Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • 5th International Congress on Construction History

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 07 Jul, 2015
    Hosted by the Construction Society of America, non-profit organization dedicated to the study of the history and evolution of all aspects of the built environment. This is the first time the Congress has been held outside Europe, with over 400 delegates expected to attend from all over the world comprised of Architects, engineers, contractors, preservationists, academics and a wide variety of trades, professions and interests associated with the Construction Industry.
  • Reading Architecture Symposium

    Athens | Dates: 16 – 18 Jun, 2015
    The symposium wishes to explore how the literary production of modernity can enlighten architects and urban planners in understanding and valorizing qualitative characteristics of the contemporary life they are called to design for. These situations of life could include a focused look into people’s everyday private and public lives, small or big scale events in human-built environments, socio-cultural and political phenomena in urban contexts. We understand these situations as place-bound (place specific) architectural experiences that allow for a qualitative, emotional and embodied apprehension of the world.
  • International Multidiciplinary Symposium on the Origins of Monumental Architecture

    to be determined | Dates: 07 Nov, 2014 – 06 Nov, 2015
    The OTS Foundation is seeking collaborators in the fields of Architectural History and Neuroscience to help organize a Multi-Disciplinary event to consider new scientific information, define further research, and develop public educational outreach.
  • Save the Date: 2015 Association of Architecture School Librarians' (AASL) Annual Conference

    Toronto | Dates: 17 – 19 Mar, 2015

    Building on the core concepts of this year’s ACSA theme, The Expanding Periphery and the Migrating Center, the Conference Planning Committee has been working hard to develop a suite of programs, tours, talks, and social events designed to address AASL members’ interests.

    In addition to hearing from local experts about the architecture of Toronto, attendees will have the opportunity to—during Lightning Rounds—share ideas with their colleagues about potential solutions to common concerns pertaining to contemporary architecture librarianship and we will experiment with a new type of unconference session entitled Venture and Vexation. Stay tuned for announcements about additional conference programming that is currently under development.

    Please plan to join us at the Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, March 17 – 19, 2015.

    We are planning to activate our conference website in November, complete with registration information.

  • Call for Contributors: Sir Banister Fletcher's A History of Architecture 21st Edition

    Dates: 04 Nov, 2014 – 01 Mar, 2015
    Call for Contributors: Sir Banister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture 21st edition The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the University of London are collaborating on an exciting project to bring Sir Banister Fletcher’s renowned book, A History of Architecture, into the 21st century. Edited by architectural historian and broadcaster, Tom Dyckhoff, the 21st edition will be completely restructured, expanded and rewritten, and is to be published both in print and online (as part of a digital hub for architectural history). We are currently seeking experts in the field of architectural history to author a number of chapters in the new edition, listed below. The deadline for first drafts is Spring/Summer 2015 and scholars are invited to express an interest in contributing to the new edition. Co-authoring is welcome and expressions of interest in parts of chapters will also be considered. Our aim is simple, exciting and hugely ambitious: to create the finest history of architecture in the English-speaking world. Our readers are students (of architecture, design, art history, archaeology, anthropology, but also other disciplines such as sociology or history); they are professionals (architects, engineers, city planners etc); but they are also interested, intelligent non-professionals. So Banister Fletcher’s new history of architecture must be scholarly, enlightening and accurate, challenging and opinionated, but also accessible and enjoyable. We want our readers to be as fascinated by the architecture of ancient Mesopotamia or 15th century Japan as they are by that of Frank Gehry or Zaha Hadid. Chapters have a common overall structure, but we want our authors to create their own history within this, to take fully credited ownership of their chapters, and to let their own interpretation of the period or place sing from the page. The new Banister Fletcher will contain a kaleidoscope of diverse voices, and many different approaches to architectural history. To express an interest in writing any of the chapters listed below, please email catherine.gregg@riba.org stating the chapter title, your affiliation and references to published works. While there is no deadline for expressions of interest, scholars should note that the very latest deadline for first drafts will be September 2015. Any questions should be directed to Catherine Gregg at the above email address or by telephone on +44 (0)207 307 3802. Chapters available are: Early Medieval Europe, 500 – c. 1000 • Central and Northern Europe and Scandinavia (4,000 words) • Eastern Europe, the Bulgars and Early Russia (4,000 words) Late Medieval Europe, c. 1000 - 1400 • The Holy Roman Empire, Central and Eastern Europe (4,500 words) • Scandinavia and Russia (2,000 words) N.B. this chapter may be split and we welcome expressions of interest in either area 1400 – 1830 Europe • The Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria and Central Europe (8,000 words) • Russia and Scandinavia (8,000 words) N.B. this chapter may be split and we welcome expressions of interest in either area 1400 – 1830 non-Europe • The Ottoman Empire (10,000 words) • Iran and the Safavid Dynasty (10,000 words) • Japan 1334 – 1868 (4,000 words) • Africa (4,000 words) 1830 – 1914 Europe • France (11,000 words) • Austro-Hungary, Prussia, Germany and Central Europe (9,000 words) • The Italian Peninsula (4,000 words) • Russia and Scandinavia (4,000 words) N.B. this chapter may be split and we welcome expressions of interest in either area 1830 – 1914 non-Europe • The Middle East (4,000 words) • Africa (5,000 words)
  • Market Street Prototyping Festival

