Recent Opportunities

  • 2015 South Carolina Historic Preservation Conference

    Columbia | Dates: 23 Apr, 2015

    The 2015 Statewide Historic Preservation Conference will be held in Columbia at the Archives & History Center on Thursday, April 23, 2015! Join us for an informative and fast-paced conference with a wide range of topics about South Carolina history, historic structures, archaeology, and
    preservation how-tos.

    Registration and Conference Program (PDF)

    Early Registration Discount Ends April 9

  • Paul Rudolph Open House in NYC

    New York | Dates: 03 Apr – 04 Dec, 2015
    A series of open houses at the only publicly viewable and fully intact Paul Rudolph residential interior in NYC
  • Exhibition Opening: Scaling Washington: Photographs by Colin Winterbottom

    Washington | Dates: 21 Mar, 2015

    Scaling Washington, photographer Colin Winterbottom's debut museum exhibition, features stunning large-scale images of the post-earthquake restoration of the Washington Monument and Washington National Cathedral. Winterbottom's images highlight the technical insights shared by the engineers and architects central to the restorations, giving visitors new perspectives on these symbolic icons.

    Over twenty years ago, Winterbottom began taking dramatic, highly textured photographs of Washington, D.C.'s many architectural masterpieces. Always determined to create imagery unlike any he'd seen before, he quickly recognized the power of scaffolding to provide up-close—and high altitude—access to these historic structures. 

    As sole photographer for restoration efforts at the Washington Monument and National Cathedral following the August 2011 earthquake that shook the nation's capital, Winterbottom blends documentation with artistic expressions, crafting photographs that share his unusual access to remarkable, fleeting vantage points.

    Composed in close proximity to generally inaccessible parts of these two landmarks, many of the photographs provide sensitive appreciation of their beauty and fragility. Surprisingly, they also transform scaffolding from an industrial workhorse to rhythmically compelling geometry that complements the historic structures they seem to engulf. 

    In Winterbottom's own words: "I took very seriously my obligations to bring the viewer with me to those narrow, scaffolded platforms and show them what that was like. The series is a mix of fine art, documentary and technical photographs; I hope that chorus helps viewers experience these events on several levels."

  • A Walk Through Time: Annual Tour of Prairie Avenue Mansions

    Chicago | Dates: 14 Jun, 2015

    Sunday June 14, 2015 from 1:00 to 4:00pm
    $50 per person / $45 for museum members
    Reservations recommended to 312-326-1480

    This very special tour, the annual benefit for Glessner House Museum, presents attendees with the rare opportunity to visit the interiors of several landmarked homes along Prairie Avenue.  Visitors will be treated to a breath-taking array of beautifully carved wood moldings, leaded glass windows, and fireplaces in elaborate tile, mosaic, and marble.

    Abbreviated tours of the Glessner and Clarke House Museums are also included on the tour as well as historic Second Presbyterian Church, with its important Arts & Crafts interior and collection of windows, including nine by Tiffany and two by Morris & Co.
    Following the tour, attendees are invited to return to the coach house of Glessner House Museum for a reception and silent auction, featuring theatre tickets, Chicago memorabilia, collectibles, architectural fragments, and other items of interest.

  • Wright Plus 2015 Architectural Housewalk

    Oak Park and Riverside | Dates: 16 May, 2015

    Join us for the 41st annual Wright Plus, an internationally renowned architectural housewalk featuring rare interior tours of private homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and his contemporaries, plus entry to landmark Wright buildings. Celebrate architecture, design, Frank Lloyd Wright’s innovative vision and the talents of his fellow architects in historic Oak Park and Riverside, Illinois. Experience extraordinary living spaces and share an enjoyable day with visitors from around the world.

