Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • CambridgeTalks 2015 Conference | Inscriptions of Power: Spaces, Institutions & Crisis

    Cambridge | Dates: 02 – 03 Apr, 2015
    Cambridge Talks is the annual spring conference organized by the Ph.D. Program in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning at Harvard University, dedicated to the exploration of interdisciplinary themes that engage issues of space. In addition to convening a group of senior scholars both interdisciplinary and international in orientation, the conference gives Harvard PhD students a chance to present and discuss their work in a formal context. The entire two-day event is free and open to the public.
  • CFP: FLWBC 2015 Conference - Wisconsin: Wright's Laboratory (Milwaukee, WI, 30 Sept-4 Oct 2015)

    Milwaukee | Dates: 23 Jan – 01 Mar, 2015
    Frank Lloyd Wright’s life story is intimately entwined with his home state. To Wisconsin he left a built legacy unmatched by any other area, spanning more than seven decades. He built houses there—both simple and elaborate, from the cozy Richards Bungalow in Milwaukee to his beloved Taliesin. His Usonian house concept and his House for a Family of $5,000-$6,000 Income highlighted in the September 26, 1938, LIFE magazine were first constructed in Wisconsin. He built several lakeside residences there. He built schools in Wisconsin, including the 1887 Hillside Home School and the 1956 Wyoming Valley Grammar School, not to mention his own school at Taliesin. He built religious buildings for both the Greek Orthodox and Unitarian faiths. He built commercial and industrial buildings for Albert Dell German and for the S.C. Johnson Company, and a tall building, one of only two he ever constructed. He built apartment buildings in Wisconsin—the Munkwitz (demolished in 1973) and Richards Duplex Apartments (restored) in Milwaukee, and experimented with the American System-Built Homes and the Erdman Prefabricated Homes projects. He worked out his cast concrete ornamental friezes on both the A.D. German Warehouse and the Bogk House. And these are just some examples of the rich and varied assortment of designs he scattered around the state. Many more structures envisioned for the state remain only as dreams on paper.

    This conference seeks to view Wright’s relationship with his home state through the lens of Wisconsin as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Laboratory. The Conservancy seeks papers that focus on Wright’s experimental nature, particularly in regard to his home state. We are looking for papers that will help us understand the unique and unorthodox nature of Wright’s theory and architecture, or that reinterpret familiar landmarks in unfamiliar ways. Though premised on a “cause conservative,” Wright’s work was radical compared to mainstream tastes, and for a long time. Which of his architectural experiments failed, and why? In which periods of his life was he more open to experimentation? Potential papers might address such Wisconsin-related topics as Wright’s American System-Built Homes, his designs for low-income housing, his interest in prefabrication or his apartment buildings. What do these projects say about Wright’s social vision? How did they compare to the efforts of architects with similar interests? Other topics might include the Johnson Wax company and Wright, his work in Racine, or his unexecuted projects for Wisconsin. What was Wright’s working relationship with George Mann Niedecken, the famous Milwaukee furniture designer? What was Wright’s relationship to Wisconsin politics?

    The conference welcomes papers from individuals working in the areas of architectural, landscape, urban and cultural history, cultural geography, sociology, American Studies or anyone else who can contribute to a discourse about Wisconsin as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Laboratory. Proposals should present fresh material and/or interpretations. They should be submitted as an abstract of no more than one page, single-spaced, with the author’s name at the top. The text should concisely describe the focus and the scope of the presentation. The proposal should be accompanied by a one-page biography/curriculum vitae that includes the author’s full name, affiliation (if applicable), mailing address, email address, and telephone and fax numbers. Please also note anticipated audio-visual needs for your presentation (final PowerPoint presentations will be requested approximately one month before the conference).

    Proposals must be received no later than March 1, 2015. Material sent electronically is preferred. Notification will be sent by March 23, 2015. Please submit proposals and direct any questions to: Dale Allen Gyure College of Architecture and Design, Lawrence Tech University 21000 West Ten Mile Rd. Southfield, MI 48075-1058 dgyure@ltu.edu 248.204.2925
  • CFP: International Congress - Le Corbusier 50 Years Later

    Valencia | Dates: 17 Jan – 03 Mar, 2015
    In August 1965, Le Corbusier, recognized as the most important architect of the twentieth‐century, passed away in the Mediterranean Sea waters. For this reason, the Architectural Design Department at the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, with the support of the Fondation Le Corbusier in Paris, promotes this international conference in Valencia. Le Corbusier was one of the most prolific architects in the creation of links between ideas and images, between visual arts and architecture, between history and modernity. The power of his ideas was continually being tested and confirmed by his architectural work. In his projects, writings, paintings and sculptures he worked out different visions of what should match architectural modernity, which drew on a personal background built upon diverse ideological references. If there is any outstanding feature in his career, it is the transversal condition of his creative work. This idea of transversality enables us to open this conference to artists, historians, book publishers, photographers, thinkers and, of course, architects. The LC 2015 congress will be held on November 18‐20 2015 at the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de la Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), which has been recently ranked as the best technical university in Spain by the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2014.

