Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • Cultural & Historic Preservation Conference -- The Remembered and the Forgotten: Preserving and Interpreting the Americas to 1820

    Newport | Dates: 22 – 24 Oct, 2015
    The Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island will hold its annual conference Oct. 22-24, 2015. The conference will focus on the preservation and interpretation of pre-1820 buildings, objects, and sites in the Americas, particularly in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy. As a key center of global trade, Newport occupied a principal place in the American landscape in the 17th and 18th centuries. Indeed, the social and economic relationships emanating from Newport spread out, linking Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and shaping the histories of millions of people throughout the colonial and into the early national period. Today, the legacy of this shared American past is materialized in buildings, furnishings, curated objects, and archaeological sites. The preservation and interpretation of these treasured resources poses challenges, but also provides many opportunities to connect professionals and the public and to improve our understanding of the “forgotten” experiences of groups whose voices are keenly absent in current histories. This public conference will include presentations, tours, student lightning talks and networking opportunities. The conference is presented by Salve Regina University in partnership with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Information on the conference is available at: www.salve.edu/chp2015.
  • SECAC Panel: Photographing Industry: Pittsburgh and Beyond

    Dates: 21 – 24 Oct, 2015
    Over the years, Pittsburgh and its industries have played host to several key photographic surveys. Beginning in 1907 as part of the pioneering Pittsburgh Survey, documentary photographer Lewis Hine recorded the complex relationship between the city's factories and its citizens. Roughly forty years later, W. Eugene Smith made nearly twenty thousand images of Pittsburgh, creating what he considered his finest work. In keeping with the spirit of these important projects, this panel seeks papers exploring the rich and complicated relationship between photography and industry. Topics of exploration may reflect the broad range of the subject, from the Industrial Revolution to the Information Age. The panel welcomes papers examining not only art and documentary, but also casual and vernacular photographic records of industry. Session chairs: Emily Morgan, Iowa State University, and James Swensen, Brigham Young University. Contact: emorgan@iastate.edu
  • Designing a Home for Snow Monkeys

    Chicago | Dates: 23 Apr, 2015

    What does it take to design a brand-new zoo habitat? More than just manpower and money, creating a new exhibit also involves intensive training for zookeepers who will care for the animals and time for educators to develop a suite of enriching programs. In the case of Regenstein Macaque Forest—the zoo’s new home for Japanese snow monkeys—it also means hiring a specialized scientist to study the behavior and cognition of the resident monkeys. Learn how this amazing exhibit took shape from concept to construction and beyond.

    6–8 p.m.
    $17 ($14 for Lincoln Park Zoo members)
    18 and older
    Café at Wild Things
    Cash bar on site, light hors d’oeuvres served

    Register for Wine & Wildlife: Designing a Home for Snow Monkeys

    For more information, please email educationprograms@lpzoo.org or call 312-742-2056.

  • Ritualizing the City: Collective Performances as Aspects of Urban Construction, Brno 3-4 March 2016

    Brno | Dates: 17 Feb – 10 Sep, 2015
    Organizer:
Ivan Foletti, Masaryk University in Brno and University of Lausanne
- Centre for Cross-Disciplinary Research into Cultural Phenomena in Central European History: Image, Communication, Behaviour. The conference aims to reflect on the ways in which collective liturgies – religious as well as civic and totalitarian – contributed to the construction of urbanism from late Antiquity to the twentieth century and, on the other hand, how urban topography and the layout of the city influenced collective performances. The goal of such a reflection is to indicate how a collective ritual performance grows and develops in dialogue with the surrounding urban space. But especially how it participates in the determination of that same space. The purpose of the conference is thus to explore the dialectic relationship between the city and collective rituals, beginning with Late Antique Rome, marked out by stationary liturgy, through medieval and modern cities designed to celebrate sovereigns and bishops, up to Stalinist Moscow, constructed to embrace the manifestations of Soviet power. Participants are invited to reflect on such issues as: the methods used by the rituals to integrate the space of the cities; in what way collective performances are modified and adjusted to a specific urban situation; the manner in which urban space is reconstructed and modified to facilitate collective performances; how, with a change of regime, the new collective liturgies adapted themselves to the new situation. Papers presenting a historiographical and diachronic art historical and methodological perspective are especially welcomed. Paper proposals of no more than one page, accompanied by a short CV, can be submitted until 10 September 2015 to: ivan.foletti@gmail.com.
  • Architectural Research Field School