    Want even more Wright? The Wright Plus Friday and Sunday Excursions are daylong trips to Wright-designed sites beyond Chicago. Luxury coach will transport guests to the B. Harley Bradley House in Kankakee, Illinois and the S.C. Johnson Administration Building and Research Tower in Racine, Wisconsin. Both tours are offered Friday, May 15 and Sunday, May 17.

    The Ultimate Plus Package offers an extended weekend of one-of-a-kind architectural experiences and includes accommodation.

  • Gender Studies: Feminist Technologies Signature Event: Wangechi Mutu

    New York | Dates: 23 Apr, 2015
    The Gender Studies program at The New School presents the signature event for its yearlong theme of Feminist Technologies.
  • Judith Paine McBrien and John DeSalvo on the Pocket Guide to Chicago Architecture

    Chicago | Dates: 11 Apr, 2015

    Join us at the Robie House for a conversation with Judith Paine McBrien and John DeSalvo, author and illustrator of the acclaimed Pocket Guide to Chicago Architecture. The popular, beautifully illustrated handbook was recently updated to reflect Chicago’s changing urban landscape, as well as to incorporate a section on the city’s rich campus architecture. Original drawings by Mr. DeSalvo will be on display. 

    A Q&A and book signing will follow the discussion. Books will be available for purchase.

    About the authors

    Architectural historian Judith Paine McBrien directs the Archimedia Workshop, which produces films and media about architecture, development and urban design. She is the recipient of the Society of Architectural Historians 2013 Award for Excellence in Architectural Media for a lifetime of documentary and interpretive filmmaking, including her PBS film, Make No Little Plans: Daniel Burnham and the American City. She lives in Wilmette, Illinois.
     
    John DeSalvo received his Masters of Architecture in Urban Design from Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. He is a full time professor at Illinois Institute of Technology where he teaches both design and free and rendering techniques. He founded his firm John DeSalvo Design in 2008.

  • PechaKucha Night Pittsburgh, Vol. 20

    Pittsburgh | Dates: 09 Apr, 2015

    7:00 p.m.: Cash Bar opens
    7:20 p.m.: Presentations begin

    Three times per year, AIA Pittsburgh and AIGA Pittsburgh partner to bring you PechaKucha Night Pittsburgh. PechaKucha Night is based on a simple, dynamic presentation style: 20 images x 20 seconds per image. The evening is focused on artistic and creative celebration, and the promotion of local talent.

    PechaKucha Night, devised in Tokyo as an event for young people to meet, network, and show their work, has turned into a worldwide celebration, with events taking place all over the world, including right here in Pittsburgh! Drawing from its name, which is derived from the Japanese word for “chit-chat,” PechaKucha features a dynamic presentation style where presenters have a total of six minutes and forty seconds to pair words and images. 

    To submit a presentation for consideration, please email the following information by March 19: 

    •3-4 images that best represent the content of your proposed presentation. 
     It can be on absolutely anything!
    •Your name, the title of your presentation, and a brief outline.
    •A brief artist statement, or bio, to be used for promotional purposes. 

    This event is presented by AIA Pittsburgh and AIGA Pittsburgh, in partnership with The Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art. 

