Recent Opportunities

view-of-Edinburgh-from-castle
  • Architectural History Workshop

    London | Dates: 20 – 20 May, 2017

    Aimed at graduate students and early career researchers
    20 May 2017
    The Gallery, Cowcross Street, London
    Convenor: Dr Julian Holder, Education Officer, SAHGB
    Student Co-convenors: Kieran Mahon, The Bartlett (UCL) and Matthew Wells, RCA/V&A.

    This new event, which replaces the hugely successful Graduate Student Research Forum, provides a venue for students and new researchers to present new research and research in progress. It also provides networking opportunities and sessions useful for career development.

    The event is run by and for students, and aims to support the next generation of architectural historians including our own PhD Scholars. Composed of a mixture of formal and informal sessions we aim to make this an unmissable event in the architectural history calendar..

  • Jane's Walk Chicago 2017

    Chicago | Dates: 04 – 07 May, 2017
    The movement – held the first weekend in May each year to celebrate Jacobs’ birthday – now encompasses hundreds of cities on six continents.

    Mark your calendar for Jane's Walk Chicago 2017, May 4-7.  In Chicago, the weekend of May 6 and 7 will feature 20 Jane's Walks across the city. To kick start the weekend, you may also want to join the Pedway Walk on Thursday, May 4 or the pub crawl on Friday, May 5. Registration is free and not required, but we encourage advance registration for the Walks, so we know how many people to expect. Select your favorite walks to join on May 4-7 here:

    https://www.eventbrite.com/d/il--chicago/jane%27s-walk-chicago/

  • Dwell on Design Fair

    Los Angeles | Dates: 23 – 25 Jun, 2017
    Dwell on Design brings together the brightest people, latest products, and curated content in modern design under one roof. Held each year at the Los Angeles Convention Center, the exhibition and conference showcases the best in modern design materials, furniture and accessories, home technology, garden and outdoor materials, kitchen & bath, and international design. Dwell on Design features world-class speakers, continuing education classes for interior design professionals, and talks for design-seeking consumers on Saturday and Sunday.

    Dwell on Design 2017 Highlights Include:

    • Architect Sir David Adjaye will speak on Friday, June 23. Adjaye is a leading architect with prestigious commissions around the world including the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo and the Smithsonian Institute National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC. There will be a special meet and greet with Sir David following his speech.
    • Interior decorator Martyn Lawrence Bullardwill appear on Saturday, June 24, as a featured speaker. Renowned for his broad range of styles and eclectic, yet sophisticated interiors, Bullard is a staple of Architectural Digest’s AD100 and ELLE Decors A-List. Martyn will doing a book-signing his new title Design & Decoration following his lecture.
    • The popular Home Tours will return giving the opportunity for attendees to explore a selection of unique, design- forward homes located all throughout Los Angeles.
    • Attendees can learn about the inspiration and creative vision behind the homes in the Home Tours during Meet The Architects, Thursday, June 22 at the Pacific Design Center.
    • Dwell on Design will welcome the Architecture & Design Film Festival at the Dwell Outdoor Pavilion, screening design centric feature and short films.
    • The Shop will make is debut where guests can shop unique creations from designer- makers and artisans, exhibited in a boutique shopping setting.
    • Silent Auction that benefits the MADWORKSHOP, will take place with 100% of the proceeds going to their work on the LA homelessness crisis.
    • Free One-on-One Consultations from both architects and interior designers are available to all attendees seeking any kind of design advice for their current or upcoming projects.
    • The popular featured panels and sessions with top leaders in design will cover one of the five major content pillars: Technology/Smart Home, Health & Wellness/Aging, Urban Space/Densification, Resiliency, and Business of Design, including Designing a Cook’s Kitchen…Best Practices from Celebrity Chefs and Design Professionals; Psychological + Physiological Effects of Color in Design; and Passive is Aggressive…Passive Design for the Future.
    • Returning pavilions include Dwell Outdoor, prefab homes by Method Home and Cocoon9, and the emerging designers pavilion, Prime Edition.

