Recent Opportunities

  • CFP: The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture, ICMS (Kalamazoo, MI, May 11-14, 2017) Deadline September 15

    Kalamazoo | Dates: 28 Jul – 15 Sep, 2016
    Call for Papers: The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017 Organized by Lindsay Cook (Columbia University) and Zachary Stewart (Fordham University) Citation, understood in its earliest legal sense, refers not to the act of reiterating or to the act of repeating but rather to a formal process of assembling parties separated by space and time. It is therefore best understood as a complex procedure for forging new relationships between people, places, and things that, though highly structured, are by no means inherently stable. Over the past several decades, a growing number of scholars—including, most notably, Wolfgang Schenkluhn, Hans-Joachim Kunst, Dieter Kimpel, Robert Suckale, Dany Sandron, and Arnaud Timbert—have examined, in explicit terms, the role of citation in architectural production during the Middle Ages. On the one hand, their work has been of great benefit to the field, demonstrating that citation is a productive paradigm for understanding the ways in which isomorphic relationships enable spatial environments to create, support, or subvert social orders. On the other hand, their work has also raised troubling questions about the capacity of buildings to convey meaning, assuming as it does that architecture, like language, functions as a coherent semiotic system. Vitruvius laid the groundwork for the application of this logocentric analogy to classical architecture, but does it necessarily obtain within all modes of architectural production, particularly those considered un- or anti-classical? What are the advantages or disadvantages of choosing citation—versus imitation, replication, appropriation, influence, or habit—as a discursive frame for studying the recurrence of formal elements within architectural ensembles? How does such a visually oriented method address issues of production, perception, technology, function, and value? How might it alter current accounts of the design, construction, and meaning of buildings modeled after famous precedents such as St. Peter’s in Rome, the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, the Great Mosque of Damascus, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, or the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris? This session invites papers that pursue these kinds of questions as they pertain to the diverse building cultures of the Middle Ages, West and East, between c.300 to c.1500. Highly encouraged are contributions that investigate the stimuli for citation, the media that make it possible, and the agents that make it productive. Especially welcome are papers involving case studies that consider the potential volatility of architectural citation across cultures, regions, institutions, audiences, materials, architectural types, art-historical styles, or chronological periods. Contact Lindsay Cook (lsc2140@columbia.edu) and Zachary Stewart (zdstewart@gmail.com) to propose a 20-minute paper. Submissions must include a title, a one-page abstract, a short CV, and a completed Participant Information Form (available here: wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions). Proposals will be accepted through September 15, 2016.
  • CFP: 5th International Conference on Civil, Architectural and Transportation Engineering (CATE-16) (Hong Kong, 17-18 Nov 16)

    Hong Kong | Dates: 27 Jul – 05 Aug, 2016
    5th International Conference on Civil, Architectural and Transportation Engineering (CATE-16) HONG KONG
    17th to 18th November 2016
    Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    Deadline of New Full Paper/Poster/Abstract Submissions: Aug. 5, 2016

    All the submitted conference papers will be peer reviewed. All accepted papers of the conference will be published in the printed conference proceedings with valid International ISBN number & DOI-CROSSREF Indexed. 

    REGISTRATION FEE 
    Author (Student): USD 190
    Author (Faculty/Academic)*: USD 225
    Listener/Co-Author: 175 USD
    Additional Paper(s): 150 USD
    Extra Proceeding: 50 USD

    TOPIC/SCOPE
    Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to:
    ---transportation 
    ---urban studies 
    ---landscape architecture 
    ---architecture 
    ---archaeology 
    ---museums and heritage 
    ---water 
    ---disaster management 
    ---rehabilitation 
    ---GIS 
    ---building design 
    ---sustainable development 
    ---transport 
    ---smart materials 
    --Structural Engineering
    --Construction Engineering 
    ---Urban Planning 

    SUBMISSION METHODS
    1. Electronic Submission System; ( .doc/.docx/.pdf formats): 
    OR
    2. Using Email: cs@caeer.org 

    Enquiries: cs@caeer.org
    Web address: http://caeer.org/conference.php?slug=CATE-16&sid=3&catDid=91
    Sponsored by: International Association of Civil, Agricultural & Environmental Engineering Researchers 
     
  • CFP: Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way? (Lisbon, 5-8 Jul 17)

    Lisbon | Dates: 27 Jul – 31 Aug, 2016
    The ARTIS – Institute of History of Art, School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon and the ICOMOS Portugal are pleased to invite all the researchers, specialists and other stakeholders involved in the process of safeguarding of architectural heritage created in the meeting of cultures, to participate in the International Congress Preserving transcultural heritage: your way or my way?, which will take place in Lisbon, between 05 and 08 July 2017.
    Paper and poster proposals are welcome until 31 August 2016. Please submit your paper or poster by sending the proposal to the email congress.artis@letras.ulisboa.pt (see the submission guidelines below). The proposals will be selected by the session organisers and the Scientific Committee on the basis of the following criteria: relevance, innovation, scientific quality and theme of the session. On 15 September proposers will be notified regarding acceptance of their paper or poster and will receive further instructions.
    The organisation encourages multidisciplinary and international research on the safeguarding of transcultural heritage (architecture, urbanism, archaeology, landscapes and decorative arts in built heritage).

