Recent Opportunities

  • CTBUH Offering Summer Internship Opportunities

    Chicago | Dates: 28 Apr – 13 May, 2016
    The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) is looking for talented individuals to join our growing team in several paid summer internship positions at our Downtown Chicago Headquarters Office.

    Candidates will have the very highest organizational skills, excellent written English language ability, and very good graphic design skills. The roles will be supporting the CTBUH team working on publications, events, research, website, administrative and office organization projects, etc. All internships are 40 hours per week over the summer.

    If you work closely with students and young professionals, or know someone who does, please help spread the word about these paid opportunities! 

    Applications should be submitted no later than May 13 to be considered for summer positions. Interested parties should email the following information to internship@ctbuh.org: 
    1. Brief cover letter explaining why the candidate would be ideal for this role (include anticipated graduation date and current GPA).
    2. Résumé
    3. Evidence of something the candidate has written (e.g., a short paper or essay), graphically designed (e.g., a book or brochure), and something they’ve organized (e.g., an event, project, or publication).

    Learn more about the CTBUH at ctbuh.org.
  • CFP: 5th Creative Cities International Conference (Porto, 25-27 Jan 17)

    Porto | Dates: 28 Apr – 15 Jun, 2016
    Porto (Portugal), January 25 - 27, 2017
    Deadline: Jun 15, 2016

    About the 5th Creative Cities International Conference

    The Creative Cities International Conference is an event idealized and organized by the Scientific Association
    ICONO14 (Spain), which aims to approach innovative actions conducted within cities by all sorts of agents (public, private, governmental, nongovernmental, individuals and collectives). It intends to be a presentation and discussion space for perspectives and solutions on different challenges related to urban contexts, exploring different resources and possibilities for major and minor world cities. 
    After four previous editions of significant success (2009, 2011 and
    2016 in Madrid; 2013 in Campinas, Brazil), the 5th Creative Cities International Conference will be held in Porto (Portugal) between January 25th to 27th2017. It will be co-organized by CITCEM – Transdisciplinary «Culture, Space and Memory» Research Centre of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Porto, and by the Scientific Association ICONO14.

    The 5th edition aims to maintain and extend the multidisciplinary and multicultural debate that, under this formexists since 2009 and that has involved participants from all over the world in the construction and sharing of a plural, crosscut and diversified debate on the characteristics, difficulties, successes and several paths performed by different types and scales of cities. Being Porto an European and international destination of great relevance, the organisation also intends to turn the city into the centre of this scientific and cultural exchange of origins and destinies for the life that defines every city which the congress will potentiate.

    Thematic lines

    - The constructed city: theory and History of the cities
    - The inherited city: patrimony and the city. 
    - The palimpsest city: destruction, reconstruction and the memory of the city. 
    - The represented and imagined city: culture, art and the city. 
    - The playful city: leisure and sports in the city. 
    - The lived city: neighbourhoods, associativism, security, mobility and freedom. 
    - The moving city: policies and strategies for transportation and public services in the city. 
    - The inhabited city: architecture and urbanism in the city. 
    - The solidary and accessible city: social services and disability integration in the city. 
    - The market city: industry, commerce and economy in the city. 
    - The visited city: tourism and the city. 
    - The communicated city: media and advertisement in the cities. 
    - The identifiable city: the city as identity and brand
    - The sustainable city: health, water, ecology and the city. 
    - The virtual and real city: technology and the city. 
    - The 2.0 city: social networks and the city. 
    - The future city: youth and the city. 
    - The creative city: tradition, personality and innovation in the city. 
    - The wise city: education and the city. 
    - The equalitarian city: gender and the city. 
    - The political city: management and administration of cities and policies for the citizens

    Submissions must include: title (English and Portuguese/Spanish), name of the author(s), filiation, abstract (maximum of 2000 characters), correspondent thematic line indication, 3 to 5 keywords and a short biography of  each author (maximum of 800 characters).