    Dwell on Design will take place at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Friday, June 23 from 10am to 6pm; Saturday, June 24 from 10am to 5pm; and Sunday, June 25 from 10 am to 4pm. 

  • Free Tours on June 8 Celebrate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th

    Oak Park & Chicago | Dates: 08 – 08 Jun, 2017

    Join the party as the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust celebrates the 150th anniversary of the birth of the iconic architect with free tours and refreshments at the Trust’s popular tour sites in Oak Park and Chicago.

    Festive Neighborhood Open Houses will take place in the evening on Thursday, June 8, Frank Lloyd Wright’s birthday, at the following locations:

    • Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio (1889/1898), 6-8 p.m., 951 Chicago Ave., Oak Park, Ill. Wright’s first home and studio is where the innovative architect experimented with design concepts and developed the Prairie style of architecture.
    • Frederick C. Robie House (1908-10), 6-8 p.m., 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave., Chicago. This masterpiece of the Prairie style and icon of modern architecture with magnificent leaded glass windows is located on the University of Chicago campus.
    • Emil Bach House (1915), 4-7 p.m., 7415 N. Sheridan Road, Chicago. Built after Wright returned to the United States after an extended stay in Europe, this fully restored house is intimate in scale and points toward Wright’s future stylistic direction.

    Free tours at each building will be offered first-come, first-served. Refreshments will be served outdoors after guests complete their tours.

    Frank Lloyd Wright was born in Spring Green, Wis. and made his name in the Chicago area, which boasts more Wright buildings that anywhere else.

    His story is rich with the influences that sparked his imagination and shaped his completely original talent. He was a pioneer of many concepts that continue to apply to modern living in the 21st century, such as integrating architecture and interior design, combining architecture with the natural environment and incorporating an open interior floor plan in home design.

    Wright began his career in 1887 in Chicago as an apprentice and later became a key assistant in Louis Sullivan’s studio. After five years with Adler and Sullivan, Wright opened his own business and quickly built a successful practice, in demand for his distinctive, ground-hugging homes inspired by the flat Midwestern landscape. This vision for a new American architecture eventually became known as the Prairie style.

    Visit flwright.org for information about tours and programs exploring Wright’s Chicago and for updates on the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust’s 150th anniversary activities.

  • A Centennial Celebration of I. M. Pei at the National Gallery of Art

    Washington | Dates: 26 – 26 Apr, 2017

    Wednesday, April 26 at 3:30
    East Building Auditorium

    Perry Y. Chin, architect, and Susan Wertheim, chief architect and deputy administrator for capital projects, National Gallery of Art

    In celebration of the 100th birthday of architect I. M. Pei on April 26, 2017, Susan Wertheim honors Pei’s gift to the nation: his design of the National Gallery of Art East Building. Harmonizing with architect John Russell Pope's neoclassical West Building, the award-winning East Building, which opened in 1978, was designed by Pei in the modern idiom of its time. Magnificently realizing the long-term vision of Gallery founder Andrew W. Mellon and his children, Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce, the East Building has taken its place as one of the great public structures in the nation's capital. Designed at a crucial point in Pei’s long and productive career, the East Building won the American Institute of Architect’s Twenty-five Year Award in 2004, and Pei, considered a living legend, was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1983. Wertheim first discusses Pei’s architectural legacy at the Gallery and then joins with his longtime associate Perry Y. Chin to share experiences working on the recently completed East Building renovation.

  • Call for Field Editors for caa.reviews

    Dates: 19 Apr – 01 May, 2017

    caa.reviews invites nominations and self-nominations for individuals to join its Council of Field Editors, which commissions reviews within an area of expertise or geographic region, for a term ending June 30, 2020. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to reviewing books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to art history, visual studies, and the arts.

