Recent Opportunities

  • Purity and Contamination in Renaissance Art and Architecture

    Cambridge | Dates: 01 – 01 Oct, 2016
    October 1, 2016
    9:30am-6:00pm
     MIT, Bartos Theater (Cambridge, Mass.)
    Registration required

    Purity and contamination have long figured in the accounts of the European Renaissance. Scholars, in the last few decades alone, have mapped the role these ideas have played in debates about godliness and sin, cleanliness, gender, and ethnicity, among other domains. Less thoroughly studied, though, is how these two intertwined categories informed European approaches to art and the built environment, both as it was created and experienced. It is precisely this lacuna that our conference aims to address. This one-day conference plots some of the myriad ways in which concerns for material purity—and contamination—shaped the artistic and architectural pursuits of early modern Europeans. The aim is not to treat these phenomena comprehensively, or to fit them within a coherent framework, but rather to recover historical instances in which they assumed particular salience: in the materials that practitioners adopted; in how they manipulated them; and in the responses (physiological, verbal, textual) that such activity provoked. To this end, participants will present case studies drawn from diverse periods and places in multiple practices, teasing out the contradictions and complexities inherent in early modern approaches to matter, but also the broader conceptual and ideological conditions that determined how matter was defined and understood. A concluding roundtable brings together a distinguished group of scholars and museum curators to debate the methodological strengths and limitations of the two categories, as well as their relevance beyond the domain of Renaissance studies.

     Participants: Joseph Ackley, Amy Bloch, Rachel Boyd, Lorenzo Buonanno, Michael Cole, Jodi Cranston, Lauren Jacobi, Caroline Jones, David Karmon, Joseph Leo Koerner, Stephanie Leone, Jessica Maier, Carolina Mangone, Christopher Nygren, Pamela Smith, Luke Syson, Jane Tylus, Michael Waters, Carolyn Yerkes, and Daniel Zolli.

    This event is the Fall 2016 New England Renaissance Conference. It is co-organized by Lauren Jacobi and Daniel Zolli.
  • PhD Scholarship: 'Architectural design to improve Indigenous health outcomes', UQ School of Architecture

    Brisbane | Dates: 11 – 21 Aug, 2016
    The School of Architecture at the University of Queensland invites applications for the following research project: 'Architectural design to improve Indigenous health outcomes' The goal of this research project is to improve the experience and use of healthcare architecture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The aim is to identify the best design principles and practices through an analysis of existing clinics and hospitals and surveys of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander users. The overarching research question is: “When it comes to health service engagement, does design matter to Indigenous people, and how does it affect their decisions around accessing health care?” Professor Paul Memmott (p.memmott@uq.edu.au) and Tim O'Rourke (t.orourke@uq.edu.au) are the Chief Investigators. For enquiries please contact: Brit Winnen, Research and Projects Manager (b.winnen@uq.edu.au). Please apply online: https://scholarships.uq.edu.au/scholarship/uq-apa-special-round-support-arc-nhmrc-projects Scholarship Applications and Details APA scholarships are funded by the Commonwealth Government to provide assistance for living costs to domestic students during completion of a PhD. This special APA round offers scholarships for projects which are aligned with recently awarded ARC and NHMRC projects. Work with leading researchers, and learn to conduct research independently and think critically, while contributing to large projects of national significance. Scholarship value: $26,288 per annum, indexed annually. Tuition fees do not apply. Closing date: Sunday 21 August (Asutralian Time). Offers will be sent to successful applicants in late September or very early October. Commencement: Monday 3 - Monday 31 October, 2016. Apply Online: UQ APA Special Round to Support ARC & NHMRC Projects http://www.architecture.uq.edu.au/launch-your-research-career-phd-scholarships-available-now
  • PhD Scholarship: 'How Meston's 'Wild Australia Show' Shaped Australian Aboriginal History', UQ School of Architecture

