Recent Opportunities

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  • Richard Guy Wilson Prize

    Dates: 14 Dec, 2016 – 25 May, 2017
    The Study of Buildings, Landscapes, and Places
  • SAH MDR Conference 2017 in Victoria BC

    Victoria | Dates: 16 – 18 Jun, 2017
    SAH MARION DEAN ROSS / PACIFIC NORTHWEST CHAPTER ANNUAL CONFERENCE, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA JUNE 16-18, 2017 This year's conference theme is "Commemorations." According to the National Park Service, a commemorative property is important not for association with the event or person it memorializes, but for the significance it has acquired after its creation through age, tradition, or symbolic value. Please join us in Victoria, B.C., June 16-18, 2017, to celebrate commemorations, especially the Canada 150 celebrations (1867-2017), the 100th anniversary of the US National Park System (2016), the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (2016), and the Parks Canada's Centennial (2011). We will also be recognizing Victoria's Centennial (1962) by reflecting on the on-going significance of Victoria's 1965 Centennial Square. A Call for Papers has been issued for the conference. Topics germane to the theme will be encouraged, but those covering any aspect of the built environment of the Pacific Northwest or beyond will be welcome. Abstracts will be blind peer-reviewed by the SAHMDR Review Committee. Details on how to submit a paper are in the Call for Papers. Submissions are due on or before March 15, 2017. Go to our website at www.sahmdr.org for further details.
  • Final Call for Proposals - Deadline Dec 2, Midnight

    Burlington | Dates: 12 – 12 May, 2017
    The Association of College and Research Libraries, New England Chapter (https://www.acrlnec.org/) invites you to submit a proposal to present at the 2017 ACRL-NEC Annual Conference: Reframing Librarianship in the 21st Century Friday, May 12 @University of Vermont Conference Center, Burlington, VT. http://conference2017.acrlnec.org/
  • CFP: Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics - Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century

    Dates: 22 Nov, 2016 – 22 Nov, 2017
    Routledge Taylor & Francis have announced a genre establishing book, Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics - Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century.


    PUBLICATION CALL:

    The book has been produced in conjunction with the scholarly journal Architecture_MPS who are preparing a special Issue on the themes of the book for late 2017. Articles should in some way respond to one of the features and /or themes of the book (see below). If you are interested in submitting an article send an initial enquiry to info@architecturemps.com<mailto:info@architecturemps.com>
    Visit: http://architecturemps.com/
    The book contains the first ever extended comments on architecture by Noam Chomsky.
    Other architects included are Daniel Libeskind, Kenneth Frampton, Michael Sorkin and others.
    It takes on the critical issues of the day of architectural design and practice from a social and political perspective.
    It presents a new genre in academic writing, the ?interview-article?.

    -

    The book is by Dr. Graham Cairns, Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. He is the author of eight books.

    Routledge information: https://www.routledge.com/Reflections-on-Architecture-Society-and-Politics-Social-and-Cultural/Cairns/p/book/9781472456083

    Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics - Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century
    This book brings together a series of thirteen interview-articles by Graham Cairns in collaboration with some of the most prominent polemic thinkers and critical practitioners from the fields of architecture and the social sciences, including Noam Chomsky, Peggy Deamer, Robert A.M. Stern, Daniel Libeskind and Kenneth Frampton. Each chapter explores the relationship between architecture and socio-political issues through discussion of architectural theories and projects, citing specific issues and themes that have led to, and will shape, the various aspects of the current and future built environment. Ranging from Chomsky?s examination of the US?Mexico border as the architecture of oppression to Robert A.M. Stern?s defence of projects for the Disney corporation and George W. Bush, this book places politics at the center of issues within contemporary architecture.
    The ?interview-article? is a variation on the interview format that deepens the scholarly potential of that particular mode of dialogue. Extensive notation - often narrative in tone - is interwoven within the text to offer supplemental information and alternative argumentation and in this regard it represents a continuation of the evolving scholarly tradition of the footnote as academic tool laid out by Anthony Grafton. In addition to these narrative commentaries, these interview-articles are accompanied by full bibliographies and specific references entwined within the text. Contributors are also encouraged to develop discursive answers to questions that they are subsequently given the opportunity to mould into more considered essay type responses.
     
