8TL

    #ArchiAffects aims to engage as many people as possible with architecture in Scotland through photography and social media.

    Architecture surrounds us every day. Whether its your own home, a simple bus shelter on your morning commute, a city street or a different type of space such as a sportsground, art gallery or club we're looking for your images of how you're affected by your built surroundings.

    Getting involved and to have your image included in July’s exhibition is easy, just post a photograph on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook with a short caption explaining your image and include the #ArchiAffects hashtag. Done!

    PRIZES to be won include
    -A one-day tutored course on digital architectural photography with Stills
    -A chance to learn on the job by accompanying award-winning photographer Andrew Lee on a shoot
  • CFP: TECHNOLOGY | ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN (TAD)

    Dates: 24 May – 01 Sep, 2016
    The TAD Editorial Board is excited to announce the launch of a new journal: TECHNOLOGY | ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN (TAD). 

    The Call for Papers for the inaugural issue, VIRAL, is open and accepting submissions at editors@TADjournal.org until September 1, 2016. 
     
    TAD is a peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to the advancement of scholarship in the field of building technology, with a particular focus on its translation, integration, and impact on architecture and design. TAD will solicit, capture, and share new knowledge in the ways we think, make, and use technology within the building arts. Published articles will feature primary research in emerging materials, construction techniques, design integration, structures, building systems, energy, environmental design, information technology, digital fabrication, sustainability and resiliency, project delivery, the history and theory of technology, and building technology education. Aimed at researchers, educators, and practitioners, the journal advances and transforms the current discourse on building based technologies with the goal of expanding, reimagining, and challenging its role for architecture and design.

    Editorial Board 
    Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Chris Ford, Stanford University
    Kyle Konis, University of Southern California
    Clare Olsen, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
    Jeane Ripple, University of Virginia
    Franca Trubiano, University of Pennsylvania
    Marci Uihlein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Andrzej Zarzycki, New Jersey Institute of Technology
     
  • A Room Without a View & the Camps

    Tasmania | Dates: 02 – 22 Jan, 2017
    In partnership with the Creative Exchange Institute, University of Tasmania
    A Room Without a View & the Camps
    Studio at the Edge of the World
    Learning Event 2017 – Launceston, Tasmania, January 2-22
    A CALL FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (open to October 1)

    There is a major global problem of growing prison populations. 
    So often prisons create more problems than they solve and become 
    institutions of instruction in crime. Dominantly prison populations come 
    from the most disadvantaged ethnic groups and social classes. 
    At the most progressive, some prisons aim to humanise the incarcerated,
    but mostly they do the reverse.
     
    Population pressure, rapid urbanisation, the displacement of people
    by conflict and climate change impacts all now converge to expand the
    nature of criminalisation.
     
    This event will explore the issues, and examine ideas that radically
    redirect how prisons and refugee camps are conceptualised, 
    designed and function with particular reference to liberatory forms 
    of social change and education.
     
    The program will be directed by Professor Tony Fry, and limited to 
    25 people selected from around the world. For more details and instructions
    on making an expression of interest go to the Learning Event section of Studio. 
    For details of the event held in 2016 see the News section.
    www.thestudioattheedgeoftheworld.com
     
  • V&A/RCA History of Design in New York 13/14 June

    New York | Dates: 13 – 14 Jun, 2016
    Dr Sarah Teasley, Head of Programme, V&A/RCA History of Design, will be in New York on 13–14 June to present the programme's new academic developments around practice-based, public-facing research into the history of design and material culture.

    The RCA’s School of Humanities offers interdisciplinary training in critical, curatorial, 
    historical and theoretical approaches to art, design and architecture, at the heart of the world’s leading university of art and design (QS, 2015 & 2016). Graduates go on to leadership roles in universities, museums and galleries, arts programming, journalism and publishing, or to work as independent researchers and writers.

    Alongside History of Design, run in partnership with world-leading centre for scholarship and creativity, the Victoria and Albert Museum, sit fellow humanities programmes Curating Contemporary Art and Critical Writing in Art and Design. In 2016/17, V&A/RCA MA in History of Design will fully launch a new programme that integrates practice-based, public-facing methods with design and material culture-led research.

    At the same time, the School will launch MRes Humanities, a new and distinct one-year Master’s in Research programme that will foster experimentation, risk-taking and critical and creative thinking through humanities research.

    Introducing History of Design and the MRes, Dr Sarah Teasley and Professor Jane Pavitt, Dean of the School of Humanities, will also discuss: 
    • Preparing for research and curatorial careers in the arts and humanities
    • What practice-based, public-facing history can do
    The presentations will be followed by a Q&A session.

