Recent Opportunities

  • Wright on the Park: Saving the City National Bank and Hotel

    Minneapolis | Dates: 13 Jun, 2015

    This year the MNSAH Spring Tour is a two-part event, right here in the Twin Cities. To start, we will tell the story of the efforts to save and restore Frank Lloyd Wright’s National City Bank and Hotel in Mason City, Iowa. MNSAH members Jane King Hession and Bill Olexy produced a documentary that describes the story of one of Wright’s most distinctive commissions, the efforts by the community to save it, and the 21st century restoration of the last remaining hotel by America’s foremost architect. Jane and Bill will discuss the creation of the documentary and we will then view the video.

    The presentation will be followed by a tour of Redeemer Missionary Baptist Church, originally known as Stewart Memorial Presbyterian. The church was designed by William Gray Purcell and George Feick. Completed just before Wright’s National City Bank and Hotel, the church provides an ideal Prairie style setting for MNSAH’s event.

    Where: Redeemer Missionary Baptist Church, 116 East 32nd Street, Minneapolis, MN.

    Park on the street or in the lot on the north side of the church, which may be accessed from the alley along the west side of the church off 32nd Street. 

  • Young Architects Program (YAP) 2015

    New York | Dates: 24 Jun – 05 Sep, 2015

    This exhibition features the five finalists’ proposals from the MoMA/MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), and the five finalists from each of our affiliated programs—in Rome at the National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI), in Santiago, Chile (CONSTRUCTO), in Istanbul, Turkey (Istanbul Modern) and in Seoul, Korea (MMCA). Now in its 16th edition, the Young Architects Program at MoMA PS1 offers emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present creative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop highly innovative designs for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling. The winning designs by Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (New York, NY) in Long Island City; CORTE (Rome, Italy) in Rome; PATTU (Istanbul, Turkey) in Istanbul; and Society of Architecture (Seoul, Korea) in Seoul will be on view throughout the summer in the courtyards of the respective museums, and in Santiago, Chile, from March through May 2016.

    OTHER VENUES AND DATES

    CONSTRUCTO, Santiago, Chile
    March 5–May 2016

    MAXXI, Rome, Italy
    June 26–September 21, 2015

    Istanbul Modern, Istanbul, Turkey
    June 10–November 15, 2015

    MMCA, Seoul, Korea
    July 1–September 30, 2015

  • Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

    New York | Dates: 27 Jun, 2015 – 06 Mar, 2016
    Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian-Hungarian-born artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's 15-year project a reference point for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange across generations and disciplines.
  • Landmark Legacy

    New York | Dates: 31 May, 2015

    Explore the exhibition Saving Place: Fifty Years of New York City Landmarks and discover the role of the Landmarks Law in preserving many of the city’s famous buildings and neighborhoods. Choose your favorite New York landmark and create a model of it. Then make a label for your landmark that explains when the building was built, when it was landmarked, and why it is architecturally or historically important.

    Family Programs are geared to families with children ages 6-12 years old.

  • The Reach of the Landmarks Law: A Balancing Act

    New York | Dates: 18 Jun, 2015

    When New York's landmarks law took effect 50 years ago, it forever changed the course of the city's history. But has its proponents' full vision been realized this past half century? In some cases, the law may have in fact been surpassed by newer legislation in other cities. Could ours be strengthened, or are additional preservation tools needed to complement the law? At this panel, preservation experts will discuss these and other questions exploring the possibilities, limitations, and challenges of the landmarks law. This program delves into the themes of our exhibition Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks

    Reception to follow!

    Alison G. Greenberg, Partner, Calcagni & Kanefsky
    Paul W. Edmondson, Chief Legal Officer/General Counsel, National Trust for Historic Preservation
    Leonard Koerner, Chief Assistant Corporation Counsel, NYC Law Department, Office of the Corporation 
    Michael T. Sillerman, Partner, Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel
    Meredith J. Kane (moderator), Partner at Paul Weiss 

  • Preserving the Fabric of Our Neighborhoods

    New York | Dates: 26 May, 2015

    Mayor Bill de Blasio has chosen to make affordable housing one of his administration’s chief policy initiatives. “As we invest in more affordable housing,” he said, “we will also work with communities to preserve the fabric of our neighborhoods and invest in things that great neighborhoods need.” Join a group of leading experts as they explore the intersections between historic preservation and affordable housing, portraying how preservation encourages sustainable development and helps to stabilize communities facing financial distress. This program accompanies the City Museum’s exhibition Saving Place: 50 years of New York City Landmarks, on view from April 21 through September 13, 2015.