    Williamsburg | Dates: 01 Jun – 03 Jul, 2015
    The Colonial Williamsburg Architectural Research Department in conjunction with the College of William and Mary’s National Institute of American History and Democracy offers a five-week course this summer that is open to all undergraduate and graduate students as well as those with a special interest in early American architecture and historic preservation. The field school is intended to introduce students to the methods used in the investigation and recording of historic buildings. They will learn how to read construction technology and stylistic details to determine the age of various features, use period terminology to describe buildings, take field notes and measurements, and produce CAD drawings, which are the fundamental skills necessary to produce Historic Structure Reports. Following several introductory lectures on building technology and architectural features, students will study structures in the Historic Area of Williamsburg and visit buildings in the surrounding Tidewater region. During the fourth week, students will document farmsteads, churches, and other sites in Piedmont North Carolina in preparation for the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s Annual Conference to be held in Durham, N.C. in June 2016. Students will measure, record, and describe a variety of buildings that will be seen on the conference tours. During this time, they will be in residence in the region. Back in Williamsburg for the final week, they will convert their fieldwork into measured CAD drawings write reports on their sites. Except for the fourth week, the class will meet four days a week, Monday through Thursday, from 10:00 to 4:30 at Bruton Heights School, the Colonial Williamsburg research campus. Students must be enrolled for the course through the College of William and Mary. For more information about the nature of the course, please email Carl Lounsbury at clounsbury@cwf.org or call (757) 220-7654. Registration information is available at the William and Mary website: http://www.wm.edu/as/niahd/summerfieldschool/index.php
  • Lecture: Jeanne Gang

    Ann Arbor | Dates: 13 Mar, 2015

    Visionary architect and MacArthur Fellow Jeanne Gang is the founder and principal of Studio Gang Architects, a Chicago-based collective of architects, designers, and thinkers whose projects confront pressing contemporary issues. Driven by curiosity, intelligence, and radical creativity, Jeanne has produced some of today’s most innovative and award-winning architecture. The transformative potential of her work is exemplified by such recent projects as the Aqua Tower (named the 2009 Emporis Skyscraper of the Year), Northerly Island framework plan, Nature Boardwalk at Lincoln Park Zoo, and Columbia College Chicago’s Media Production Center.

    Jeanne seeks to answer questions that lie locally (site, culture, people) and resound globally (density, climate, sustainability) through her architecture. Her designs are rooted in both architectural form and idea-driven content to make a compelling whole, and she often arrives at design solutions through investigations and collaborations across disciplines.

    Jeanne’s work has been honored and exhibited widely, most notably at the International Venice Biennale, MoMA, the National Building Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago. A distinguished graduate of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, she has taught at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and IIT, where her studios have focused on cities, ecologies, materials, and technologies. Reveal, her first volume on Studio Gang’s work and working process, was released in 2011 from Princeton Architectural Press.

    Jeanne Gang’s lecture will serve as the kick off for the 2nd Annual Urban Development Now Symposium, which will focus on the changing economic and development landscape of cities, and the distinct role of the capital markets in realizing large-scale urban projects.

    5pm reception at the UMMA Forum
    The symposium will continue on Saturday, March 14 with panel conversations and a networking lunch.

  • Stepping into the Yards: A Mega Project on the Hudson

    New York | Dates: 03 Mar, 3015

    A dramatic transformation of Manhattan’s West Side is underway at Hudson Yards, the largest private real estate development in American history and the largest development in New York City since Rockefeller Center. New Yorkers, this is your chance to learn all about this 28-acre, emergent neighborhood wrapped by the final section of the High Line, and soon to feature new housing, office space, parkland, cultural and public spaces. Join our distinguished speakers as they discuss the thinking behind the Hudson Yards development process, and the questions that the mega project raises for the city’s future.

