Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • Bricks, Barrel Vaults & Beer: The Architectural Legacy of Cincinnati Breweries

    Cincinnati | Dates: 10 Jan – 07 May, 2015

    Returning to the Betts House from January 10 through May 7, 2015

    Come celebrate Cincinnati’s unique beer history at The Betts House! The Betts House is pleased to announce the return its 2013 exhibit, Bricks, Barrel Vaults, & Beer: The Architectural Legacy of Cincinnati Breweries, on view from January 10 through May 7, 2015. Bricks, Barrel Vaults, & Beer is the first exhibit to explore the tunnels, breweries, buildings and people that made Cincinnati a leader in the 19th-century brewing industry. Through photos, charts and detailed narrative, the exhibit explains the technology and construction of Cincinnati’s breweries. Bricks, Barrel Vaults, & Beer also highlights the social and cultural influences that made Cincinnati a brewing destination, such as immigration and labor.

    Why a beer exhibit? In the late 1890s, beer consumption in Cincinnati was two-and-a-half times the national average. To satisfy such a significant beer drinking community, the Cincinnati brewery industry grew to meet the demands, resulting in one of the largest collections of pre-Prohibition brewery buildings in the United States.

    This exhibit was researched, written and curated by local experts, Steve Hampton, architect and executive director of the Cincinnati Brewery District Urban Redevelopment Corporation, and Michael Morgan, historian and author, “Over-the- Rhine, When Beer was King”.

    Bricks, Barrel Vaults & Beer is created in partnership with The Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation and sponsored by the Josephine Schell Russell Charitable Trust, PNC Bank, Trustee; the John Hauck Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, John W. Hauck, E. Allen Elliot, and Narley L. Haley, Co-Trustees; and the Ohio Humanities Council.

    ABOUT THE BETTS HOUSE
    Built in 1804, Ohio’s oldest brick house is located in the Betts-Longworth Historic District near downtown Cincinnati.  The Betts House is a museum of the built environment, offering exhibits and programs exploring architecture, historic preservation, building trades, construction technologies, and building materials.  Located two blocks west of Music Hall, at 416 Clark Street, the house is open Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. and the second and fourth Saturdays of each month, 12:30 – 5 p.m. Other days and times are available by appointment.  Admission is $2 per person. Visit http://www.TheBettsHouse.org for more information.

    The Betts House is owned by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Ohio (NSCDA-OH), a non-profit organization, founded in 1896, which promotes our national heritage through historic preservation and education.  In 2000, the National Trust for Historic Preservation presented their prestigious Trustee Emeritus Award for Excellence in the Stewardship of Historic Sites to The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America “for acquiring, restoring, and interpreting a collection of historic properties that offer invaluable opportunities to experience the rich variety of America’s heritage.”

  • SAH 68th Annual International Conference

    Dates: 15 – 19 Apr, 2015
    Visit sah.org/2015 for information on the SAH 2015 Annual International Conference in Chicago, April 15-19.
  • Medford (MA) Historical Commission

    Medford | Dates: 08 Dec, 2014 – 30 Jun, 2015
    The Medford Historical Commission is seeking qualified individuals from the Medford community to serve on its board. The Medford Historical Commission, along with the Medford Historic District Commission, is entrusted with the preservation and protection of the City's historic character and heritage. The Commission was established under Section 8d of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws and Chapter 48 of the Medford Municipal Ordinances. The Commission is the official City body charged with the identification of properties and sites of historical significance and is the principal advisor to the City on matters relating to historic preservation. The Commission reviews all requests for the demolition of buildings constructed before 1900 or listed on the National and Massachusetts Registers of Historic Places, in accordance with the City's demolition delay ordinance. The board holds regular monthly meetings and occasional special hearings at City Hall, conducts site visits as necessary, oversees historic property surveys and grants, and engages with Medford property owners on issues of preservation. Applicants should have interest, knowledge, and experience in fields related to architectural history, historic preservation, and/or Medford history. Applicants should contact the Commission by submitting a letter of interest outlining their qualifications. Please include name and contact information, as well as relevant supporting material. Candidates may be contacted for an interview. The Commission shall then present nominees to the Mayor for final selection and appointment. Those selected to serve on the board volunteer for three-year terms as Special Employees of the City. Please submit letters & materials to: Medford Historical Commission c/o Office of Planning and Community Development Medford City Hall 85 George P. Hassett Drive Medford, MA 02155 or by email to historicalcommission@medford.org
  • The University of Wisconsin, Madison libraries are pleased to announce the launch of a new digital project: The Dominy Craftsmen Collection.