    Sessions
    Session 1: Heritage values and management of African and American historic cities and sites with European influences
    Session 2: Transcultural heritage, musealisation and memory: preservation of the Indigenous minorities’ heritage in Americas and in the Pacific region formerly under Western rule
    Session 3: Contextualizing the (un)wanted: tourism and management of the architecture of totalitarian regimes in Europe
    Session 4: Globalisation as generator of new transcultural heritages: preserving migrants’ architectural heritage
    Session 5: Greeks, Romans and Byzantines in the Mediterranean region and Near East: guarding transcultural remains containing ancient classical influences
    Session 6: Preserving shared heritage along the Silk Road, a major creator of cultural encounters
    Session 7: Memories to remember and (not) forget: slaves’ heritage outside their homelands
    Session 8: The “Indian melting pot” for religions and cultures: challenges concerning transcultural heritage preservation
    Session 9: West versus East: differences and difficulties to the conservation of their shared heritage (European colonies in Far East / “Asiantowns” in the West)
    Session 10: The discovery of ancient cultures: safeguarding of native architectural heritage in European colonies
    Session 11: Religious, political and ideological fanaticisms as destroyers of “different” heritages throughout History
    Session 12: European heritage as Imperialist statements in colonies: (un)desirable memories whish must be protected or to be forgotten?
    Session 13: Between Far East and the Indian Sea: Indochinese and Insulindian cultures (influences, fusions and heritage safeguarding)
    Session 14: The Ottoman Empire in the crossroad between Europe, Asia and Africa: fusion of cultures and heritages to preserve
    Session 15: Questions, controversies, idiosyncrasies and case studies on authenticity between different cultures, when focusing the safeguarding of transcultural architectural heritage
    Session 16: Should be followed or ignored? Reception of European heritage theories within non-Western cultures
    Session 17: Safeguarding of architectural heritage belonging to ethnic and religious minorities inside countries with dominant cultures
    Session 18: Other relevant themes

    SUBMISSION  GUIDELINES
    Download the submission template, and fill it with the following data:
    Paper or poster?
    Name of the session (only for papers)
    Title of the paper, with 15 words maximum;
    Abstract with 250 words maximum;
    Three to five keywords;
    Personal data (name, professional affiliation, mail and email addresses, and telephone contact of the authors);
    The acceptance notification for submitted papers and posters will be known by 15 September 2016. After being accepted, preliminary versions of paper texts and poster drafts should be submitted until 30 November 2016, for peer-review.
    Researchers can submit simultaneously a paper and a poster, but only with different subjects (paper and poster cannot be both about the same subject). Therefore, it must be submitted an abstract for each proposal.
    Dimension of posters should be AO (841 x 1189 mm) vertical. Posters should be printed by their authors and delivered in the first day of the congress (in the registration) or by mail (should arrive until 30 June 2017).
    For further questions, please contact the organisation. Download here the pdf of the call for papers and posters.
  • CFP: Decoding Destruction and Decay

    New York | Dates: 27 Jul – 30 Aug, 2016
    This is a call for papers for a session to be held at the College Art Association's Annual Meeting in New York City in February of 2017. In recent years, theoretical concepts of the ruin as memorial, as inspiration, and as symbol have generated scholarly inquiry and public fascination alike. The physical study of ruinous buildings tends to be overshadowed by the current emphasis on meaning and morality, and yet ruins and their conservation or restoration have long been sources for both new scholarship and the reevaluation of existing scholarly constructs. By making visible what was never intended to be visible, fragmentation provides significant insight into structure, materials, and architectural practices. Divergent interpretations of architectural fragments can lead to vastly different constructs of the history of style; processes of cleaning and restoration provide opportunities to examine building materials with new technology while simultaneously preventing—perhaps permanently—the chance for future scholars to perform the same kinds of evaluations. Restoration may create substantively new buildings that await incorporation into the history—and historiography—of architecture and the built environment. We propose a session that examines loss, destruction, fragmentation, and restoration in the context of intellectual inquiry. Potential questions include: what are the ramifications of studying buildings in their less-than-complete states? How does decay, disaster, or resurgence lead to the reordering of architectural canons? What are we able to see, understand, or imagine in architectural fragments that would otherwise be impossible in a complete or restored structure? What can we learn from buildings via processes of preservation or restoration, and how do such processes open or close different means of investigation? Session sponsors: Sarah Thompson, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Maile Hutterer, University of Oregon. Interested applicants should visit http://www.collegeart.org/news/2016/07/05/2017-call-for-participation-now-open/ to download submission instructions, which are listed on the call for papers.
  • CFP: The Politics of Environments: Architectures, Natures and Data (Tallinn, 20-23 Apr 17)

    Tallinn | Dates: 21 Jul – 01 Nov, 2016
    Two themes stand out prominently in discussions, projects and strategies that are at the forefront of contemporary urbanisation. It is, on one hand, the question of ecology, where the city and architecture are reconceptualised in "green" terms such as sustainability, resilience, metabolic optimisation and energy efficiency. On the other hand is the cybernetic question, where the futures of architecture and urbanisation are staked upon the pervasive use of digital communication, interactive technologies, ubiquitous computing, and the "big data". Moreover, these two questions have become increasingly intertwined as two facets of a single environmental question: while real-time adjustments, behaviour optimisation and "smart" solutions are central to urban environmental agenda, the omnipresent network of perpetually interacting digital objects constitutes itself a qualitatively new environment within which urban citizens are enfolded. But as digital networks become our "second nature," we also hark back to the models derived from the "first nature".