    The journal seeks field editors for books in the following subject areas: digital humanities; Early Modern Iberian and Colonial Latin American Art; nineteenth-century art; Early Modern and Southern European Art. The journal also seeks a field editor for exhibitions in the Northeast. Candidates may be artists, art or design historians, critics, curators, or other professionals in the visual arts; institutional affiliation is not required.

    Working with the caa.reviews editor-in-chief, the editorial board, and CAA’s staff editor, each field editor selects content to be reviewed, commissions reviewers, and reviews manuscripts for publication. Field editors for books are expected to keep abreast of newly published and important books and related media in their fields of expertise, and field editors for exhibitions should be aware of current and upcoming exhibitions (and other related projects) in their geographic regions. The Council of Field Editors meets annually at the CAA Annual Conference. Field editors must pay travel and lodging expenses to attend the conference.

    Candidates must be current CAA members and should not currently serve on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a statement describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editorial Board, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents to Deidre Thompson, CAA publications assistant. Deadline: May 1, 2017. 

  • Princeton-Mellon Call for Fellows, 2017-18

    Dates: 19 Apr – 12 May, 2017
    The Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities is pleased to announce a call for fellows for the 2017-18 academic year. Two fellows will be appointed; one fellow will focus on Architecture and Humanities and the other on Urban Adaptation to Climate Change.

    For questions, please email arc-hum@princeton.edu.

    ARCHITECTURE AND HUMANITIES FELLOW

    The Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities and the Council of the Humanities at Princeton University (link is external) seek to attract a fellow whose work is grounded in the humanities to collaborate with both programs. Applicants with outstanding intellectual, literary, and visual talents who demonstrate an abiding interest in multi-disciplinary work focused on the intersection of architecture, urbanism, and the humanities are strongly encouraged to apply. The fellow may be expected to team-teach a new interdisciplinary design studio for undergraduates that will be required for Urban Studies certificate students, or a seminar on urbanism and the environment, with a member of the design faculty in the School of Architecture at Princeton (contingent upon sufficient enrollments and approval from the Dean of the Faculty).

    Please submit a cover letter (including your teaching interests), CV, 1,000 word description of a proposed research project, and a brief (chapter or article-length) writing sample, and contact information for three references by May 12, 2017 for full consideration.

    For applicants taking a sabbatical year, please apply here (link is external).

    For applicants seeking a postdoctoral position, please apply here (link is external).

    URBAN ADAPTION TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    The Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities, together with the Climate Futures Initiative (link is external) at Princeton University, are seeking fellowship applications in urban adaptation to climate change for the 2017-18 academic year. 

    We seek to attract a Fellow engaged in bridging the environmental sciences, social sciences, planning and architecture and/or the humanities. Fields of specialization might include planning and architecture, cultural studies, geography, history, philosophy, politics, or public policy. We welcome research projects contemplating any given dimension of the relationships between built and natural environments. These could include scholarship on the impact of different urbanization models (e.g.: density vs. sprawl); ethical questions (who wins and who loses in various adaptation scenarios); models of deliberative governance; the arts in the 'anthropocene'; or design solutions to cope with the consequences of climate change. The individual will be required to team-teach an undergraduate course on urban adaptation to changing environmental conditions (contingent upon sufficient enrollments and approval from the Dean of the Faculty), and expected to participate regularly in the events and activities of both the Princeton-Mellon Initiative and the Climate Futures Initiative.

    This position is funded through the support of the Princeton Environmental Institute's Urban Grand Challenge, which fosters productive exchanges between students and scholars working in a variety of fields to create an innovative program that combines the study of the natural and built urban environments with a goal of identifying solutions that are sensitive to environmental issues including global change, water resource management, energy efficiency, technology innovation, human and environmental health, as well as equity and fairness, poverty and jobs creation, race, ethnicity, and more intangible notions of belonging.