    To know more: www.cidadescriativas2017.com.
     
  • CFP: Border Regimes: Confrontations, Configurations, Transpositions (Kandersteg, 4-9 Sep 16)

    Kandersteg | Dates: 28 Apr – 20 May, 2016
    Kandersteg (CH), Seminarhotel Alpha Soleil, September 4 - 09, 2016
    Deadline: May 20, 2016

    Border Regimes: Confrontations, Configurations, Transpositions

    The notion of the border as a clear cut geopolitical division of national territories has been challenged for quite some time in multiple disciplines, including history, art history, literature, philosophy, anthropology, and cultural theory engaged in the field of postcolonial studies. Even though state borders prove effective in terms of inclusion and exclusion, they can never be reduced to one single meaning.

    The transposition of persons, commodities, materialities, and imaginaries involved in border regimes both reflects and affects the transpositioning nature of borders. Such a dynamic and fluid notion of the border shifts our focus beyond geopolitical landscapes with its fences of death, barbed wire, walls, mountains or swamps, towards a more complex notion of border regimes. This implies all sorts of triages of socio-cultural inclusion and exclusion (such as those found within financial markets, art markets, schools, and health check centers), but also the connecting, collaborative, and creative aspects of “contact zones” (Pratt), “-scapes” (Appadurai), “trading zones” 
    (Galison) or interstitial “third spaces” (Bhabha, Soja). Although never free from confrontations, the border can be seen as “not that at which something stops but […] from which something begins its presencing” 
    (Heidegger). Moreover, it generally complicates dichotomies between natural/real/factual and conceptual/imaginary/fictional borders, those inside our heads and those outside. Borders are always to be understood as highly complex configurations of difference and identity, inside and outside, inclusion and exclusion, diachrony and synchrony, imagination and its real effects. The analysis of border regimes, therefore, requires a plurality of methodological approaches as well as an inter- and transdisciplinary dialogue.

    The Summer School invites doctoral and postdoctoral scholars from all disciplines of the Humanities and the Social Sciences to contribute to a critical interdisciplinary discussion on borders and analogous concepts. It addresses the following questions:

    - What are the idiosyncrasies, constitutive elements and specific discursive, socio-cultural or political conditions of borderlands, borderscapes, contact zones, liminal spaces, margins etc.? Which institutions, agents or actants are involved?

    - What are the impacts of knowledge transfer, the circulation and flows of persons, objects, images, and information on the transpositioning of borders, whether physical or imaginary?

    - In which ways can ‘border thinking’ or ‘border knowledge’ (Mignolo) inform us about our own disciplinary positions when analysing border regimes? What are the consequences of the claim that we tend to invoke/produce the borders we describe (Mezzadra/Neilson)?

    Keynote speakers and possible foci of their lecture:

    Mary C. Fuller
    (Head of the Literature Section, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
    MIT)
    Early modern European and North American literature and culture, history of early modern voyages, exploration and colonization, cultural encounters, cartographies

    Monica Juneja
    (HCTS Professor “Global Art History”, Universität Heidelberg) Global art history, transcultural visuality, cultural translation, transcending boundaries

    Sandro Mezzadra
    (Associate Professor, Department of Political and Social Sciences, Università di Bologna) Political philosophy, colonial and postcolonial studies, frontiers of citizenship, border struggles, inclusion and exclusion, global governance, transit labour

    Bernhard Siegert
    (Gerd-Bucerius-Professor für Geschichte und Theorie der Kulturtechniken, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar) Media philosophy, comparative visual and cultural theory, medial and cultural triages (grids, filters, doors, passages)

    Please provide us with the following application material:
    - a letter of motivation, indicating how you expect to benefit from participating in this Summer School and how you can contribute, in turn, to the discussions (mentioning your specific interest in the
    topic)
    - a CV of max. two pages
    - an abstract (500 words) of your current research project
    - one referee we might contact

    Please apply electronically (PDF) to Melanie Altanian who is happy to answer questions regarding the application: 
    melanie.altanian@wbkolleg.unibe.ch. For further questions please contact michael.toggweiler@wbkolleg.unibe.ch.