    Brisbane | Dates: 11 – 21 Aug, 2016
    The School of Architecture at the University of Queensland invites applications for the following research project: "How Meston's 'Wild Australia Show' Shaped Australian Aboriginal History" The Wild Australia Show (1892-93), staged by a diverse company of Aboriginal people for metropolitan audiences, provides the focus for an interdisciplinary study of performance, photography, collections, frontier environments and race relations in colonial Australia. Using archival and visual records, and in partnership with key cultural institutions and Indigenous communities, the research seeks to produce an authoritative and original interpretation of the Show situating it within local, national and transnational narratives informed by contemporary Indigenous perspectives. It aims to illuminate Aboriginal agency in the ensemble, reconnect Aboriginal kin to performers, and chart changing concepts of race at a critical juncture in Australian history. Students with backgrounds in history, architecture, anthropology and related disciplines are encouraged to apply. Professor Paul Memmott is the Chief Investigator (p.memmott@uq.edu.au) . For enquiries please contact: Dr. Brit Winnen, Research and Projects Manager (b.winnen@uq.edu.au). Please apply online: https://scholarships.uq.edu.au/scholarship/uq-apa-special-round-support-arc-nhmrc-projects Scholarship Applications and Details APA scholarships are funded by the Commonwealth Government to provide assistance for living costs to domestic students during completion of a PhD. This special APA round offers scholarships for projects which are aligned with recently awarded ARC and NHMRC projects. Work with leading researchers, and learn to conduct research independently and think critically, while contributing to large projects of national significance. Scholarship value: $26,288 per annum, indexed annually. Tuition fees do not apply. Closing date: Sunday 21 August (Australian Time). Offers will be sent to successful applicants in late September or very early October. Commencement: Monday 3 - Monday 31 October, 2016. Apply Online: UQ APA Special Round to Support ARC & NHMRC Projects See: http://www.architecture.uq.edu.au/launch-your-research-career-phd-scholarships-available-now
  • Shore to Core: A research competition to understand how cities impact wellbeing

    West Palm Beach | Dates: 10 – 21 Aug, 2016
    You're invited to submit a proposal to Shore to Core: A research competition to understand how cities impact wellbeing

    This summer, help us understand how we can build better cities! Create a framework for measuring relationships between cities and wellbeing using West Palm Beach as a model.

    Yesterday, Van Alen Institute and the West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency launched Shore to Core, a research competition to develop a framework for studying and measuring how changes in the urban landscape affect the wellbeing of individuals over time. One winning team will create a pilot study that identifies:

    • The existing relationships between the built environment and residents’ physical health, mental health, and social capital
    • An approach to measuring how distinct elements of the built environment affect wellbeing
    • Tools to engage the study participants and/or residents of West Palm Beach

    One research team will be selected to participate in a three-month process to develop and implement a subsequent pilot study. The research team will receive a $40,000 stipend to develop the study, and a $10,000 stipend to implement the pilot study. Finalists will be notified in September. Download the full project brief on the competition website! 

    Teams are encouraged (but not required) to pre-register their interest by 11:59 PM ET on Wednesday, July 27. Project updates and any answers to questions submitted about the request will be emailed to team leads who have pre-registered.
    The deadline for registration and electronic submission of the Request for Qualifications is 11:59 PM ET on Sunday, August 21, 2016.  
     
  • 26th International Sculpture Conference: Sculpture in Context: Tradition and Innovation

    Pittsburgh | Dates: 15 – 18 Oct, 2016
    The Conference will feature 11 panel discussions, keynote speaker Diana Al-Hadid, annual ISC littleSCULPTURE Show, ARTSlams & Mentor Sessions, hands-on workshops, gallery hops, evening parties, and a number of exciting optional tours.
  • ACLS 2016-17 Competitions

    Dates: 09 Aug, 2016 – 31 Mar, 2017
    The online application system (OFA) is now open for many ACLS programs with fall 2016 deadlines.

    ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships
    ACLS Digital Extension Grants
    ACLS Fellowships
    African Humanities Program
    Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society
    Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars
    Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
    Luce/ACLS Program in China Studies
    Luce/ACLS Program in Religion, Journalism & International Affairs
    Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships
    Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows
    The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies
  • 2016 Design Matters Conference: Miami Rising

    Miami | Dates: 02 – 04 Nov, 2016
    The Design Matters Conference presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations is the world’s only dedicated annual meeting that seeks to bring top designers, journalists and civic leaders into exploratory dialogue with those not-for-profit professionals and volunteers charged with creating cultural programs (exhibitions, tours, lectures and symposia, festivals and films, youth outreach) to spur broader public interest in architecture and design.

    If you’re involved with a not-for-profit architectural, design or educational institution, come join your peers at the Design Matters Conference and enjoy 2.5 days of workshops, presentations, tours and networking events. See below for preliminary Schedule, initial list of Featured Speakers, Open Call for Presenters, Lodging and Registration information.