    Reception to follow!

    Gale Brewer, Borough President of Manhattan
    Ingrid Gould Ellen, Paulette Goddard Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, Director of the Urban Planning Program at NYU Wagner
    Ellen Baxter, Executive Director of Broadway Housing Communities
    Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of Fifth Avenue Committee 
    Simeon Bankoff (moderator), Executive Director, Historic Districts Council

  • Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks

    New York | Dates: 15 May – 13 Sep, 2015
    Exhibition celebrating the 50th anniversary of the New york City landmarks law at the Museum of the City of New York through September 13, 2015. Co-curated by Andrew S. Dolkart and Donald Albrecht.
  • Turner Prize 2015 Exhibition

    Glasgow | Dates: 01 Oct, 2015 – 17 Jan, 2016

    Arguably Europe's most prestigious visual art award is coming to Tramway and Scotland for the first time this Autumn.

    The Turner Prize is awarded to a British artist under the age of 50 for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of their work in the preceding year.  The Turner Prize award is £40,000 with £25,000 going to the winner and £5,000 each for the other shorlisted artists.

    The four shortlisted artists for Turner Prize 2015 are:

    Assemble
    Bonnie Camplin
    Janice Kerbel
    Nicole Wermers​

    ​​​​​​​Join in with the discussion on Twitter using #TurnerPrize​

    In addition to the exhibition, there will be an extensive programme of workshops, talks, tours and activites for people of all ages to get involved and be inspired by the creativity on show. 

    This year's Turner Prize Jury are:

    - Mr Alistair Hudson, Director, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art
    - Jan Verwoert, Critic and Curator
    - Ms Joanna Mytkowska, Director, Warsaw Museum of Modern Art
    - Ms Kyla McDonald, Artistic Director, Glasgow Sculpture Studios

    The Jury is chaired by Dr Penelope Curtis, Director of Tate Britain.​​​

  • Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library Modernization

    Washington | Dates: 18 Jun, 2015

    The DC Public Library has hired the award-winning architect team of D.C.-based Martinez & Johnson and the Dutch firm Mecanoo Architecten to design the modernization of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library. The team will present preliminary renderings of plans to transform this historic Ludwig Mies van der Rohe building into an amazing center for education, entrepreneurship and entertainment for the residents of the District of Columbia. Learn more about the plans at dclibrary.org/mlkfuture.

    1.0 LU HSW (AIA) .
    Free. Pre-registration required.

  • Film Screening: Take Shelter

    Silver Spring | Dates: 16 May, 2015

    “[A] frightening thriller based not on special effects gimmicks but on a dread that seems quietly spreading in the land…” — Roger Ebert

    “…Nichols has a genius for making landscapes and everyday objects resonate like crazy, for nailing the texture of dread.” — David Edelstein, New York Magazine

    Arkansas-native Jeff Nichols (MUD, SHOTGUN STORIES) directs this exquisite study in the unsettling power of fear. A working class Ohio father (Michael Shannon) grows increasingly anxious about the safety of his wife (Jessica Chastain) and deaf daughter (Tova Stewart) as his grasp on reality breaks down. Terrifying visions compel him to take actions that put family and friends at risk, in this slow-to-unwind but impossible to shake parable about the instability of modern life.

    DIR/SCR Jeff Nichols; PROD Sophia Lin, Tyler Davidson. US, 2011, color, 121 min. RATED R

    Show times subject to change. Go to AFI.com/Silver  to view the complete schedule.

    Co-presented by the AFI Silver Theatre and the National Building Museum. Special thanks to the AFI Silver Theatre for its collaboration, including director of programming Todd Hitchcock, and associate programmer Josh Gardner. For more information visit AFI.com/Silver.

    Ticket Information:

    Tickets may be purchased online at AFI.com/Silver or at the AFI box office, located at 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, Maryland (opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day). Please note that tickets are not available for purchase through the National Building Museum. Metro: Red Line to Silver Spring.

    $8.50 AFI and NBM members | $12 General Admission | $10 Seniors (65+), Students (with valid ID), and Military | $7 Children (12 and under).

    AFI Members who show their membership card will receive the member rate to National Building Museum exhibitions, including "Designing for Disaster".

