Recent Opportunities

  • Call for Papers: Richard E. Greenwood Young Scholar Award

    Dates: 25 Oct, 2015 – 04 Jan, 2016
    CALL FOR PAPERS for the Richard E. Greenwood Award for younger scholars, to be presented at the VAF-NE Annual Meeting on Saturday, April 2, 2016, in Sturbridge, Massachusetts.   The Board of the New England Chapter of the Vernacular Architecture Forum invites submissions of abstracts for papers from younger scholars no more than 5 years beyond the terminal degree. Subject matter includes all aspects of vernacular architecture and everyday urban, suburban, and rural landscapes seen through interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary methods. We are particularly interested in papers that incorporate field work as a component of the research, that have engaging visual images, and that investigate topics within New England. (Agendas with paper titles from recent Annual Meetings can be found at http://www.vernaculararchitectureforum.org/about/chapters-NE-meetings.html)
  • VAF Durham: From Farm to Factory

    Durham | Dates: 01 – 04 Jun, 2016
    Diversity—human, agricultural, industrial, religious, and educational—characterizes North Carolina’s Piedmont region. The legacy of slavery, transformation of the agricultural landscape following the Civil War, industrialization based on tobacco and textiles, a variety of Protestant denominations, African American business leadership, and the development by both races of elementary and higher education have all left their imprint on the landscapes and communities of the region. The theme of the 2016 conference, “From Farm to Factory: Piedmont Stories in Black and White,” will be expressed through tours of plantation housing for blacks and whites; diversified farms of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; turn-of-the-20th-century textile and tobacco factories and their associated villages; Quaker communities and churches built by Germans, Scotch-Irish, and African Americans; rural schools and urban universities; rural courthouse and crossroads communities; and urban neighborhoods. With a population that has ranged from 34% to 40% African American since the 1890s and a remarkable number of historic rehabilitation projects, Durham provides a unique opportunity to consider the impacts of a prosperous black middle-class, Jim Crow segregation, the Civil Rights movement, and an impressive number of incredibly successful industrialists on a place that has transformed itself from a city wreathed in cotton lint and the aroma of processed tobacco to today’s “City of Medicine” with an economy based primarily on health care.
  • VAF Durham: Pamela H. Simpson Presenter Fellowship

    Durham | Dates: 24 – 30 Oct, 2015
    VAF’s Pamela H. Simpson Presenter’s Fellowships offer a limited amount of financial assistance to students and young professionals presenting papers at VAF’s annual conference. Awards are intended to offset travel and registration costs for students, and to attract developing scholars to the organization. Any person presenting a paper who is currently enrolled in a degree-granting program, or who has received a degree within one year of the annual conference is eligible to apply. Awards cannot exceed $500. Previous awardees are ineligible, even if their status has changed. Recipients are expected to participate fully in the conference, including tours and workshops. To apply, submit with your abstract a one-page attachment with "Simpson Presenter’s Fellowship" at the top and the following information: 1) name, 2) institution or former institution, 3) degree program, 4) date of degree (received or anticipated), 5) mailing address, 6) permanent email address, 7) telephone number, and 8) paper title.
  • VAF Durham 2016: Farm to Factory

    Durham | Dates: 23 – 30 Oct, 2015
    The Vernacular Architecture Forum (www.vafweb.org) invites paper proposals for its 36th Annual Conference in Durham, North Carolina, June 1-4, 2016. Papers may address vernacular and everyday buildings, sites, or cultural landscapes worldwide. Submissions on all relevant topics are welcome but we encourage papers exploring African-American life, including slavery, the rise of a black middle class, the Civil Rights movement, and the relationship of race and the built environment; the transformation and industrialization of agricultural landscapes; and the architecture of institutions, including churches, schools, and hospitals. SUBMITTING AN ABSTRACT Papers should be analytical rather than descriptive, and no more than twenty minutes in length. Proposals for complete sessions, roundtable discussions or other innovative means that facilitate scholarly discourse are especially encouraged. Proposals should clearly state the argument of the paper and explain the methodology and content in fewer than 400 words. Please include the paper title, author’s name, and email address, along with a one-page c.v.. You may include up to two images with your submission. Note that presenters must deliver their papers in person and be VAF members at the time of the conference. Speakers who do not register for the conference by March 1, 2016, will be withdrawn. Please do not submit an abstract if you are not committed to attending the papers session on Saturday, June 4th.
  • Drawn to Build: Architectural Representation in the Digital Age