    Please submit a cover letter, vita, 500-word description of a proposed course, brief (chapter or article-length) writing sample, 1,000 word description of a research project that he/she would undertake as a fellow, and contact information for three references by May 12, 2017.
  • Chicago Schools: Authors, Audiences and History

    Chicago | Dates: 10 – 10 Jul, 2017
    "Chicago Schools: Authors, Audiences, and History," the 2nd International Graduate Student Symposium, will be hosted by the IIT College of Architecture PhD Program in partnership with the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial.
  • Facades and Fashions in Medical Architecture

    New York | Dates: 11 – 11 May, 2017
    This evening is an introduction to the architectural remains of medical care in the city. While many sites of New York’s medical history have been lost, especially interiors and equipment that we can no longer view except through images, New Yorkers are fortunate that our streets still present lively remnants of the past. History professor Bert Hansen will place numerous NYC sites into the main chapters of medical development for the last 200 years. The lecture invites everyone to wander the city with new eyes for medical heritage. This lecture is an optional introduction to places Hansen will share with Friends-only tour groups on the following two Saturdays (May 13 and May 20). The lecture and the two tours are all complementary, but each event is independent and complete in itself. To join the Friends of the Rare Book Room please click here. About the Speaker Bert Hansen, Professor Emeritus of History at Baruch College of CUNY, has been teaching the history of science and medicine since 1974. He holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Columbia and a PhD in history of science from Princeton. His 2009 book Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio: A History of Mass Media Images and Popular Attitudes in America was honored by the American Library Association and the Popular Culture Association. His recent articles explore the connections between Louis Pasteur and the art world of 19th-century Paris.
  • What's Your Sign?

    Iowa City | Dates: 19 Apr – 01 Jul, 2017
    The Legacies for Iowa Collections-Sharing Project at the University of Iowa Museum of Artseeks proposals for papers considering the history of retail architecture signage. For as long as goods have been bought and sold, shopkeepers and traders have visually communicated their wares through signs. This breakfast symposium explores the evolution of signage from the shutter paintings of ancient Pompeii to the wooden trade signs hanging along Medieval English streets to the neon of twentieth-century American roadside signs. How have symbols of selling shifted over the centuries? How do retail signs reflect or reject broader visual cultures? What technological shifts have precipitated the most dramatic design departures? Papers may examine the iconography, typography, and materiality of retail signs as well as the cultural, financial, and geo-political forces that shaped storefront signs in the past. Papers may also contend with the future of retail sinage in an increasingly digital and global economy. This public event will be livestreamed and occurs in conjunction with the City of Iowa City Downtown District’s CoSign project, which partners local artists and craftspeople with small business to create exciting and distinctive new signs. SUBMISSION: Proposals from architectural historians, architects, designers, and related specializations welcome. Abstracts (up to 300 words) for 20 minute papers should be submitted with a CV by July 1, 2017. Please submit all materials electronically to Vero Rose Smith (veronica-smith@uiowa.edu). IMPORTANT DATES: July 1, 2017: Submissions due July 15, 2017: Participants notified August 25, 2017: Registration deadline September 9, 2017: Symposium
  • Rae and George Hammer Memorial Visiting Research Fellowship

    Queensland | Dates: 13 – 28 Apr, 2017
    Call for Applications: Rae and George Hammer Memorial Visiting Research Fellowship,
    Fryer Library, University of Queensland,

    Deadline: 28 April 2017.

    This fellowship encourages scholars to visit UQ and to access the Fryer Library collection for your research.  Honours, Masters and PhD
    students, undertaking a research project or paper, from Universities outside of Brisbane are invited to apply.

    Award
    * Up to AU$2500 to be awarded annually as a single prize or split among winners
    * Assistance in accessing the collections by Fryer Library staff

    The award is for expenses relating to a research trip to the UQ Fryer Library for your Honours, Masters or PhD including travel, accommodation, living expenses and research related costs.