    This event is aimed at graduates and early- to mid-career professionals in art and design-related humanities, gallery or museums work, or those considering a career transition into these areas. 

    For those interested in applying to the School’s MA or MRes programmes, one-to-one consultations with Professor Pavitt and Dr Teasley are also available on 13 June. To book an appointment, or to attend the talk event, please contact aine.duffy@rca.ac.uk. Further information on the School and its programmes can be found at www.rca.ac.uk

    US applicants please note that the College is designated as an eligible institution for a Guaranteed Student Loan under the Direct Loan Program.
     
    Venue: British Council, New York Office, British Consulate General, 845 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022 
  • Artists' Critical Interventions into Architecture and Design, 1950 - 2016

    Coventry | Dates: 15 – 16 Jul, 2016
    University of Warwick, July 15 - 16, 2016

    Artists’ Critical Interventions into Architecture and Design, 1950 -
    2016

    University of Warwick, 15-16 July 2016

    To register, please email: artconferencewarwick2016@gmail.com

    What happens when fine artists engage with architecture and urban space?  What forms can such engagements take?  What political issues arise at the junctures between these disciplines?

    During the modern period, when artists and critics have often complained that fine art is overly remote from everyday life, one common way of overcoming this gap has been to draw on the greater social efficacy that architecture can seem to provide.  However, in other instances artists have used their relatively autonomous position to criticise or interrupt the relationship between architecture, urbanisation and power.  This conference will explore these issues as they arise in practices spanning the period from the 1960s to the present, exploring intersections between art, architecture and urbanism both within and outside Europe and North America.

    Day One: Friday 15 July 2016

    10.15 Registration

    10.40 Start

    Bill Roberts and David Hodge: Opening Remarks

    10.55 Keynote Speech

    Alexandra Kokoli (Middlesex University)

    ‘Uncanny Domesticities in Art informed by Feminist Anti-Nuclear Activism’

    (chaired by Imogen Racz, Coventry University)

    12.00 Break

    12.25 Panel 1: Race, Architecture, Art

    Gemma Rodrigues (Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute)

    ‘Simone Leigh’s Architectural Excavations and Inventions: A Storehouse of Signs’

    Monique Kerman (Western Washington University)

    ‘Structural Racism? Architectural Space in the Work of Mary Evans’

    13.35 Lunch

    14.35 Panel 2: Rethinking Modernism

    Natasha Adamou (Kingston University)

    ‘Shade Between Rings of Air: Architecture as Sculpture: Carlo Scarpa / Gabriel Orozco, 1952 / 2003’

    Hamed Yousefi (Independent)

    ‘The Avant-garde in the City: Koorosh Shishegaran on the Eve of the Iranian Revolution’

    Catrin Huber (Newcastle University)

    ‘Art, Architecture and Life: A Critical Discussion Between Three Historical Artists’

    16.05 Break

    16.30 Panel 3: History, Memory, the Nation

    David Burns (Royal College of Art)

    ‘The Spaces of Conflict in the Work of Mike Parr’

    Mark Stuart-Smith (Independent)

    ‘Something is Growing in the Wall: Architectural Subversions in the Work of Juan Muñoz’

    Kirstie Gregory (Leeds Beckett University)

    ‘Building inside Buildings: Michael Landy’s Semi-detached in the Duveen Galleries’

    18.00 End

    Day Two: Saturday 16 July 2016

    10.15 Registration

    10.30 Start

    Bill Roberts and David Hodge: Opening Remarks

    10.35 Keynote Speech

    Nicolas Whybrow (University of Warwick)

    ‘Complex Cities: The Architecture of Art in Urban Situations’

    11.40 Break

    12.05 Panel 1: Architecture, Urbanism and their ‘Publics’

    Kenneth Allan (Seattle University)

    ‘Billy Al Bengston, Frank Gehry and the Stakes of Spectatorship in Los Angeles, 1968’

    Danielle Child (Manchester Metropolitan University)

    ‘Art and the Public Square: From Decoration to Declaration!’

    David Hodge (The Art Academy)

    ‘Siah Armajani, Architectural Space and the Production of the Public’

    13.15 Lunch

    14.15 Panel 2: Art, Urbanism and the City

    Juliana Kei (Royal College of Art)

    ‘Art and Architecture Society, 1982-2007’

    Tomasso Gorla (Paris, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales)

    ‘Living Without Architecture: Italy’s Alternative Models for Life on Earth’

    Joel Robinson (Open University)

    ‘The Architecture Biennial as a Platform for Artists: The Case of the Urbanism and Architecture Bi-City Biennale (Shenzhen / Hong Kong)’

    Anne Kersten (Heinrich-Böll-Foundation)

    'Knowledge and Mediation in Form – Design in the Works of Artists Group Futurefarmers and myvillages'

    16.05 Finish
     
  • Central-Asian Journal of Art Studies

    Dates: 24 May – 01 Sep, 2016
    The editors of the Central Asian Journal of Art Studies (CAJAS) call for submission of manuscripts of original research papers and articles for publication.