    With the growing pressure on architects, urbanists and planners to deliver ecological and techno-informational solutions, with (self-)monitoring of citizens "behaviour", optimisation of the buildings "performance", and smoothing of urban "flows", and with the respective substitution of democratic politics by automated governance models, it is ever more important to interrogate the historical, theoretical, methodological and epistemological assumptions beneath the above set of processes that can be described, following Michel Foucault, as environmental governmentality. These questions will be explored under three thematic tracks: Optimised urban ecosystems, Architectural turn to nature?, and "Big data" and urban subjectification."

    Authors are welcome to submit analytical papers, theoretically well-grounded case studies, or architectural counter-projects for presentations while indicating their preference for one of the above tracks. At the same time we ask that their contributions consider specifically how natures and data are intertwined in architectural and urban politics today, how the politics of environments is ecological and cybernetic simultaneously.

    Please submit your proposal (max 400 words) and a short bio (max 50 words) to architecturesnaturesdata@gmail.com by the November 1st, 2016.
  • CFP: 105th ACSA Annual Meeting | Brooklyn Says "Move to Detroit" (Detroit, 23-25 Mar 17)

    Detroit | Dates: 21 Jul – 21 Sep, 2016
    ACSA invites paper submissions under 18 thematic session topics plus an additional open category. Authors may submit only one paper per session topic. The same paper may not be submitted to multiple topics.

    Submission Requirements
    All authors submitting papers must be faculty or staff at an ACSA member schools; Individual Members; Student Members or become supporting ACSA members at the time of paper submission. If you are not a member, you can join ACSA here.

    Authors may submit only one paper per session topic. The same paper may not be submitted to multiple topics. An author can present no more than two papers at the Annual Meeting. Papers must report on recently completed work, and papers cannot have been previously published or presented in public except to a regional audience.

    Paper formatting requirements: 

    Papers should be no longer than 4,000 words, excluding the abstract and endnotes.
    No more than 5 images may be used in the paper. Images (low resolution) and captions should be embedded in the paper.
    Omit all author names from the paper and any other identifying information to maintain an anonymous review process. 
    Papers must be written in English.
    Do not include an abstract in the paper file. 
    Papers may be uploaded in Word, RTF, or PDF formats.
     
    Submission Process
    The deadline for submitting a paper to a session for the Annual Meeting is September 21, 2016 (extended). Authors will submit papers through the ACSA online interface. 

    All submissions will be reviewed carefully by at least three reviewers. The session topic chairs make official acceptance. Selection is based on innovation, clarity, contribution to the discipline of architecture, and relevance to the session topic. All authors will be notified of the status of their paper and will receive comments from their reviewers. 
  • CFP: Footprint 21: Trans-bodies / Queering Spaces

    Dates: 20 Jul – 01 Dec, 2016
    Call for Papers Footprint #21
    Trans-Bodies / Queering Spaces

    This issue of Footprint aims to introduce the latest developments in the field of queer theory into the realm of architecture and urban design – and vice versa, to make architectural and urban design concerns an element of queer studies. Next to uncovering hitherto hidden or repressed histories and practices as part of an agenda of inclusiveness, we consider an introduction of queer theory to architecture as engendering a radical reconceptualisation of the architectural discipline: That is, to upset and replace any conception of architecture as an embodiment of essentialist identities, forms or types, in order to move towards an understanding of architecture as a practice engaged in consistent transformation. Such a reconceptualisation of architect ure views difference in terms of process, foregrounds liminal situations, their metamorphosis and transgression. 

    Within queer theory one finds various contesting propositions regarding the very definition of ‘queer’ and acts of queering, especially now LGBTQI identities have become part of mainstream culture in western societies. Generally speaking, these propositions range from the mapping of queer identities – sometimes as another category in a taxonomy of essentialisms – to the idea of queering as performative acts of activist subversion and subjectivation. Such acts of queering resist the establishment of stable identities, while they promote transitory assemblages that are embedded within an unfolding process of differencing. 

    A first concern is here the ‘logics’ in which these differences are produced and conceptualised, the concomitant disciplinary power structures and the epistemological frameworks that sustain these logics. The most radical variants of queering seek to undermine any bipolar, mutually exclusive opposition as in the case of heterosexist normativity and any other hegemonic discourse based on classic structuralist ‘twin-phenomena’ such as male-female, inside-outside, centre-periphery et cetera. Arguably, the recent coming-into-mainstream of transgender issues placed full attention on bodily transitioning processes themselves. In their fierce act of self-displacement, trans-bodies overcome dualist logics by exploring t he transgressive dimensions involved in forms of becoming.