    STRUCTURE OF THE CONGRESS

    Lectures:
    Main lecturers* (Tim Benton, Jean Louis Cohen, Antoine Picon, Josep Quetglas, Bruno Reichlin, Arthur
    Ruëgg)
    Guest lecturers* (José Ramón Alonso, Juan Calatrava, Arnaud Dercelles, Marta Llorente, Xavier Monteys,
    María Cecilia O’ Byrne, Marta Sequeira, Marida Talamona)
    (* waiting for confirmation)

    Papers:
    Oral presentation
    Poster presentation
    Exhibition:
    Le Corbusier in Rusia “Paris n’est pas Moscou”
    Le Corbusier's filmography
    Drawings and models of Le Corbusier's work
    Presentation of publications on Le Corbusier
    Student's work presentation from Architecture Schools


    CALL FOR PAPERS

    TOPICS OF INTEREST
    The program committee encourages the submission of articles that communicate and explore some of
    the aspect of Le Corbusier’s work or of his life.
    Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas:
    • Le Corbusier's formation
    • Le Corbusier and the Visual Arts
    • Savoir habiter. The question of dwelling.
    • Le Corbusier, global architect
    • Le Corbusier: texts, books and writings.
    • Interiors by Le Corbusier.
    • Urban views: Le Corbusier and human habitat
    • Le Corbusier: personal moments
    • Creative work at 35 rue de Sèvres. Le Corbusier and partners.
    • Le Corbusier, 1965. Last year, last work.
    • Le Corbusier's legacy

    PUBLICATIONS
    Accepted papers will appear in the conference proceedings, published by UPV Press, and will be provided with a DOI number and indexed in major international bibliographic databases. Authors of selected papers could be awarded and invited to submit an extended version to be published as a chapter in a book edited by the organization of the Congress.

    CALENDAR
    Call for papers: January 12th ‐ March 3rd, 2015
    Abstract acceptance: April 7th 2015
    Submission of papers, posters, presentations of publications: June 9th 2015
    Results of the review process: July 14th 2015
    Final paper submission July 28th 2015
    Final decision about presentation format (oral, written or poster) September 8th 2015
    Printed poster submission: November 3rd 2015
    Deadline for early registration: April 17th 2015
    Deadline for registration: November 11th 2015
    CONFERENCE: November 18th ‐ 20th 2015
  • CFP: "Women and the Great Hunger in Ireland" an interdisciplinary conference

    Hamden | Dates: 19 Jan – 31 Mar, 2015
    Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University will host a four-day conference entitled "Women and the Great Hunger in Ireland" June 3–6, 2015 As Margaret Ward has demonstrated, Irish women have been systematically "excluded and silenced" in written history, thus denying them their rightful position as agents of change. In regard to Ireland’s Great Hunger, while many contemporary depictions of the Famine have been dominated by female imagery, the involvement of women in other ways (e.g., as landowners, as relief-givers or providers for the family) has received little attention. This conference asks: how did women experience—and shape—the tragedy that unfolded in Ireland between 1845 and 1852? And how does the Great Hunger compare with the experience of women in other famines? This conference seeks to explore the diverse—and still largely unexplored—role of women during the Great Hunger. Where appropriate, a comparative approach is encouraged. Abstracts of 300 words are invited. Please include a short biography (maximum 50 words) including your institutional affiliation and contact address. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length with 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposals for specialist panels are welcome. Postgraduates also are encouraged to submit abstracts. Selected papers may be published in a collection following the conference.
  • 4th International Green Roof Congress 2015

    Istanbul | Dates: 20 – 21 Apr, 2015
    Accelerating international interest and investment into ecological design is the current reality, either in the forms of environmental planning, urban storm water management or living architecture. The incorporation of green roofs and facades of fantastic scale and biodiversity is quickly gaining a forefront position in global architectural concerns, and a great many professional disciplines will find their fields affected by this change. Whether specializing in planning and design, architecture, landscape architecture, urban ecology or environmental science, informing oneself and keeping an edge on the most up-to-date research and techniques is critical for success. The 2015 International Green Roof Conference in Istanbul is an international summit of experts and leaders in this exciting new realm; a unique opportunity for exchange and discussion of the most current achievements in this field. Noted experts include Dr. Ken Yeang (T.R. Hamzah & Yeang Sdn. Bhd), Prof. Herbert Dreiseitl, Jaron Lubin (Safdie Architects), Laura Gatti (Laura Gatti Studios) and Roland Appl (IGRA). A pair of workshops will take place on the second day of the Congress. These simultaneous workshops each address an important aspect of Green Roofing. One is practice-oriented, where focus will be laid on the installation and maintenance of Green Roofs. The other is more conceptual, addressing the current state of scientific research and policy formation in the field of Green Roofing. A diverse panel will be present to describe and discuss these two facets of the industry. The 4th International Green Roof Congress will host important players involved in the promotion of Green Roofs worldwide, through exceptional works of architectural achievement. Logos: (available in higher resolution from www.greenroofworld.com) Key words/Topics: green roofs, roof garden, living roof, façade greenery, vertical greenery, urban planning, stormwater management, green buildings, sustainability, Istanbul, Turkey, IGRA,
  • Opening of Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry

    Chicago | Dates: 14 Feb, 2015
    Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry features more than 250 exemplary works of art jewelry between the late Victorian Era and the First World War, including cloak clasps, hair ornaments, pins, brooches, rings, bracelets, pendants and necklaces. This groundbreaking exhibition illuminates the international proliferation of art jewelry through the lens of woman as its maker and muse. For the first time during this period, women emerged as prominent jewelry makers in their own right, establishing independent studios amid changing social norms. In other regions, the female figure acted as a powerful muse, appearing in jewelry as audacious and novel motifs.