  • ATTINGHAM STUDY PROGRAMME Palaces and Villas of Rome and Naples

    Rome and Naples | Dates: 18 – 26 Sep, 2017
    September 18-26, 2017 Directed by Andrew Moore and run in association with the British School at Rome this programme considers palaces and villas with their collections in the light of papal patronage. Visits will include some of the most important Roman palaces still intact, including a number still in private hands, such as the Palazzo Corsini and the Palazzo Colonna. Travelling through the Roman Campagna to Naples visits will include the Pio Monte della Misericordia, the newly opened Museo Civico Gaetano Filangieri, the Villa Caserta just outside the city and Herculaneum. Some scholarship funding may be available. Application information at http://www.americanfriendsofattingham.org/studyprogramme.html Deadline for applications: February 12, 2017
  • Attingham Trust Summer School

    Dates: 29 Jun – 16 Jul, 2017
    THE 66th ATTINGHAM SUMMER SCHOOL June 29-July 16, 2017 Directed by David Adshead and Elizabeth Jamieson, and accompanied by specialist tutors and lecturers, this intensive 18-day course will include visits to approximately 25 houses in Sussex, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Oxfordshire. The Summer School will examine the country house in terms of architectural and social history, and the decorative arts. Applications are invited from those working in related fields and some partial scholarships are available.
  • Extreme: Rethinking the Limits to Community, Architecture and Urbanism

    Longyearbyen | Dates: 21 – 25 Jan, 2018
    EXTREME: Rethinking the Limits to Community, Architecture, and Urbanism
    Longyearbyen, Svalbard, 21-25 January 2018
    http://www.islanddynamics.org/extreme.html

    Density and sparsity, height and depth, hot and cold, centre and periphery, wet and dry, war and conflict: People the world over have adapted their living practices, architectures, and landscapes to extreme conditions. In our globalised era, local conceptions of the ideal dwelling, city, and community are increasingly exposed to alternative understandings. How do the house in the country and the flat in the skyscraper, the remote mountain village and the hyper-dense world city, the frigid arctic science station and the blazing desert financial district differ from and resemble one another? Can extreme environments foster innovative lifestyles that are conducive to community and inspire beneficial future urbanisms? Or do the technical solutions relied upon to help people cope with extremes of population, climate, light, height, and other factors necessarily distance people from each other and from the natural environment?

    This interdisciplinary conference probes the limits to community, architecture, and urbanism from the perspectives of urban studies, geography, design, architecture, anthropology, sociology, and other fields and disciplines.

    About Longyearbyen, Svalbard.
    Longyearbyen (population 2200) is the world's northernmost town, the main settlement in Norway's vast, icy Svalbard archipelago. The polar night, when the sun never breaches the horizon, lasts from late October until mid-February. Most residents stay for only a season or a few years, and even those who remain must eventually return to their homelands: Because Norway provides no health and social care, it is colloquially said that 'In Svalbard, it is illegal to die.' Furthermore, the risk of attack by polar bears means that people are only permitted to leave town in the company of someone with firearms training.

    Although Longyearbyen is iconically remote, the town is highly cosmopolitan, hosting citizens of over 40 nations and an economy based on tourism and mining.

    About the conference.
    Delegates will arrive in Longyearbyen on 21 January. On 22 and 25 January, delegates will take tours out into Svalbard's spectacular arctic landscape: a hike to an ice cave and a trip out into the polar night on by dog sled. Conference presentations by delegates will be held on 23-24 January at Radisson Blu Polar Hotel Spitsbergen. Full registration covers five dinners and all conference activities.

    How to make a presentation.
    Presentations are welcome on all aspects of life in extreme conditions. Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes' question time. The early deadline for abstracts is 28 February 2017, but to take advantage of early registration rates and ensure that you have time to seek funding from your institution or government, we recommend that you submit your abstract early. You can submit an abstract here: http://www.islanddynamics.org/extreme/cfp.html

    If you have any questions, please e-mail convenor Adam Grydehøj (agrydehoj@islanddynamics.org). 
     