    Jay Cross, President of Related Hudson Yards
    Sarah Goldhagen, Architecture Critic
    William Pedersen, FAIA, Founding Design Partner of Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
    Thomas Woltz, FASLA, Principal and owner of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects
    Suzanne Stephens (moderator), Deputy Editor of Architectural Record

    Co-sponsored by the AIA New York Chapter | Center for Architecture and the ASLA-NY (New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects)

    Free for Museum members; $12 students/seniors; $16 general public.

  • Brutal! Paul Rudolph’s Postwar New York Interiors: A Conversation with Timothy M. Rohan & Donald Albrecht

    New York | Dates: 26 Feb, 2015

    Though best known for brutalist structures like the Jewett Center and the University of Massachussets Dartmouth campus, architect Paul Rudolph (1918-1997) also designed some of New York’s most remarkable apartment interiors of the late twentieth century. Rudolph’s unconventional use of multiple levels, photomurals, and reflective surfaces elicited reactions of both delight and dismay. Drawing upon his new monograph The Architecture of Paul Rudolph, University of Massachusetts Professor Timothy M. Rohan will discuss the architect’s brutalist interiors, including Rudolph’s own Beekman Place residence, the townhouse of 1970s fashion designer Halston and numerous Fifth Avenue apartments. Donald Albrecht, our Curator of Architecture and Design, will join Dr. Rohan following his presentation for a conversation.

    Book signing and reception to follow. 

    Co-sponsored by DOCOMOMO New York/Tri-State and the AIA New York Chapter | Center for Architecture. 

    Free for Museum and DOCOMOMO members; $12 students/seniors; $16 general public.

  • Everything is Design: The Work of Paul Rand

    New York | Dates: 25 Feb – 19 Jul, 2015

    A Visionary of Modern Branding—for IBM and other Icons—Rand’s Work Reshaped American Design.

    Everything is Design: The Work of Paul Rand features more than 150 advertisements, posters, corporate brochures, and books by this master of American design. It was Rand who most creatively brought European avant-garde art movements such as Cubism and Constructivism to graphic design in the United States. His philosophy, as expressed in his work and writings, including the recently republished 1947 Thoughts on Design, argued that visual language should integrate form and function. Born in Brooklyn in humble circumstances, Rand (1914-1996) launched his career in the 1930s with magazine cover design and, starting in the early 1940s, he worked as an art director on Madison Avenue, where he helped revolutionize the advertising profession.

    He later served as design consultant to leading corporations like IBM, ABC, UPS, and Steve Jobs’s NeXT, for whom he conceived comprehensive visual communications systems, ranging from packaging to building signage, all grounded in recognizable logos, many of which are still in use today. Rand’s influence was extended by students he taught at Yale University. His visually stimulating, yet problem-solving, approach to graphic design attracted devoted admirers during his own lifetime and he remains influential today.

    Exhibition co-chairs: Dana Arnett, Michael Bierut, Steven Heller, Curt Schreiber, Willy Wong, Keith Yamashita