    Drawn from the Driehaus Collection’s extensive jewelry holdings and prominent national collections, many of these stunning pieces have never been seen by the public. The exhibition upholds the same ideals of beauty as did its makers, who in the early decades of the twentieth century were inspired by broader art movements of the day to create handcrafted jewelry with dramatic forms, intricate craftsmanship, saturated colors, and semiprecious stones.

    Maker & Muse explores five different areas of jewelry design and fabrication: the Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain, Art Nouveau in France, Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago. Each section explores the important female figures and historic social milieu associated with these movements.
  • A+D 101 Lecture - Midcentury Italian Glass and American Studio Glass

    Palm Springs | Dates: 18 – 18 Apr, 2015
    Speakers: Joan and Gary Gand Patchwork….swirls….stripes…..bended and twisted into sculptural shapes. The art of glass-blowing was once confined and the process kept secret on the island of Murano. How did the art of glass-blowing evolve from the Italian masters to the American studio glass movement? How did blown glass change from goblets and vases to abstract sculpture? Midcentury Italian glass collectors Gary and Joan Gand will trace the fascinating history of this Midcentury collectible and how it inspired the glass artists of today. Lecture will be held in the Annenberg Theater and will be followed by a site visit beginning at 11 a.m. Joan and Gary Gand, also known as the Gand Band, are musicians by trade, but they are also collectors with an avid appreciation of all things Midcentury. Experts on vintage furniture, art, architecture, they created and maintain the only definitive information website for Italian Glass collectors. Their collection of over 250 pieces of Italian glass from 1927-1975 resides at their Illinois home.
  • A+D 101 Lecture and Site Visit - The Midlife Crisis of Midcentury Modern

    Palm Springs | Dates: 28 – 28 Mar, 2015
    Speaker: Leo Marmol, Marmol Radziner Architects Uneven surfaces, poor circulation, leaks, lack of a sense of purpose. Despite increased recognition of Modern architecture’s cultural significance, our midcentury heritage seems to have reached that all too familiar midlife crisis. Leo Marmol, FAIA, will present the conservation strategies and particular challenges that arise when restoring these architectural icons. How do we determine what to preserve, while providing for current lifestyle needs and expectations? Lecture will be held in the Annenberg Theater and will be followed by a site visit beginning at 11 a.m. Leo Marmol, Managing Principal of Marmol Radziner, established the Los Angeles-based architectural firm with his business partner Ron Radziner in 1989. Marmol Radziner is a unique design-build practice that includes architecture, construction, landscape, interiors, furniture, and jewelry. The firm has completed restorations of important buildings in the Coachella Valley and beyond, including Richard Neutra’s Kaufmann House (1946), Erle Webster and Adrian Wilson’s Ship of the Desert (1937), Albert Frey’s Loewy House (1946), and Santa Fe Federal Savings and Loan Association (1961), now the site of the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion.
  • Friends of Fairsted 2015 Beveridge Research Fellowship

    Brookline | Dates: 09 Jan – 01 Apr, 2015
    Friends of Fairsted 2015 Beveridge Research Fellowship This fellowship supports research in the Olmsted archives at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site. It provides a $1,500 stipend that may be used to defray living or travel expenses. Students, developing Olmsted scholars, and emerging professionals are encouraged to apply. Applications are due April 1, 2015; research must be completed within one year. For more information, including past recipients and the application form and guidelines, please visit www.friendsoffairsted.org.
  • Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft, and Design, Midcentury and Today

    New York | Dates: 28 Apr – 27 Sep, 2015

    Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Midcentury and Today considers the important contributions of women to modernism in postwar visual culture. In the 1950s and 60s, an era when painting, sculpture, and architecture were dominated by men, women had considerable impact in alternative materials such as textiles, ceramics, and metals. Largely unexamined in major art historical surveys, either due to their gender or choice of materials, these pioneering women achieved success and international recognition, laying the ground for the feminist movement that followed.

    Featuring more than 80 works, Pathmakers focuses on a core cadre of women—including Ruth Asawa, Edith Heath, Sheila Hicks, Karen Karnes, Dorothy Liebes, Alice Kagawa Parrott, Lenore Tawney, and Eva Zeisel—who had impact and influence as designers, artists, and teachers, using materials such as clay, fiber, and metals in innovative ways. Significantly, the group came to maturity along with the Museum of Arts and Design itself, which was founded in 1956 as the center of the emerging American modern craft movement.

    The exhibition also highlights contributions of European émigrés, including Anni Albers and Maija Grotell, who brought with them a conviction that craft could serve as a pathway to modernist innovation. Parallels between women creating work in Scandinavia and the United States are emphasized by the inclusion of important Scandinavian designers such as Rut Bryk, Vuokko Nurmesniemi, Mariana Richter and Vivianna Torun Bülow-Hübe.

    The legacy of these women is conveyed through a section of the exhibition that presents works by contemporary female artists and designers that reflect and expand upon the work of the earlier generation. International and United States-based artists and designers featured in this section include Polly Apfelbaum, Vivian Beer, Front Design, Hella Jongerius, and Magdalene Odundo, among others. 

    Pathmakers is organized by guest curators Jennifer Scanlan and Ezra Shales, along with Barbara Paris Gifford, Curatorial Assistant and Project Manager. The exhibition will be accompanied by a special issue of the Journal of Modern Craft, guest edited by MAD’s Windgate Research Curator Elissa Auther. The issue will serve as an in-depth exploration of subjects raised in the exhibition, and will feature articles by international scholars including Helena Kaberg, Professor and Curator at the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, Sweden; Dr. Sarah Lichtman, Assistant Professor of Art & Design Studies and Director of the Cooper Hewitt’s Masters in Decorative Arts and Design; and  Dr. Simon Olding, Professor and Director of the Crafts Study Centre at the University of Creative Arts in Surrey, UK.

    Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft and Design, Midcentury and Today is supported by Hans and Jayne Hufschmid, the Tapio Wirkkala Rut Bryk Foundation, and the Consulate General of Finland in New York. Research was supported by a Craft Research Fund grant from The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, Inc.

  • Frank Lloyd Wright and the Challenge to Historic Preservation

    Oak Park | Dates: 26 Mar, 2015

    The buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright are not immune to the social and environmental forces that affect all architecture. Because of the popular recognition and historical significance of his work, however, the stakes are unusually high when his buildings are modified in any way. Any additions or changes must meet the highest standards; how exactly this can be achieved is an ongoing debate. Daniel Bluestone, Professor and Director of Historic Preservation Program, University of Virginia and Richard Longstreth, Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, George Washington University, will discuss the challenges and rewards of restoring Wright’s historic buildings.

    About the speakers

    Daniel Bluestone is a specialist in 19th century American architecture and urbanism. Mr. Bluestone’s Buildings, Landscapes, and Memory: Case Studies in Historic Preservation (W.W. Norton, 2011) received the Society of Architectural Historians 2013 Antoinette Forrester Downing Book Award for “the most outstanding publication devoted to historical topics in the preservation field that enhances the understanding and protection of the built environment.”  The book surveys the changing history, nature and politics of historic preservation in the United States between the early 19th century and today.  Mr. Bluestone’s book, Constructing Chicago (1991), was awarded the American Institute of Architects International Book Award and the National Historic Preservation book prize.

    Richard Longstreth has served as president of the Society of Architectural Historians (1998-2000); first vice president of the Vernacular Architecture Forum (1989-91); trustee of the National Building Museum (1988-94); board member of Preservation Action (1980-95), Adirondack Architectural Heritage (1998-2010) and the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. (1994-98); and a member of the National Historic Landmarks Advisory Group (1989-1994). Currently he chairs the Maryland Governor's Consulting Committee on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a member of the boards of the Fort Ticonderoga Association and the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy.

    Date: Thursday, March 26, 2015
    Time: 7 pm
    Location: Unity Temple, 875 Lake St, Oak Park, IL
    Admission: Free to members and volunteers, $8 general public

     

  • 100 Years Later: Rehabilitating Bach House and the Ravine Bluffs Development

    Oak Park | Dates: 12 Mar, 2015

    Join the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust at Unity Temple as two of Chicago’s leading preservation architects discuss their restoration of work by Wright in the Chicago area.

    John Eifler, FAIA, will present on the history and rehabilitation of Ravine Bluffs, a housing development consisting of six houses and three poured concrete sculptures designed by Wright and located in Glencoe, IL. The project was commissioned by Wright’s attorney, Sherman J. Booth, and built in 1915. 2015 marks its centennial year.

    Gunny Harboe, FAIA, will discuss his restoration of Wright’s Emil Bach House. Built in 1915 and located on Chicago’s North Side, the house combines the vocabulary of Wright’s earlier Prairie buildings with stylistic innovations that anticipate his later work. Harboe Architects was responsible for the recent restoration of the Bach House and the replication of its missing leaded glass windows.

    About the speakers

    John Eifler is principal of Eifler & Associates Architects, an architectural firm that concentrates on both new design and restoration work. The firm was founded in 1990 and enjoys a variety of commercial, institutional and residential projects. Eifler has contributed to the restoration of a number of Wright-designed houses, including the Bradley House (Kankakee, IL) and The Darwin D. Martin House (Buffalo, NY), among others. His firm is also responsible for the restoration of buildings designed by Louis Sullivan, George Maher, Walter Burley Griffin, Schmidt Garden & Martin, Tallmadge & Watson, Pond and Pond and E.E. Roberts.

    Gunny Harboe is an award-winning architect who started his own firm, Harboe Architects, in 2006. Over the last 25 years, he has restored some of the Chicago area’s most cherished landmarks including The Rookery Building, Reliance Building (now the Hotel Burnham) and Carson Pirie Scott (now the Sullivan Center). His current projects include several Frank Lloyd Wright-designed sites, such as Unity Temple, Robie House and Taliesin West.

    Date: Thursday, March 12, 2015
    Time: 7 pm
    Location: Unity Temple, 875 Lake St, Oak Park, IL
    Admission: Free to members and volunteers, $8 general public
  • This Was Tomorrow: London 1956, Geoffrey Holroyd, Santa Barbara

    Santa Barbara | Dates: 17 Jan – 01 May, 2015

    On view: January 17–May 1, 2015

    Opening Reception: January 16, 2015; 5:30-7:30pm

    After World War II, a generation of young, London-based architects, artists, and writers rethought the art and architecture of a culture fascinated with American consumerism, pop culture, mass communication, and visions of a better tomorrow. In 1956, several of these architects, painters, and sculptors collaborated on This is Tomorrow. This exhibition at London's Whitechapel Art Gallery presented twelve group exhibits drawn from the everyday, which questioned the tenets of traditional and modernist art.