    Date: Saturday, May 16, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    This event does not require an RSVP. Registered users can request event reminders.
    Register

  • Scaling Washington

    Washington | Dates: 21 Mar, 2015 – 03 Jan, 2016

    "Winterbottom smartly turns to time-lapse photography, packaged in a high-quality video format, to show how light travels through the cathedral’s stained-glass windows and across its neutral stone walls—a journey as slow as flowing lava and as mesmerizing as a kaleidoscope." - Washington City Paper

    Scaling Washington, photographer Colin Winterbottom's debut museum exhibition, features stunning large-scale images of the post-earthquake restoration of the Washington Monument and Washington National Cathedral. Winterbottom's images highlight the technical insights shared by the engineers and architects central to the restorations, giving visitors new perspectives on these symbolic icons.

    Over twenty years ago, Winterbottom began taking dramatic, highly textured photographs of Washington, D.C.'s many architectural masterpieces. Always determined to create imagery unlike any he'd seen before, he quickly recognized the power of scaffolding to provide up-close—and high altitude—access to these historic structures. 

    As sole photographer for restoration efforts at the Washington Monument and National Cathedral following the August 2011 earthquake that shook the nation's capital, Winterbottom blends documentation with artistic expressions, crafting photographs that share his unusual access to remarkable, fleeting vantage points.

    Composed in close proximity to generally inaccessible parts of these two landmarks, many of the photographs provide sensitive appreciation of their beauty and fragility. Surprisingly, they also transform scaffolding from an industrial workhorse to rhythmically compelling geometry that complements the historic structures they seem to engulf. 

    In Winterbottom's own words: "I took very seriously my obligations to bring the viewer with me to those narrow, scaffolded platforms and show them what that was like. The series is a mix of fine art, documentary and technical photographs; I hope that chorus helps viewers experience these events on several levels."

  • HOT TO COLD: an odyssey of architectural adaptation

    Washington | Dates: 24 Jan – 30 Aug, 2015

    "HOT TO COLD is obligatory for anyone who cares about architecture and museums."—The Washington Post

    On the heels of its summer blockbuster BIG Maze, the international design firm BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) returns to the National Building Museum with a behind-the-scenes look at its creative process. The exhibition, HOT TO COLD: an odyssey of architectural adaptation, takes visitors from the hottest to the coldest parts of our planet and explores how BIG's design solutions are shaped by their cultural and climatic contexts. More than 60 three-dimensional models will be suspended at the second-floor balconies of the Museum's historic Great Hall in an unprecedented use of this public space.

    Founded in 2005 by Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, BIG has taken the world by storm with its seductive, sustainable, and community-driven designs. Ingels, named by WSJ Magazine in 2011 as Innovator of the Year in Architecture, has coined the phrase "hedonistic sustainability" to reflect his philosophy that environmentally responsible buildings and neighborhoods need not be defined by pain and sacrifice. Ingels says that architecture is not just about decorating a box, but also about reconfiguring things for the better. He explains, "If we're extremely successful we can maybe build 50 structures in our life span. But if we can make something that inspires others, it might be the beginning of a new species that can evolve and migrate, and we can make a much more substantial impact on the world we play a role in creating."

    BIG's projects are currently taking shape from Copenhagen to Manhattan, from Shenzhen to Paris, and soon in Calgary and Vancouver. Now, with a major part of the practice located in New York—and a major stake in Washington, D.C.'s infrastructure as the designer of a $2 billion National Mall and Smithsonian refurbishment—a BIG influence on American architecture and urbanism has begun.

    HOT TO COLD premieres 20 of the studio's latest projects, interpreted through Iwan Baan's masterful photography of BIG's built work, films by Ila Bêka and Louise Lemoine, and the Grammy Award-winning graphic artist Stefan Sagmeister’s design for the accompanying catalog by Taschen.

    Start your visit on the ground floor, with a stop at the firm's enormous model for a new Danish LEGO museum made (made of LEGO bricks of course!). On the second floor, follow the path around the entire balcony to explore all the firm's projects, organized by hottest to the coldest parts of our planet and showcasing how BIG's solutions are shaped by cultural and climatic contexts.

    Read our complete staff-recommended walkthrough to get the most out of your vist.


  • Spring 2015 CityVision Final Presentation

    Washington | Dates: 15 May, 2015

    CityVision teaches the principles of city planning and architecture to show students that they can affect the world around them and enact positive change through good design. As students explore neighborhoods, brainstorm solutions, and accomplish projects together, they learn the importance of teamwork, creative problem solving, and advocacy skills.

    This spring, students from Burroughs Education Campus and Stuart-Hobson Middle School explored the area being developed over I-395 and proposed their designs to create an active community gathering spot. 