    Conference Theme: Miami Rising
    Comparatively speaking, Miami is a young city. It is a place beset with urban challenges, but a place on the make, and evolving much more rapidly than your average American city—therein lies the excitement. At this year’s Design Matters Conference, we investigate four Miami experiments that point to realities all urban centers are certain to face sometime soon. Let’s get out and explore and meet the designers and civic leaders pushing Miami into the future. 
  • The Secret Life of Buildings

    Austin | Dates: 20 – 22 Oct, 2016
    SYMPOSIUM: OCTOBER 20-22, THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN CAMPUS
     
    October 17, Goldsmith Hall Loggia
    OBJECTS Exhibition Opening 
     
    October 19, Jessen Auditorium
    Prologue Lecture by Matthew B. Crawford, “In Defense of the Attentional Commons”
     
    October 20, Goldsmith Hall Wood Shop
    Lectures by Jorge Otero-Pailos, PhD, and Albena Yaneva, PhD
    Evening reception in honor of the people who maintain The School of Architecture buildings and grounds
     
    October 21, Utility Spaces
    Morning tours

    October 21, Battle Hall Library Reading Room
    Lectures by Professor Michael Benedikt and Graham Harman, PhD

    October 22, Goldsmith Hall *(this event is closed to the public)*
    Roundtable Discussion: "Do 'Objects' and 'Relations' Make Space for Architecture?"
    Benedikt, Bieg, Harman, Otero-Pailos, Yaneva, with Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant, Timothy Morton, Craig Dykers
  • Dialogue in Architecture: An Evening with architect Toshiko Mori

    Chicago | Dates: 29 Sep, 2016
    The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust's annual Thinking into the Future: The Robie House Series on Architecture, Design and Ideas presents a conversation with acclaimed architect Toshiko Mori Sept. 29 at the University of Chicago.

    In Dialogue in Architecture: An Evening with Architect Toshiko Mori, the Harvard University professor will discuss how architecture develops languages and dialogues that reflect and respond to complex circumstances and contexts.

    The presentation takes place Thursday, Sept. 29, at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, University of Chicago, 915 E. 60th St., Chicago, with a cocktail reception at 5 p.m., followed by Mori's presentation at 6 p.m. Admission is $25; $5 for students; and $20 for Frank Lloyd Wright Trust members, University of Chicago alumni and staff, teachers and AIA Chicago members. 
     
  • CFP: 2017 Visual Resources Association Conference Lightning Round

    Louisville | Dates: 09 – 29 Aug, 2016
    Call for Proposals for the “New Faces, New Voices: Emerging Professionals Lightning Round” Proposals due EOB August 29 Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students (VREPS) is pleased to to announce a call for proposals for lightning presentations by new professionals (within 10 years of the start of their career) and students for the 2017 Visual Resources Association’s Annual Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. The format is 24 x 7 (24 slides in 7 minutes), with 8-10 presenters. A moderator will keep talks on time and facilitate discussion. To submit a proposal, please fill out the form at: https://goo.gl/forms/7PgL5gHTTHLH9AFn2 If you have any questions, please email me at: alazet@collegeforcreativestudies.edu
  • 2016 SAH Awards Gala

    Chicago | Dates: 04 Nov, 2016
    The Society of Architectural Historians will present its 2016 Awards for Architectural Excellence at the 7th annual SAH Awards Gala on Friday, November 4, 2016. The awards represent a unique coming together of architectural practice and academic study, honoring the contributions of individual projects to our built environment. Proceeds from the gala benefit the Society's educational mission and the ongoing restoration of SAH's headquarters, the Landmark Charnley-Persky House.

    Honorees:

    Architectural Stewardship
    Richard H. Driehaus, The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation

    Public Engagement with the Built Environment
    Sarah Herda, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts

    Design, Planning and Sustainability
    Peter Landon, FAIA, LEED AP, Landon Bone Baker Architects

    Co-chairing this year's gala are John M. Syvertsen, FAIA, American Architectural Foundation; Cynthia Winter, AIA, Cynthia Winter Architects LLC; and Nicholas Weingarten, FAIA.
  • SITElines.2016 much wider than a line

    Sante Fe | Dates: 08 Aug, 2016 – 08 Jan, 2017
    SITElines.2016 much wider than a line

    SITE Santa Fe presents 
    SITElines.2016: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas

    Opening in July, this exhibition, entitled much wider than a line, is part of SITE’s ongoing biennial series with a focus on Contemporary Art from the Americas

    PREVIEW EVENTS: JULY 14 – 15, 2016
    PUBLIC OPENING: JULY 16, 2016

    #SITELINES2016
    #muchwiderthanaline

    SITE Santa Fe is pleased to present SITElines.2016 opening on July 16, 2016. This exhibition is the second installment in SITE Santa Fe’s reimagined biennial series with a focus on contemporary art from the Americas and features 35 artists from 16 countries and 11 new commissions organized around intersecting ideas brought together by a team of five curators−Rocío Aranda-Alvarado, Kathleen Ash-Milby, Pip Day, Pablo León de la Barra, and Kiki Mazzucchelli.

    This year’s biennial, entitled much wider than a line, is an articulation of the interconnectedness of the Americas and various shared experiences such as the recognition of colonial legacies, expressions of the vernacular, the influence of indigenous understandings, and our relationship to the land.

    much wider than a line takes its title from Leanne Simpson’s, Dancing on our Turtle’s Back, a book about life ways of Nishnaabeg people. In her accounts of non-colonial conceptions of nationhood and sovereignty, it is the joint care taking required in the overlapping territorial boundaries between one Indigenous nation and another that are traditionally relationship-building. The relationships that emerge are, like the borders themselves, much wider than a line.

    The organizing principles of the exhibition take their cue from the remarkable amphitheater structure in Santa Fe designed by the architect Paolo Soleri. Commissioned in the 1960s by Lloyd Kiva New, then Arts Director of the newly founded Institute of American Indian Arts, the Paolo Soleri Amphitheater was originally built to support their groundbreaking curricula in contemporary American Indian drama. The organic concrete building drew on principles of Native American design, and was host to extraordinary performances of American Indian Theater that bridged cultures and histories. The amphitheater was completed in 1970 on the campus of the Santa Fe Indian School (established in 1890 to assimilate Native American children from tribes throughout the Southwestern United States). Today, the structure stands empty, derelict, and is very much a contested site. With research contributed by Conrad Skinner, AIA, much wider than a line presents a gallery dedicated to the amphitheater that expresses its role as both a historically potent forum for the exploration of collaborative cross-cultural processes and a stand-in for complexities of geopolitical tensions that presently exist in the region and throughout the Americas.

    Key thematic threads explored in much wider than a line include:

    Vernacular Strategies The importance of vernacular sources−in design, architecture, textiles, and technique− that influence the work of artists throughout the Americas.

    Indigenous Understandings Performance, ritual, histories, and materials drawn from indigenous sources, as they relate to the natural world.

    Shared Territories The complexity of networks and affinities in the Americas through questions around identity, race, borders, and emerging de-colonial practices.
  • CFP: Landscapes of Pre-Industrial Cities (Washington, 5-6 May 17)

    Washington | Dates: 05 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    LANDSCAPES OF PRE-INDUSTRIAL CITIES 
    GARDEN AND LANDSCAPE STUDIES SYMPOSIUM 2017
    DUMBARTON OAKS, WASHINGTON, D.C.
    MAY 5-6, 2017

    CALL FOR PAPERS (DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2016)
     
    The use of the word “landscape” to describe the formation and infrastructure of cities—as reflected, for example, in current theories of landscape urbanism—largely seems to express contemporary preoccupations with the post-industrial urban condition. Indeed, the Industrial Revolution is often seen as a turning point in the emergence of the urban landscape of the modern metropolis. The large city as commonly experienced today in the world—whether vertical or horizontal, congested or diffused, and divorced from productive nature—is certainly dependent on a range of recent (or quite recent) breakthroughs in construction technology, climate control, communication, and transportation. In this view, urban landscapes appear as a historically late development and are therefore seen to embody an essentially modern and Western concept.  

    Yet, features associated with contemporary urban landscapes—most notably the forms of human adaptation to and reshaping of the sites where cities develop and expand—can also be found in pre-industrial contexts in different time periods and across the globe. Pre-industrial urban settlements generally occupied land that had been used for other, mostly productive, purposes, and their development involved complex and dynamic relationships with the management of natural resources, especially food and water. While ancient cities are traditionally studied as the centers of commerce, trade, and artisan production as well as the seats of secular and religious authorities, questions of how the original clusters of agrarian communities evolved into urban formations, how they were spatially organized, and what their specific landscape characteristics were deserve further analysis and discussion. Another closely related question concerns the role of environmental factors and the presence or lack of particular natural resources in enabling this process of urbanization.