    Dates: 11 Nov, 2014

    The University of Wisconsin, Madison libraries are pleased to announce the launch of a new digital project: The Dominy Craftsmen Collection.

    http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/Dominy

    Three generations of the Dominy family of East Hampton, New York functioned as craftsmen from ca. 1760 to ca. 1850.  Working in wood and metal, they produced clocks and furniture and repaired thousands of pocket watches.  Direct descendants of the Dominy craftsmen kept together the shop equipment, tools, and manuscript material on their original site until 1946, thus preserving the only complete record of craftsmen working in colonial America and the New Republic.  Much of this material is now relocated to the Winterthur Museum.

    UW-Madison's Digital Collections Center, in collaboration with Winterthur Museum and Libraries, the Chipstone Foundation, and Dominy scholar Charles F. Hummel, is now making these archival materials and related resources publicly available online.

    Phase One of the project is now live.  Currently you can find manuscript materials, images of watchpapers, a video-taped lecture by Charles Hummel about the Dominy craftsmen, articles by Carl Bopp and Charles Hummel, and more.

    A future addition to the project will be an enlarged digital edition of With Hammer in Hand, the major scholarly publication on the Dominy craftsmen by Charles F. Hummel.

    As usual with a newly launched project, we appreciate your feedback and notice of any glitches you might encounter.  And we hope you will help pass the word about the existence of this new resource to your researchers.

     

  • CFP: Urban Culture (Dubrovnik, 14-18 Sep 2015)

    Dubrovnik | Dates: 19 Nov, 2014 – 15 May, 2015

    Dubrovnik, Croatia, Inter University Center, September 14 - 18, 2015
    Deadline: May 15, 2015

    International conference on Urban Culture

    Urban cultures are increasingly constituted at the crossroads of cultures, religions, and ideologies at the local, regional, national and global level. Conflicting ideas of development, conservation and urban planning bring attention to the importance of broadening the understanding of the socio-cultural, political, economic and environmental problems we are faced with today.

    Different groups of interest have for a long time sought to influence the planning of city space in various directions in response to the challenges of a rapidly increasing urbanization. As an example researchers and activists have in urban habitats observed a developmental agenda shared by big city governments and corporate players alike myopically focusing on a city´s marketability, leading to a commodification of cultural representation, expressions and cultural memories.

    Recognizing the danger inherent in this agenda of excluding democratic participation from below, citizenship groups and NGO´s seeking common ground have succeeded in exploring and finding alternative and creative solutions to urban challenges that have found resonance and support among city managers and meeting the aspirations of the general public. In some research environments in cities like Bangkok, Osaka, Zagreb and Dubrovnik the cultural sectors of art and music have been able to contribute to such explorations in a fruitful way.

    Various media for researching as well as spheres for interventions – tangible and intangible – are conceivable. For music, e.g., what does a soundscape of a concrete city reveal about its social reality? About different dimensions of image construction? About activities of various social groups?" For arts, e.g., which artistic practices and initiatives can contribute to double reading of urban and cultural memory in urban spaces, and relate it to lived and living expressions? How can art counteract the dominant urban trend of aestheticization and the function of culture in urban contexts that has become „image-based“ and commodified ?