    The Fryer Library collectionThe Fryer Library <https://web.library.uq.edu.au/locations-hours/fryer-library> collection embraces Australiana, rare books, literary and political
    papers, architectural plans and the papers of significant UQ scholars  and alumni.

    Enquiries: Email Simon Farley, s.farley@library.uq.edu.au<mailto:s.farley@library.uq.edu.au>, Manager of Fryer Library, about this fellowship.

    For further information, including application process, conditions and eligibility, please see: https://web.library.uq.edu.au/about-us/awards-and-fellowships/rae-and-george-hammer-memorial-visiting-research-fellowship
     
  • The Laboratory Revolution: the Rise of the Modern Laboratory and the Changing Nature of the University, 1850-1950

    Groningen | Dates: 26 – 27 Oct, 2017
    Laboratories are the ultimate place where knowledge is created. What originally had been the workplace of chemists and alchemists, by the end of the nineteenth century had become a standard element in the infrastructure of science. The rise of the laboratory revolutionized the sciences in many ways and continues to do so. This development has been studied over the past decades by many historians, but the tremendous impact the rise of the laboratory had on the university is less well studied. In the nineteenth century, simple lecture halls were replaced by purpose built science laboratories, that could dominate the city scape. Even academic disciplines that on the face of it needed no laboratory space to develop, like astronomy, psychology and linguistics, each acquired their own laboratories. Also metaphorically, the laboratory became the paradigmatic site for scientific and scholarly research, as is shown by the historians, who liked to compare their libraries to laboratories. Finally, the nature of the academic community was tremendously changed by the rise of the laboratory, each laboratory becoming a small, self-contained community of professors, technical assistants, students, and administrative personnel. The conference ‘The Laboratory Revolution’ intends to bring together scholars from different backgrounds to study how the laboratory changed both science and the university. By bringing together the expertise of historians of science and scholarship, historians of architecture, social and cultural historians, and historians of the university, the organizers hope to create a better understanding of the revolution brought about by the rise of the laboratory – a revolution that is still going on. For further information, go to the website: www.labrevolution2017.com Key Note Speakers - Antonio Garcia Belmar (Alicante University) - Klaas van Berkel (University of Groningen) - Ernst Homburg (Maastricht University) - Peter Morris (Science Museum, London) - Alan Rocke (Case Western University, Cleveland) - Geert Vanpaemel (University of Leuven) Practicalities The conference fee is € 75 for early registration, which ends on 30 June. After that date, the fee is € 100 (students pay a fee of € 50). For further information regarding accommodation, travel and registration, see the above mentioned website or contact the organizing Groningen Congres Bureau: info@gcb.nl
  • The Laboratory Revolution: the Rise of the Modern Laboratory and the Changing Nature of the University, 1850-1950