    Such tension between essentialism and becoming can already be observed in earlier attempts at connecting queer theory and architecture: in Queer Space (1997) Aaron Betsky proposed familiar gay tropes such as the closet and the interior, or hedonistic urban lifestyles as the ultimate spaces of queer identities, whereas Stud (1996) edited by Joel Sanders suggested a more complicated relationship between space and gay identities by clarifying that there is no ‘queer space’, only space put to queer use (Chauncey, in Sanders 1996, 224).

    Another vector of productive debate regarding this queering can be located between the discursive and the body, between language and matter. Judith Butler famously understands the formation of gendered identities, their enactments and possible undoing as performative. Alternatively, Rosi Braidotti’s feminist re-reading of Gilles Deleuze's concept of becoming starts with an emphasis on the conditioning, generating and accommodation of difference as belonging to situated material processes from one moment of actualisation to another. The difference that bodies make is here no longer seen as a formation ‘in’ space or ‘in’ an environment, but actualised as a figuration ‘of’ its material milieu (Bar ad, Bennett). A body (architecturally or otherwise) is understood as a transient and  reciprocal form-taking of a milieu – unlike a singular entity contained by and acting in a neutral ‘space’ or ‘environment’. Such trans-bodies are not just in a state of transition themselves, they also trigger a transformation of the environment they traverse and populate, a queering of spaces indeed.

    We welcome papers that embrace LGBTQI and gender-theoretical debates, in order to go beyond essentialist conceptualisations of architecture. Methodologically speaking, there are obvious overlappings with feminist and post-colonial theories, as well as with contemporary urban geography, cultural studies and sociology. Therefore, an intersectional and transdisciplinary approach is highly encouraged, from the queering of high modernism in architecture to queer migrant histories to female queer urban lifestyles to the current debates on the place of transgender in public spaces. 
    Authors are invited to explore and subvert theoretical frameworks, research methods and analytical instruments, including the archive and historiography, all in order to demonstrate queer modes of thinking and operating, and to enlighten us on the operations of trans-bodies, what trans-architecture could be, what a queer architect might do. 

    Footprint #21 will be published in Autumn 2017. 
    Authors interested in submitting a contribution are requested to submit an abstract of 1000–1500 words to the editors before 1 December 2016. The Footprint editors will then select papers that are considered on topic, innovative and demonstrate an explorative academic level. The notification of acceptance will be sent before 15 January 2017.

    Deadline for selected full papers is 1 April 2017 after which these papers will enter the peer-review process. Please note: the ultimate selection of papers for publication will not be based on the abstracts, but will be based on the double blind peer-review of full papers. 

    In case of review articles (2000–4000 words) or visual reports related to the topic, these will be selected on the basis of a short summary (500 words max) which the authors are requested to submit to the editors before 1 November 2016. 

    Please, also include a short bio of 300 words max. 

    For submissions and inquiries, please contact editors Robert Gorny and Dirk van den Heuvel at fp21@footprintjournal.org.
  • The Discipline of Nature: Architect Alfred Browning Parker in Florida

    Miami | Dates: 24 Sep, 2016 – 15 Jan, 2017
    HistoryMiami Museum is proud to announce its upcoming exhibition, The Discipline of Nature: Architect Alfred Browning Parker, which will examine the 60-year career of the famed Miami architect whose organic tropicalist designs made him a regional leader and a national icon. 

    Opening on the 100th anniversary of the architect’s birth, The Discipline of Nature will celebrate Parker’s rich and prolific life. Featuring original drawings, archival photographs, and models and furnishings, the exhibition will illustrate Parker’s evolving designs and illuminate his use of natural principles, forms, and materials to create an organic structure for his work. 

    The exhibition, running from September 24, 2016 – February 26, 2017, brings new relevance to Parker as the activist architect, writer, speaker, teacher and philosopher of Miami. 

    “Parker has a remarkable legacy in Miami. He was an original thinker who emphasized environmentally friendly design and sustainability longer before the “green movement” even existed," said Stuart Chase, President and CEO of HistoryMiami.  “This exhibition not only celebrates his remarkable designs, but highlights the ecological and environmental basis to his work.” 

    Parker designed more than 500 projects in his 60-year career, many of which were award-winning designs, and was the recipient of the American Institute of Architects Florida Association’s inaugural Award of Honor in 1967.  

    "As an architect deeply rooted in Florida, Parker designed and built singular works directed by a coherent system of values that directly address issues of place," said co-Curator Allan Shulman. "Central to his ethos was respect for the earth and its resources, and moral and aesthetic interest in the power of nature."

    HistoryMiami Museum will host a Grand Opening party for The Discipline of Nature on September 24th with a special conversation with curators Randolph C. Henning and Allan Shulman that will bring to light the indelible impact Parker had on Florida's built landscape. 

    “Without question Alfred Browning Parker is Florida’s most renowned and celebrated architect,” Curator Randolph C. Henning said. “What better day to open this exhibition, a celebration of his passionate creative energy and commitment to living in harmony with the environment, than on the day marking the centennial anniversary of his birth.”

    For more information visit www.historymiami.org. Tickets to see the exhibition cost $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, $5 for children, and free for children under 6 years old. 
     