    There seems to be consensus about the way ahead: In order to address the pressing challenges of a rapidly globalizing world we need to reopen our cities as living, communicative spaces, bringing into our lives a sense of living together in shared and living spaces. We need to re-envision the urban fabric as a living, thriving and sustainable community. The UN Post-2015 Agenda calls for a new participatory and collaborative effort in studying and consequently making informed recommendations and decisions about our future course. Recognizing these pressing needs the organizer invite researchers, practicioners, politicians, students, activists and artists to collaborate in our quest for a sustainable urban future by participating in our conference. In accord with the leadership of the Inter-university Cenre Dubrovnik conferences focusing on urban culture studies are being planned as annual occurrences.

    Deadline for abstract submission: May 15th, 2015. We invite abstracts of no more than 500 words (including an indicative reference list).

    Presentations in the form of papers, visual presentations and panels are especially welcome but not obligatory for registration and attendance, as are also contributions to the peer reviewed Journal of Urban Culture Research.

    Administration and organizational costs, working materials, and coffee breaks during conference are covered by the organizers.

  • CFP 2015: SACRPH (Society for American City and Regional Planning History)

    Los Angeles | Dates: 05 – 08 Nov, 2015
    The Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH) presents THE 16TH NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANNING HISTORY Los Angeles, California, November 5-8, 2015 SACRPH cordially invites papers on all aspects of the history of urban, regional, and community planning, worldwide. Particularly welcome are papers or complete sessions addressing: • planning and the built environment in the U.S. Sunbelt • comparative and global studies of planning, especially of the U.S. West/Pacific Rim, or U.S. Southwest/Latin America • preservation planning in 20th-century cities • disaster and urban resiliency • the ethics of planning • planning and the law We also encourage papers that examine planning before the 19th century and SACPRH awards the de Montequin Prize for the best paper presented at the conference in colonial planning history. A Thursday afternoon program will be dedicated to the legacy of urban renewal in L.A. after the demise of redevelopment authorities in California in 2012, and SACRPH wishes to extend a special welcome to practitioners. Sunday morning will offer a range of tours exploring the planning of Los Angeles. SACRPH is an interdisciplinary organization dedicated to promoting humanistic scholarship on the planning of metropolitan regions. Its members include historians, practicing planners, geographers, environmentalists, architects, landscape designers, public policy makers, preservationists, community organizers, students, and scholars from across the world. SACRPH publishes a quarterly journal, The Journal of Planning History (http://jph.sagepub.com/), hosts a biennial conference, and sponsors awards for research and publication in the field of planning history. For further information please consult our website: http://www.sacrph.org. The Program Committee welcomes proposals for complete sessions of three or four papers, and for individual papers. We also encourage submissions that propose innovative formats and that engage questions of teaching and learning, digital information, and publishing. Submissions should be formatted as a single PDF (preferred) or as a single Word document. Please format the proposal with a standard 12-point font and 1.25-inch side margins. Do not include illustrations. Each proposal must include the following: • a one-page abstract for each paper, clearly marked with title and participant's name • a one-page CV for each participant, including address, telephone, and e-mail • for individual papers, four key words identifying the thematic emphases of the topic • for session proposals, a cover page indicating lead contact, with telephone and email; the names of the session Chair and Commentator (if available), a one-paragraph overview of the session's themes and significance, and a description of the format (regular panel, roundtable, workshop) Proposals must be received by February 15, 2015 via email attachment to sacrph2015@gmail.com. Inquiries may be directed to Program Committee co-chairs: Matthew Lasner, Assistant Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning, Hunter College mlasner@hunter.cuny.edu Paula Lupkin, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of North Texas paula.lupkin@unt.edu
  • Call for Papers: 2015 Conference on Illinois History

    Springfield | Dates: 24 – 25 Sep, 2015
    Proposal deadline: March 11, 2015 Proposals for papers, panels, or teacher workshops on any aspect of Illinois' history, architecture, culture, politics, geography, literature, and archaeology are requested.
  • 5th International Congress on Construction History

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 07 Jul, 2015
    Hosted by the Construction Society of America, non-profit organization dedicated to the study of the history and evolution of all aspects of the built environment. This is the first time the Congress has been held outside Europe, with over 400 delegates expected to attend from all over the world comprised of Architects, engineers, contractors, preservationists, academics and a wide variety of trades, professions and interests associated with the Construction Industry.
  • Reading Architecture Symposium