    Groningen | Dates: 14 Apr – 15 May, 2017
    Laboratories are the ultimate place where knowledge is created. What originally had been the workplace of chemists and alchemists, by the end of the nineteenth century had become a standard element in the infrastructure of science. The rise of the laboratory revolutionized the sciences in many ways and continues to do so. This development has been studied over the past decades by many historians, but the tremendous impact the rise of the laboratory had on the university is less well studied. In the nineteenth century, simple lecture halls were replaced by purpose built science laboratories, that could dominate the city scape. Even academic disciplines that on the face of it needed no laboratory space to develop, like astronomy, psychology and linguistics, each acquired their own laboratories. Also metaphorically, the laboratory became the paradigmatic site for scientific and scholarly research, as is shown by the historians, who liked to compare their libraries to laboratories. Finally, the nature of the academic community was tremendously changed by the rise of the laboratory, each laboratory becoming a small, self-contained community of professors, technical assistants, students, and administrative personnel. The conference ‘The Laboratory Revolution’ intends to bring together scholars from different backgrounds to study how the laboratory changed both science and the university. By bringing together the expertise of historians of science and scholarship, historians of architecture, social and cultural historians, and historians of the university, the organizers hope to create a better understanding of the revolution brought about by the rise of the laboratory – a revolution that is still going on. For further information, go to the website: www.labrevolution2017.com Key Note Speakers - Antonio Garcia Belmar (Alicante University) - Klaas van Berkel (University of Groningen) - Ernst Homburg (Maastricht University) - Peter Morris (Science Museum, London) - Alan Rocke (Case Western University, Cleveland) - Geert Vanpaemel (University of Leuven) We welcome abstracts for papers on topics related to the conference theme. Possible themes include: the German Model of Laboratory Science, Planning and Construction of University Laboratories, the Design and Architecture of Laboratories, Social Life in the Laboratory, the Differentiation of Laboratory Space, Laboratories as Teaching Units, and Instruments and Laboratories. See also the provisional program on the website of the conference. Please send the abstract of your proposal to Professor Klaas van Berkel (k.van.berkel@rug.nl) by May 15, 2017. The abstract must be no longer than 500 words, anonymized for the sake of blind reviewing, and sent as a doc or docx file (please do not use pdf format). The author’s name and contact information (affiliation, address and professional status) should be specified in your e-mail message. If you are not sure whether your proposal fits in the program, feel free to contact the organizers at the above e-mail address. Notification of acceptance will be sent by June 23, 2017.
  • Improving Sustainability Concept in Developing Countries

    Cairo | Dates: 12 – 14 Dec, 2017
    Given the importance and the impact of the Earth’s ecological systems and refraining from causing any alterations that might be caused by humans, incorporating sustainability in all levels of our daily life has become a challenge as well as a necessity. Nonetheless, we cannot neglect the responsibility of acting with the best of our knowledge to ensure that our actions do not hinder the opportunities and lives of future generations through implementing ecological and sustainable design and development.
  • Conservation of Architectural Heritage (CAH) – 2nd Edition

    Luxor | Dates: 23 – 26 Feb, 2018
    Architecture is the platform where all cultures, heritages, traditions, and histories meet, through architectural conservation, the built heritage is prolonged and conserved by the planning of individuals or organizations that works solely for the purpose of conservation & preservation of Architectural heritage. Through critical decisions that are based on the criteria of combining, artistic, contextual, and informational values, the heritage is preserved, restored, or sometimes, no actions might be taken for the best interest of the cultural and architectural heritage.
  • Archaeology of Communism - Expedition to Communist Monuments of Bulgaria

    Sofia | Dates: 17 Jun – 01 Jul, 2017
    A comprehensive introduction to the Communist-era history, art and architecture in Bulgaria and the role of photography and propaganda. Field trips to and photo-sessions at significant and impressive Bulgarian sites from the period located in spectacular urban and natural environment, behind-the-scene visits and meetings with artists and historians all the way from the capital Sofia to the Black Sea.
  • Travel Tour: Modern Mexico City

    Mexico City | Dates: 14 – 22 Oct, 2017
    October 14, 2017 - October 22, 2017
    Mexico City - Hotel Camino Real Polanco (8 nights)

    Tour Leaders: Louise Noelle Gras and Kathryn O'Rourke
    Felix Candela Special Guide: Juan Ignacio del Cueto

    Docomomo US welcome guests to join us for our second travel tour series: Modern Mexico City. This nine-day, eight-night trip will focus exclusively on Mexico City's modern architecture, art and design. Highlights of the tour include a special visit to the house and studio of Luis Barragán and the Barragán designed Gilardi House; many important sites by the Mexican architect Mario Pani including the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) campus (pictured above); and a special full day exploration of the works by Felix Candela including the breathtaking Los Manantiales restaurant. Guests will have the opportunity to visit some of the most important works by Diego Rivera including the murals at the Palacio Nacional and Carcamo de Rio Lerma, with an afternoon visit to the Anahuacali Museum. A full day tour to the archeological site Teotihuacan is planned.