    San Francisco | Dates: 09 – 11 Apr, 2015

    The Festival
    This April, for the first time ever, Market Street will transform into a public platform, showcasing exciting ideas for improving the famed thoroughfare and how we use it. Winning entries, as diverse and exciting as the people of San Francisco themselves, will be brought to life for three days along Market Street, where millions of pedestrians from all walks of life will have the chance to experience, explore, and interact with the prototypes.

    The Goal
    The goal of the Prototyping Festival is to unite diverse neighborhoods along Market Street, encouraging these vibrant communities to work together in building a more connected, beautiful San Francisco. This unique collaboration is a partnership between the San Francisco Planning Department, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and the Knight Foundation.

    We invite you to push the limits of your creativity and submit groundbreaking ideas to the Market Street Prototyping Festival. Winning entries will be given the funding, workspace, and mentorship necessary to make their visions and reality.

    And who knows? Your idea may become San Francisco’s newest icon.

  • Taking Stock: A Morphology - Documentation of historic agricultural buildings in the Gallatin Valley, MT

    Bozeman | Dates: 30 Oct, 2014 – 30 Jun, 2018
    This drawing project was directed by Maire O’Neill, Associate Professor in the School of Architecture. Approximately 80 buildings were recorded for the project involving hundreds of hours of fieldwork and studio work with architecture student research assistants. The exhibit presents extant historic buildings on early farmsteads in the Gallatin Valley, which are rendered in pen and ink in precise plan, section, and elevation drawings. The drawings are the basis for interpretation of early agricultural building construction in the Gallatin Valley, Montana. The evolving building practices of livestock producers and farmers settling the inter-mountain west reflect a wide range of influences over time. Prior farming experience, available resources, the development of agricultural practices, an evolving understanding of climatic variability, the infusion of construction knowledge from the Midwest, availability of promotional literature, and evolving markets are a few of the major influences on the structure and form of the buildings. However, there are a wide variety of motives for the adoption and adaptation of building forms and construction techniques. Local growers and livestock producers learned to diversify and these trends are reflected in the wide variety of storage buildings and shelters they built. The drawings illustrate a cross-section of building scale, form, use, and construction type. The exhibit includes a comparative analysis of floor plans and building sections in which the structure, form, and proportions of the spaces are diagrammed, leading to a graphic typology and structural morphology. Included in the exhibit is a brief narrative chronology which highlights four eras of agricultural building and the building types and methods associated with them.
  • ETH Zurich: The Future of Open Building

    Zurich | Dates: 09 – 11 Sep, 2015
    Overview Comparatively no longer a radical alternative to many approaches emerging to analyze and organize the design and construction processes which shape the built environment, THE FUTURE OF OPEN BUILDING conference asks participants to critically consider what the notion of 'open building' continues to offer. The aim of this provocation is to encourage participants to challenge how collaborative synergies amongst the design professions and those impacted by design choices, are often made, unmade and transformed within every scale of the built environment. Structure Designed to be relevant and accessible to both academics and practicing design professionals, the conference is organized around keynote speakers and panelists in the morning sessions and academic paper sessions in the afternoon. Speakers Details coming soon...
  • 2015 Midwest Art History Society Conference

    Minneapolis and St. Paul | Dates: 26 – 28 Mar, 2015
    Annual Art History Conference in Minneapolis and St. Paul.
  • Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) (Sydney, 7-10 July 15)

    Sydney | Dates: 07 – 10 Jul, 2015
    The 32nd Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ), will be held in Sydney, Australia, from the 7-10 July 2015. It will be devoted to an exploration of the theme ‘Architecture, Institutions and Change’. We warmly welcome paper abstract submissions from members of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH).