    To explore these questions, the Garden and Landscape Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks is planning a symposium, Landscapes of Pre-Industrial Cities. Organized by Georges Farhat (University of Toronto) and John Beardsley (Dumbarton Oaks), it will be held on May 5–6, 2017. Topics will be drawn from a wide range of historical periods and a global geographical perspective; it is anticipated that presentations will represent a wide range of disciplines and include both scholars and practitioners. In order to integrate this discussion into the current debate on the sustainable city, the speakers will be asked to address the following questions:

    How was the modern dichotomy between the urban and the rural historically expressed in the relationship between cities and the natural environment—especially with respect to land use, environmental control, and resource management?  

    To what extent was the ability to exert control over the natural environment and its resources through territorial expansion, hydraulic management, and land reclamation a determinant factor in the design, evolution, and historical fortunes of pre-industrial cities?

     What sense can we make of the contemporary concepts of urban sprawl, biodiversity, climate change, connectivity, and integrated management of natural resources if applied to pre-industrial urban landscapes? What implications does this understanding have for current scholarship, design strategies, and planning policies in an age of ecological transition? 

     Please send proposals including a 200-word abstract and a short CV (with five most significant publications), by September 15, 2016, to Georges Farhat, georges.farhat@daniels.utoronto.ca, and John Beardsley, BeardsleyJ@doaks.org.
  • City in a Garden: Alfred Caldwell's Eagle Point Park

    Dubuque | Dates: 07 – 08 Oct, 2016
    Heritage Works Inc. is hosting a symposium:  "City in a Garden:  Alfred Caldwell's Eagle Point Park" as part of its inaugural Dubuque Heritage Festival on October 7 & 8, 2016. This year’s festival will highlight Alfred Caldwell’s work at Dubuque’s Eagle Point Park.

    In 1934, the City of Dubuque, Iowa, turned to a young Prairie School landscape architect, Alfred Caldwell, to design and then supervise the construction of landscapes and shelters at Dubuque’s Eagle Point Park.  It was Caldwell’s first large scale commission.  Over 80 years later, we are now celebrating his work with a two-day symposium and community celebration focusing on Caldwell’s work. 

    The symposium: “City in a Garden:  Alfred Caldwell’s Eagle Point Park” is designed for those interested in learning more about Caldwell’s work through the lens of his designs for Eagle Point Park. A list of speakers can be found on our website. Additionally, 6.0 hours of AIA CEUs and LA CES are pending approval.

    The symposium is part of a community event that will include the opening of an exhibit on Friday evening, October 7th at the Dubuque Museum of Art featuring original Alfred Caldwell drawings and artifacts from his time in Dubuque. There will be docent-led tours of Caldwell’s shelters and landscapes at Eagle Point Park on Saturday, October 8th. We hope that you will attend and also invite your colleagues and constituents to attend. 
  • Getty Research Institute Grants: Iconoclasm and Vandalism (2017-2018)

    Los Angeles | Dates: 04 Aug – 03 Oct, 2016
    Every year since 1985 the Research Institute has welcomed scholars, artists, and other cultural figures from around the world to work in residence at the Institute on projects that bear upon its annual research theme. While in residence, they pursue their own research projects, make use of Getty collections, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty Center and the Getty Villa.

    2017/2018 Theme: Iconoclasm and Vandalism

    Iconoclasm raises contentious questions that transcend cultural and temporal boundaries. It can be understood as vandalism, destruction, or a means of repression, all of which fundamentally put culture at risk.

    However, iconoclasm can also be a form of protest or a vehicle for creative expression. Iconoclasm is transformative, creating entirely new objects or meanings through alterations to existing artworks. Charged with symbolism, these remains testify to a history of reception, offering clues about the life and afterlife of an object. To a certain extent, all radical changes in cultural production can be described as iconoclastic. 

    Applicants are encouraged to adopt a broad approach to the theme by addressing topics such as religious and political iconoclasm, protection of cultural heritage, use of spolia, damnatio memoriae, street art, graffiti, performance art, or activism. 
  • African Humanities Program Fellowships 2016-17

    Dates: 04 Aug – 02 Nov, 2016
    The African Humanities Program (AHP) seeks to reinvigorate the humanities in Africa through fellowship competitions and related activities in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. In partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which has generously provided funding, AHP offers African scholars an integrated set of opportunities to develop individual capacities and to promote formation of scholarly networks. The African Humanities Program supports the Carnegie Corporation’s efforts to develop and retain African academics at universities in Africa.