    Athens | Dates: 16 – 18 Jun, 2015
    The symposium wishes to explore how the literary production of modernity can enlighten architects and urban planners in understanding and valorizing qualitative characteristics of the contemporary life they are called to design for. These situations of life could include a focused look into people’s everyday private and public lives, small or big scale events in human-built environments, socio-cultural and political phenomena in urban contexts. We understand these situations as place-bound (place specific) architectural experiences that allow for a qualitative, emotional and embodied apprehension of the world.
  • International Multidiciplinary Symposium on the Origins of Monumental Architecture

    to be determined | Dates: 07 Nov, 2014 – 06 Nov, 2015
    The OTS Foundation is seeking collaborators in the fields of Architectural History and Neuroscience to help organize a Multi-Disciplinary event to consider new scientific information, define further research, and develop public educational outreach.
  • Save the Date: 2015 Association of Architecture School Librarians' (AASL) Annual Conference

    Toronto | Dates: 17 – 19 Mar, 2015

    Building on the core concepts of this year’s ACSA theme, The Expanding Periphery and the Migrating Center, the Conference Planning Committee has been working hard to develop a suite of programs, tours, talks, and social events designed to address AASL members’ interests.

    In addition to hearing from local experts about the architecture of Toronto, attendees will have the opportunity to—during Lightning Rounds—share ideas with their colleagues about potential solutions to common concerns pertaining to contemporary architecture librarianship and we will experiment with a new type of unconference session entitled Venture and Vexation. Stay tuned for announcements about additional conference programming that is currently under development.

    Please plan to join us at the Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, March 17 – 19, 2015.

    We are planning to activate our conference website in November, complete with registration information.

  • Call for Contributors: Sir Banister Fletcher's A History of Architecture 21st Edition

    Dates: 04 Nov, 2014 – 01 Mar, 2015
    Call for Contributors: Sir Banister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture 21st edition The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the University of London are collaborating on an exciting project to bring Sir Banister Fletcher’s renowned book, A History of Architecture, into the 21st century. Edited by architectural historian and broadcaster, Tom Dyckhoff, the 21st edition will be completely restructured, expanded and rewritten, and is to be published both in print and online (as part of a digital hub for architectural history). We are currently seeking experts in the field of architectural history to author a number of chapters in the new edition, listed below. The deadline for first drafts is Spring/Summer 2015 and scholars are invited to express an interest in contributing to the new edition. Co-authoring is welcome and expressions of interest in parts of chapters will also be considered. Our aim is simple, exciting and hugely ambitious: to create the finest history of architecture in the English-speaking world. Our readers are students (of architecture, design, art history, archaeology, anthropology, but also other disciplines such as sociology or history); they are professionals (architects, engineers, city planners etc); but they are also interested, intelligent non-professionals. So Banister Fletcher’s new history of architecture must be scholarly, enlightening and accurate, challenging and opinionated, but also accessible and enjoyable. We want our readers to be as fascinated by the architecture of ancient Mesopotamia or 15th century Japan as they are by that of Frank Gehry or Zaha Hadid. Chapters have a common overall structure, but we want our authors to create their own history within this, to take fully credited ownership of their chapters, and to let their own interpretation of the period or place sing from the page. The new Banister Fletcher will contain a kaleidoscope of diverse voices, and many different approaches to architectural history. To express an interest in writing any of the chapters listed below, please email catherine.gregg@riba.org stating the chapter title, your affiliation and references to published works. While there is no deadline for expressions of interest, scholars should note that the very latest deadline for first drafts will be September 2015. Any questions should be directed to Catherine Gregg at the above email address or by telephone on +44 (0)207 307 3802. Chapters available are: Early Medieval Europe, 500 – c. 1000 • Central and Northern Europe and Scandinavia (4,000 words) • Eastern Europe, the Bulgars and Early Russia (4,000 words) Late Medieval Europe, c. 1000 - 1400 • The Holy Roman Empire, Central and Eastern Europe (4,500 words) • Scandinavia and Russia (2,000 words) N.B. this chapter may be split and we welcome expressions of interest in either area 1400 – 1830 Europe • The Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria and Central Europe (8,000 words) • Russia and Scandinavia (8,000 words) N.B. this chapter may be split and we welcome expressions of interest in either area 1400 – 1830 non-Europe • The Ottoman Empire (10,000 words) • Iran and the Safavid Dynasty (10,000 words) • Japan 1334 – 1868 (4,000 words) • Africa (4,000 words) 1830 – 1914 Europe • France (11,000 words) • Austro-Hungary, Prussia, Germany and Central Europe (9,000 words) • The Italian Peninsula (4,000 words) • Russia and Scandinavia (4,000 words) N.B. this chapter may be split and we welcome expressions of interest in either area 1830 – 1914 non-Europe • The Middle East (4,000 words) • Africa (5,000 words)
  • Market Street Prototyping Festival