  • Restore a Greenhouse to Grandeur

    Moray, Scotland | Dates: 04 – 17 Jun, 2017
    Travel to northern Scotland with Adventures in Preservation to help save one of the last remaining Edwardian glasshouses. Delight in the area’s unique microclimate – both warmer and drier than the rest of Scotland – while you explore the Burgie Estate’s unique story: ruins of a medieval castle, an Edwardian greenhouse and elegant country home, and a man named Hamish who is dedicating his property to conservation. The focus of this hands-on experience is rescue of the greenhouse, which is deteriorating and in dire need of conservation. Survival of the greenhouse is key to Hamish Lochore’s efforts to establish an arboretum of trees from around the world. A network of international volunteers hand selects seeds and sends them to Scotland where they are nurtured in the greenhouse. It’s time for action from those passionate about preservation. Project attendees have the opportunity to learn and apply skills involving documentation, carpentry, masonry and glazing. The project is open to all regardless of experience. You will have the option of dividing your time between building conservation and plant conservation. Details and registration at: http://bit.ly/AiPinScotland
  • The Arts of Spinoza + Pacific Spinoza

    Auckland | Dates: 26 – 31 May, 2017
    Interstices Under Construction symposium, 26-28 May 2017
    Auckland University of Technology and University of Auckland, New Zealand
    www.interstices.ac.nz œ
     
    Plenaries / keynotes include:
    Moira Gatens Challis Professor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
    Michael LeBuffe Baier Chair, Early Modern Philosophy, University of Otago
    Susan Ruddick Professor, Geography & Planning, University of Toronto
    Anthony Uhlmann Professor, Writing and Society, University of Western Sydney Plenary panel
    Jacob Culbertson Visiting Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Haverford College
    Albert Refiti Senior Lecturer, Spatial, Auckland University of Technology
    Carl Te Hira Mika Tuhourangi, Ngati Whanaunga Senior Lecturer, Education, University of Waikato
    By Skype
    Beth Lord Reader, Philosophy, University of Aberdeen
    Peg Rawes Professor, Architecture, Bartlett, University College London 

    We invite scholarly submissions on the philosophy of Benedict de Spinoza (1632-1677), for a special issue of Interstices journal and the annual Interstices symposium to be held in Auckland, New Zealand, 26-28 May 2017. The intent is to further consolidate the recent revival of interest in Spinoza’s thought, and to reaffirm his status as an enormously powerful thinker of contemporary relevance. Papers on any aspect of Spinoza studies are thus welcomed. But the more specific aim of the symposium and journal issue is twofold: firstly, to extend the burgeoning scholarship on Spinoza into the domains of study parsed by Interstices, namely arts and architecture, and secondly, to situate Spinoza’s philosophy within the particular locus of New Zealand, Australasia, the South Pacific, and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Each of these aspects will be tackled in separate sessions or separate days of the symposium.

    With regard to the first aim, we welcome submissions that put Spinoza’s philosophy in productive proximity with a particular artform or an individual work of art, whether literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, music, dance, performance, etc. — or that have an especial focus on any of the numerous artistic and literary figures who are known to have read Spinoza appreciatively and in whose works Spinozist shadings might be discerned (Goethe, Coleridge, George Eliot, Thomas Hirschhorn, etc.). Contributors might like to think of this event and journal issue as extending, in the direction of arts and architecture, the very fine work done by the anthology Spinoza Beyond Philosophy (2012, ed. Beth Lord).

    Since Interstices’s particular interest is in architectural studies, we would be keen to see contributions that consider Spinoza as helpful for thinking any of the design and spatial disciplines (architecture, urban design, landscape, geography, interior design, and so on). Contributors might also choose to take ‘architecture’ in the sense of ‘structure’, in which case not only would built environments and tectonics be the subject of analysis, but also the very structure of Spinoza’s texts, the extraordinary way in which his texts are wrought (the famous geometric architecture of the Ethics, for example).

    We also invite submissions that don’t necessarily fall under any of the artistic disciplines listed above, and that interpret “arts” in the broadest possible sense. Spinoza’s philosophy predates the modern idea of a differentiated domain of the arts, and so the Latin word that Spinoza uses — ars — has the older and broader sense of skill or craft or ability or proficiency.[1] We thus welcome submissions that are about ‘arts’ in this more general sense — for example, about what Spinoza teaches us about the arts of living (ars vivendi) or the arts of constructing a liberal polity (ars politica, government, statecraft).

    With regard to the second aim, we invite submissions on any aspects of Spinoza studies that have a connection to New Zealand, Australia, the South Pacific, or Asia-Pacific and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Such papers might, for example, examine the historical reception and interpretation of Spinoza in New Zealand, Australia, the Oceanic “sea of islands”, or any proximate sister region.[2] The idea is to give geographic concreteness and local specificity to the interpretation of Spinoza — to see how Spinoza might be or has been read in New Zealand and the Pacific, and inversely to see how our ways of thinking about New Zealand and the Pacific might be productively inflected by reading Spinoza.