    The full CfP (PDF) can also be found on our website: 
    http://www.wbkolleg.unibe.ch/e277930/e379838/e425334/CfA_GSH_SummerSchool_2016_BorderRegimes_ger.pdf
  • Big Ben Bash at the Drake Hotel

    Chicago | Dates: 15 May, 2016
    Historic Chicago architect Benjamin Marshall, who created E. Lake Shore Dr. and The Drake Hotel, will be feted at “The Big Ben Bash,” hosted by The Benjamin Marshall Society. Festivities take place Sunday, May 15, from 5pm to 8pm at The Drake Hotel, 140 E. Walton Place, in Chicago. 

    The dual celebration salutes the 95th Anniversary of The Drake Hotel and the just-published, first-ever book on legendary Benjamin H. Marshall-Chicago Architect. The four-color, tabletop book of Marshall’s incredible work was a key mission of The Benjamin Marshall Society. (Author signings of the book will be available at the party). 
    The renowned Stanley Paul and his musicians will provide dancing and festive music in the Gold Coast Room. 

    A VIP Champagne party is offered pre-event for Marshall connoisseurs from 4pm to 5pm in The Drake Room. Guests are guaranteed a copy of the Benjamin Marshall book, included in ticket price, plus a chance to meet the family of Benjamin Marshall (who will autograph your book). Admission to the 5pm to 8pm celebration is also included. 

    Benjamin Marshall was a celebrity in his heyday, renowned for his extravagant Gatsby-like parties (filled with Hollywood celebrities, and even the Prince of Wales) at his Shangri-La studio and home on Lake Michigan in Wilmette. His compelling architectural style joined classic tradition with modern 21st century. Marshall created a new landscape of living.

    Several Benjamin Marshall buildings have 100th anniversaries this year--the South Shore Country Club (now South Shore Cultural Center), the Polish Consulate at 1530 N. Lake Shore Dr. plus the Edgewater Beach Hotel (formerly on Lake Shore Dr.)  The South Shore Cultural Center features original Benjamin Marshall buildings from 1909 to 1916 and later. (The original 1906 building was demolished).

    Those interested in Chicago history, Benjamin Marshall designs, discovering cultural gems, or catching up with friends, are invited to join in the fun at The Big Ben Bash. 
    Ticket price is $80 for the Sunday, May 15, 5pm – 8 pm party in the Gold Coast room, including wine and hors d’oeuvres, plus live music by Stanley Paul and his musicians.  For an added experience, there is a $250 VIP ticket, including above, plus a 4pm-5pm pre-event private Champagne party. The Champagne event includes hors d’oeuvres, an autographed copy of the Benjamin H. Marshall—Chicago Architect book and a chance to meet Benjamin Marshall’s relatives (and have your book autographed).

    Books will be available for sale at the event. The limited print run cannot be reprinted and only 1,000 books exist. Sale price is $45.

    Net proceeds from the event benefit the Benjamin Marshall Society, a 501c3 charity, whose mission is to educate the public on the life and works of Benjamin Marshall and to revive the discussion on the civic responsibility of the urban architect and the role of architecture, planning and design in the urban environment and in society as a whole.
  • Architect Tom Kubala Presents the FLW Alfred Adelman House Restoration

    Rockford | Dates: 23 – 23 Apr, 2016
    Architectural lecture followed by appetizers and an optional tour of the Frank Lloyd Wright Laurent House.
  • Digital Open Source Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage

    Evora | Dates: 04 – 15 Jul, 2016
    The registration for the participation in the two courses in the area of Open Source Digital Technologies applied to Cultural Heritage opened on April 4. I. 2D documentation Methodologies with Management through GIS II. Methodologies of 3D Documentation The two courses will have both theoretical and practical classes and are preferentially oriented towards students and professionals with training in the fields of Archaeology, History, Architecture, Art History, Museology, Conservation and Restoration, and Multimedia, as well as experts who are involved in Digital Technologies applied to Cultural Heritage. From a transdisciplinary point of view, the training aims to combine the knowledge of the material culture of our past with technology and innovation. The courses are designed to introduce the participants to the concepts of Open Source and to acquaint them with the use of open source software as a resource for documentation, dissemination and exploitation of Cultural Heritage. Each course lasts 5 days (40h), an intensive week on which the trainees will learn to master the initial concepts, working directly with several software and in case studies. At the end, the trainees should be able to start their own projects and master the concepts that will enable them to develop knowledge in this area.
  • EAHN

    Dublin | Dates: 02 – 04 Jun, 2016
    Twenty-five sessions and roundtables, key note addresses by Jean-Louis Cohen, Roger Stalley, and Sibel Bozdogan, plus a full program of tours and receptions.
  • History of Color in Architectural Drawing

    Paris | Dates: 11 – 11 May, 2016
    Basile Baudez (Paris-Sorbonne University), Histoire de la couleur dans le dessin d’architecture, XVIe–XIXe siècles / History of Color in Architectural Drawing, 16th–19th Centuries Public Lecture Centre André Chastel Wednesday, 11 May 2016, 6:30–8:00pm, Galerie Colbert, 2 rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris, salle Ingres (2nd floor).
  • Fulbright Scholar Program: Opportunities in the Fine Arts

    Dates: 13 Apr – 01 Aug, 2016
    The Fulbright Scholar Program offers teaching, research or combination teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty, administrators as well as for professionals, artists, journalists, scientists, lawyers, independent scholars and many others.  
     
    This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 65 awards in the field of Art, including all specializations: Architecture, Art History, Dance, Drama/Theater, Film Studies, Music, as well as the Visual and Performing Arts. Opportunities include:
     
    Canada: Research Chairs in Arts and Humanities
    China or Europe: Fulbright-Terra Foundation Award in the History of American Art
    Egypt: Visual and Performing Arts
    Guinea: Open to All Disciplines, with a preference for scholars in the Visual Arts and Dance
    Nepal: All Disciplines
     
    For additional awards in the field of Art, please visit our discipline highlights webpage. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in the Arts, as well as scholar testimonials which highlight the outcomes and benefits associated with completing a Fulbright Scholar grant.
     
    For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link: http://cies.org/program/core-fulbright-us-scholar-program. You may also wish to register for one of our webinars or join our mailing list, My Fulbright, a resource for applicants interested in receiving program updates and application tips. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.

    Please contact Beth Anderson at BAnderson@iie.org or reach any of our regional program staff for more information. We are happy to answer any questions you may have on applying.
     
    The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world.
     