    San Francisco | Dates: 09 – 11 Apr, 2015

    The Festival
    This April, for the first time ever, Market Street will transform into a public platform, showcasing exciting ideas for improving the famed thoroughfare and how we use it. Winning entries, as diverse and exciting as the people of San Francisco themselves, will be brought to life for three days along Market Street, where millions of pedestrians from all walks of life will have the chance to experience, explore, and interact with the prototypes.

    The Goal
    The goal of the Prototyping Festival is to unite diverse neighborhoods along Market Street, encouraging these vibrant communities to work together in building a more connected, beautiful San Francisco. This unique collaboration is a partnership between the San Francisco Planning Department, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and the Knight Foundation.

    We invite you to push the limits of your creativity and submit groundbreaking ideas to the Market Street Prototyping Festival. Winning entries will be given the funding, workspace, and mentorship necessary to make their visions and reality.

    And who knows? Your idea may become San Francisco’s newest icon.

  • Taking Stock: A Morphology - Documentation of historic agricultural buildings in the Gallatin Valley, MT

    Bozeman | Dates: 30 Oct, 2014 – 30 Jun, 2018
    This drawing project was directed by Maire O’Neill, Associate Professor in the School of Architecture. Approximately 80 buildings were recorded for the project involving hundreds of hours of fieldwork and studio work with architecture student research assistants. The exhibit presents extant historic buildings on early farmsteads in the Gallatin Valley, which are rendered in pen and ink in precise plan, section, and elevation drawings. The drawings are the basis for interpretation of early agricultural building construction in the Gallatin Valley, Montana. The evolving building practices of livestock producers and farmers settling the inter-mountain west reflect a wide range of influences over time. Prior farming experience, available resources, the development of agricultural practices, an evolving understanding of climatic variability, the infusion of construction knowledge from the Midwest, availability of promotional literature, and evolving markets are a few of the major influences on the structure and form of the buildings. However, there are a wide variety of motives for the adoption and adaptation of building forms and construction techniques. Local growers and livestock producers learned to diversify and these trends are reflected in the wide variety of storage buildings and shelters they built. The drawings illustrate a cross-section of building scale, form, use, and construction type. The exhibit includes a comparative analysis of floor plans and building sections in which the structure, form, and proportions of the spaces are diagrammed, leading to a graphic typology and structural morphology. Included in the exhibit is a brief narrative chronology which highlights four eras of agricultural building and the building types and methods associated with them.
  • ETH Zurich: The Future of Open Building

    Zurich | Dates: 09 – 11 Sep, 2015
    Overview Comparatively no longer a radical alternative to many approaches emerging to analyze and organize the design and construction processes which shape the built environment, THE FUTURE OF OPEN BUILDING conference asks participants to critically consider what the notion of 'open building' continues to offer. The aim of this provocation is to encourage participants to challenge how collaborative synergies amongst the design professions and those impacted by design choices, are often made, unmade and transformed within every scale of the built environment. Structure Designed to be relevant and accessible to both academics and practicing design professionals, the conference is organized around keynote speakers and panelists in the morning sessions and academic paper sessions in the afternoon. Speakers Details coming soon...
  • 2015 Midwest Art History Society Conference