    CAJAS publishes papers of original research, theoretical articles, and substantive reviews of topics central to Arts (theater, cinema, music, visual and decorative arts, architecture, contemporary art), Art Studies (history, theory, art criticism), Higher Education in Art studies (art pedagogics and innovations), Art in Social Humanity and Philosophy Sciences.

    The journal is published quarterly and is peer-reviewed. The editors plan to publish both regular and thematic/special issues. Each issue
    includes: research articles, results of research/studies and reviews for books, exhibitions, performances, films etc. CAJAS’s aim is to provide a platform to exchange ideas on new emerging trends that need more focus and boost and will consider proposals that strengthen our goals.

    Prospective authors, scholars, art-critics, instructors of universities and colleges, postgraduates and undergraduates students of universities as well (undergraduates can submit as coauthors with research advisers) are invited to contribute to the publication.

    Review and Publication Process: 
    After submission of the manuscript/paper, the author(s) will be informed as soon as possible by the editorial team regarding its standing. Once the paper passes the double-blind review it will be published in the upcoming issue of the Journal.

    Deadlines to submit papers: 
    1 January
    1 March
    1 June
    1 September

    Date of publication: 
    19th of January
    19th of March
    19th of June
    19th of September

    More information and submissions:
    http://cajas.kz/
    caj.artstudies.kaznai@gmail.com
  • Modelling Medieval Vaults

    London | Dates: 14 – 14 Jul, 2016
    The University of Liverpool in London, Finsbury Square. Seminar Room 4, 
    July 14, 2016
    Registration deadline: Jul 7, 2016

    The use of digital surveying and analysis techniques, such as laser 
    scanning, photogrammetry, 3D reconstructions or reverse engineering 
    offers the opportunity to re-examine historic architecture.

    Digital analysis has enabled new research into design processes, 
    construction methods, structural engineering, building archaeology and 
    relationships between buildings. Recent research on Continental 
    European and Central American architecture has established the 
    significance of these techniques, however, as yet there has been little 
    exploitation of digital technologies in the context of medieval 
    architecture in the British Isles. This is despite international 
    recognition of the importance of thirteenth and fourteenth-century 
    English vault design to the history of Gothic architecture in an 
    international context.

    The aims of the present symposium are to present new research in this 
    emerging field to establish appropriate methodologies using digital 
    tools and identify significant questions for future research in the 
    area.

    The symposium will be relevant to anyone with an interest in:
    Medieval architecture
    Three-dimensional digital methodologies 
    Digital techniques used for the analysis of historic works of 
    architecture
     
  • CFP: THE PLAN Journal

    Dates: 23 May, 2016 – 23 May, 2017
    THE PLAN Journal (TPJ) intends to disseminate and promote innovative, thought-provoking and relevant research, studies and criticism in architecture and urbanism.

    The criteria for selecting contributions will be innovation, clarity of purpose and method, and potential transformational impact on disciplinary fields or the broader socio-cultural context.

    The ultimate purpose of the TPJ is to enrich the dialog between research and professional fields, in order to encourage both applicable new knowledge and intellectually driven modes of practice.

    Prospective contributors are encouraged to discuss or send outlines or drafts to the Editors before making a formal submission. Such proposals, drafts or outlines (in .pdf or Word - .doc or .docx files) need not to comply with the instructions listed below for final submissions. Such proposals should be sent to:
    Dr. Maurizio Sabini
    Editor-in-Chief, THE PLAN Journal
    msabini@theplanjournal.com 
  • CFP: 2+3D Photography – Practice and Prophecies, May 11 & 12, 2017, Rijksmuseum

    Amsterdam | Dates: 11 – 12 May, 2017
    The aim of the conference is to provide us with a framework for international compatibility on the best practice methods for digitizing our heritage, and offers an outstanding and unique opportunity for exchanging ideas on how we should meet the challenges that lie ahead. This conference will also give us the opportunity to discuss how we can incorporate new techniques into international standards of practice. Call for Short Presentations For the afternoon sessions of both days we intend to hold a series of short presentations. Potential presenters are invited to submit relevant and challenging contributions related to the conference themes. Please submit your ideas to the Conference Secretary: 2and3dphotography@rijksmuseum.nl The conference is organized by the Rijksmuseum, in cooperation with the Association for Historical and Fine Art Photography (AHFAP). The official language will be English.
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
1365 N. Astor Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
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