    A fuller Call for Papers / Discussion Document is attached as a PDF file, or available online at www.interstices.ac.nz/news-events/ 

    Abstracts of 300 words, along with a short biographical statement of 100 words, to be sent to pacificspinoza@gmail.com, by midnight nzst, 30th January 2017. For purposes of peer review, the abstract should be sent in a separate self-contained file with no identifying information in it. Please send Microsoft Word files only (doc or docx). Abstracts will be vetted through a process of blind peer review.

    Selected papers from the symposium will be invited for revision, peer review, and publication in the subsequent issue of Interstices. If you are unable to attend the symposium in New Zealand, but wish to submit a paper for the journal issue, please send the full and completed paper to pacificspinoza@gmail.com by 31st May 2017.

    Further inquiries can be directed to the convenor Eu Jin Chua, echua@aut.ac.nz, Farzaneh Haghighi, F.Haghighi@auckland.ac.nz, or to Susan Hedges, the Coordinating Editor of Interstices, shedges@aut.ac.nz. www.interstices.ac.nz [1] See Moira Gatens, “Spinoza on Goodness and Beauty and the Prophet and the Artist”, European Journal of Philosophy 23, no. 1 (2015), p. 3. [2] The reference is to Epeli Hau’ofa’s “Our Sea of Islands”, The Contemporary Pacific 6, no. 1 (1994), 147–161.
  • Docomomo US Call for Articles

    Dates: 07 Oct, 2016 – 07 Oct, 2017
    Docomomo US accepts article submissions on a wide range of issues concerning modernism. Those interested in submitting an article should send a brief description including images, drawings, etc to info(AT)docomomo-us.org. Full submissions are required 15 days prior to publication. Additional details including submission guidelines are available upon request.

    Thematic Requests
    • Lesser Known Architects/Designers
    • Endangered Landscapes
    • Corporate Campuses
    • Art + Architecture
    • "Growing up Modern": Interviews w/ various children/family members of architects/designers 
    • Off the Beaten Path/Unsung Heroes" from the National Register (featured buildings/sites of the modern listings on the National Register )
    Suggest a future theme - email us info(AT)docomomo-us.org
     
  • CFP: Cold War Cities: Spatial Planning, Social Politics and Cultural Practices in the Era of Atomic Urbanism, 1945-65

    Dates: 22 Sep, 2016 – 30 Apr, 2017
    We are seeking 10-12 thoughtful and unpublished essays that analyse a substantive thematic area and situate this empirically in a particular city case study. Essays can draw on a range of different evidential bases, archival research, visual methods, media hermeneutics, and personal histories and lived experiences. Book chapters should deploy appropriate theoretical ideas to understand the physical planning, politics and cultures of atomic era urban development. They should be accessible to readers without deep theoretical background in the particular thematic area and little knowledge of the city case study.

    If you are interested in contributing, please provide a tentative title,
    250 words abstract and brief bio (to be used in a formal proposal to publisher). Email to m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk>


    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Co-editors:
    * Richard Brook, Manchester School of Architecture. R.Brook@mmu.ac.uk<mailto:R.Brook@mmu.ac.uk>

    * Martin Dodge, Department of Geography, University of Manchester.
    M.Dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:M.Dodge@manchester.ac.uk>

    * Jonathan Hogg, Department of History, University of Liverpool.
    J.G.Hogg@liverpool.ac.uk<mailto:J.G.Hogg@liverpool.ac.uk>

    Aims:
    In this book we wish to explore how the real threat of nuclear attack through the 1950s and early '60s affected the spatial planning of cities, as well considering how such 'atomic urbanism' was manifest in political processes or expressed through cultural practices. The book is consciously to be based on set of case studies of specific cities, through which we seek understandings, at an urban scale, of how cold war doctrines played out in different thematic areas (e.g. architectural designs for survivable human habitation or anti-nuclear protests). There should also be scope for questioning the degree to which the historical development of individual cities was determined or shaped by atomic threats, thus problematizing 'the Cold War' as general analytical lens.  Rather than focus on the nation state or a whole continent, we believe looking at series of individual cities (or city regions) will provide a distinctive lens through which to reinterpret cold war histories.