    Minneapolis and St. Paul | Dates: 26 – 28 Mar, 2015
    Annual Art History Conference in Minneapolis and St. Paul.
  • Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) (Sydney, 7-10 July 15)

    Sydney | Dates: 07 – 10 Jul, 2015
    The 32nd Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ), will be held in Sydney, Australia, from the 7-10 July 2015. It will be devoted to an exploration of the theme ‘Architecture, Institutions and Change’. We warmly welcome paper abstract submissions from members of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH).

    For the Call for Papers, please see the SAHANZ website: www.sahanz.net.
    Deadline for abstracts October 6, 2014
    Dr Paul Hogben (PaulH@fbe.unsw.edu.au) and Dr Judith O’Callaghan (JudithO@fbe.unsw.edu.au) SAHANZ 2015 Conference Convenors

    During the 1960s and 1970s, the probity and relevance of the institutional model in most areas of life were called into question. Of particular significance were Michel Foucault’s studies of forms of institutionalised care and organised supervision which he associated with the exercise of dominance, surveillance and control – famously represented in physical form by the Panopticon (Discipline and Punish, 1975). While alternative models were and have been sought, few institutions were totally disassembled or abandoned. In fact, many of those that weathered the storm, especially within the financial sector, appear to have become larger, more dominant and more powerful.

    Recent scrutiny of the abuses of power by religious clergy, politicians and corporate bodies has however lent impetus to the ongoing historical and theoretical investigation of institutions and how they operate. Old concepts such as ideology and the agency-structure dialectic continue to inform discussion, as does the consideration of new forces such as the internet which has complicated our conception of the social domain.

    It is timely therefore to renew the discussion of the role and status of architecture in its relationship to the institutional realm, especially around questions of change and transformation. What ideals, principles and values have underpinned the architecture of institutional organisations and constructions in the past and have these changed in recent times? How has the role of architecture in the consolidation and exercise of institutionalised power and authority changed? What role can architecture play in the reconceptualisation of institutions? As was the case with Foucault, there will be conceptions of historical continuity and discontinuity as well as historical method that need to be considered.

    The 32nd Annual SAHANZ Conference to be held in Sydney in July 2015 will be devoted to the exploration of architecture and institutions. Papers are invited that examine and reflect on various aspects and examples of this theme within different cultural contexts. There are many ways that this can be approached through a focus on the history of institutional building types and collectives, organisations, practices, customs, pedagogy and critique as suggested by the following sub-themes:

    • Architecture and large institutional complexes, for example, architecture and the State, architecture and religious organisations
    • Building types and building collectives, for example, educational buildings, hospitals, prisons, government buildings, art galleries, university campuses, military campuses, sacred buildings
    • Professional organisations, for example, institutes of architects and their history
    • The history of architectural and design education
    • Intellectual and disciplinary histories, including architectural history and its institutional underpinnings
    • Architecture and the concept of the public good
    • The reform and/or reconceptualisation of the institution and its implications for architecture
    • Alternatives to the institutional model
    • The anti-institutional, for example, the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s and 1970s
  • Learning from the Reservation: Using the Traditional Cultural Place Perspective for Better Decision Making in a Diverse Cultural Landscape