    Stanford | Dates: 28 – 28 Oct, 2015
    In this panel discussion, Sergei Tochoban and Andrew Zago will discuss the role of the architectural drawing–both analog and digital–as a tool in the design process and as an object worth collecting and putting on display. Event location is in the Cantor Auditorium at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University. The event begins at 5:30pm.
  • International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

    Washington DC | Dates: 24 Oct – 09 Nov, 2015
    Organizers:  International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property, Rome (ICCROM)  The Smithsonian Institution, USA In cooperation with Prince Claus Fund, Cultural Emergency Response Programme (CER) #Culturecannotwait: Many different types of professionals respond to an unfolding crisis. This course provides strategies for interlocking culture specialists with humanitarian specialists during an emergency situation and aims to unify these sometimes conflicting perspectives. The course imparts practical skills and knowledge for taking simple measures to secure and stabilize endangered cultural heritage during a complex emergency situation, which in turn can become a driver for peace and holistic development. The recovery and stabilization of such cultural material can be a strategy that allows people to cope in a crisis. After four international, and more than nine regional and national editions in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis (FAC) will now be hosted for the first time in Washington DC, USA, by the Smithsonian Institution, in early summer 2016. The course content will be enriched through case examples on safeguarding cultural heritage in the aftermath of national disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and, most recently, Hurricane Sandy. For more information, please refer to the following: Full announcement of 2016 FAC Course Framework Document (6 pages) Infographic on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis Video of final 2015 simulation exercise (05:25) The course application can be found here. The deadline for submitting applications is Monday, 9 November 2015.
  • College Art Association’s Fair Use Code: How Will It Help the Visual Arts Community?

    Chicago | Dates: 09 – 09 Nov, 2015
    A presentation by Peter Jaszi, Lead Principal Investigator of CAA’s Fair Use Project
    Monday, November 9, 2015 
    2:00-4:00 PM 
    Columbia College Chicago 

    The College Art Association, in conjunction with the Business & Entrepreneurship Department and Art & Art History Department at Columbia College Chicago, are proud to announce that Peter Jaszi, Professor of Law at Washington College of Law, American University and co-facilitator of the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts, will be speaking about the code, and answering questions on Monday, November 9th at Columbia College Chicago.

    The Code of Best Practices http://www.collegeart.org/fair-use/best-practices provides visual-arts professionals with a set of principles addressing best practices in the fair use of copyrighted materials. It describes how fair use can be invoked and implemented when using copyrighted materials in scholarship, teaching, museums, archives, and in the creation of art.

    A reception will be held after the event in the adjacent Hokin Gallery, where an exhibition of interdisciplinary work from BA & BFA Students from across the country juried by Buzz Spector, organized by the Art & Art History Department and mounted by the Gallery Management Practicum is ongoing.

    Attendance is free and open to the public; this un-ticketed event will be held in a space limited to 160 attendees. Light refreshments will be served.

    This event is made possible by the College Art Association with a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

    Facebook Event:
    http://on.fb.me/1L9ygQP

    Twitter: @collegeart
    Hashtag: #caafairuse

    Location: Columbia College Chicago
    HAUS / Quincy Wong Center for Artistic Excellence
    623 S. Wabash Ave. First Floor – Chicago, IL

    Questions:
    email: art@colum.edu

    More Information about Code of Best Practices
    http://www.collegeart.org/fair-use/
     
  • CFP: Byzantine Studies Alive (Nijmegen, 16-17 Jun 16)

    Dates: 22 Oct – 01 Dec, 2015
    Radboud University Nijmegen, June 16 - 17, 2016
    Deadline: Dec 1, 2015

    Organizers: 
    Daniëlle Slootjes (Department of History, Radboud University Nijmegen) Mariëtte Verhoeven (Department of Art History, Radboud University
    Nijmegen)

    In recent decades many new studies on the Byzantine world have appeared that have offered us new perspectives on existing views of the Byzantine Empire. For instance, Judith Herrin in Byzantium. The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire (2009) and Margins and Metropolis (2013) made an appeal for Byzantium to be saved from its negative stereotype of an autocratic, completely ritualized and almost fossilized empire. Averil Cameron has demonstrated in her recent Byzantine Matters (2014) that – although we have made progress in the past few decades – Byzantine Studies is still left with many questions on issues such as Byzantine identity, the Hellenistic influence or our understanding of religious practices and orthodoxy in the Byzantine world.