  • LOST AND TRANSFORMED CITIES: A digital perspective

    Lisbon | Dates: 12 Apr – 30 Jun, 2016
    LOST AND TRANSFORMED CITIES: A digital perspective International Conference, November 17-18, 2016 Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Nova University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal The city is by definition a living entity. It translates itself into a collectiveness of individuals who share and act on a material, social and cultural setting. Its history is one of dreams, achievements and loss. As such, it also bears a history of identity. To know the history of cities is to understand our own place in the contemporaneity. The past is always seen through the eyes of the present and can only be understood as such. Time erases memory through development and disaster. Cities can simply disappear because they lost their status in society, suffered severe catastrophes or transformed themselves so radically that their history is no longer materially traceable. They can also exemplary absorb the built and cultural heritage through rehabilitation and re-use. Archaeologists, historians, art historians, geographers, anthropologists and sociologists try to decipher and interpret a diverse but comparable amount of data in order to translate remote realities into a contemporaneous discourse. The more interconnected the research is the more efficient it becomes. Digital technology is playing a major role in the study of the city and the preservation of its built and cultural heritage. It allows the collecting, processing and testing of an extensive amount of data in a swift and proficient manner. It also enables interdisciplinary research teams to work collaboratively, often in real time. Digital technology applied to the study of cities and their cultural heritage not only widens the scope of the research, but also allows its dissemination in an interactive fashion to an extensive and diverse audience. Through the intersection of digital technology with historical practice it is possible to convey a perspective of the past as a sensorial-perceptive reality. The resulting knowledge furthers the understanding of the present-day city and the planning of the city of the future. Cities in the digital realm are, therefore, presented in their historical continuum, in their comprehensive and complex reality and are opened to interaction in a contemporary social context. On the occasion of the 261st anniversary of the 1755 earthquake in Lisbon, we invite scholars and experts in the fields of heritage studies, digital humanities, history, history of art and information technology to share and debate their experience and knowledge on digital heritage. We aim for an integrative perspective of the study of lost or transformed urban realities stressing its multidisciplinary character and the impact of the digital in this equation. We especially welcome papers that address (but are not necessarily limited to) the following topics: The historic city from 2D to virtual and augmented reality; Cities as virtual museums; Cities, tourism and digital heritage; Digital Heritage: methodological and epistemological challenges; The contemporary city and digital citizenship. Abstracts: Paper title, abstract (maximum 350 words), 5 keywords, author(s), affiliation (s). Length: 350 words Language of submission: English Abstracts Submission limit: only 1 paper submission per author. Deadline: June 30, 2016 Notification of acceptance: July 31, 2016 Submission link: lostcitiesconference@gmail.com
  • CFP: Theory’s history (Brussels 9-10 February 2017)

    Brussels | Dates: 12 Apr – 15 Jun, 2016
    In recent international literature addressing the history of 20th century architectural theory, the year 1968 is indicated as a decisive moment, giving rise to a ‘new’ architectural theory. From that moment onwards, emphasis was no longer placed on the aesthetics of architecture, but on its critical potential. Yet, according to some scholars, this intensification of theory was short-lived. A presence of coexisting and even contradictory paradigms derived from very different epistemic domains (anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, social sciences, etc.) led to a setback of theory, resulting in an end-of-theory atmosphere in the 1990s. It is not a coincidence that the so called death of architectural theory concurred with the upsurge of anthologies on architectural theory that collect and classify referential texts. Instead of burying theory, these anthologies had an additional effect, namely to institutionalise it. In other words, they offered both closure to a past period and also defined the locus of a next period of theorisation, invoking a ‘historical turn’. At the same time architectural discourses, and especially architectural historiography, were engaging with new theoretical fields such as gender studies or postcolonial studies, giving rise to a continued production of theoretically informed books and articles. The goal of this conference is to discuss the methodological challenges that come along with this historical gaze towards theory, by focusing on the concrete processes in which knowledge is involved. By screening the unspoken rules of engagement that the accounts of post-war architectural theory have agreed to and distributed, we want to point at dominant assumptions, biases and absences. While anthologies inevitably narrate history with rough meshes, we believe it is time to search for those versions of theory formation that have slipped through these nets of historiography, in order to question the nature of theory and the challenges it poses to historians. How do you do historical research on something as intangible as theory, or in a broadened sense, the knowledge of architecture? We are in other words not only interested in what theorists and practicing architects were arguing for, but also how, why and where they did so. Looking at case-studies, the singular and ‘minor’ expressions of theory, the local discourses and the different formative contexts (e.g. education, publication culture) can be subjected to careful scrutiny. We particularly welcome case-studies from the 1960s to the 1990s that deal with one or more topics formulated in the full CFP: A) the Place of Knowledge 1. Theory’s Geography 2. The Expressions of Knowledge 3. The Agendas of Theory B) the Figure of Knowledge 1. Minor Historiography 2. The Making of the Architectural Theorist C) the Time of Knowledge 1. Problems of Periodization 2. Architectural Theory and Postmodernity 3. Problems of Historical Distance Practical information Please visit our website for up to date information: http://architecture.kuleuven.be/theoryshistory/index.html This two-day conference will be held in Brussels on Thursday and Friday 9th - 10th February 2017. The conference aims to bring together both young and established scholars from every discipline that is able to engage with the topics outlined above. Confirmed keynotes are Joan Ockman, Ákos Moravánszky and Łukasz Stanek. We’re happy to receive abstracts of up to 300 words until the 15th of June, 2016. Information on how to submit is provided on our website. Abstracts will be anonymously reviewed by an international scientific committee. Authors will be notified of acceptance on the 15th of July 2016. In order to provide a solid conference, we expect full papers one month in advance of the conference, i.e. 1st of January, 2017. Please note that there will be a conference fee for participants of maximum €150 and a reduced price for students. For any other questions, please contact theoryshistory@kuleuven.be Organising committee: Hilde Heynen Yves Schoonjans Rajesh Heynickx Maarten Delbeke Ricardo Agarez Elke Couchez Sebastiaan Loosen (KU Leuven/UGent) Scientific committee: Hilde Heynen (chair, KU Leuven) Maarten Delbeke (UGent) Rajesh Heynickx (KU Leuven) Yves Schoonjans (KU Leuven) Joan Ockman (University of Pennsylvania) Ákos Moravánszky (ETH Zürich) Łukasz Stanek (University of Manchester) Teresa Stoppani (Leeds Beckett University) Hélène Jannière (Université Rennes 2) K. Michael Hays (Harvard) (TBC)
  • Residential Fellowships in Architecture