  • 2015 Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Summer Field School

    Milwaukee | Dates: 08 Jun – 10 Jul, 2015
    Class Dates: June 8 - July 10, 2015; Final exhibit: July 24, 2015 Preparatory Workshop (attendance required), June 1, 2015, 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Room 191, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UWM You will need to apply in order to be admitted. We will be accepting a maximum of 15 students. You may take a maximum of 6 credits. Choose from the list below. ARCH 190 Special Topics: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School. –3 cr. ARCH 534 Field Study. –3 cr. ARCH 561 Measured Drawing for Architects. –3 cr. ARCH 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory. –3 cr. Arch 391/791: Independent studies for undergraduate/graduate students. –3 cr. This summer we will study a variety of homes in Milwaukee's Washington Park—everyday residences, boarded up homes, refabricated and reused homes, homes transformed into stores and workplaces, homes as works of art, homes remembered in family histories and homes as domestic worlds. As cultural resources, saturated with diverse values, memories, stories and imaginations, our homes matter, because they represent how we feel about our community and how we value our environment. This project seeks to employ the enduring creativity of storytelling, the power of digital humanities, and depth of local knowledge in order to galvanize Milwaukee residents to talk about their homes as repositories of community memory, spaces of caring and markers of civic pride. The five-week course calendar covers a broad array of academic skills. Workshops during Week 1 will focus on photography, measured drawings, documentation and technical drawings; no prior experience is necessary. Week 2 will include workshops on oral history interviewing and digital ethnography. Week 3 is centered on mapping and archival research. Week 4 and 5 will be devoted to producing final reports and multi-media documentaries. Students will learn how to “read” buildings within their urban material, social, ecological and cultural contexts, create reports on historic buildings and cultural landscapes and produce multimedia documentaries. Nationally recognized faculty directing portions of this school include Jeffrey E. Klee, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Anna Andrzejewski, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michael H. Frisch, Professor and Senior Research Scholar, University at Buffalo, Jasmine Alinder, Associate Professor of History, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Steve Wetzel, Assistant Professor of Film, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Arijit Sen, Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, and Matthew Jarosz, Associate Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Historic Preservation, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. For more information or for a copy of an application form, please contact Prof. Arijit Sen at senA@uwm.edu or go to http://www.TheFieldSchool.weebly.com.​​
  • Architecture on Stage Bus Tour

    Chicago | Dates: 09 May, 2015

    Saturday, May 9th at 9:00 a.m.

    Join art historian and author Rolf Achilles on a bus tour of theatrical sites throughout the city. Find out more about Chicago’s cultural heritage, including lavish art and architecture designed to enrich onstage experiences. Stops include a backstage tour of the Civic Opera House, home to the world-renowned Lyric Opera.

    Logistics: Tour runs 3.5 to 4 hours and makes three to four stops along the way.
    Meeting Location: Chicago History Museum
    Cost: $55, $45 members

  • Creating Beauport's Historic Landscape

    Gloucester | Dates: 21 May, 2015
    Thursday, May 21, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 
    Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House, 75 Eastern Point Boulevard, Gloucester, Mass. 

    $15 Garden and Landscape and Ogden Codman Design Group members, $20 Historic New England members, $35 nonmembers 


    The gardens at Beauport are extensions of Henry Sleeper's decorative interior rooms. Join Ben Haavik, team leader for property care at Historic New England, for a tour of Beauport's historic landscape. Learn how the landscape evolved over time, the philosophy behind the 2011 landscape restoration, and how the exterior of the house and the landscape play together. Dave Wagner of Jeffreys Creek Land Contractors is available to answer questions about plants. Light refreshments are provided, followed by an optional tour of the house. Sunhats are recommended. Rain or shine. 

    Registration is required. Please call 978-283-0800 for more information. Purchase tickets now.
  • Introduction to New England Architecture

    Waltham | Dates: 26 Apr, 2015

    Sunday, April 26, 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
    Lyman Estate, 185 Lyman Street, Waltham, Mass.
    $45 Historic New England members, $60 nonmembers

    Want to know how to tell a real Colonial-era house from a Colonial Revival? Learn about New England architecture from Historic New England's experts with this in-depth workshop on architectural style and structure from the 170ss to the beginning of the twentieth century. Preservation staff lecture on regional architectural tradisions and styles, influential New England architects, and changing building technologies. Historic New England properties and other iconic regional buildings are highlighted.


    The program concludes with a tour of the Lyman Estate mansion and nearby Stonehurst, the Robert Treat Paine Estate, a nineteenth-century masterpiece designed by H.H. Richardson and located on land that was once owned by the Lyman family.