    However, whereas both Herrin and Cameron encourage Byzantine scholars to continue to deal with these issues, to take up new avenues and to unite the various disciplines that work on the Byzantine field, Norman Davies in his Vanished Kingdoms (2011) has been more pessimistic. In his discussion of the rise and fall of various kingdoms in Europe he offered his readers a gloomy view on our possibilities of understanding Byzantium. In fact, in the chapter on Byzantium he concluded that “describing or summarizing Europe’s greatest ‘vanished kingdom’ is almost too much to contemplate. The story is too long, too rich and too complex” (p. 322).

    This rather negative point of view of being overwhelmed by Byzantium’s complexities almost seems to suggest that we should refrain ourselves from attempting to analyze Byzantium and its history. Our conference likes to object to this suggestion as it will take up the challenge of demonstrating that Byzantine Studies is far from dead. We want to show how the diversities and complexities have made Byzantium into a fascinating world worth of our attention, encouraged by the studies of Herrin and Cameron. We are very pleased to announce that Averil Cameron will give the key note lecture of the conference.

    We would like to bring together both junior and senior scholars from various disciplines such as Byzantine history, art history, literature and archaeology in our attempt to unlock the importance of the Byzantine world for our current generations.

    We welcome proposals for papers on the following two themes:

    1) Byzantium as a key player in the relationship between East and West, A.D. 330 -1453 Byzantium can be seen as a leading catalyst in the political, cultural, economic and religious exchange between East and West, to be detected in the relationship both between Byzantium and Latin Western Europe and Byzantium and the Islamic world.

    Keywords: contacts, interchange, imitation, competition, confrontations

    We especially welcome the papers on this theme to include analyses on
    (a) Agents of exchange such as rulers, bishops, popes, diplomats, pilgrims, writers  or artists
    (b) Objects of transcultural encounter and transfer such as,
    (religious) monuments, texts (hagiography, historiography, liturgical texts, travel accounts)  decorations, liturgical objects, relics or diplomatic gifts. 
    These agents and objects can be regarded as part of the larger historical context within which Europe took shape in the Middle Ages and beyond.

    2) The position of Byzantine heritage, 7th Century - present day The definite end of the Byzantine Empire is marked by the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottomans in 1453. Through its history, however, the dimension and identity of the Empire was not one identical continuum. In different phases of development (Arab conquests, iconoclasm, Crusaders period) Byzantine monuments and artefacts were appropriated or under threat, a phenomenon that continued after the Ottoman conquest.

    Keywords: appropriation, transformation, identity, continuity, rupture.

    We especially welcome the papers on this theme to include analyses on: 
    (a) Appropriation and transformation of Byzantine heritage (objects, monuments, cities)
    (b) Display of Byzantine heritage in museum collections
    (c) Preservation and restoration of Byzantine heritage
    (d) Byzantine heritage under threat

    Abstracts, no more than 400 words, can be submitted to d.slootjes@let.ru.nl  and m.verhoeven@let.ru.nl  before the 1st of December, 2015.
     
  • Next Generation Humanities PhD Planning Grants

    Dates: 22 Oct, 2015 – 17 Feb, 2016
    Receipt Deadline February 17, 2016 for Projects Beginning August 2016

    Brief Summary

    In recent years, research published by Humanities Indicators, among others, has revealed that humanities PhDs pursue careers in many different professions—both inside and outside academia. Yet most humanities PhD programs in the United States still prepare students primarily for tenure-track professor positions at colleges and universities. The increasing shortage of such positions has changed students’ expected career outcomes. NEH therefore hopes to assist universities in devising a new model of doctoral education, which can both transform the understanding of what it means to be a humanities scholar and promote the integration of the humanities in the public sphere.