  • EXCHANGES ABOUT DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION

    Dates: 11 Feb, 2015 – 03 Sep, 2017
    CALL FOR PAPERS: EXCHANGES ABOUT DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION Terrae Incognitae 47.2 (2015), 48.1/2 (2016), and 49.1/2 (2017) Columbus’s contemporary, Oviedo, credited the man for being the “first discoverer” of the Americas; Columbus had “found” “new” lands, cities, and peoples (Historia general de las Indias [Seville: Cromberger, 1535], fol. 1v). Las Casas later linked this attribution to his own criticism that Columbus “had made taxpayers of the Indians there” (Brevíssima relación [Seville: Trugillo, 1552], fol. 192r). The verbs associated with Columbus’s conduct evolved away from ones that either celebrated or affirmed Spanish possession of the New World to include ones like destroyed, devastated, exterminated, and ruined in the subsequent tomes authored by William Robertson, Abbé Raynal, and Washington Irving. By the twentieth century, important works by Tzvetan Todorov and José Rabasa—to name just two of deep field of scholars—prefer “invention” rather than “discovery,” “the other” rather than “the savage,” and so on. As this example demonstrates scholars writing in any period reconsider past historical events according to the paradigms of the age; the approach to and conclusions drawn from research into the history of discovery and exploration vary remarkably depending upon the timeframe and the socio-cultural perspective in which that scholarship is conducted. Is contemporary scholarship moving away from an establishment of the facts concerning the European exploration of the world—how they traveled, where, and when, and what they encountered—and toward an interest in the variety of narratives and perspectives afforded by an entire world that at one point or another discovered other parts of itself? How do we navigate the realities and dystopias, ethnocentricities and lack of understandings, inherent to the act of discovery conducted by men such as Columbus upon whose narratives and the history books they have engendered we rely for our own research? Do we answer these specific challenges by identifying and asserting new voices as well as counter-perspectives? What new consciousness might we possess today that requires us to revisit past scholarship so that we can reap new knowledge from these historical contexts? And, finally, what is the state of our discipline today; how and why does it remain relevant? Essays and position papers are invited for a special series devoted to reflecting upon the scholarship of discovery and exploration. Early- and late-career scholars, graduate students, collectors as well as members of our association are encouraged to prepare article-length contributions (4000-6000 words) that will be peer reviewed about the state of our discipline. Specific topics might also include examples of new directions, epistemological and theoretical approaches, and trends in scholarship. Proposals for innovative ways of answering this Call for Papers are also welcome.
  • Stenton’s Landscape, and the Quaker Roots of Philadelphia’s Rural Cemetery Movement

    Philadelphia | Dates: 05 Mar, 2015
    Please bring a bag lunch and join us for a special Lunch-and-Learn Lecture, in which we will relate Deborah Norris Logan’s Quaker-inflected views of death, family, and historical change to the wider Philadelphia Quaker community’s responses to urbanization and shifting norms surrounding burial and graveyard design in the early 19th Century. Local Quakers, including Deborah’s relatives, led the movement to establish “rural” cemeteries, such as Laurel Hill. Leery of innovation, Deborah disliked newly established Quaker burial grounds, and was ambivalent toward non-sectarian alternatives. Her family’s private burial ground at Stenton became a focus of her own attention and rumination. Presented by Aaron Wunsch, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the University of Pennsylvania’s Historic Preservation Program. Lecture is free, please RSVP by calling 215-329-7312 or email programs@stenton.org.
  • Texas Medical Center Walking Tour

    Houston | Dates: 14 Mar, 2015

    The Texas Medical Center is the largest medical center in the world. Equivalent to the 12th largest business district in the United States, TMC has over 33.8 million square feet of patient care, education, and research space. 160,000+ individuals visit the Texas Medical Center each day with more than 6 million patients treated annually. The 1000+ acres is approximately the size of Chicago inside the "Loop" with over 160 buildings on the main campus alone. Join our ArCH docents on this introductory architectural tour of Houston's own modern marvel of medicine. Sites on our tour will include Baylor College of Medicine, the new Texas Children's Hospital Maternity Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Methodist Research Center, and a short ride on Houston's Metro Rail.

    Meet in the ground floor lobby of the John P McGovern Commons Building, 6550 Bertner Ave, 77030. Texas Medical Center Entrance 4. $10 parking available in the TMC Commons parking garage.

  • Lecture: Inventing the New American House - Howard Van Doren Shaw, Architect

    Chicago | Dates: 05 May, 2015

    Tuesday May 5, 2015 at 7:00pm
    $10 per person / $8 for museum members
    Reservations requested to 312-326-1480

    Architect Stuart Cohen offers a new look at one of the best-known architects of the early 20th century, who built homes for the leading industrialists of his era.  A traditionalist who incorporated English and Italian precedents, Shaw also created Market Square - America's first shopping center (in Lake Forest), the interior of Second Presbyterian Church, and R. R. Donnelley's massive printing plant on nearby Calumet Avenue.  Copies of Cohen's new book of the same title will be available for purchase and signing.