    Bogliasco, Genoa | Dates: 08 – 15 Apr, 2016
    The Bogliasco Foundation, located in a small coastal town near Genoa,Italy, provides one-month residencies for gifted individuals working on projects in all the disciplines of the arts and humanities, and encourages cross-pollination in a diverse community comprised of some of the world's most innovative minds. Applications for the next deadline - April 15th, 2016 - can be submitted online at the Foundation's website. The Foundation is actively searching to increase representation in architecture.
  • Putting Preservation on the Road: Protecting Our Overlooked Automotive Heritage in the Twenty-first Century

    Allentown | Dates: 20 – 22 Oct, 2016
    For much of the twentieth century, heritage preservation primarily focused on immovable objects (i.e., 1906 Antiquities Act in the United States, 1919 Historic Sites and Monuments Board in Canada, etc.). While some countries have studied and documented vehicles for preservation and/or conservation, their official recognition as landmarks or listing on registers of official distinction has rarely happened. Individual automotive vehicles are not listed as contributing elements – only immovable buildings and sites. The newly created National Historic Vehicle Register (NHVR), is now being used as a tool to carefully and accurately document the most historically significant automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, and commercial vehicles, as well as recognize the dynamic relationship among people, culture, and transportation needs. Suggested presentation topics may include, but are not limited to: • Case studies of regional and local automotive culture and heritage, including those viewed through the lens of ethnic/regional studies (American studies, Canadian studies, material culture studies, studies of nomadic peoples, etc.) • Automotive design as an extension of the built environment design professions, such as architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, and planning. • Considering if there is a world automotive heritage, and whether UNESCO or ICOMOS should be encouraged to get involved, and the role of FIVA (Fédération Internationale des Véhicules Anciens) as part of this. • Innovative ways to add the preservation of automotive heritage to the educational curriculum within colleges/universities, high schools, and technology schools. • Using HAER/HABS techniques for studying and documenting historic vehicles as artifacts, as well as exploring innovative techniques and tools through the use of new technologies • Reevaluating listed historic places and sites, as well as considering new places where buildings and landscapes (etc.) are tied with vehicles and people, in a more comprehensive designation that ties together the NHVR and NRHP, where both building/structure and car/vehicle elements are equally contributing. The program committee invites proposals from people of all backgrounds and professions to participate – from senior professionals to students with innovative ideas – for the following: 1. Papers Sessions: We prefer to receive proposals for complete three to four paper sessions but will consider individual presentations as well. You are welcome to include a chair and/or moderator or the conference committee will appoint a chair. The entire panel presentation should span no more than 60 minutes. 2. Individual Papers: If accepted, we will place your individual presentation in session selected by the committee. Paper presentations should span no more than 20 minutes. 3. Roundtables: Discussions facilitated by a moderator with three to five participants about a historical or professional topic or issue. Roundtables should span no more than 60 minutes. 4. Workshops/Demonstrations: Interactive presentations led by facilitators to encourage learning about a professional topic or issue. Workshops/demonstrations should span no more than 60 minutes. 5. Posters/Short Film: Interactive presentations produced and facilitated to encourage learning about a professional topic or issue. Poster presentations and short films should span no more than 10 minutes. Please submit proposals of no more than 300 words and a brief CV/resume (two pages maximum) in a PDF or MS Word format to Barry L. Stiefel at stiefelb@cofc.edu. Deadline for proposals is May 15, 2016. Proposals should include the name(s) of presenters, affiliation/position and contact information. The official language of the conference will be English. Decisions on proposals for the conference will be made by June 1, 2016. Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume. For participants traveling more than 100 miles to Allentown, Pennsylvania (50 miles for students), assistance with travel and accommodations for the conference will be considered. Please submit a travel budget along with your proposal, as well as a summary of what if any additional support you anticipate receiving. Registration fees will come with a one-year membership with the HVA. More details can be found at https://www.historicvehicle.org/putting-preservation-on-the-road/
  • INTERNATIONAL PRIZE FOR SCHOLARLY WORKS IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART AND ARCHITECTURE «L'ERMA» di BRETSCHNEIDER.