  • Call for Applications: 2017 Grants to Individuals

    Dates: 15 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    Application available online: August 15, 2016
    Deadline: September 15, 2016

    Since 1956, the Graham Foundation has provided direct funding to individuals for projects that foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society. As one of the few funders of individuals in the field of architecture, the foundation's grants provide important support for the work of emerging and established architects, scholars, writers, artists, designers, curators, filmmakers, and other individuals.

    To apply for an individual grant, applicants must submit an Inquiry Form—the first stage of a two-stage application process. The online Inquiry Form will be available on our website from August 15 until the deadline on September 15, 2016.  
     
    Download the Inquiry Form Worksheet here to prepare your responses and gather requested materials before August 15.   

    For more information about the Graham Foundation's grants and to learn if your project is eligible for funding, please see our grant guidelines.
     
  • Endless Images: A SoCal Summer Program

    Laguna Beach | Dates: 14 – 15 Aug, 2016
    ENDLESS IMAGES: A SoCal Summer Program organized by the Visual Resources Association (VRA), Society of CA Archivists (SCA), and Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS-SC) on Sunday, August 14 & Monday, August 15, 2016 at the Laguna College of Art & Design.  Sessions and Lightning Round talks will take place on Monday; optional tour of the Laguna Art Museum and attendance at the Pageant of the Masters are organized for Sunday.  

    For more information and to register, please see: 
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1x1kGEyubbWxIViXd5xGSxCdMtHhGdkA4ObxkgJRm0Ko/viewform

    The early bird deadline to obtain the best value is this Wednesday, July 20th.  If you would like to attend the Pageant of the Masters performance Sunday night, you need to register and pay for your ticket by the early bird deadline. 
     
  • Brick x Brick

    St. Paul | Dates: 18 Aug – 30 Dec, 2016
    Brick x Brick is a group exhibition that foregrounds the slow and deliberate process of building as a way to understand the social and cultural topographies of cities and the built environment. Artists represented in the exhibition use a diversity of media—including photography, painting, sculpture, drawing, and craft—to show how building contributes to and disrupts the features of local, national, and international urban landscapes.
     
    Architecture is an endlessly fascinating lens through which to observe dramatic changes in the history and texture of contemporary cities. From Robert Polidori’s photographs of pastel-hued Havana to Carolyn Swiszcz’s paintings of St. Paul’s aging retail landmarks, buildings reflect how communities change and adapt, while creating more diverse layers of social and architectural history. Allan McNab’s woodcuts show houses sprouting up like mushrooms that spread over a hillside. Mike Lynch’s painting of abandoned grain silos, Elevator – 29th and Harriet from 1988, is a haunting reminder of Minneapolis’s past as the “Flour Milling Capital of the World.”
     
    Artists also use building blocks of form and color to comment on the formal and conceptual construction of art itself. Julie Mehretu’s lithograph Entropia contains 32 layers of colorful ink that recall architectural plans and swirling topographical maps. George Morrison’s Cube is a sculptural collage of finely polished wooden puzzle pieces. Rob Fischer’s Industrial Revolution salvages a high-Modernist color palette and old panes of glass in order to build something new from something old. Each work in the exhibition reveals how art and architecture share the same reflex—to construct a new relationship to the world around us. 

    Brick x Brick showcases works by over 30 artists from across the country, including 12 from Minnesota. The majority of the works in the show come from the permanent collection of the Minnesota Museum of American Art, and are complimented by generous loans from artists and private collections.
  • The Architectural Heritage of the Piscataqua, A Photographic Reflection, In tribute to John Mead Howells

    Portsmouth | Dates: 22 Jul – 05 Nov, 2016
    It has been nearly eighty years since the publication of Architectural Heritage of the Piscataqua by the architect John Mead Howells. This summer’s exhibition is a photographic reflection of the book and the houses that inspired Howells to record them for posterity. The twentieth century proved tumultuous for the buildings and residents of Portsmouth. The 1920s saw the sale of historic interiors and the resulting destruction of their edifices. The Depression of the 1930s slowed this trend and allowed Howells to photograph buildings viewed as architecturally important to his audience. Urban renewal emerged from the victories of World War II with mixed results for the built environment and residents of Portsmouth when neighborhoods were destroyed or moved in an effort to “improve’ the living arrangements and structures of the city. On the brink of these changes, the images in Architectural Heritage of the Piscataqua offer a nostalgic hold on the imagination, but perhaps more importantly they provide a visual clue to the historical architectural importance of Portsmouth to the nation. William Laurence Bottomley in his introduction to the book regarded Charleston, Annapolis and Portsmouth as a trinity of eighteenth-century towns, “with much of their early work complete and extant,” but of these, he wrote, Portsmouth “was the most complete.” In 1937 this book brought that vision to the rest of the country. Architectural fragments and objects associated with the properties will also be on view. The photographs in the exhibit have been reproduced in a process that converts them from digital into silver gelatin prints. Through this process, a close approximation of the originals has been realized that utilizes the chemistry light and silver to capture the effect of light and shadow on 18th Century architecture. The exhibit is located in the Randal Gallery of the Portsmouth Athenaeum, 9 Market Square, Portsmouth, NH 03801 from July 22 through November 5, 2016. Gallery hours are Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday from 1-4 P.M. The gallery is also open for Portsmouth Arts Around Town on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 P.M.
  • CFP: EAHN Fifth International Meeting (Tallinn, 13-16 Jun 18)