    The book is also focused in its time period on the crucial decades after the Second War World because they have interpretative coherence in cold war historiography and were key periods in urban redevelopment across much of the world (such as the rise of suburban consumerism in the West, Soviet directed socialist renewal in the East and decolonialisation in other places). However, contributors may also wish to consider the legacy of actions and decisions made in this period of atomic high tension down to the contemporary city if appropriate. The objective is to have an international set of contributors with a diversity of thematic perspectives, and deploying case study cities not only in North America and Western Europe but also in the former Eastern Bloc, the Soviet Union, the Asian region and, potentially, from the Global South.

    Thematic areas could include (non-exhaustive list):

    * Physical planning in the cold war city: shelters and population survivability; spatial dispersal planning; resilient infrastructures, buildings and engineering (telecommunications, transport, etc); the zoning of land for needs of military, security and the atomic state; enrolment of scientific facilities, commercial R&D and universities; planning health services, and more general welfare planning post-attack.

    * Social / political issues in the cold war city: anti-nuclear protests, passive resistance, active unrest; participation in civil defence and critiques of preparation; public information, propaganda, education; work of news media; political struggles, legal structures.
    * Cultural practices in the cold war city: visual arts, literary responses to nuclear threats; architectural design, landscape aesthetics; religious responses and faith perspective; popular culture and entertainment (television, radio, fiction); civic spaces and the representation of atomic age ideas; design and functioning of the domestic sphere.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Practical details:
    * Submission date: April 2017
    * Length: around 7,000 words (exc. bibliography)
    * Language: UK English
    * Format: please try to use the Routledge style guide, esp. for citations and formatting of bibliography to facilitate production
    * Figures: high-quality b/w illustrations desirable. Limited colour figures may be possible in plates section. Please ensure you have copyright or can secure copyright clearance for illustrations. Authors will be responsible for any costs of copyright licensing
    * Delivery: Word document, email to m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk>

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Intellectual background:
    Cities across the world were the primary target of strategic atomic weaponry in the early cold war period. Post-war urban planning, politics and cultural practice became a central part of Cold War battlefront. For instance, important mechanisms to try secure cities against atomic attack were created, and social space was re-designed to contain the threat of Communism or Capitalism, or to offer an ideologically-informed vision of the modern, high-tech and consumerist or socialist future. However, the focus of historical studies of these decades has traditionally been on international relations, continental blocs and geopolitical struggles at the global scale. While there has been some historical work published in recent years on cold war planning, politics and culture at the national level, which is often strongly urban in focus (e.g. monographs by Andrew Burtch, Jennifer Light, Matthew Grant, Matthew Farish), there has been less analysis of the context of the city as site in which physical plans, social politics and cultural practices played out in distinctive ways (exceptions include theme issue of Urban History (2015) and the May 2016 Cold War Cities workshop at the University of Sheffield). One of the major features of intellectual growth in the humanities, especially history, is interdisciplinary interest in space and place. Here, the city is viewed a significant context in which to explore place, landscape and locational attributes under a set of specific imperatives of defence from an unprecedented new threat.  This edited collection will be a unique contribution that looks at how the cold war unfolded in different cities across the world.

    We intend authors to come from more than North America and Europe; they may include scholars in Japan, Russia, China and elsewhere.  Contributors will be drawn from cogent disciplinary backgrounds including, for example, architectural history, planning, history of science, economic and social history, human geography, political science, cultural studies, and other cognizant fields of scholarship.


    Proposed book structure:
    The volume will include an introductory overview essay by the editors and series of chapters grouped into three major sections: physical, social-political, cultural. Each chapter will tackle a substantial thematic issue and make use of a specific city for empirical evidence.  We expect that some contributions may speak across this threefold structure and will deal with this by section overviews.
     
  • CFP: Interartive, Issue #87: Street Art and its Languages

    Dates: 08 – 20 Sep, 2016
    Issue #87 of Interartive aims to focus on street art in the following 
    topics:

    - Street art, architecture and urban spaces
    - The role of digital media in project communication
    - Styles, methods of intervention and practices of action
    - Participatory and urban regeneration processes
    - Institutionalization forms of the phenomenon.

    Submissions must be made by the deadline of September 20, 2016.

    All material intended for publication in InterArtive should be sent to 
    the attention of Modesta Di Paola and Marco Mondino by mail at: 
    info@interartive.org with mail subject: "Street art And Its Languages".

    The text should be in Spanish and/or English.

    Texts should be around 800 to 3000 words: PUBLISHNG GUIDELINES Texts

    The works and art projects will be published in the form of Online 
    Exhibition (images and short text): PUBLISHING GUIDELINES Artworks
    The 87th issue of Interartive will be published at the end of September 
    2016.
     