  • Fifth Annual Clarke House History Symposium: Fugitves & Freeman - The African American Experience in Early Chicago

    Chicago | Dates: 25 Apr, 2015

    9:00am - 5:00pm
    $30 per person / $25 for students, docents, and Illinois Dames
    (Price includes breakfast and lunch)
    Glessner House Museum coach house
    Prepaid reservations required to 312-326-1480

    Fugitive slaves and freemen established Chicago's first black community in the 1840s, with the population nearing 1,000 by 1860.  Although hindered by discrimination through both state and federal laws, these men and women of color thrived in the growing city and sought to help others do the same.  Learn about their challenges and triumphs during turbulent times with presentations by four noted historians.  Optional tours of Clarke House Museum will be offered at the conclusion of the program.  Don't miss this fascinating glimpse into the African American experience in early Chicago.

  • Lecture: Arts and Crafts Architecture - History and Heritage in New England

    Chicago | Dates: 14 Apr, 2015

    Tuesday April 14, 2015 at 7:00pm
    $10 per person / $8 for museum members
    Reservations requested to 312-326-1480

    Anyone who has visitied the New England states will recognize the century-old buildings that Maureen Meister will discuss in a slide lecture that draws upon her new book, Arts and Crafts Architecture: History and Heritage in New England.  In the 1870s, the architect H. H. Richardson and craftsmen including John Evans began collaborating, laying the groundwork for an Arts and Crafts movement in Boston.  Two decades later, several alumni of Richardson's office helped establish Boston's Society of Arts and Crafts.  Prof. Meister will explain how these individuals were influenced by English Arts and Crafts theories and produced exquisite buildings, recognized today as landmarks.  Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing.

  • CFP: The Avery Review Critical Essays on Architecture

    Dates: 05 Feb, 2015 – 06 Feb, 2016
    The Avery Review seeks out reviews and critical essays on books, buildings, and other architectural media, broadly defined. We envision a typical length of 1,500-3,000 words. We like stylish, concise, and accessible writing, and we invite our contributors to experiment with tone and format as suits their topic. Most of all, we hope to publish pieces that are consequential and earnestly felt. We also welcome responses to the essays that have already been published.

    Whether a pitch for a review or a long-form think piece, we welcome your thoughts—with the simple request that they critically engage the work of someone else. Please send all submissions, queries, and comments to editors@averyreview.com.
  • Jens Jensen The Living Green: A Documentary Film Screening & Panel Discussion

    Bronx | Dates: 22 Apr, 2015
    This Earth Day, get inspired to take action with this award-winning film celebrating Danish-born Jens Jensen (1860-1951), who rose from street sweeper to "dean of landscape architects" and pioneering conservationist. When he arrived penniless in Chicago in 1885, it was a fast-growing city teeming with urban squalor. Rejecting the neo- classical vision of the 1893 Columbian Exposition, Jensen joined Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Sullivan in taking the prairie as inspiration for a new city design. In his parks, workers' children enjoyed playgrounds and grew food in community gardens, and Jensen became known as "The Vexing Thorn" for his passionate battles with Chicago's political bosses over the city's future.

    As designer of landscapes for scions of industry such as Henry Ford, J.O. Armour, and Julius Rosenwald, Jensen leveraged powerful relationships to block the steel industry from developing the entire Lake Michigan shoreline; Indiana Dunes is now a National Lakeshore. His legacy also includes Chicago's Humboldt, Douglas, and Columbus Parks, and the stunning Garfield Park Conservatory. 