    Next Generation Humanities PhD Planning Grants support universities in preparing to institute wide-ranging changes in humanities doctoral programs. Humanities knowledge and methods can make an even more substantial impact on society if students are able to translate what they learn in doctoral programs into a multitude of careers. Next Generation PhD Planning Grants are designed to bring together various important constituencies to discuss and strategize, and then to produce plans that will transform scholarly preparation in the humanities at the doctoral level. Students will be prepared to undertake various kinds of careers, and humanities PhD programs will increase their relevance for the twenty-first century.

    Grantee institutions must provide funds (either their own funds or funds raised from nonfederal third parties) equal to the grant funds released by NEH.

    Information about Next Generation Humanities PhD Implementation Grants is available here.
  • CFP Architectural Theory Review 21.1: Animal Mineral Vegetable

    Sydney | Dates: 22 Oct – 31 Dec, 2015
    Animal, mineral, vegetable? For Plato, the answer to such a question lay in the relative beauty of organisms that were divided by their chemical constitution and their notable lack of a spiritual soul. In classic philosophy, definitions across these three kingdoms were often vigorously contested: Aquinas classified plants as being created solely for the consumption of animals while in the Great Chain of Being (scala naturae), Aristotle defined human beings as rational animals who existed in a different moral realm than their lower counterparts. Even in the contemporary sphere, the underground notion of theorizing the animal extends from Stanley Cavell, Jacques Derrida, Emannuel Levinas, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Slavoj Zizek to current scholars like Brian Massumi and Cary Wolfe.

    The animal condition in its disciplinary iterations returns to the question of life, whether an object should be considered inanimate or animate. Even the muteness of substances such as stone possesses its own internal dynamism, unknown to the human eye. Beyond metaphysics, animality provokes issues of identity and difference linked to discourses surrounding colonialism, race, and sexuality. Across empires controlled by Western nations, the subjugation of slaves and women has long been coupled with the “animalization” of human beings and points to the animal condition as one of hierarchical economy and coercive power.

    Alongside the animal condition, biological models of architecture have drawn upon the mineral and vegetable worlds to provide inspiration for industrial design and architectural buildings – to name a few, Owen Jones’s botanical prints, Victor Ruprich Robert’s Flore ornamentale (1866-76) on the decorative arts, Claude Bragdon’s projective arabesques, and Karl Blossfeldt’s Urformen der Kunst. Organic architecture, despite its sometimes eccentric origins, has been radically reinvented since the days of modernists Hans Scharoun and Eero Saarinen. Design computation and digital fabrication have pushed these metaphors to new heights, creating sinuous forms through material properties.

    As artist Jim Dine states, “I trust objects so much. I trust disparate elements going together.” For this thematic issue, we invite contributions that examine new definitions of the animal, mineral, or vegetable in light of architectural history/theory, art history, literature, history, and philosophy, including but not limited to the following topics: animal studies, animality and race/sexuality, anthropomorphism, artistic collections that deal with animals/minerals/plants, biological models and architecture, contemporary art and the bestiary, discourse of species, labor and slavery, natural history and museum design, historical models of organicism, and posthumanism.

    Architectural Theory Review, founded at the University of Sydney in 1996 and now in its twentieth year, is the pre-eminent journal of architectural theory in the Australasian region. Published by Routledge in print and online, the journal is an international forum for generating, exchanging, and reflecting on theory in and of architecture. All texts are subject to a rigorous process of blind peer review.

    Submission Instructions
    Enquiries about this special issue theme, and possible papers, are welcome, please email the editor, Jennifer Ferng at jennifer.ferng@sydney.edu.au. The deadline for the submission of completed manuscripts is Wednesday, 31 December 2015. Please submit manuscripts via the journal’s online submission system. When uploading your manuscript please indicate that you are applying for this special issue, for example: vol. 21.1 – Animal, Mineral, Vegetable.