    Dover | Dates: 23 – 25 Apr, 2015
    April 23-25, 2015, Delaware State University The National Council for Preservation Education is hosting a conference to highlight and share the innovative work that applies the Traditional Cultural Place perspective beyond its application to Native American historic resources to identify, document and mitigate impacts to properties important to other cultural groups. The issue of diversity in historic preservation, in terms of landscape associations, culture, and practice, is a critical and complicated one. This conference will provide a forum for the discussion of how issues of diversity challenge the application of conventional methods of identification, documentation and mitigation. The historic resources to be discussed at this conference are best described as Traditional Cultural Places (TCPs), a term most often applied to those properties of importance to Native American/Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations. The title, Learning from the Reservation, pays homage to the perspective of the sovereign nations who deal with the impact of the dominant American culture on their land and community. The cultural groups being discussed at this forum can benefit from the hard work and legacy of the application of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) through the lens of the Tribal Preservation programs. The most challenging historic resources are those that continue to function into the present in the same manner as they were in the past, protected by groups who continue to manage and preserve their culture. As practitioners, we have a challenge to assist these living historic communities with getting the recognition and protections of the NHPA in ways that actually protect what the community values about their places. What constitutes physical integrity when a property is continuing to be used as it was historically? What alternative documentation strategies have worked? The goal of this conference is to bring together practitioners who have wrestled with these issues to discuss the challenges faced in an open and supportive environment, to share solutions, and have a dialog with the National Park Service, State Historic Preservation Offices, preservation practitioners and the cultural communities who need the protections of the NHPA. Written and revised in the 1990s, the National Register of Historic Places Bulletin 38, Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties provided an approach to tribal preservation issues and alluded to the application of these principles to non- Native American properties. The application and acceptance of these guidelines was without much further guidance or framework for the preservation practitioners to use. Bulletin 38 is under revision by the National Park Service staff, providing an opportune time to discuss the issues of the application of these principles and hear the NPS perspective on where this approach is headed. The conference will be organized around a single track of papers focused on three aspects of working with non-traditional Traditional Cultural Places: Identification, Documentation, and Mitigation. Confirmed speakers include: preservation consultant, blogger and Bulletin 38 co-author Tom King; consultant, professor and visionary, Ned Kaufman; and National Register and National Historic Landmark Program Manager Paul Loether. Papers can address all three topics but must focus primarily on one aspect. A stipend to cover travel expenses will be offered to all successful paper authors to facilitate participation in this event. Paper proposals should be no more than 400 words in length, and should be accompanied by a one-page c.v. Submit paper proposals by October 15, 2014, via email to Rebecca Sheppard, rjshep@udel.edu and Jeremy Wells, jwells@rwu.edu. Authors will be notified by November 30, 2014, regarding acceptance of papers. Full drafts of selected papers will be due by February 1, 2015. For information about the conference, contact Robin Krawitz via email at rkrawitz@desu.edu or 302-857-7139. Conference sponsors include: the National Council for Preservation Education, Delaware State University, the University of Delaware, Roger Williams University, the Delaware State Historic Preservation Office and Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, and the Historic Preservation Education Foundation.
  • Aqueducts of Portugal

    Boston (Chestnut Hill) | Dates: 16 Aug, 2014 – 30 Mar, 2015
    A photographic exhibit surveying Portugal's diverse variety of surviving aqueducts. All but one post-reconquest, ranging from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment, they supplied fortress and university cities, monasteries, and estate gardens, and Lisbon's huge Aqueduto das Águas Livres whose central span is the tallest Gothic arch ever constructed. The exhibit is presented with the support of the Museu da Água, Lisbon and the Consul General of Portugal in Boston. http://www.bostonportuguesefestival.org/#!photo-exhibition/cp5h
  • Gather Up The Fragments

    chicago | Dates: 07 Feb – 26 Apr, 2015
    February 7–April 26, 2015 This exhibition will present the Shakers’ history and religious philosophy through 190 objects drawn from the Andrews Shaker Collection at Hancock Shaker Village in Pittsfield, Massachusetts and local Chicago Shaker collectors. the exhibition explores the relationship of Shaker faith and beliefs and their aesthetic in architecture, furniture and the applied arts. Works on view will not only include historical costumes, but also reels, spool racks, looms, furniture, architectural elements, woven baskets, steamed wood boxes, and kitchen implements. The exhibition will also tell the story of Faith and Edward Deming Andrews, pioneers who built the most comprehensive collection of Shaker artifacts in the country. The exhibition is generously supported by the American Folk Art Society, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and Terry Dowd, Inc.
SAH2015