    Half a century after his death, Jensen is now hailed as a pioneer of sustainable design, an early champion of native species, and an unsung American hero. Immediately after the screening, a panel will explore Jensen's work and its relevance to today's urban environmental issues. 
  • Paul R. Williams: A Gracious Legacy

    Pasadena | Dates: 18 Apr, 2015

    Lecture by Karen Hudson
    Saturday, April 18, 2015 • Lecture: 11:00 a.m.
    Scottish Rite Temple
    150 N Madison Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101

    FoGH Members: $25  |  Non-Members: $30

    Karen Hudson will discuss the groundbreaking career of Paul R. Williams, spanning 50 years and some 3,000 projects. Williams became know for his elegantly stylized designs and had a list of such celebrity clients as Frank Sinatra, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, Tyrone Power, Lon Chaney, Bert Lahr and Zsa Zsa Gabor. The Los Angeles Times observed, “If you have a picture in your mind of Southern California in the 1950s and early 1960s, you are quite likely picturing a building created by Paul Williams.” Williams designed such iconic public buildings as the futuristic Theme Building at LAX, LA County Courthouse, Saks Fifth Avenue Beverly Hills, and the 1940s redesign of the Beverly Hills Hotel.

    As the granddaughter of the legendary architect, Hudson will give us a historical and uniquely personal view of the man who was the first black architect to become a member of the American Institute of Architects, in 1923, and in 1957 was inducted as the AIA’s first black fellow.

    About the Lecturer: Karen Hudson is director of the Paul R. Williams Architectural Collection. A third-generation Angeleno, Hudson chronicles the history of blacks in Los Angeles through photography and writing. Hudson is the author of Paul R. Williams — Architect: A Legacy of Style; The Will and the Way: Paul R. Williams Architect; Basic Black: Home Training for Modern Times; and Paul R. Williams, Classic Hollywood Style. Hudson is currently writing a book on her two grandfathers, Paul R. Williams and Dr. H. Claude Hudson, which will look at early black Los Angeles through the eyes of these two remarkable men.

    About the Venue: Scottish Rite Cathedral in Pasadena, California was built in 1925, by Joseph J. Blick and W. C. Crowell, in a Moderne and/or Zig-Zag Moderne style.

    Architecturally significant in greater Los Angeles as a pre-PWA Classical Moderne building with distinctive decorative guardian sphinxes. The Scottish Rite Cathedral is associated strongly with the social history of Pasadena, in particular with the Scottish Rite, an appendant body associated with Freemasonry.

  • Draw Like an Architect with Lorcan O’Herlihy

    Pittsburgh | Dates: 30 Mar, 2015

    Discover how drawing by hand underpins any creative practice from Los Angeles-based architect Lorcan O’Herlihy, as he discusses his award-winning buildings, his views on architecture as a catalyst for change, and his passion for drawing.

    O’Herlihy will then lead participants in inventive drawing exercises held throughout the museum designed to stimulate the imagination. This workshop is designed for all skill levels; beginning and advanced participants are welcome. Drawing materials are provided. 

    This event is co-sponsored by the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Sketch to Structure

    Pittsburgh | Dates: 31 Jan – 17 Aug, 2015

    Sketch to Structure unfolds the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. With sketches, plans, blueprints, renderings, and models from the Heinz Architectural Center collection, this exhibition reveals that architectural design, from initial concept to client presentation, isn’t straightforward.

    Beautiful hand-drawn sketches by Lorcan O’Herlihy show an architect quickly capturing ideas about shapes and color. Pencil drawings of the Los Angeles County Hall of Records by Richard Neutra show a master draftsman at work. And watercolors by Steven Holl of a client’s home render in beautiful detail, on a single sheet of paper, the planned building’s exterior, floor plan, and elevation. Through these and other objects from every stage of the design process, Sketch to Structure presents the ingenious ways that architects and firms accumulate ideas and whittle them down, ultimately solving design challenges for their clients.

    Visitor Note:
     Sketch to Structure will close temporarily on May 25, 2015. The exhibition reopens on June 6, 2015, to serve as an inspiration for Carnegie Museum of Art's summer art and architecture camps. Visit us again to explore seven case studies of design thinking from the collection and see the campers at work.

    Sketch to Structure 
    is organized by Alyssum Skjeie, curatorial assistant at the Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art.