    Recently, Geoffrey Holroyd, formerly of London and now of Santa Barbara, donated to the Museum's Architecture and Design Collection the artwork that he, Lawrence Alloway, and Toni del Renzio created as Group 12 for the 1956 exhibition. This was Tomorrow explores Group 12's contribution to the This is Tomorrow exhibition, and the architecture and design works of Geoffrey and June Holroyd.

  • This Thing Called Theory 12th AHRA International Conference

    Leeds, LS2 9EN | Dates: 04 Jan – 04 May, 2015
    CALL FOR PAPERS This Thing Called Theory 12th AHRA International Conference 19th-21st November 2015 This conference proposes Theory as a form of architectural practice which opposes the instrumentalization of its use. It aims to explore the status of Theory in architecture through an examination of instances in current practice, and invites critical reconsiderations of the role of Theory in architecture, its successes and shortcomings. It seeks to trigger discussions, arguments and polemics around this thing called Theory.

    SYNOPSIS Since the Architectural Humanities Research Association was created twelve years ago to promote and develop research in the architectural humanities, the practices of architecture have transformed and diversified, and so has the relationship between the designs, representations and makings of architecture and their surrounding discourses. After semiotics, psychoanalysis, deconstruction’s flirt with Derridean philosophy, and Deleuzian redefinitions of folds and diagrams, the impact of the digital in architecture seemed to have vanquished the ‘need’ for architecture to refer to discourses from the humanities. Whilst concerns of the humanities are converging with the sciences, they are also simultaneously diverging and dissipating with notions of network, apparatus and agency. The recent imperative in architecture to withdraw from claims of singular design visions has also been characterised by the gathering of individuated credits and subjecting to commodified distribution in the production of theory. Today, in an age of extreme specialization and thus far inconceivable intersections of fragmented strands of knowledge, architecture continues to reinvent itself. As architecture reconsiders its status as a discipline in relation to digital technologies, material sciences, biology and environmental transformations, it continues to resort to and introject thoughts and practices developed ‘outside’ architecture. It is indeed the very openness and connectedness of architecture that can offer a line of continuity in the ongoing process of self-definition and reinvention that has always characterized architecture as a practice of the multiple and of the critical. As a discipline that never simply makes physical environments, architecture will continue to act in and through all its intersections with its ‘other’ as a critical and cultural agent.

    CALL FOR PAPERS While architecture’s discourse seemed to have been muted with the shift from the alphabet to the algorithm (Mario Carpo, 2011), it has more recently emerged that even for the digital it is already not only possible but indeed necessary to construct an archaeology (Greg Lynn, 2013), and this has to be both historical and critical. Log’s ‘Stocktaking’ issue (summer 2013) borrowed Reyner Banham 1960’s instrumental opposition of tradition and technology to resume (or restart) a critical discourse on contemporary architectural practices, attempting to relate them to recent and not so recent disciplinary pasts, while the ‘Ways to Be Critical’ proposed by Volume 36 (Archis 2013, no. 2) seems to reduce the issue of criticality to a series of positions of militant criticism. Beyond the mediatory function of theory (Michael Hays, 2000) and its problematic tag of authorship and authority (Giorgio Agamben, in ‘What is a Paradigm’, 2002), this conference proposes that theory, far from dead, extinct or rejected, remains crucial to the discipline. In the age of post-digital architecture and digital materiality, This Thing Called Theory aims to explore current practices of theory. This conference proposes Theory as a form of architectural practice which opposes the instrumentalization of its use. It aims to explore the status of Theory in architecture through an examination of instances in current practice, and invites critical reconsiderations of the role of Theory in architecture, its successes and shortcomings. It seeks to trigger discussions, arguments and polemics around this thing called Theory. We have identified three main areas for discussion and argumentation: THIS THING CALLED THEORY THOUGHT Theory as Criticism Theory as Architecture Theory as History ACTION Theory as Politics Theory as Praxis Theory as Material SPECULATION Theory as Utopia Theory as Science Theory as Media

    We invite individual and group proposals for 20 minute papers and full sessions from architectural historians, theorists, designers and practitioners, as well as those working on the issues identified in the synopsis from other disciplines, including film-making, art practice and performance. We welcome contributions that explore contemporary developments and project future trends, as well as those that offer retrospective theoretical and critical interrogations. Please send a 500 word abstract, including title, and a 50 word biographical note to T.Stoppani@leedsbeckett.ac.uk and D.Bernath@leedsbeckett.ac.uk Deadline for abstracts of papers: 4th May 2015
     
    Please note that full papers will be required prior to the conference for panel chairs and to begin the editorial process for publication in the This Thing Called Theory volume of the Routledge ‘Critiques’ series,and for a special conference issue of Architecture and Culture, the AHRA journal.

    CONFERENCE Thursday 19th - Saturday 21st November 2015 VENUES Rose Bowl Building, City Campus, Leeds Beckett University, and other venues in Leeds (UK) city centre.