  • CFP: 2017 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference (Minneapolis, 30 Mar-2 Apr 17)

    Minneapolis | Dates: 08 – 15 Sep, 2016
    Hyatt Regency Minneapolis, 30 March — 2 April 2017
    Proposals due by 15 September 2016 to basile.baudez@paris-sorbonne.fr or basile.baudez@gmail.com

    Color in Eighteenth-Century Architecture
    Basile Baudez, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV

    Although associated with baroque exuberance born after the Counter Reformation movement or the nineteenth-century rediscovery of polychromy in Greek architecture, color was far from absent from eighteenth-century architecture—even if critics like Quatremère de Quincy, or draftsmen like Boullée, favored monochromy on built structures and their representation. At a moment when color was invading every aspect of daily life, when artists and printers were developing new ways to diffuse color reproductions, when authors from Roger de Piles to Goethe were revalorizing the evocative and sensualist effectiveness of color, how did architects respond to this pressure, both in their drawings and buildings? The geographic breath of this session is left deliberately open, but proposals should be unified by their close attention to the complex and paradoxical relationship between theory and practical use of color in architecture in the eighteenth-century. Key issues will include comparisons of attitudes towards color in different national traditions, the decision to hide or reveal colored materials, the place of color in architectural definitions of beauty or connotations of color within typologies, spaces or specific periods.
     
  • CFP: MDCCC 1800, No. 6: Arts on Display

    Dates: 08 Sep – 12 Oct, 2016
    Call for papers
    International on-line scientific peer reviewed journal MDCCC 1800
    http://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/it/edizioni/riviste/mdccc-1800/
    Deadline for abstracts: 12 October 2016 
    Deadline for submission of papers: 30 December 2016.

    Call for papers
    The call for papers for the 6th issue of the MDCCC1800 journal is now 
    open.

    Arts on display: the 19th century international expositions.
    The international online peer reviewed journal MDCCC1800 wishes to 
    celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Exposition universelle held in 
    Paris in 1867 with an issue dedicated to the phenomenon of the 
    international exhibitions set up during the 19th century.?We welcome 
    original, unpublished articles offering in-depth analysis of the 
    developments, significance and legacy of this phenomenon starting from 
    the Universal Exhibition of London (1851).

    Contributors are free to propose any topic related to the general 
    theme, such as the study of single national participations, the impact 
    of the events on public opinion, the display architectures, the 
    diffusion of decorative arts and photography etc.

    A list of suggested topics, by no means exhaustive, includes:?
    - The national participation to the events (committees, single artists, 
    works of art) 
    - The art market: private collectors and museum acquisitions?
    - The divulgation of the arts: publicity, magazines, exhibitions 
    catalogues?
    - The social and pedagogical role of international exhibitions?
    - Architecture, outfitting, national pavilions?
    - The use of decorative arts and photography at the events?
    - Colonialism and the influence and reception of non-European cultures
    - Literature and the arts: the narration of the exhibitions?
    - Correspondence (relationships among artists, architects, art critics 
    etc)?
    - The role played by the Antiquities at the exhibitions (as models for 
    inspiring artists; means for showing prestige; physical emblems for the 
    building of identity; political propaganda etc)

    Papers in Italian, English, French, Spanish and German are welcome.

    ABSTRACT SUBMISSION | Please submit an abstract concerning the topic 
    you propose with a provisional title and a short autobiography. The 
    abstract should not exceed 3,000 characters (spaces included). Files 
    should be submitted by 12 October 2016. The authors of selected 
    abstracts will receive a reply within two weeks (by 26 October 2016).

    The editorial rules concerning the text and any images the author might 
    wish to include are available (in Italian, English and Spanish) at the 
    following link: 
    http://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/it/edizioni/norme-redazionali/

    We suggest that articles should be of a length between 20,000 and 
    40,000 characters. All articles will undergo a double peer review 
    process prior to publication.

    Articles should be uploaded on the MDCCC1800 platform before 30 
    December 2016.