    Programs are free. No registration required. Reception to follow presentations. For more information, please contact Teen Programs at teenprograms@nbm.org or 202.272.2448.

    The National Building Museum’s teen programs are generously supported by The William Randolph Hearst Foundation; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; the D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities, an agency supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts; Hattie M. Strong Foundation; Clark Charitable Foundation; DAVIS Construction; McGraw Hill Financial; American Society of Interior Designers; The Butz Foundation; The Tower Companies; and an anonymous donor. Geppetto Catering, Inc. is the official Meal Provider for Teen Programs at the National Building Museum.

    Date: Friday, May 15, 2015 
    Time: 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM 

  • Spotlight on Design: Ehrlich Architects: The Evolution of Multicultural Modernism

    Washington | Dates: 02 Jun, 2015

    The work of Ehrlich Architects is guided by "multicultural modernism" - a humanistic approach that masterfully melds classic California Modernist styles with multicultural and vernacular design elements. Founding partner Steven EhrlichFAIA, will discuss the firm’s architectural evolution in light of their recent honor of the 2015 American Institute of Architect’s (AIA) Architecture Firm Award. Following the talk, he will sign copies of the firm’s latest book, Ehrlich Architects: Learning, Working, Living, published in July 2013.

    1.5 LU HSW (AIA) 

    $12 Members; $12 Students; $20 Non-members. Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability. 

  • Working with an Architect & Ask an Architect

    Chicago | Dates: 18 May, 2015

    Have you thought about exploring a “green” renovation or remodeling project on your bungalow, but don’t know where to begin? Hear from residential architectural specialists about choosing an architect, navigating zoning and permit regulations, and budgets and realistic payback periods for green items. Additional seminar topics include: defining the environmental goals for your vintage home, finding out what resources are available, and understanding the steps involved in design and construction. Following the session, attendees will have an opportunity to participate in a 15-minute one-on-one consultation with an architect.

    In partnership with the Historic Chicago Bungalow Association.  Please register here.

  • The New American Garden

    Washington | Dates: 17 Oct, 2015 – 03 Apr, 2016

    Wolfgang Oehme (1930-2011) and James van Sweden (1935-2013) revolutionized modern American landscape architecture. Rejecting the well-manicured but perpetually thirsty lawns that had become icons of 20th-century suburban neighborhoods and corporate campuses, Oehme and van Sweden instead used ornamental grasses and perennials to create living tapestries requiring relatively little maintenance. These self-sustaining, meadow-like landscapes exemplified what came to be known as the New American Garden.

    Founded in 1977 and based in Washington, D.C., the firm of Oehme, van Sweden & Associates went on to design projects for clients across the United States. Residential commissions ranged from urban townhouse gardens in D.C. and New York to expansive waterfront landscapes along the East Coast. The firm also completed high-profile designs for prominent corporate, institutional, and governmental clients including the Federal Reserve Bank in D.C., the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the New York Botanical Garden. Although Oehme and van Sweden are now deceased, the firm continues to operate under the next generation of leadership.

    This exhibition will include both contemporary and new photographs of key projects designed by Oehme, van Sweden & Associates over the past several decades, along with related drawings and artifacts from the firm’s practice. A highlight of the exhibition will be the presentation of original paintings and sculptures by prominent artists—such as Henry Moore—that strongly influenced Oehme and van Sweden’s design work. The result will be an unprecedented exploration of the broad arc of landscape design, from early inspirations to project execution to the continuous changes that all landscapes undergo over time.

  • Lasting Legacies: The Grandes Dames of McCormickville

    Chicago | Dates: 02 May – 21 Nov, 2015

    First and third Saturdays, May 2 through November 21
    10:30 a.m.
    $20 Adults, $30 with Museum Admission

    Historian Sally Sexton Kalmbach presents a new and unique walking tour illustrating seven civically minded entrepreneurial women who led fascinating lives in the prestigious neighborhood of McCormickville. Ms. Kalmbach will highlight the achievements of these remarkable society women which left a lasting imprint on the city of Chicago.

    Tour is 90 minutes and requires standing and walking. Rain or shine. Comfortable walking shoes are highly recommended. Please arrive at the Museum 15 minutes before the tour begins.