    For the Call for Papers, please see the SAHANZ website: www.sahanz.net.
    Deadline for abstracts October 6, 2014
    Dr Paul Hogben (PaulH@fbe.unsw.edu.au) and Dr Judith O’Callaghan (JudithO@fbe.unsw.edu.au) SAHANZ 2015 Conference Convenors

    During the 1960s and 1970s, the probity and relevance of the institutional model in most areas of life were called into question. Of particular significance were Michel Foucault’s studies of forms of institutionalised care and organised supervision which he associated with the exercise of dominance, surveillance and control – famously represented in physical form by the Panopticon (Discipline and Punish, 1975). While alternative models were and have been sought, few institutions were totally disassembled or abandoned. In fact, many of those that weathered the storm, especially within the financial sector, appear to have become larger, more dominant and more powerful.

    Recent scrutiny of the abuses of power by religious clergy, politicians and corporate bodies has however lent impetus to the ongoing historical and theoretical investigation of institutions and how they operate. Old concepts such as ideology and the agency-structure dialectic continue to inform discussion, as does the consideration of new forces such as the internet which has complicated our conception of the social domain.

    It is timely therefore to renew the discussion of the role and status of architecture in its relationship to the institutional realm, especially around questions of change and transformation. What ideals, principles and values have underpinned the architecture of institutional organisations and constructions in the past and have these changed in recent times? How has the role of architecture in the consolidation and exercise of institutionalised power and authority changed? What role can architecture play in the reconceptualisation of institutions? As was the case with Foucault, there will be conceptions of historical continuity and discontinuity as well as historical method that need to be considered.

    The 32nd Annual SAHANZ Conference to be held in Sydney in July 2015 will be devoted to the exploration of architecture and institutions. Papers are invited that examine and reflect on various aspects and examples of this theme within different cultural contexts. There are many ways that this can be approached through a focus on the history of institutional building types and collectives, organisations, practices, customs, pedagogy and critique as suggested by the following sub-themes:

    • Architecture and large institutional complexes, for example, architecture and the State, architecture and religious organisations
    • Building types and building collectives, for example, educational buildings, hospitals, prisons, government buildings, art galleries, university campuses, military campuses, sacred buildings
    • Professional organisations, for example, institutes of architects and their history
    • The history of architectural and design education
    • Intellectual and disciplinary histories, including architectural history and its institutional underpinnings
    • Architecture and the concept of the public good
    • The reform and/or reconceptualisation of the institution and its implications for architecture
    • Alternatives to the institutional model
    • The anti-institutional, for example, the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s and 1970s
  • Learning from the Reservation: Using the Traditional Cultural Place Perspective for Better Decision Making in a Diverse Cultural Landscape

    Dover | Dates: 23 – 25 Apr, 2015
    April 23-25, 2015, Delaware State University The National Council for Preservation Education is hosting a conference to highlight and share the innovative work that applies the Traditional Cultural Place perspective beyond its application to Native American historic resources to identify, document and mitigate impacts to properties important to other cultural groups. The issue of diversity in historic preservation, in terms of landscape associations, culture, and practice, is a critical and complicated one. This conference will provide a forum for the discussion of how issues of diversity challenge the application of conventional methods of identification, documentation and mitigation. The historic resources to be discussed at this conference are best described as Traditional Cultural Places (TCPs), a term most often applied to those properties of importance to Native American/Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations. The title, Learning from the Reservation, pays homage to the perspective of the sovereign nations who deal with the impact of the dominant American culture on their land and community. The cultural groups being discussed at this forum can benefit from the hard work and legacy of the application of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) through the lens of the Tribal Preservation programs. The most challenging historic resources are those that continue to function into the present in the same manner as they were in the past, protected by groups who continue to manage and preserve their culture. As practitioners, we have a challenge to assist these living historic communities with getting the recognition and protections of the NHPA in ways that actually protect what the community values about their places. What constitutes physical integrity when a property is continuing to be used as it was historically? What alternative documentation strategies have worked? The goal of this conference is to bring together practitioners who have wrestled with these issues to discuss the challenges faced in an open and supportive environment, to share solutions, and have a dialog with the National Park Service, State Historic Preservation Offices, preservation practitioners and the cultural communities who need the protections of the NHPA. Written and revised in the 1990s, the National Register of Historic Places Bulletin 38, Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties provided an approach to tribal preservation issues and alluded to the application of these principles to non- Native American properties. The application and acceptance of these guidelines was without much further guidance or framework for the preservation practitioners to use. Bulletin 38 is under revision by the National Park Service staff, providing an opportune time to discuss the issues of the application of these principles and hear the NPS perspective on where this approach is headed. The conference will be organized around a single track of papers focused on three aspects of working with non-traditional Traditional Cultural Places: Identification, Documentation, and Mitigation. Confirmed speakers include: preservation consultant, blogger and Bulletin 38 co-author Tom King; consultant, professor and visionary, Ned Kaufman; and National Register and National Historic Landmark Program Manager Paul Loether. Papers can address all three topics but must focus primarily on one aspect. A stipend to cover travel expenses will be offered to all successful paper authors to facilitate participation in this event. Paper proposals should be no more than 400 words in length, and should be accompanied by a one-page c.v. Submit paper proposals by October 15, 2014, via email to Rebecca Sheppard, rjshep@udel.edu and Jeremy Wells, jwells@rwu.edu. Authors will be notified by November 30, 2014, regarding acceptance of papers. Full drafts of selected papers will be due by February 1, 2015. For information about the conference, contact Robin Krawitz via email at rkrawitz@desu.edu or 302-857-7139. Conference sponsors include: the National Council for Preservation Education, Delaware State University, the University of Delaware, Roger Williams University, the Delaware State Historic Preservation Office and Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, and the Historic Preservation Education Foundation.
  • Aqueducts of Portugal