    Tallinn | Dates: 18 Jul – 12 Dec, 2016
    EAHN Fifth International Meeting (Tallinn, 13-16 Jun 18)

    Tallinn, Estonia, June 13 - 16, 2018
    Deadline: Dec 12, 2016

    EAHN Fifth International Meeting
    Call for Sessions and Round-Tables

    Deadline: December 12, 2016

    European Architectural History Network (EAHN) is organising its fifth pan-European meeting in Tallinn, Estonia, from June 13-16, 2018. In accordance with its mission statement, the meeting aims to increase the visibility of the discipline; to foster transcultural, transnational and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of the built environment; and to facilitate the exchange of research results in the field. 
    Although the scope of the meeting is European, members of the larger scholarly community are invited to submit proposals related not only to European architecture but also to that of the rest of the world.  
     
    The main purpose of the meeting is to map the general state of research in disciplines related to the built environment, to promote discussion of current themes and concerns, and to foster new directions for research in the field. Session proposals are intended to cover different periods in the history of architecture and different approaches to the built environment, including landscape and urban history. Parallel sessions will consist of either five papers or four papers and a respondent, with time for dialogue and questions at the end. In addition, there will be a number of round-table debates addressing burning issues in the field. Proposals are sought for round-table debates that re-map, re-define or outline the current state of the discipline. They will consist of a discussion between panel members, but will also encourage debate with the audience. The goal is to create a forum for scholars to present and discuss their ideas, research materials and methodologies.

    Scholars wishing to chair a scholarly session or round-table debate at Tallinn 2018 are invited to submit proposals by December 12, 2016 to andres.kurg@artun.ee, Dr. Andres Kurg, General Chair of the EAHN Fifth International Meeting, Institute of Art History and Visual Culture, Estonian Academy of Arts, Suur-Kloostri 11, Tallinn 10133, Estonia.

    Duties of the chairs of session and of round-tables include: selecting from the proposals submitted for presentation by the agreed deadline; communicating the list of speakers and titles to the conference organisers by the agreed deadline; and submitting material for the proceedings to the conference organisers by the agreed deadline. Chairs will not be eligible for selection as speakers in their own or any other session or round table at the conference.

    All chairs and selected presenters and speakers are required to obtain membership of EAHN (available for an annual membership fee at
    http://www.eahn.org/members-2/) prior to registration at the conference. Chairs are expected to pursue their own institutional or other support for membership, registration, travel and accommodation.

    Proposals in English, of no more than 400 words, including a session or round-table title, should summarise the subject and the premise. Please include name, professional affiliation (if applicable), address, telephone, e-mail address and a current CV. Proposals and short CVs should be submitted by e-mail, including the texts in both the body of the mail and as attachments.

    Session and round-table proposals will be selected on the basis of merit and the need to organize a well-balanced programme. Please note: 
    preference will be given to proposals from chairs who have not hosted a session in the previous biennial conference (Dublin 2016). The International Scientific Committee may organise additional open sessions, depending on the response to this call.

    The complete Call for Sessions and Round-Tables can be downloaded from the Conference website: http://eahn2018conference.ee
     
  • Living and Sustainability: An Environmental Critique of Design and Building Practices, Locally and Globally

    London | Dates: 09 – 10 Feb, 2017
    Living and Sustainability: An Environmental Critique of Design and Building Practices, Locally and Globally

    9th to 10th February 2017

    LONDON, United Kindgom

    Hosted in London, UK this international and interdisciplinary conference is open to engineers, architects, planners, building technologists, environmentalists and others interested in environmental and social sustainability. The conference seeks to share knowledge on various issues, such as: advances in the retrofitting of houses, new ideas for environmentally efficient buildings, and the latest developments in Zero Carbon construction from across the world.

    It is organized by London South Bank University and AMPS. 

    Registration: http://architecturemps.com/london-2017/
  • Editorships for EAHN Journal Architectural Histories

    Dates: 18 Jul – 01 Oct, 2016
    June 1, 2017 - May 31, 2021
    Deadline: Oct 1, 2016

    The journal Architectural Histories of the European Architectural History Network, is now seeking to appoint a new editor-in-chief and editorial assistant from 1 June 2017 for a four-year term. These are strictly voluntary positions with no paid remuneration. The journal is a highly ranked peer-reviewed public access on-line publication. 
    Details about the positions can be requested from Nancy Stieber nancy.stieber@umb.edu.  Applications consisting of a cover letter and CV are due by 1 October 2016.
     
  • Kunsthallen. Architectures for the Continuous Contemporary

    Bern | Dates: 02 – 03 Sep, 2016
    CONF: Kunsthallen. Architectures for the Continuous Contemporary (Bern, 2-3 Sep 16)

    Bern University, 02. - 03.09.2016

    International Conference
     
    KUNSTHALLEN. Architectures for the Continuous Contemporary in Europe and the US

    Prof. Dr. Peter J. Schneemann
    peter.schneemann@ikg.unibe.ch
    http://www.ikg.unibe.ch/

    In July 1968, on the occasion of the fiftieth birthday of the Kunsthalle Bern, Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped the building in
    2.430 square meters of white polyethylene fabric. The Kunsthalle was the first architecture in Europe that received the honor of being fully wrapped by Christo.