    To obtain the credentials which will allow authors to register to the 
    platform, please send an e-mail to the editorial board at the following 
    address: mdccc1800@unive.it.?
    Please do not hesitate to contact us with any queries you might have 
    regarding the application or any further stage of the process.
  • Building Optimism: Public Space in South America

    Pittsburgh | Dates: 10 Sep, 2016 – 13 Feb, 2017
    Spanning projects in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Peru, and Venezuela, Building Optimism: Public Space in South America investigates ways that emerging architects and designers instigate change through design in public space. Using photography, video, drawings, and models, the exhibition immerses visitors in inventive ways that public spaces become social spaces—sites that respond to the unique circumstances and pressures of their communities.

    Related Programming:
    Friday, September 9: NIGHTIME — Enjoy a sneak preview of Building Optimism: Public Space in South America during CMOA's all-night party.
    Friday, October 7: Architecture Against All Odds: Architect Talk and Discussion — Join CMOA for an architecture talk and discussion with Marialuisa Borja, prinicipal for the architecture firm Al Borde.
  • CFP: Modern Living in Asia 1945-1990 (Brighton, 10-11 Apr 17)

    Brighton | Dates: 06 – 30 Sep, 2016
    We are pleased to announce that Professor Gyan Prakash (Princeton University) and Dr. Duanfang Lu (University of Sydney) will the keynote speakers for the conference. Professor Gyan Prakash's work ranges from sub-altern and postcolonial studies, colonial genealogies of modernity to urban history. Dr Duanfang Lu's research includes architectural history and theory, urban planning and Modern Chinese architecture, and planning history. She is the editor of Third World Modernism.
     
    New extended deadline 30th September 2016.
     
    CALL FOR PAPERS

    Modern Living in Asia 1945-1990

    Dates: 10-11 April 2017

    Venue: City Campus, University of Brighton

    Hosted by University of Brighton, UK

    Supported by University of Brighton’s Rising Stars Award, Internationalising Design History Research Cluster and College of Arts and Humanities.

    Convenors: Dr. Yunah Lee and Dr. Megha Rajguru (University of Brighton)

    Extended deadline for proposals: 30 September 2016

    This conference aims to develop the study of modern living in Asia between 1945 -1990 from a transnational perspective. Scholarship on Modernism in architecture, interior design and ideas of modern living in Asian countries in post-civil war, postcolonial and pre-globalised years of 1945-1990 has been steadily rising. Most research, however, focuses on certain geographical pockets and within particular national boundaries such as China, India, Japan, and Korea, examining major architects and key architectural projects. In the midst of acutely debated theoretical positions of globalization, transnationalism and multiple modernisms, in works by Arjun Appadurai (1996), Homi Bhabha (1994), Shumei Shi (2013), Duanfang Lu (2011), we will explore cultural flows beyond borders (national, regional and political) that informed notions of modern living in Asian countries. We also aim to expand the discourse to include geographical areas or countries in Asia that have been under-explored or entirely ignored in scholarly debates.  

    Key themes that will be explored in the conference include the introduction and adaptation of Euro-American ideas of Modernism in local contexts, the development of ‘critical regionalism’ (Kenneth Frampton, 1983) and inter-Asian exchanges of ideas of modernity and modern design in living spaces. The conference will also consider methodological approaches in examining the notion of the 'modern' within an Asian context, from postcolonial perspectives and within the context of the Cold War. It will develop theoretical understandings of modernity and modernism, whether the term 'modern' was employed within these culture-specific contexts and the variations in the 'modern' or modernisms across these.

    We seek papers that will examine one or more of these areas. We also welcome suggestions.

    ·         Adaptation of vernacular forms of architecture and interior spaces into modern models of living such as apartments.
    ·         Relation of culture-specific living practices to new forms of modern and modular lifestyles.
    ·         Interior design magazines and their consumption.
    ·         Women and modern lifestyles.
    ·         Standardisation in housing and interior design.        
    ·         Modernity, modernisation and Modernism: theoretical trajectories in relation to living space.
    ·         Modern living and modernity in postcolonial contexts. 
    ·         Cold War and Modern living.
    ·         Architecture and Interior Design professions.
    ·         Exhibitions of modern living spaces and modern life.
    ·         Art in the modern home.
     
    The call for papers can also be found online: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/research/design-art-history/idh/internationalising-design-history-events/modern-living-in-asia-1945-1990

    Please submit a 300-word abstract and 100-word biography to modernlivingasia@brighton.ac.uk by 30th September 2016. All proposals will be peer-reviewed. Papers will be given in English. We also welcome a panel proposal with three or four papers. Please do contact us if you have any questions.
  • "The Art of Architecture: Hand Drawing and Design" Conference

    Notre Dame | Dates: 29 Sep – 01 Oct, 2016
    Join the Notre Dame School of Architecture for the “Art of Architecture: Hand Drawing and Design” Conference, Sept. 29-Oct. 1, 2016.