    Goals of the African Humanities Program
    to encourage and enable the production of new knowledge and new directions for research
    to strengthen the capacity of early career researchers and faculty at African universities
    to build the field of humanities by establishing networks for scholarly communication across Africa and with Africanists worldwide.

    Fellowship stipends allow recipients an academic year free from teaching and other duties for completion of the PhD dissertation, for revising the dissertation for publication, or for the first major research project after the PhD. Fellows are also eligible for additional benefits such as residential stays for writing, manuscript development workshops, and publication support.

    Each Fellow may request a residential stay at an African institute for advanced study. Residencies have proved to be extremely popular and productive, granting Fellows time and space to concentrate on writing. Because residencies must be taken at an institute outside the home country, they foster international communication. Currently AHP Fellows may take residencies at six institutes from South Africa to Senegal, Ghana to Tanzania.

    Fellows are invited to submit their manuscripts to the AHP Publications series, a collaboration with UNISA Press in Pretoria, South Africa. The rigorous development and peer-review process of AHP Publications is overseen by series co-editors, Kwesi Yankah, Central University College, Ghana, and Frederick Hendricks, Rhodes University, South Africa.

    Fellows may apply to attend a Manuscript-Development Workshop to discuss their manuscripts with AHP mentors and other Fellows in a weeklong, intensive retreat. Many authors use these discussions to guide their final revisions before submitting manuscripts for publication.

    AHP also partners with the African Studies Association every year to bring select AHP Fellows to the ASA Annual Meeting as ASA Presidential Fellows.
  • Organicism, Open Systems, and Technology in Feminist Art (New York, Feb. 15-18, 2017), Deadline Aug. 30

    New York | Dates: 04 – 30 Aug, 2016
    For the CAA session “Organicism, Open Systems, and Technology in Feminist Art” we seek papers that shed new light on the theoretical origins of process, growth, and collaboration in feminist art that derive from the sciences. We are particularly interested in how women artists re-conceptualized scientific theories of organicism and open systems, and notions of technological progress in support of their social and utopian aims. We welcome papers focusing on feminist practitioners in art, architecture, and design working in the US and internationally.  The scientific theory of open systems put forth by biologist Ludwig von Bertalanffy, for example, became a model for artists conceptualizing an ever-changing relationship between humans and their social, political and “natural” environment. Also rooted in the natural sciences, notions of organicism were taken up by many twentieth century designers, architects, and urban planners, including Frank Lloyd Wright and Buckminster Fuller. They conceived human-made structures and new technologies in analogy to naturally growing forms. Among other questions, this session asks: How did feminist artists incorporate science and technology as theory, process, or media to convey ideals that were in many ways opposed to the notion of scientific objectivity undergirding a rationalized, male-dominated society? In what ways did women’s involvement with the art and technology movements of the 1950s and 60s impact their subsequent feminist practices? How did women artists engage with the utopian rhetoric centered on science and technology in the context of the space race or New Left criticism of the military-industrial-complex? Please submit a paper abstract (250 words max.), CV, and session participation form by August 30 to Susanneh Bieber, Texas A&M University, bieber@tamu.edu, and Christine Filippone, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, cfilippone@millersville.edu See http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2017-call-for-participation.pdf for more information including the session participation form (last page of the pdf).
  • CFP: Building Technology Educators' Society 2017 Meeting (Des Moines, 8-10 Jun 17)

    Des Moines | Dates: 03 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    Building Technology Educators’ Society 2017 Meeting
    Des Moines, IA 8-10 June 2017 Call for Papers

    TOPIC: Poetics and Pragmatism.

    “Talk is cheap and easy; making dreams real takes hard, humble work. Dreams in the Midwest are acceptable, just keep them to yourself. Maybe tell your family, but don’t just talk—do something about it.”             Peter Jenkins, Looking for Alaska

    Iowa opened to European-American settlers in 1834, and ever since it has been a place where Americans have held a tenuous grip on the land and against a climate that resists occupation.  Its soil produces grain for the entire continent; its legendary work ethic has fueled generations of farmers but also writers, poets, musicians, and astronomers.  It is a place that takes the real world seriously, but that has also raised the products of such engagement to poetic levels; the novels of Marilynne Robinson, the music of Greg Brown, and the paintings of Grant Wood all speak to this possibility among the sublime landscapes of our state.  But it is also a place of technological engagement and advancement: Iowa State can make a legitimate claim to be the birthplace of digital computing, a legacy reflected in its investment in fabrication and analysis initiatives today.