  • Terrific Tuesdays: Historically-Inspired Crafts for Kids, Ages 3-13

    Chicago | Dates: 16 Jun – 04 Aug, 2015

    Tuesdays June 16 - August 4, 2015
    10:00 - 11:00am
    $5 per child / $3 for Junior Members
    Reservations requested to 312-326-1480

    Come for a new adventure every week!  Learn about life in early Chicago and on Prairie Avenue while making craft projects inspired by area history.  Recommended for children ages 3 through 13; children must be accompanied by an adult.  Enter museum on 18th Street.

    June 16: Quilt Blocks

    Early Chicago families made beautiful quilts to keep them warm.  Learn about historic block patterns and recreate one.  Or design your own!

    June 23: Japanese Leather

    The Glessner dining room is decorated with dimensional wallpaper that looks like hand-tooled leather.  Use it as inspiration to design your own colorful embossed papers.

    June 30: Basket Weaving

    Native American families and early settlers wove baskets to carry and store food or other supplies.  Learn how to weave a real reed basket.

    July 7: Hooked Rugs

    Thrifty Chicago families used scraps of wool to create pretty rugs for their homes.  Make a mini version of a primitive hooked rug.

    July 14: Picture Frames

    Isaac Scott designed most of the picture frames in the Glessner house.  Design your own frame for a photograph or artwork.

    July 21: Stained Glass Windows

    Second Presbyterian Church is brightened by beautiful stained glass windows.  Create your own colorful design to hang in a window at home.

    July 28: Decorative Tiles

    Designer William De Morgan crafted many of the fireplace tiles used at Glessner House.  Decorate a fancy tile for your home.

    August 4: Band Boxes

    The Clarke family stored their belongings in paper-covered boxes.  Construct a band box from wallpaper scraps to keep your own treasures safe.

  • Lecture: Arts & Crafts Metalwork and Jewelry

    Chicago | Dates: 21 May, 2015

    Thursday May 21, 2015 at 7:00pm
    $10 per person / $8 for museum members
    Reservations requested to 312-326-1480

    The Arts & Crafts movement, a fascinating period in American decorative history, led to the unprecedented commercialization of fine crafts and the empowerment of thousands of women and immigrants, who began to pursue new careers in design and handicraft.  In 1893, the World's Columbian Exposition heralded the egalitarian art movement in America that led to the establishment of a plethora of metalwork and jewelry companies and studios by the turn of the century.  Author Darcy Evon documents how these new trends spread throughout the Midwest and eventually the country, led by innovative pioneers who inspired an entire nation.  They designed exquisite, original pieces of metalwork and jewelry by hand, starting with basic raw materials.  Frances Glessner's work will be featured.  Feel free to bring some of your jewelry or metalwork for show and tell at the end of the program.  Copies of Evon's book of the same title will be available for purchase and signing.

  • Evanston Preservation Symposium

    Evanston | Dates: 23 May, 2015

    In honor of National Preservation Month, the Evanston Preservation Commission invites community members to attend a Preservation Symposium on Saturday, May 23, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Evanston History Center, located at 225 Greenwood St. in Evanston.

    The free symposium, “On Adding on to Historic Structures: A Dialogue between Preservationists and Architects,” will provide strategies to better understand how building additions are viewed by architects and local preservation commissions. Examples of successful additions to homes and properties in Evanston and the North Shore will also be discussed.

    Space for this event is limited. Community members are encouraged to register online by noon, Friday, May 22, or by contacting City of Evanston Senior Planner/Preservation Coordinator Carlos Ruiz at 847-448-8687, or cruiz@cityofevanston.org.

    Presented by both preservation experts and architects, the symposium will focus on the ways that local and national standards affect homeowners, the Realtor community, and institutions. The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion and Q&A.

    The event will be moderated by Evanston Preservation Commissioner and Architect Julie Hacker, of Stuart Cohen & Julie Hacker Architects LLC. Presenters and panelists include:

    Carol Dyson, Chief Architect
    Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer IHPA

    Stuart Cohen, Architect
    Stuart Cohen & Julie Hacker Architects LLC
    Professor Emeritus University of Illinois at Chicago

    Guy Bergh, Architect
    Melichar Architects
    Former Lake Forest Preservation Commissioner

    Tom Shafer, Architect
    Thomas Shafer Architects LLC
    Former Highland Park Preservation Commissioner

    Dan Weese, Architect
    Weese Langley Weese Architects

    Susan Benjamin, Architectural Historian
    Benjamin Historic Certifications
    Former Highland Park Preservation Commissioner

    Brad White, Associate Director for Alphawood Foundation
    Authored Evanston’s Preservation Ordinance

Driehaussized
SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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