    Rome | Dates: 05 Apr – 15 Jun, 2016
    First edition of the International “L’ERMA C” Prize, aiming to publish an original manuscript produced by a young scholar.
  • Picturing Policy: How Visual Culture Shapes the Urban Built Environment

    Philadelphia | Dates: 14 – 15 Apr, 2016
    Images play a critical role in shaping perceptions of what cities are, have been, and should be. Documentary images, in particular, have both influenced and reflected the implementation of urban policy. In the Progressive Era, for example, Jacob Riis’s lantern slides stimulated tenement reform in New York City. In the 1930s, Farm Security Administration photographs helped justify New Deal policies. In the post-World War II decades, government-sponsored images spurred urban renewal at the local level. Images from the past also drove postwar historic preservation decisions about how to restore selected properties to mimic earlier eras. In the 1960s and ‘70s, photographs of despoiled natural environments helped instigate passage of federal policies like the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA). Moreover, across time, images of natural disasters—from San Francisco to New Orleans—have shaped local decisions about what, where, and how to rebuild. This two-day symposium explores the relationship between images—especially photographs—and the urban built environment. Through presentation and conversation among an interdisciplinary group of image makers and scholars, we will consider the often silent ways that visual representations have helped structure the policies and practices of urban life. The symposium begins with a keynote lecture by Anne Whiston Spirn, on the evening of Thursday, April 14. Friday, April 15, consists of a series of panels and concludes with a talk by photographer Nancy Davenport. This event is organized by Francesca Russello Ammon and the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at PennDesign. The symposium is free and open to the public. For the full program, and to register, please see: https://www.design.upenn.edu/historic-preservation/events/symposium-picturing-policy. [Please do not include my email address or phone number in this posting. It would be helpful if you could include the symposium website, though. Thank you!]
  • Architecture, Media, Politics, Society

    London | Dates: 04 Apr – 01 Jun, 2016
    Journal themes revolve around the relationship of architecture and the built environment with questions of the politics, media and society. Multidisciplinary papers are welcomed as particularly pertinent to the journal’s diverse perspective. Areas of interest include (but are not restricted to): architecture, urbanism, regeneration, new technologies, heritage, cultural and political identity, socio-cultural symbolism, mediated representation and environments. Historical papers should seek to draw contemporary issues into their debates. 