    BTES’ first meeting in the Midwest offers an opportunity to ask how building can address both practical and poetic desires.  The ‘hard, humble work’ of constructing in an indifferent environment can balance our needs with what that environment has to offer while touching our deeper sensibilities.  Indeed, cognitive science has produced evidence suggesting that beauty, in the words of Denis Dutton, is “nature’s way of acting at a distance,” an instinctive preference for objects, landscapes, and sustenance that can leverage our relations with the world.

    How do the pragmatics and the poetics of building coincide?  How do they resist, challenge, or provoke one another?  How do buildings and the ways in which we build bridge realms of material performance and aesthetics?  And how does a new generation of tools collide with, enhance, or critique these traditions?  We seek papers on a broad range of topics that address how and why we build, that examine technology and techne in the contexts of function, beauty, and poetics, and that reveal these links both in contemporary practice and throughout history.  Papers that address Midwestern traditions are particularly welcome, but we seek a broad mix of geographical, conceptual, and disciplinary approaches.

    Submit abstracts of no more than 500 words via EasyChair. Papers will be reviewed in a two-stage process.

    Deadline for abstracts: 15 September 2016
    Notifications to Authors:  1 November 2016
    Final Papers Due: 1 March 2017
    Notification of Paper Acceptance:  15 April 2017
  • CFP: The Architect as Active Reader (15-17 Jun 17)

    Vicenza | Dates: 03 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    The Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio will organize an international conference on the theme of The Architect as Active Reader, 15-17 June 2017.

    Printed treatises and texts have been the main vehicle for the communication of architectural ideas. Architects and builders, as owners of these texts, have left records of their thoughts in the form of subsequent annotations, comments, and drawings within the texts or closely connected to them. In developing the notion of the architect as an “active reader” who absorbs new information for future practical application, the conference seeks to bring out examples of architects in dialogue with texts.

    Geographic area and time period are open. Scholars may apply individually or propose a theme to be carried through in a single session by a group or team. (Such a theme might address a single architect’s varied reading practices; multiple approaches to a single work; the collecting practices revealed in an architect’s library). Contributions from scholars and librarians are welcome. 

    Those interested in participating with a contribution (20 minute limit) should send an outline (no more than 250 words) and brief CV (no more than 100 words) to Ilaria Abbondandolo (ilaria.abbondandolo@cisapalladio.org) by 15 September 2016. Speakers will be notified by 31 October 2016.
  • National Humanities Center Fellowships 2017-2018

    Research Triangle Park | Dates: 02 Aug – 18 Oct, 2016
    The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2017 through May 2018. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career scholars as well as senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work are also invited to apply. The Center does not normally support the revision of a doctoral dissertation. In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects. The Center is international in scope and welcomes applications from scholars outside the United States.

    Areas of Special Interest. Most of the Center’s fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research, including fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian Studies, theology, and a young woman in philosophy. The Center also invites applicants from scholars in inter-disciplinary fields, including African American Studies, area studies, Cultural Studies, and Media Studies.  

    Stipends. The amounts awarded are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center’s ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide at least half salary and covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents.  

    Facilities and Services. The Center provides a rich environment for individual research and the exchange of ideas. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. The stunning Archie K. Davis building includes private studies for Fellows, conference rooms, a central commons for dining, lounges, and reading areas. The Center's unparalleled, comprehensive library service supports Fellows by fulfilling thousands of requests for books and other research materials from out partner institutions in the Triangle, usually within 24 hours, and libraries around the world. Library staff also provide reference assistance and instruction in new online research tools. 

    Support. Fellowships are supported by the Center’s endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    Deadline and Application Procedures. Applicants submit an application form, a curriculum vitae, a 1000-word project proposal, and three letters of recommendation. The application form and instructions may be found at the Center’s website: http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org. Applications and letters of recommendation must be submitted online by October 18, 2016.

    http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org            e-mail <nhc@nationalhumanitiescenter.org>

    The National Humanities Center does not discriminate on the basis of
    race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation, or age. We are dedicated to fair treatment, diversity, and inclusion.
     
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