    Interventions in the architectural structure of the Kunsthalle, such as Sol LeWitt's structures (1972) for example, continued during the following fifty years, leading to a constant and critical examination of both the institution and its building. The centennial of the Kunsthalle Bern in 2018 is the starting point for the international conference KUNSTHALLEN. Architectures for the Continuous Contemporary in Europe and the US, which will be held at Bern University September 2-3, 2016. In contrast to collecting museums the model of the Kunsthalle is characterized by freedom and novelty. Due to its dynamic concept, this institutional format contributes to the formation of contemporary art in essential ways.

    The conference assembles international guests from diverse institutions and professional fields who will discuss the historical development, political implications as well as the societal positioning of the Kunsthalle. The institution's role as curatorial field of experimentation, artistic material, and as a platform for transatlantic exchange will be examined as well.

    This conference is organised by the Department for Modern and Contemporary Art History, Institute for Art History, Bern University, in cooperation with the Institute for Art History, Basel University and the Kunsthalle Bern. It has received generous financial support from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

    Concept and organisation:
    Prof. Dr. Peter J. Schneemann, Bern
    Prof. Dr. Eva Ehninger, Basel
    Valérie Knoll, Director Kunsthalle Bern
     
  • Digital Humanities and Historic Preservation

    Dates: 18 Jul – 01 Oct, 2016
    The editors of Preservation Education & Research (PER) invite papers on the use of the digital humanities to teach, research, communicate, and experience aspects of the historic environment for the 10th (2017) edition of the journal. Digital humanities are commonly defined as the application of digital content, methods, and tools to the disciplines of the humanities. Preservationists are already well acquainted with digital content and tools such as mapping, laser scanning, and the online archiving of historical documents, to name only a few. These approaches have undoubtedly extended the reach and depth of preservation practice, yet there remains enormous potential for digital tools and methods to enable new research questions, interpretations, and experiences that otherwise may be impossible. PER welcomes paper manuscripts on subjects that may include but are not limited to the following examples: • Tours that make use of smart phones and tablets to feature archival information, video, sound, and other media that augment reality or enhance understanding of the built environment. • Geospatial analysis, mapping, modeling, and visualizations that illustrate change over time, distribution of historical features, or other patterns that reveal aspects of historical significance. • Digital storytelling or digitally recorded and disseminated oral histories as a means of enriching knowledge about the history of places or the meanings they hold for people across time. • Web-based surveys, social medial platforms, or other interactive, digitally-enabled public engagement methods for advancing approaches to values-based preservation planning. • Preservation-related research made possible by recently-digitized, primary source data. • Historic sites and museums enriched by digitally-enabled, multisensory, auditory, visual, or olfactory experiences. • Successes and challenges associated with incorporating the digital humanities into preservation pedagogy. While we encourage submissions based on this issue’s theme, papers on all topics related to preservation education, research, and scholarship will also be considered. The deadline for submission of papers (4,500-6,000 words in length) is February 15, 2017. All submissions must be emailed to pereditor@gmail.com and must adhere to the journal’s publication guidelines located at http://www.ncpe.us/publications/manuscriptsubmissionguidelines. Papers will be blind reviewed and authors notified of publication status by April 2017. About PER Preservation Education Research (PER) is a refereed journal focusing on scholarship related to historic preservation (e.g., heritage conservation/cultural patrimony) education that addresses the historic environment. The National Council for Preservation Education (NCPE) launched PER in 2007 as part of its mission to exchange and disseminate information and ideas concerning preservation education, current developments and innovations in preservation, and the improvement of historic preservation education programs and endeavors in the United States and abroad. For more information about NCPE and PER, visit http://www.ncpe.us. Back issues of PER are also available on NCPE’s web site.
  • Documenting the Visual Arts