    The conference comes at a crucial time.  NCARB is considering deleting drawing from the Architectural Exam, while others are touting “programs which can design buildings without architects.” At the same time, many claim hand drawing is essential to the design process. In the last five years we have seen an outpouring of interest in the subject through books, websites, and sketching trips. 

    The conference will explore the continued vitality of hand drawing in the practice of architecture, education, and scholarship. We are bringing together over 150 academics, architects, historians, and students. 
     
  • Building the Outer Boroughs: Architecture and Urbanism beyond Manhattan (Brooklyn College, March 23, 2017)

    Dates: 04 – 12 Sep, 2016
    Building the Outer Boroughs: Architecture and Urbanism beyond Manhattan Brooklyn College, March 23, 2017 Organizers: Anna Jozefacka (Fellow, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2015-17) and Malka Simon (Brooklyn College) Co-sponsored by the Wolfe Institute for the Humanities and the Art Department at Brooklyn College Before they were the “outer boroughs,” the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island developed as cities, towns, and villages in their own right, independent of New York City. Though these so-called outer boroughs comprise most of today’s New York and are part of its architectural identity, the bulk of existing scholarship in architecture is persistently Manhattan-centric. However, there remains much to be said about New York City’s outer boroughs and their neighborhoods. The different pace of growth and initial political independence of these parts of the city have yielded architecturally varied urban landscapes well worth examining. This symposium seeks to highlight the study of New York City’s architecture and urban development outside of Manhattan. We invite papers that expand beyond the existing field of scholarship on the city’s built environment. We aim to discuss the variety of building types, styles, and urban patterns evident in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island and to consider their roles in shaping the city. We welcome interdisciplinary papers that address architecture within the context of other fields. Papers might examine topics that include but are not limited to the following: -Early colonial settlements -Urban archeological sites -Industrial architecture and infrastructure -Civic, cultural, and religious centers past and present -Housing typologies across the outer boroughs -Gentrification and architectural style Intersections of the natural and built environments -The skyscraper outside of Manhattan -Adaptive reuse of buildings and sites -Preservation in the face of real estate development -Building with the “The Other”: voices of immigrants, women, and architects of color In recent years, native and new residents alike have “discovered” the richness of life outside Manhattan, leading to a wave of fast-paced development and neighborhood transformations. The time is right for a closer scholarly examination of the places and spaces of New York City’s outer boroughs. Please send a 500-word paper proposal and an academic CV to: outerborougharchitecture@gmail.com Deadline for submissions is September 12, 2016. Successful applicants will be notified by September 30, 2016.
  • Dialogue in Architecture: An Evening with Toshiko Mori

    Chiacgo | Dates: 29 – 29 Sep, 2016
    The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust's annual Thinking Into the Future: The Robie House Series on Architecture, Design and Ideas presents a conversation with acclaimed architect Toshiko Mori, FAIA, who will discuss how architecture develops languages and dialogues that reflect and respond to complex circumstances and contexts.
  • Monuments Made of Words: Text and Architecture, from Antiquity to Modernity

    Durham | Dates: 08 – 11 Sep, 2016
    From Horace’s odes to the sonnets of Shakespeare and beyond, the idea that the written word outlasts even the grandest of monuments has long been a literary topos. In the case of antiquity it rings particularly true. Despite their apparent vulnerability during centuries of transmission in manuscript form, classical accounts of architecture have almost always outlived their subjects; of brick and stone, often only words survive. This conference seeks to explore the diverse content and legacy of ancient descriptions of architecture. Modern studies have tended to concentrate on specific accounts or periods. The present conference addresses a much broader selection of classical texts and the various ways they were perceived over a wider geographical compass and timeframe. It situates these accounts – such as Greek reports of architecture in the Near East and Latin poetry on the architectural wonders of Rome – within the intellectual and aesthetic discourse of their time but also, importantly, in the context of later ages, when they came to fire the imagination of new generations of architects, artists, writers and scholars. With contributions drawn from an international group of scholars, ranging from classicists to architectural historians and specialists in other fields, the intention of this conference is to elicit a richer understanding of the contribution of these ‘literary monuments’ to thought and visual culture from antiquity onwards, as well as of the dialogues between these monuments over time.
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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