    Manuscript submission guidelines can be found on the Architectural Theory Review website.

    http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/pgas/atr-cfp-animal-mineral-vegetable
     
  • Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grant Program

    Dates: 22 Oct, 2015 – 15 Jan, 2016
    Each year, the Friends of the Princeton University Library offer short-term Library Research Grants to promote scholarly use of the library’s research collections. Up to $3,500 is available per award. Applications will be considered for scholarly use of archives, manuscripts, rare books, and other rare and unique holdings of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, including Mudd Library; as well as rare books in Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, and in the East Asian Library (Gest Collection). Special grants are awarded in several areas. The Program in Hellenic Studies supports a limited number of library fellowships in Hellenic studies, and the Cotsen Children’s Library supports research in its collection on aspects of children’s books. The Maxwell Fund supports research on materials dealing with Portuguese-speaking cultures. The Sid Lapidus '59 Research Fund for Studies of the Age of Revolution and the Enlightenment in the Atlantic World covers work using materials pertinent to this topic.
  • PastForward Preservation Conference Live Streaming

    Dates: 04 – 06 Nov, 2015
    This year's national preservation conference, PastForward, TrustLive presentations will focus on urban strategies including Main Street approaches to saving historic places, federal innovation and excellence in historic preservation, and telling a more inclusive story of preservation by featuring multiple voices and experiences. Finally, we will launch a rich and engaging discussion about the future as we approach the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act.
  • Wolfsonian Fellowship Program

    Miami Beach | Dates: 31 – 31 Dec, 2015
    The Wolfsonian-FIU Fellowship Program The Wolfsonian–Florida International University is a museum and research center that promotes the examination of modern visual and material culture. The focus of the Wolfsonian collection is on North American and European decorative arts, propaganda, architecture, and industrial and graphic design from the period 1885-1945. The United States, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands are the countries most extensively represented. There are also smaller but significant collections of materials from a number of other countries, including Austria, Czechoslovakia, France, Japan, the former Soviet Union and Hungary. The collection includes works on paper (including posters, prints and design drawings), furniture, paintings, sculpture, glass, textiles, ceramics, lighting and other appliances, and many other kinds of objects. The Wolfsonian’s library has approximately 50,000 rare books, periodicals, and ephemeral items. Fellowships are intended to support full-time research, generally for a period of three to five weeks. The program is open to holders of master’s or doctoral degrees, Ph.D. candidates, and to others who have a significant record of professional achievement in relevant fields. Applicants are encouraged to discuss their project with the Fellowship Coordinator prior to submission to ensure the relevance of their proposals to the Wolfsonian’s collection. The application deadline is December 31, for residency during the 2016-2017 academic year. For information, please contact: Fellowship Coordinator The Wolfsonian-FIU 1001 Washington Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33139 305-535-2613 (phone) 305-531-2133 (fax) research@thewolf.fiu.edu https://www.wolfsonian.org/research-library/fellowships
  • CFP: Modernism in New England, March 5th, 2016, Wellesley College

    Wellesley | Dates: 20 Oct – 13 Nov, 2015
    Modernism in New England Saturday, March 5th, 2016 Collins Cinema, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts A symposium funded by the Barra Foundation and co-sponsored by the Grace Slack McNeil Program for Studies in American Art at Wellesley College and Historic Deerfield, Inc.
  • Now Accepting Applications: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures PhD Program:

    Dates: 19 Oct – 15 Dec, 2015
    The Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures doctoral program is now accepting applications! A collaborative effort between the school of Architecture at Milwaukee and the Department of Art History at Madison, BLC is a leader in innovative field-based learning. We pride ourselves on our classes getting students in the field as they expand their methods and hone their research interests. We offer innovative field schools and methods courses and take advantage of the strengths of both of our campuses. BLC PhD Students • Attain skills to explore buildings, landscapes, and cultures as process, lived, and representation • Utilize a range of methods including formal analysis of architecture, fieldwork and documentation, archival research, oral history 
 • Develop multiple forms of literacy such as spatial/architectural, landscape, cultural and visual literacy 
 Applicants may apply to UW-Madison’s Department of Art History (PhD Art History) or UW-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture & Urban Planning (PhD in Architecture). For more about the program and how to apply, visit blcprogram.weebly.com Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/331499171288/ or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/BLCProgram.
  • Modern Cuba: Continuity of Past and Present

    Dates: 14 – 23 May, 2016
    Docomomo US is pleased to announce registration for this educational travel tour of modern architecture in Havana, Cuba. Guests will experience the rich architectural past of this long elusive Caribbean island located just 90 miles south of U.S. soil. Modern Cuba offers a unique travel opportunity in a small group setting featuring access to modern homes and buildings considered off the beaten path or not ordinarily open to the public.
  • Call for Papers: Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage

    Taipei | Dates: 20 Oct – 20 Nov, 2015
    Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage March 31 – April 4, 2016, Taipei, Taiwan Call for Papers deadline: 20 November. In the context of rapid cultural and economic globalisation, over half of the World’s population now live in urban areas. This dramatic expansion poses many challenges to a city’s character and identity, shifting the way in which cities preserve, present and promote their pasts and traditions against fierce and competitive demands for space. Urban heritage, as the valued tangible and intangible legacies of the past, would appear to be an increasingly important asset for communities and governments alike, allowing cities to mark their distinctiveness, attract tourists and inward investment and, retain a historical narrative that feeds into the quality of life. At the same time, new heritage – the heritage of the future – is being created in cities and towns across the globe from ‘starchitecture’ and the creation of new iconic structures, to communities that are protecting and nurturing buildings and practices that have meaning and value to them. In this context we ask: What will future residents and tourists inherit from their towns and cities? This conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and seeks to bring together researchers, policy makers and academics from a wide range of disciplines and fields including: anthropology, architecture, archaeology, art history, cultural geography, cultural studies, design, ethnology and folklore, economics, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, philosophy, political science, sociology, tourism studies, urban history and urban/spatial planning. Topics of interest to the conference include, but are not limited to, the following:  Innovative modalities of protection and planning urban heritage  Community approaches to and uses of, urban heritage  City based tourism and visitor economies of urban heritage  Urban heritage as a form of social resistance  Heritage as city memory  Cosmopolitan urban heritage and re-creating identities  Global and mega-city competition through heritage  Revitalising the city through heritage  Sub-urban and sub-altern heritage  Urban spaces, traditions and intangible heritage Further information and full Call for Papers can be found on the website Please submit a 300 word abstract by 20 November Ironbridge@contacts.bham.ac.ukFull details: www.inheritingthecity.wordpress.com
  • Back to the City - Urbanism, Density, and Housing 1976-2016

    Glasgow | Dates: 05 – 06 May, 2016
    Proposals are invited for papers and posters on topics relating to the conference themes. Abstracts of up to 300 words should be sent to Ambrose Gillick (a.gillick@gsa.ac.uk) by 16 November 2015, along with contact details and a CV/biographical information (1-2 pages). The conference is supported by the Leverhulme Trust. A limited number of travel bursaries are available.
  • 53rd IMCL Conference on Caring for Our Common Home: Sustainable, Just Cities & Settlements

    Rome | Dates: 18 Oct – 20 Dec, 2015
    We must make our cities healthy, just and sustainable for all humans and for the earth. We must adopt wiser strategies and practices­ in architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, planning, transportation planning ­ that lead to genuine social, environmental and economic sustainability, a healthy environment for humans and for the earth. We must do this NOW. We can wait no longer. At this conference, we will share knowledge of the effects of the built environment on the health of humans and the earth; foster interdisciplinary collaboration on real sustainable and equitable practices; and define a universal charter (or road map) for improving the built environment. Paper proposals are invited from elected officials, scholars and practitioners concerned with the following issues: Topics for Caring for Our Common Home: · Achieving Healthy, Just, Sustainable Cities · Prioritizing Urban Health Equity · Healing Forgotten Neighborhoods · Sociable Squares and Special Places · Making Poor Neighborhoods Beautiful · Regeneration Projects · Caring for Green and Blue in the City · Strategies to Improve Air and Water Quality · Lifetime Communities · Constructing Cities to Last · Ensuring a Truly Sustainable Urban Fabric · Impact of the Built and Natural Environment on Health · Strategies to Achieve a Green Healthy City for Children · The Common Good, Urban Design, and the Public Realm · How Public Health and Urban Design Collaborate · Prioritizing Low Energy Use Cities · The City of Short Distances · Community-led Neighborhood Planning · Integrated Strategies to Combat Poverty and Protect Nature
  • Call for Application for Three Short-Term Fellowships for New Research on Local Renaissances