     

    Box lunch is included. Registration is required. Please call 617-994-5912 for more information. Purchase tickets now

  • Understanding the Architecture of Paul Rudolph

    Lincoln | Dates: 24 Apr, 2015
    Friday, April 24, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
    Codman Estate
    , 34 Codman Road, Lincoln, Mass.

     $10 Historic New England members, $15 non-members 

    Once acclaimed and then reviled, American architect Paul Rudolph (1918-97) had one of the most extraordinary careers in postwar Modern architecture. A student of Walter Gropius at Harvard, Rudolph was famous internationally in the 1950s and '60s for his innovative Florida beach houses, sensitive contextual buildings like the Jewett Art Center at Wellesley College, and large-scale, concrete buildings, such as his Government Service Center in downtown Boston. Author of the first monograph about Rudolph, Timothy M. Rohan of UMass Amherst explains the ideas that informed Rudolph's architecture by looking at his key works in light of the concerns of the postwar era and today. An optional tour of the nearby Gropius House follows the lecture. 

    Space is limited. Registration is required. Please call 781-259-8098 for information. Purchase tickets now
  • Sensing and Sensibility: Politics and Technology in the Contemporary City

    Chicago | Dates: 23 Apr, 2015

    Thursday, April 23, 4:30–6:30 p.m.
    Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr., Room 203

    Douglas Pancoast is a graduate of the University of Kansas School of Architecture and Urban Design (BArch 1991) and Cranbrook Academy of Art (MFA Arch 1995). He has worked for firms including Richard Meier and Partners, 1100 Architect, BlackBox Studio at SOM, and agency.com. His work has been shown in the Chicago-based exhibitions Art in the Urban GardenMystique: Space, Technology, and Craft and Speculative Chicago; and in Scale at the Architectural League of New York and the National Building Museum, Washington, DC. His projects have been featured in Architectural RecordArchitectureA.P.+, and The Architectural Review, and in the book Young Architects: Scale.

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes about power, politics, and the weird feelings people have about both. She is currently a fellow at the Data and Society Research Institute and a member of Deep Lab. Her writing has previously appeared inCreative Time ReportsTechPresident, and San Francisco Art Quarterly. She lives on a small island off the coast of America.

    Iker Gil is an architect and director of MAS Studio, an architecture and urban design office in Chicago. He is also the editor in chief of the quarterly design journal MAS Context and the editor of the book Shanghai Transforming (ACTAR, 2008). He has taught at UIC and IIT and co-directs the Chicago Expander program. He is a PhD candidate from Escola Tecnica Superior d'Arquitectura de Barcelona (ETSAB), and holds a Master of Architecture from University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC).

    Javier Arbona is a geographer researching the spatial legacies of militarization and violence. He is currently a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow in the American Studies Program at the University of California, Davis. Arbona is working on a book manuscript titled "The City of Radical Memory: Spaces of World War II Home Front Repression and Resistance in the San Francisco Bay Area." In addition, Arbona is a founding member of the DEMILIT landscape arts collective. DEMILIT has produced works for the Headlands Center for the Arts, Deutschlandradio, the 2012 New City Reader at the Istanbul Design Biennial, and the Art Gallery at UC San Diego. Arbona holds architecture and urbanism degrees from Cornell University and MIT, and a PhD in geography from UC Berkeley.

    Laura Forlano is an Assistant Professor of Design at the Institute of Design at IIT where she is Co-director of the Critical Futures Lab. From 2012–13, she was a Visiting Scholar in the Comparative Media Studies program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research is focused on the intersection between emerging technologies, material practices and the future of cities. She is co-editor with Marcus Foth, Christine Satchell and Martin Gibbs of From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen: Urban Informatics, Social Media, Ubiquitous Computing, and Mobile Technology to Support Citizen Engagement, which was published by MIT Press in 2011. She received her Ph.D. in communications from Columbia University.

    This lecture is presented with MAS Context and made possible by the William Bronson and Grayce Slovet Mitchell Lectureship.

    All lectures and events are free and open to the public.