    WEBSITE http://www.thisthingcalledtheory.org/ http://cagd.co.uk/public/research/design_and_creativity.php

    CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Professor Teresa Stoppani, Head of The Leeds School of Architecture, Leeds Beckett University Dr Doreen Bernath, Senior Lecturer in Architecture and Leader of the BA Architectural Studies course, Leeds Beckett University Braden Engel, Undergraduate History and Theory Coordinator, Academy of Art University, San Francisco and PhD Candidate, Leeds Beckett University George Themistocleous, Part Time Lecturer and PhD Candidate, Leeds Beckett University
  • New Brutalist Image 1949-1955

    London | Dates: 19 Dec, 2014 – 04 Oct, 2015
    In 1953 the sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi, the artist-photographer Nigel Henderson, and the architects Alison and Peter Smithson joined up with the pioneering structural engineer Ronald Jenkins to create the radical and influential exhibition Parallel of Life and Art. This historic collaboration was first forged during the design and building of the Hunstanton School in Suffolk which was conceived by the Smithsons in 1949. Capturing the time and process of the building of Hunstanton, this display brings together an extensive range of previously unseen photographs by Henderson, drawings and proposals by the Smithsons, engineering milestones by Jenkins, and sculptures by Paolozzi. Curated with direct reference to the innovative design and commissioning process of Jenkins’s office at Ove Arup & Partners in 1951, the display highlights how this office project became the test-bed of ideas for the group’s design and installation of Parallel of Life and Art, which underpinned the creative and intellectual sensibility and culture that the critic Reyner Banham would infamously label ‘New Brutalism’ in 1955. This display has been curated by Victoria Walsh and Claire Zimmerman, assisted by Helen Little, Elena Crippa, and Ricky Bowtell. Installation design and execution: RVTR and Westby and Jones, Ltd. This project was made possible with generous support from Arup and The University of Michigan (College of Literature, Science and the Arts, and Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning).
  • 2015 Arizona Historic Preservation Conference

    Flagstaff | Dates: 13 – 15 May, 2015

    The Arizona State Historic Preservation Office, the Arizona Preservation Foundation, and the City of Flagstaff invite you to join them at the 13th Annual Arizona Historic Preservation Conference. This year’s conference, “Paths to Preservation” is being held in Flagstaff on May 13th-15th, 2015. The goal of the Conference is to bring together preservationists from around the state to exchange ideas and success stories, to share perspectives and solutions to preservation issues, and to foster cooperation between the diverse Arizona preservation communities.

    At this year’s conference we will analyze the different paths to preservation. Although these paths are not always defined, they still convey a direction or process to follow.  Whether a literal path, such as a historic highway, roadway or trail, or a procedural path, such as rehabilitation, adaptive re-use or the process of listing a site or property on the National Register, these paths are there to guide us to our desired location or result.  Through examples from businesses, communities, and even government agencies, we will share the pathways that guide preservationists in their efforts to save our historic and cultural heritage.

    The Preservation Awards will be the focal event of the Conference. The 33rd Annual Governor’s Heritage Preservation Honor Awards, presented by the State Historic Preservation Office and the Arizona Preservation Foundation, recognize people, organizations, and projects that represent outstanding achievements in preserving Arizona’s prehistoric and historic resources. The 29th Annual Governor’s Awards in Public Archaeology are also presented at the event. These awards, selected by the Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, recognize excellence in archaeological awareness, conservation and education. The awards make the conference more than a venue to learn, debate and network, but also a celebration of outstanding historic preservation efforts and achievements.

    As we move forward, it is imperative that we work together to build a path for the future of our valuable historic resources.

  • Science for Parks, Parks for Science: The Next Century Summit

    Berkeley | Dates: 25 – 27 Mar, 2015

    NCPTT invites you to participate in “Science for Parks, Parks for Science: the Next Century,” a unique science and technology summit organized and hosted by the University of California, Berkeley. The two-and-a-half day summit will focus on state-of-the-science research conducted by natural and cultural resources scientist, managers, and practitioners. The summit will be held on March 25-27, 2015 at UC Berkeley. The unique partnership between UC Berkeley, the National Park Service and the National Geographic Society to bring you this summit grows out of a meeting 100 years earlier that helped launch the National Park Service.

    The focus of the meeting is to bring together visionary scientists to envision and contribute to strategies for science in parks and science using parks for the coming decades. Distinguished plenary speakers and panelists include David Ackerly, Jill Baron, Steven Beissinger, Joel Berger, Ruth DeFries, Thomas Dietz, Josh Donlan, Holly Doremus, Ernesto Enkerlin-Hoeflich, Denis Galvin, David Graber, Jane Lubchenco, Gary Machlis, George Miller, Hugh Possingham, Jedediah Purdy, Nina Roberts, Mark Schwartz, Daniel Simberloff, Monica Turner, & Jennifer Wolch.

    It is critical to the future of preservation science in the National Park Service to be represented and NCPTT encourages you to submit to the contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. The deadline for abstracts is November 1, 2014. Click here to submit an abstract.

    More information, key dates, and ways to submit presentations for the summit click here.

  • Mid-Century Modern Structures: Materials and Preservation 2015 Symposium

    St. Louis | Dates: 13 – 16 Apr, 2015

    The Friends of NCPTT, the World Monument Fund, the American Institute for Architects St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial are partnering for a jointly organized symposium on the preservation of Mid-Century Modern Structures. The meeting will be held at the Drury Plaza Hotel in St. Louis, Missouri, April 14-16, 2015. A public lecture will precede the meeting on Monday evening, April 13 at Washington University in St. Louis.

    Focusing primarily on the history, use, and preservation of materials found in Mid-Century modern architecture, the 2015 three-day symposium will provide in-depth understanding of the complex issues associated with the preservation of these structures. Special emphasis will be on modern architectural metals, but presentations on other materials, such as concrete and curtain wall structures, will be included.

    Mid-Century Modern Structures: Materials and Preservation 2015 Symposium Schedule

  • Greater & Greener 2015: Innovative Parks, Vibrant Cities

    San Francisco | Dates: 11 – 14 Apr, 2015

    City Parks Alliance and the San Francisco Recreation & Park Department are excited to be partnering to present Greater & Greener 2015: Innovative Parks, Vibrant Cities. 