    Boston (Chestnut Hill) | Dates: 16 Aug, 2014 – 30 Mar, 2015
    A photographic exhibit surveying Portugal's diverse variety of surviving aqueducts. All but one post-reconquest, ranging from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment, they supplied fortress and university cities, monasteries, and estate gardens, and Lisbon's huge Aqueduto das Águas Livres whose central span is the tallest Gothic arch ever constructed. The exhibit is presented with the support of the Museu da Água, Lisbon and the Consul General of Portugal in Boston. http://www.bostonportuguesefestival.org/#!photo-exhibition/cp5h
  • Gather Up The Fragments

    chicago | Dates: 07 Feb – 26 Apr, 2015
    February 7–April 26, 2015 This exhibition will present the Shakers’ history and religious philosophy through 190 objects drawn from the Andrews Shaker Collection at Hancock Shaker Village in Pittsfield, Massachusetts and local Chicago Shaker collectors. the exhibition explores the relationship of Shaker faith and beliefs and their aesthetic in architecture, furniture and the applied arts. Works on view will not only include historical costumes, but also reels, spool racks, looms, furniture, architectural elements, woven baskets, steamed wood boxes, and kitchen implements. The exhibition will also tell the story of Faith and Edward Deming Andrews, pioneers who built the most comprehensive collection of Shaker artifacts in the country. The exhibition is generously supported by the American Folk Art Society, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and Terry Dowd, Inc.
  • Civic Foundation Legends in Italian Art

    Kalamazoo | Dates: 14 – 17 May, 2015
    Nearly every Italian civitas created one or more foundation narratives that glorified and advertised its origins. In Florence, for example, an anonymous writer drafted a chronicle circa 1200 that recounted the city’s ancient past and the heroic exploits of its early leaders. In the trecento, Giovanni Villani expanded upon the story and embellished it with the addition of fanciful anecdotes. Other major centers, such as Arezzo, Perugia, and Bologna, formulated similar narratives, which told of conquering Romans or the noble Etruscans before them. In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, civic legends—typically a conflation of history and myth—were already being promoted and disseminated through art and architecture, long before the age of Coluccio Salutati and Flavio Biondo. In cities that had actually been founded in antiquity, such artworks commonly served to enhance or exaggerate the historical truth, often with propagandistic intent. Other cities, such as Siena and Venice, were not established until the Middle Ages and thus found themselves in the difficult position of having to invent their ancient pasts. In Siena, the communal authorities adopted the Roman she-wolf as the primary symbol of the Republic by the middle of the duecento, and it was systematically replicated in painting and sculpture, including on the exterior of public buildings, until the end of the Renaissance period.

    The Italian Art Society will host three sessions in which scholars investigate the artistic programs of Italian cities in the medieval and early modern eras as they relate to their foundation legends. These sessions aim to advance our understanding of the interrelation between civic identity and visual culture while exploring the complex sociopolitical circumstances underlying the manufacture and propagation of historical narratives. Papers addressing questions of patronage, historiography, iconography, political ideology or cultural interchange would be especially welcome.