    Florence/Naples | Dates: 17 – 30 Oct, 2015
    The aim of the call for applications is to create an international team formed of three scholars, either PhD candidates at the end of their research or postdoctoral fellows, to work together for three months to explore different notions of antiquarian culture and artistic patronage in different areas in Europe during the early modern period. Working on the assumption that a universal and monolithic Renaissance is increasingly seen to be a superseded concept, the research group will be encouraged to investigate the idea of “local Renaissances”, as well as crucial historiographical concepts such as “antiquity”, “identity” and “style”. Over a very long period the idea that Florence and Rome represent the canon of Renaissance art and architecture has led to a deep misunderstanding of the specific artistic cultures found in other contexts, which have often been relegated to the margins of scholarship as backward-looking peripheries. It is now well known that different local all’antica styles developed across Italy, such as those in Venice and Milan, and more attention has been devoted to the multiple ‘antiquities’ which informed also the artistic and literary cultures of Florence and Rome. The ERC-HistAntArtSI project has been working for four years on rediscovering the specific character of antiquarian culture and artistic patronage in the Kingdom of Naples between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and on redefining the concept of Southern Renaissance. This concept, once used in local historiography to indicate a phenomenon of uniformity and backwardness, is gradually being reshaped and revised, reinforcing the idea of another Renaissance, one which belongs more coherently to the regional histories presently being uncovered throughout Italy and the rest of Europe. Furthermore, recent research has demonstrated how a new fascination with the classical past was a widespread phenomenon in early modern Europe. While work has been done on the reception of antiquity in France, Germany and the Netherlands, there are other contexts that still remain at the margins of Renaissance historiography and need to be investigated. As a result of collaboration between the ERC/HistAntArtSi project and the Kunsthistorisches Institut, three research scholarships are being offered to investigate the reception of the classical past in selected areas and regions of Europe. We seek for proposals that, taking an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, look at single regions or areas which for historical or cultural reasons were connected to southern Italy, such as Spain, Dalmatia, Greece or Flanders. It is possible that other areas in northern or eastern Europe will also be considered. A particular requirement will be that the candidates investigate not only single examples of local Renaissances but also the possible connections, networks and dialogues which existed among different contexts. Scholars are encouraged to present proposals which explore local concepts of the antique in the form of archaeological excavations, works of art, architecture, antiquarian literature, and history, and which address the problem both of how the contemporary “identity” of cities and regions was formed by a local notion of the “antique” as well as how local antiquities were used to construct a sense of identity for civic institutions or individuals. We welcome cases which question the idea of a “single antiquity”, considering instead how the idea of antiquity varied widely, including not only Roman, but also Greek and pre-classical indigenous antiquities, as well as monuments and objects from the more recent medieval past. Proposals may consider aspects of the local reception of antiquity, such as the notion of competing ‘antiquities’, the character and priorities of local conceptions of the antique, the merge and clash of imported modes of classical revival with local idioms or relationships between concepts of antiquity in various regions. Candidate profile: Potential candidates will be scholars who are already working on a European area at a doctoral or postdoctoral level. In line with the approach and methodology of the HistAntArtSI research project, the selected group of scholars would work together sharing an interdisciplinary and comparative approach and maintaining constant contact with the research team hosted at the University of Naples Federico II. In addition to their individual and specific research skills, each candidate should be able to demonstrate her/his capacity to cooperate as part of a research group. Candidates should also have a good knowledge of spoken and written Italian and English. Work description: Scholarships will begin in January 2016 and end in March 2016. Fellows will be expected to live in Florence and to work at the Kunsthistorisches Institut. Each scholar will work individually on her/his research topic, but will be expected to engage closely and continuously in seminars and discussions with the other two selected scholars and with the ERC HistAntArtSI research group. The group of scholars will be expected to organize a workshop in which they will present the results of their work at the Kunsthistorisches Institut and to submit a proposal for a panel to be held in the following RSA (2017). Stipend: Each scholar will receive circa 2000 € monthly. There are no additional funds for travel to Florence. Application: Applicants must submit a thousand-word length project proposal, together with a curriculum vitae and a cover letter. The names of two established scholars ready to support the application must be listed at the end of the cover letter. Applicants are required to merge all the documents in a single PDF (max. 2 MB) and submit it via e-mail to info@histantartsi.eu + dirnova@khi.fi.it
Driehaussized
SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
1365 N. Astor Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
312.573.1365
Copyright - (c) 2012