    Dates: 01 – 01 Nov, 2016
    The proliferation and popularity of visual arts documentaries are a major component of the recent international documentary boom, but they tend to be overlooked in film criticism and scholarship in favor of documentaries framed more explicitly in social and political terms. Yet visual arts documentaries remain on the cutting edge of documentary innovation, from 3D cinema (Cave of Forgotten Dreams) to questioning documentary truths (Exit Through the Gift Shop). Moreover, visual arts documentaries have long played significant roles in various historical formations around documentary politics (e.g. USIA films in the Cold War, the Left Bank essay films of 1950s and Channel Four programming in the 1980s). This edited collection will examine the significance of visual arts documentaries from a range of critical perspectives and methodologies. The book will explore not only how documentaries from around the globe exploit the formal properties of film and video to illuminate the aesthetic specificities and intersections of other visual arts, but also how they elucidate the material and cultural conditions in which visual arts are produced and experienced (e.g. the discourse of the artist, museums and galleries, activist art, religious practice, commercial design etc.). To complement these interpretative contributions, the book will also include critical analyses of the political economy of visual arts documentaries, especially the geopolitics of the genre. As an interdisciplinary and intermedial project, I am particularly interested in contributions that connect film studies to other disciplines and fields, including anthropology, art history, architecture, communication, rhetoric, performance studies and visual studies, among others. Consideration will be given to submissions about any historical period or cultural/national/regional context (the book aims for genuinely global scope). Contributions may focus on a single film, a body of work (organized around filmmaker, artist or subject) or a particular institutional context. I am defining visual arts broadly to include applied arts, such as fashion, architecture and design, as well as film, video, photography, painting, sculpture, illustration and performance art etc. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): • Medium specificity and the visual arts documentary • Cultural politics of visual arts television programming • Documentary film and arts education • Visual arts documentary as cultural diplomacy • Post/colonial appropriation and resistance in visual arts documentaries • Representing visual aesthetic practices in ethnographic film • Documenting performance and collaboration in the visual arts • Documenting activist art practices • Discourses of the visual artist in documentary film • Documentaries about art institutions and markets • Visual arts documentary as paratext (making of documentaries, exhibition documentaries) • Relationship between documentary filmmaking and archival documentation of visual arts • Histories of arts television networks and series • Film technologies and the visual arts documentary • Fakery, forgery and mockumentary Deadline for electronic submission of 350-400 word abstract (plus brief biographical statement and sample 5-item bibliography): November 1, 2016. Notification by December 1, 2016. Commissioned chapters should not exceed 5,000 words and must be completed by October 1, 2017. Please send submissions and inquiries via email to Roger Hallas, Associate Professor of English (Film & Screen Studies), Syracuse University, USA: rhallas@syr.edu
  • CFP - "Ancient Worlds, Digital Screens," SCMS Chicago, 22-27 March 2017

    Chicago | Dates: 18 Jul – 01 Oct, 2016
    The ancient world on the cinematic screen has recently been resurging. Digital effects have enabled new worlds to be developed for television and cinema, allowing classic sword-and-sandal flicks to be reimagined with emerging technologies. These mythical, biblical, and historical accounts from ancient Greece, Rome, and Egypt have been marketed and distributed worldwide as major theatrical releases. Despite generally negative reviews, the classics keep coming—with a new Ben Hur scheduled for release at the end of summer in 2016. Considering Jeffrey Richards’ argument that “historical films are always about the time in which they are made and never about the time in which they are set” (2008), what does the resurgence of ancient themes in cinema mean? What are the reasons they are being produced despite hit-and-miss reviews? This panel is an exploration of the re-emergence of ancient themes in cinema, but pushes the idea of what they mean to contemporary society by considering the ways they move with emergent trends in media. Paper topics may include: - Architecture and/of ancient worlds - Ancient and early medieval archaeology - Adaptation and remakes - Ancient themes on television and/or other media (eg. Rome, Spartacus) - Ancient motifs in sci-fi and fantasy - Differences between historical accounts and cinematic representations of histories - Looking at classics through the emerging scholarship of media archaeology - National(ism), identity, and ancient Egypt - Ancient myth in contemporary art/film - Sexuality, race, and gender - Digital media, 3D cinema, and special effects - Renaissance art and/in cinema/media - Historiography of classics in cinema - Process, context, and worlding across media - Media convergence of ancient themes across cinema, art, architecture, media. Please send a 250-300 word abstract, along with brief (1 page if you can) cv, and a 100-150 word biography to: braden.scott@mail.mcgill.ca by August 10, 2016. The finalised panel will be proposed to SCMS by August 31, 2016.
  • Garden City | Mega City

    New York | Dates: 15 Jul – 04 Sep, 2016
    WOHA rethinks cities for the age of global warming

    March 23 - September 4, 2016

    In the tropical countries and islands of Southeast Asia and South Asia, nature, sun, and people are abundant. Of the world’s twenty largest megacities – metropolitan areas with a population of 10 million or more – seven are located in these hot and humid regions. Rapid urbanization has been the pattern of growth and accommodating rising densities poses major challenges for governments, planners, and architects – as does the crisis of climate change.
      
    Just one degree latitude north of the equator, the tiny city-state of Singapore, with 5.5 million people and a territory of 278 square miles (719 km2) – slightly smaller than New York’s five boroughs – presents an extraordinary model of social engineering and architectural innovation. In Singapore, where 80 percent of the resident population lives in some form of public housing, of which 90 percent own their homes, the Housing Development Board (HDB) has embraced both the high-rise typology and the goal of a garden city.

    WOHA – the practice begun in 1994 by architects Wong Mun Summ and Richard Hassell – has built extensively in Singapore, as well as in Bangkok, Mumbai, and other megacities in the region. The firm advances skyscrapers as solutions for urban density, but critiques the Western conventions of steel and concrete frames, wrapped and sealed in a curtain wall of glass and artificially cooled. WOHA proposes – and they have built – tropical towers enveloped by nature and vertical villages with sky gardens, breezeways, and elevated parks. At a time when global warming threatens the future, the enlightened work of WOHA rethinks the urban environment, offering prototypes that use vertical density to create highly social, sustainable, and garden-filled cities.
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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