  • Van Evera Bailey and Regional Modernism

    Irvington | Dates: 08 May, 2015

    Van Evera Bailey was one of the architects who developed the Northwest Regional Style of architecture popularized in the Pacific Northwest, along with Pietro BelluschiJohn Yeon and Saul Zaik. Born in Portland in 1903, Bailey apprenticed locally and then traveled the world working in New Zealand and Southern California before returning to Portland in 1936. in 1940, California architect Richard Neutra hired him as the local supervising architect for the Jan de Graaff house in Dunthorpe, a Portland suburb. The house, which included some of Bailey’s ideas, received national exposure and gave him his first big break.

    Bailey’s modern homes include large windows and deep overhanges. He designed a new and beautiful type of stilt system to deal with the challenges of hillside construction.

    Our program will provide insights on Bailey and the scope of his career, along with disucussions on interior design & preservation of Modern architecture and it all takes place in the beautiful Pietro Belluschi designed Central Lutheran Church. Featured speakers will include:

    • Anthony Belluschi, FAIA, – Central Lutheran Church and its design and restoration;
    • Becca Cavell, FAIA – Bailey’s Life and Work;
    • Jack Bookwalter, freelance writer and architectural historian onBailey’s work in Pasadena and Palm Springs;
    •  21st Century Interpretations of Modern Interiors
    • Peggy Moretti, Executive Director of Restore Oregon on the Preservation of Mid-Century Buildings;

    Those interested in personally experiencing Van Evera Bailey’s residential designs may want to participate in our Mid-Century Modern Home Tour the following day, featuring several Portland area homes by Van Evera Bailey, many of which have never been open to the public before. This is the first time such a collection of his residential work has been available for viewing.

  • Cultural & Historic Preservation Conference -- The Remembered and the Forgotten: Preserving and Interpreting the Americas to 1820

    Newport | Dates: 22 – 24 Oct, 2015
    The Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island will hold its annual conference Oct. 22-24, 2015. The conference will focus on the preservation and interpretation of pre-1820 buildings, objects, and sites in the Americas, particularly in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy. As a key center of global trade, Newport occupied a principal place in the American landscape in the 17th and 18th centuries. Indeed, the social and economic relationships emanating from Newport spread out, linking Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and shaping the histories of millions of people throughout the colonial and into the early national period. Today, the legacy of this shared American past is materialized in buildings, furnishings, curated objects, and archaeological sites. The preservation and interpretation of these treasured resources poses challenges, but also provides many opportunities to connect professionals and the public and to improve our understanding of the “forgotten” experiences of groups whose voices are keenly absent in current histories. This public conference will include presentations, tours, student lightning talks and networking opportunities. The conference is presented by Salve Regina University in partnership with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Information on the conference is available at: www.salve.edu/chp2015.
  • SECAC Panel: Photographing Industry: Pittsburgh and Beyond

    Dates: 21 – 24 Oct, 2015
    Over the years, Pittsburgh and its industries have played host to several key photographic surveys. Beginning in 1907 as part of the pioneering Pittsburgh Survey, documentary photographer Lewis Hine recorded the complex relationship between the city's factories and its citizens. Roughly forty years later, W. Eugene Smith made nearly twenty thousand images of Pittsburgh, creating what he considered his finest work. In keeping with the spirit of these important projects, this panel seeks papers exploring the rich and complicated relationship between photography and industry. Topics of exploration may reflect the broad range of the subject, from the Industrial Revolution to the Information Age. The panel welcomes papers examining not only art and documentary, but also casual and vernacular photographic records of industry. Session chairs: Emily Morgan, Iowa State University, and James Swensen, Brigham Young University. Contact: emorgan@iastate.edu
  • Designing a Home for Snow Monkeys

    Chicago | Dates: 23 Apr, 2015

    What does it take to design a brand-new zoo habitat? More than just manpower and money, creating a new exhibit also involves intensive training for zookeepers who will care for the animals and time for educators to develop a suite of enriching programs. In the case of Regenstein Macaque Forest—the zoo’s new home for Japanese snow monkeys—it also means hiring a specialized scientist to study the behavior and cognition of the resident monkeys. Learn how this amazing exhibit took shape from concept to construction and beyond.