    Greater & Greener is a four-day indoor and outdoor conference designed to equip you with the tools you need to create innovative, vibrant, and sustainable parks in your city, district, community or neighborhood.

    You’ll be joining more than 1,000 global park leaders, city planning and design professionals, civic officials, and other urban park advocates at Greater & Greener in San Francisco — an inspiring network of peers from cities across the world. 

    Through outdoor workshops and tours, engaging speaker and panel discussions, volunteer opportunities and exclusive events, we’ll highlight the people and programs having a positive impact across urban park creation, management and stewardship – in the San Francisco Bay Area and globally.

    For more information, review our Schedule-At-A-Glance or the Full Schedule.


  • 2015 IDEA Journal: Call for Submissions

    Dates: 18 Dec, 2014 – 01 Mar, 2015

    EDITORS

    • Suzie Attiwill (RMIT University, Australia)
    • Luciano Crespi (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
    • Davide Fassi (Politecnico di Milano, Italy; Tongji University, China)
    • Elena Enrica Giunta (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
    • Belén Hermida (Universidad CEU San Pablo, Spain)

    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
    Academics, research students and practitioners are invited to submit design research papers and critical project works that make a contribution to the discipline of interior design/interior architecture through an engagement with the provocation of  URBAN + INTERIOR for the IDEA JOURNAL 2015.

    PROVOCATION
    Unprecedented movements of people, growth in population density and forces of capitalism and globalism shape the twenty-first century urban environment and transform how people live in the world – spatially, temporally and subjectively. In the disciplines of interior design, interior architecture, architecture, spatial design and urban design, one encounters the coupling of the conditions of ‘urban’ and ‘interior’ with increasing frequency. Urban interior, interior urbanization, urban interiority and urban interior design are used as provocations for designing, teaching and writing – researching and thinking – in cities and cultures as diverse as Milan, Madrid, Melbourne, Jakarta, Austin, London, Stockholm, Bangkok, Singapore and Bogotá.

    While some might see this as the bringing together of vastly distinct conditions and scales, the conjunction – urban and interior – seeks to engage the potential of practices and techniques of disciplines concerned with interior and urbanism in new ways involving multi-scalar, multi-cultural, multi-discipline approaches. A rethinking of the concept of interior is invited where the defining characteristics of enclosure, form and structure are opened to other possibilities than an equation with the inside of a building. ‘Interior’ is introduced here in an expanded sense. A thinking differently about urbanism and the concept of ‘urban’ is also invoked.

    The question of, and conjunction of, urban + interior is a critical one in the contemporary context where the inhabitation of urban environments and cities has exceeded the population living in rural areas; . We are keen to explore this condition through actual proposals, scenarios and solutions that address the challenges, as well as historical, anthropological, sociological and epistemological reflections.

    The aspiration for this forthcoming issue of the IDEA JOURNAL is to gather this emerging trajectory composed of practices, techniques, and genealogies for future practice. With our call for submissions, we have not specified research questions or positioned in advance what, how, when or why ‘urban’ and ‘interior’ are/might be connected. Our strategy is to be open to what comes in and from this make an arrangement of connections where the potential of urban + interior can be grasped, offered up and discussed.

    The conjunctions, conversations and debates have already begun. The editorial approach for this issue of the IDEA JOURNAL is different to the individual guest editor of previous issues. Five people from three cities are already in discussion about this emerging trajectory of urban + interior: Suzie Attiwill from Melbourne and the research group Urban Interior Laboratory; Davide Fassi, Luciano Crespi and Elena Enrica Giunta from Politecnico di Milano – Design Department and Belén Hermida from University CEU San Pablo in Madrid – who are co-directors and co-coordinators of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design, a program that is offered between POLI.Design in Milano and University CEU San Pablo in Madrid. And now we would like to invite others who are researching urban + interior – through design and projects, through historical and theoretical research, through teaching – to contribute and participate!

    THE IDEA JOURNAL ACCEPTS:

    DESIGN RESEARCH PAPERS
    that demonstrate development and engagement with interior design/interior architecture history, theory, education and practice through critique and synthesis. The focus is on the documentation and critical review of both speculative research and practice-based research

    REFEREED STUDIOS
    that present the nature and outcomes of refereed design studios which have either been previously peer reviewed in situ and/or critically discussed through text and imagery for the IDEA JOURNAL.

    PROJECT REVIEWS
    that critically evaluate design-based works which seek to expand the nature of spatial, temporal and theoretical practice in interior design/interior architecture and associated disciplines.

    VISUAL ESSAYS
    that demonstrate and present speculative research and practice-based researchthrough visual media. For examples of visual essays please refer to previous issues of the IDEA JOURNAL – for example, the visual essay by Sara Bomans and Remco Roes ‘Nothing will come of nothing, speak again’ (http://idea-edu.com/journal/2013-idea-journal/).

    BOOK & EXHIBITION REVIEWS
    to encourage debate into the emerging literature dedicated to the expression and expansion of the theory and practice of interior design/interior architecture. 