    The journal publishes two volumes per year. Each volume is contains four issues. Individual issues are published on the first day of each month during the publication cycle. 

    Articles submitted for peer review should be between 5,000 – 7,000 words in length.

    You should also submit a full CV and a 300 word abstract.

    For complete submission instructions visit: http://architecturemps.com/submissions/
    Abstracts and works in progress can be submitted for preliminary consideration.
  • The RIBA President's Awards for Research 2016

    London | Dates: 02 Apr – 30 Jun, 2016
    The RIBA is now welcoming entries for the 2016 RIBA President’s Awards for Research, which includes the RIBA President’s Medal for Research. The RIBA President’s Awards for Research promote and celebrate the best of research in the field of architecture and the built environment that contributes to new knowledge and understanding of architecture and the practice of architecture. All those conducting architectural and built environment research related to architecture and the practice of architecture are eligible to enter the RIBA President’s Awards for Research. The Awards are for the research completed between 1st July 2015 to 30th June 2016 Submissions are welcome at any level of architectural research, and should be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. Submissions are invited from historians, theorists and practitioners whose work has relevance to the history and theory of the practice, culture and profession of architecture most broadly conceived. This can include but is by no means limited to: • Historical research of direct relevance to a project, e.g. conservation plans and reports • Cultural studies relating to architecture, professionalism and the built environment • Histories of construction, science and technology • Historical and/or theoretical research on place, space and urban planning • History and/or theory of practice and praxis, including professionalism, architectural education, procurement and non-design aspects of architectural practice Please not there is no regional restriction for potential entrants.
  • A tour of Silsbee in Polo: A Chicago Architect in a Prairie Town

    Polo | Dates: 17 – 17 Apr, 2016
    Program includes an interior tour of the Bryant & Lucy Barber House, designed by J.L. silsbee in 1901. the tour will also include an interior tour of another historic home and a short walking tour to see other nearby Silsbee structures as well as many of Polo's remarkable landmarks. April 17, 2016, 1:30-3:00PM; Tickes are $30, $25 for Pleasant Home members.
  • CFP: 2nd MoMoWo International Conference-Workshop (Ljubljana, 3-5 Oct 16)

    Ljubljana | Dates: 03 – 05 Oct, 2016
    For its second historical conference-workshop to be held in Ljubljana, Slovenia, between 3rd-5th October 2016 project Women’s Creativity since the Modern Movement - MoMoWo welcomes papers addressing themes and subjects regarding activities and lives of women designers, architects and civil engineers between 1946 and 1968. The historical conference-workshop will provide the opportunity to share and discuss the professional experiences of European women active within various fields of design. The workshop is addressed to both, scholars and students. SUBMISSION DEADLINES: Deadline for submission of abstracts (in English, 300 words max.): 15th April 2016. Deadline for submission of articles (in English, 5000 words max.): 15th September 2016.
  • Art Historical / Archaeological Study Tours to Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Sicily, and Greece

    Dates: 15 May – 30 Oct, 2016
    Opportunity - Archaeological / Art Historical Study Tours to Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Sicily, and Greece Dear All, I am wondering if it wold be possible for you to forward the links to the three different study tours I am leading this year. They are wonderful opportunities to see amazing places in very little time. Anyone can sign up for these, and there is room left in all three trips, whose content should appeal to your members. They cater to the intellectually curious traveler. Their itineraries are rigorous and very much focused on art history, architecture, and archaeology rather than leisure, although there is sometimes enough time for that as well. I greatly appreciate it. Thank you. Dr. Veronica Kalas, PhD vkalas@yahoo.com http://mideasttrvl.com/gems-of-the-trans-caucasus-armenia-georgia-azerbaijan/ https://www.andantetravels.co.uk/tour/899/Italy/Sicily-Art--History.html http://archaeologicaltrs.com/product/classical-greece/
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