    6–8 p.m.
    $17 ($14 for Lincoln Park Zoo members)
    18 and older
    Café at Wild Things
    Cash bar on site, light hors d’oeuvres served

    Register for Wine & Wildlife: Designing a Home for Snow Monkeys

    For more information, please email educationprograms@lpzoo.org or call 312-742-2056.

  • Ritualizing the City: Collective Performances as Aspects of Urban Construction, Brno 3-4 March 2016

    Brno | Dates: 17 Feb – 10 Sep, 2015
    Organizer:
Ivan Foletti, Masaryk University in Brno and University of Lausanne
- Centre for Cross-Disciplinary Research into Cultural Phenomena in Central European History: Image, Communication, Behaviour. The conference aims to reflect on the ways in which collective liturgies – religious as well as civic and totalitarian – contributed to the construction of urbanism from late Antiquity to the twentieth century and, on the other hand, how urban topography and the layout of the city influenced collective performances. The goal of such a reflection is to indicate how a collective ritual performance grows and develops in dialogue with the surrounding urban space. But especially how it participates in the determination of that same space. The purpose of the conference is thus to explore the dialectic relationship between the city and collective rituals, beginning with Late Antique Rome, marked out by stationary liturgy, through medieval and modern cities designed to celebrate sovereigns and bishops, up to Stalinist Moscow, constructed to embrace the manifestations of Soviet power. Participants are invited to reflect on such issues as: the methods used by the rituals to integrate the space of the cities; in what way collective performances are modified and adjusted to a specific urban situation; the manner in which urban space is reconstructed and modified to facilitate collective performances; how, with a change of regime, the new collective liturgies adapted themselves to the new situation. Papers presenting a historiographical and diachronic art historical and methodological perspective are especially welcomed. Paper proposals of no more than one page, accompanied by a short CV, can be submitted until 10 September 2015 to: ivan.foletti@gmail.com.
  • Architectural Research Field School

    Williamsburg | Dates: 01 Jun – 03 Jul, 2015
    The Colonial Williamsburg Architectural Research Department in conjunction with the College of William and Mary’s National Institute of American History and Democracy offers a five-week course this summer that is open to all undergraduate and graduate students as well as those with a special interest in early American architecture and historic preservation. The field school is intended to introduce students to the methods used in the investigation and recording of historic buildings. They will learn how to read construction technology and stylistic details to determine the age of various features, use period terminology to describe buildings, take field notes and measurements, and produce CAD drawings, which are the fundamental skills necessary to produce Historic Structure Reports. Following several introductory lectures on building technology and architectural features, students will study structures in the Historic Area of Williamsburg and visit buildings in the surrounding Tidewater region. During the fourth week, students will document farmsteads, churches, and other sites in Piedmont North Carolina in preparation for the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s Annual Conference to be held in Durham, N.C. in June 2016. Students will measure, record, and describe a variety of buildings that will be seen on the conference tours. During this time, they will be in residence in the region. Back in Williamsburg for the final week, they will convert their fieldwork into measured CAD drawings write reports on their sites. Except for the fourth week, the class will meet four days a week, Monday through Thursday, from 10:00 to 4:30 at Bruton Heights School, the Colonial Williamsburg research campus. Students must be enrolled for the course through the College of William and Mary. For more information about the nature of the course, please email Carl Lounsbury at clounsbury@cwf.org or call (757) 220-7654. Registration information is available at the William and Mary website: http://www.wm.edu/as/niahd/summerfieldschool/index.php
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
1365 N. Astor Street
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