    REGISTRATION OF INTEREST:
    Authors are invited to register their interest in making a submission via an online form (please see link below). Registrations of interest will be received until beginning of March 2015. It is important to note that the registration of interest is not refereed; acknowledgement of registration facilitates development of a proposal to full research paper, refereed studio, visual essay or project review by providing formatting guidelines and publication standards to registrants. Registrations of interest will be responded to within one week of receipt. Authors are encouraged to register sooner than later.

    link to REGISTRATION OF INTEREST FORM
    link to PDF of 2015 Call for Submissions

    For any queries please contact Suzie Attiwill (executive editor) via emailIDEAJournal2015@gmail.com or phone +61 3 9925 3498

    Important deadlines/dates:

    • Call for contributions: November 2014 to March 2015.
    • Registration of interest including 50 words and image will be acknowledged
      within one week of sending.
    • Submission of full draft for review by April 30 2015.
    • Peer review process: May to June 2015.
    • Notification to authors of acceptance late July 2015.
    • Revisions by author(s) returned to Executive Editor by 30 September 2015.
    • Journal published early 2016.

    2015 IDEA JOURNAL EDITORS:

    Suzie Attiwill practises interior design using curatorial and exhibition techniques. She is the current executive editor of the IDEA JOURNAL; associate professor in the discipline of Interior Design and deputy dean of Learning + Teaching, RMIT University’s School of Architecture and Design, Melbourne, Australia. Her research has been published nationally and internationally. Publications include: ‘interiorizt’, Brooker, G & L, Weinthal (eds), The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design, 2014 and ‘Urban and Interior: techniques for an urban interiorist’, Hinkel, R (ed), Urban Interior. Informal explorations, interventions and occupations, 2011. Suzie is a founding member of the Urban Interior Laboratory. From 2006 to 2012, she was chair of IDEA (Interior Design/Interior Architecture Educators Association). She holds a PhD (Interior Design, RMIT), Master of Arts (Design, RMIT), Bachelor of Arts Hons (Interior Design, RMIT), Bachelor of Arts Hons (Art History / Indian Studies, Uni Melb) and a Certificate in Applied Arts (Textiles).

    Luciano Crespi is an architect and full professor of design at the School of Design of Politecnico di Milano and President of the Interior Design Study Course. Luciano has been teaching at the Architecture Faculty of Politecnico di Milano since 2000; he is a member of the PhD Professor Board of Design; co-director of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design (Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano); head of Postgraduate Master ‘Exhibition Design’, Politecnico di Milano; and coordinator of DHOC, Interior Design for Hospitable Cities, Politecnico di Milano, a research group that deals with the design of interior and exterior urban spaces, aimed to set up new forms of hospitable places in the contemporary city through temporary, diffused services, new quality for public areas, and innovative models of re-use for disused buildings. Recent books include: Luciano Crespi, Da spazio nasce spazio. L’interior design nella trasformazione degli ambienti contemporanei, (Milan: Postmedia books, 2013)

    Davide Fassi, PhD, is an architect and he is currently teaching and researching in interior and product service system design both at Politecnico di Milano and at Tongji University (College of Design and Innovation). He joined DHOC (Interior Design for Hospitable Cities research group) in 2009. He is coordinator of double degree programs with universities in China and the School of Design – Politecnico di Milano, coordinator of GIDE (Group of International Design Education), co-coordinator of [MUID], the International Master in Urban Interior Design (Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano) and member of the International Coordination Committee of the DESIS Network (Design for Social Innovation and Sustainability). He has published and edited several books including: In-Trattenere (2010) and Temporary Urban Solutions (2012). His research focus is the relationship between space and service with a community-centred approach: Coltivando, the convivial garden at the Politecnico di Milano (2011) and campUS (2014) are the most recent applied research projects.

    Elena Enrica Giunta, PhD, is a designer. She has a Bachelor of Science in Interior design, and a Masters in Interior Architecture (Exhibit Design for Cultural Heritage. Elena is a research fellow and contract professor at School of Design, Politecnico di Milano; member of GIDE (Group of International Design Education) and co-coordinator of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design (Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano). Since 2003 she has been involved in research programs, both national and international, on topics addressing interior design at urban scale and design strategies for cultural heritage enhancement; she joined DHOC in 2007. Her research interest is focused on specific implications of intangible assets arising from places and artifacts. She holds a PhD in Multimedia Communication (Design, Politecnico di Milano) and a Certificate in Art-Therapy (Artea). Publications include: ‘Cities * society = scenarios of changing. Urban micro-environment between Art and Design’, PRO-OCCUPANCY. Design dei microambienti urbani contemporanei: tra performatività dell’allestimento e appartenenze, (Milan: 2012).

    Belén Hermida is a licensed architect in Spain since 1990. She holds an Artium Baccalaureate in Studio Art and Architecture, Wellesley College (1986) and a Master of Architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT (1988). She is currently a PhD candidate at Universidad de Zaragoza with a thesis on the Prado Museum Extension. Her PhD research is based on her extensive experience in museum design in collaboration with Rafael Moneo with whom she worked between 1989 and 2007. Since 2005 Belén has taught Form Analysis and Architectural Design and researches in the group Re-Thinking Cities at Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid, Spain. She is coordinator of International Relations, coordinator of the Bilingual Program in Architecture and co-director of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design: Design of the Public Realm in Contemporary Cities taught at University CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano, where she is also visiting faculty. Since 2013, she is a partner at Urban Networks in Madrid, a firm specialized in the conceptual design of urban and architectural initiatives. Urban Networks main task is the creative transformation of cities.

    IDEA JOURNAL is published by IDEA (Interior Design / Interior Architecture Educators Association)

SAH2015