    Please submit a paper proposal to the organizer, Max Grossman (megrossman@utep.edu) Deadline: September 15, 2014
    Please include the following materials in your application:
    1) A one-page abstract
    2) Completed Participant Information Form available at the website of the Medieval Congress: http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF
    3) A one-page CV
  • The Art History of Architectural History

    Norwich | Dates: 09 – 11 Apr, 2015
    Call for Papers for this session in the Association of Art Historians (UK) 41st Annual Conference & Bookfair
    Sainsbury Centre for Art, UEA, Norwich 9 - 11 April 2015
    Deadline for submission of papers - 10 November 2014

     Art history and architectural history are sister disciplines… or are they? How many art history departments regard architectural history as a core component of their provision? What might art history students miss if architectural history were not part of their curricula? Perhaps art objects and architectural objects are so radically different their study cannot be shared. Or perhaps there are modes of enquiry that can be developed to mutual benefit. This session reviews the art history/architectural history relationship in several ways. One way is to excavate those moments when art and architectural history were tightly bound together: in the very formation of art history as a discipline, for example, when both art and architecture were natural objects of study. Other ways might be: investigations of the parallel developments of formalism in art and architectural history; of architectural history’s relation to the ‘new art history’; of the ways in which architectural history might adopt recent developments in object studies, global art history, and art writing. Academics dealing with contemporary architecture find themselves wrestling with debates that in other disciplines may be more abstract or indirect: How does money or power represent itself in visual form? How does the general public (whoever they may be) understand form? How does government use aesthetics to communicate? All of these things are, and always have been, live in architecture. Perhaps this might be part of a case for making architectural history more central to art history. If so, what implications would it have for our curricula and our pedagogy?
  • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Makes 30,000+ Images Free to Download

    Dates: 03 Jun, 2014
    The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa is pleased to announce there are now over 30,000 images downloadable, for free, in the highest resolution we have them. You can search for and download them at Te Papa's Collections Online http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/

    17,000 images are have no known copyright restrictions so are downloadable for any use, free of charge. Another 14,000 images are available under a Creative Commons licence CC BY-NC-ND<http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>.

    We hope that by making these images available for reuse, we are empowering people to use images of the collection in teaching and learning, research, innovation and new forms of creativity.

    Visit the Te Papa website http://www.tepapa.govt.nz.
  • Hartwick Pines Memorial Hall--Grayling, Michigan

    Grayling | Dates: 15 Jul, 2014 – 15 Jul, 2016
    Hartwick Memorial Hall is a large log structure (architect Ralph Herrick of Lansing, Mich., 1928) standing on the grounds of Hartwick Pines State Park near Grayling, Michigan. Since 1994 it has been on the National Register of Historic Sites. However, it has stood empty and in disuse since then. It desperately needs a thorough cleaning within and without, not to mention the necessary stabilization, preservation and restoration that it needs as well. It resembles the great log cabin hotel built in 1910-11 in Yellowstone National Park, and this rustic appearance nicely complements its setting of magnificent virgin white pines. In short, Hartwick Memorial Hall needs attention urgently if it is to survive.
  • Fifth International Congress on Construction History

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 07 Jun, 2015
    We invite researchers and practitioners from all aspects of the history of construction to submit paper abstracts for the 5th International Congress on Construction History, to be held in Chicago and hosted by the Construction History Society of America June 3-7, 2015. The congress follows on successful interdisciplinary congresses held in Madrid (2003), Cambridge UK (2006), Cottbus (2009), and Paris (2012). Submission: Submit proposals to https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=icch5 by June 1, 2014.
  • The American Research Center in Egypt Fellowships 2014-2015

    Dates: 01 Oct, 2014 – 30 Sep, 2015

    ARCE administers research fellowships for students enrolled in doctoral programs at North American universities, and for American post-doctoral scholars and professionals affiliated with universities and research institutions worldwide.

    ARCE Fellowships are awarded for a minimum of three months and a maximum of twelve months depending on the funding source. Fellowships provide sufficient funding to cover round-trip air transportation, a living allowance, mentoring and a home base in Egypt for doctoral candidates in the all-but-dissertation stage and senior scholars conducting more advanced research.
     
    Post-doctoral scholars are invited to indicate their interest in serving as the ARCE Scholar-in-Residence on the fellowship application. The Scholar-in-Residence may serve for a period up to 12 months depending on the length of his/her fellowship. In addition to conducting his/her research, s/he agrees to advise junior scholars and organize a workshop, conference, or other scholarly activity in consultation with the Director. An additional modest per diem is available for the Scholar-in-Residence for these concurrent duties. Interested and qualified candidates are identified during the Fellowship Committee Meeting and recommendations made to the ARCE Director, who makes the final selection.