    Modern Mexico City will be led by Louise Noelle Gras, Professor and Researcher at the National University of Mexico and long-standing president of Docomomo Mexico. Joining Ms. Gras will be Kathryn O'Rourke, associate professor of art history at Trinity University and author of the recently published book Modern Architecture in Mexico City. Docomomo Mexico and Felix Candela expert, Juan Ignacio del Cueto, rounds out the tour leadership.

    Guests will stay at the Camino Real Polanco - the legendary hotel designed by Ricardo Legorreta in 1965.

    45 AIA Continuing Education Credits will be available.
  • CFP: Making Futures: Crafting a Sustainable Modernity - Towards a Maker Aesthetics of Production and Consumption

    Devon | Dates: 07 Apr – 22 May, 2017
    Making Futures will be held on Thursday 21st and Friday 22nd September 2017, at the magnificently sited Mount Edgcumbe House on the River Tamar opposite the City of Plymouth, Devon, UK.

    Making Futures is a research platform exploring contemporary craft and maker movements as ‘change agents’ in 21st century society. Convinced of the transformative potential of small-scale making and its capacity to contribute to new progressive futures, Making Futures seeks to situate these material cultures at the centre of the critical issue facing global consumer society: how we move beyond the reductive instrumentalism of ‘homo economicus’ and modes of mass consumption that are destructive of human and non-human natures. As such our purpose is to examine and promote the possibilities for maker economies built around contemporary craft, neo-artisanal design-to-make and related creative micro-entrepreneurs and movements. We believe that these activities have the potential to consolidate into nascent post-industrial maker ecologies that, while not replacing global consumer manufacturing, can nonetheless contribute substantially to progressive economic and social change at local and regional levels, and beyond.

    Crafting a sustainable Modernity - towards a maker aesthetics of production and consumption.

    We start with recognition of the seemingly intractable crises (social, economic and environmental) of late Modernity. But our concern is to explore this problématique through the optic of contemporary craft and neo-artisanal maker movements, and what might be seen as a new emerging ‘aesthetics’ of production and consumption. Therefore, rather than seeing these emergencies as grounds for a sweeping dismissal of the modern project and all its presuppositions, we take our cue from recent commentators who have called for a re-framing of Modernity - one that seeks to re-imagine, and reinvest in its socially progressive elements.

    However, we also take our cue from the Making Futures community itself and the examples it produces of how we might re-frame, re-imagine and reinvest in the socially progressive possibilities of craft and makers. As this community consistently demonstrates through examples of material thinking-in-action, contemporary craft and maker cultures, so often viewed as inferior and marginal to the political economies of modern life, should be recognised as important components of emerging visions of a progressive future worth striving for.

    In addressing these concerns, Making Futures moves between the individual and the social, the personal and the collective, and explores how they can come together in global examples of emerging post-Fordist maker economies. (For example, in the last edition we looked closely at the north Californian ‘Fibreshed’ movement). In this 2017 edition we will turn to explore a European model based on the Berlin ‘alternative culture’ of auteur makers - their appreciation for materials and strong commitment to city and neighbourhood, their concern for environmental factors, re-cycling and up-cycling, and overall scepticism towards the regimes of fast fashion, luxury fashion and big brands.

    Building upon many of the themes running through its four previous editions Making Futures: Crafting a sustainable Modernity will explore what it means ‘to make’ and its future significations - personally, socially, its possible impact on sustainable agendas, its relation to new technologies, its possible subversion of mass consumption and potential contribution to the emergence of new political economies capable of valuing our needs for social well being and resilient communities that incorporate concerns for human non-human natures alike.
  • Berlin/Los Angeles: Space for Music

    Los Angeles | Dates: 25 Apr – 30 Jul, 2017
    Upcoming, April 25 - July 30
    Research Institute Gallery II

    Free | No ticket required

    Berlin/Los Angeles: Space for Music celebrates the 50th anniversary of the sister-city partnership between Berlin and Los Angeles by exploring two iconic buildings: the Berlin Philharmonic (1963), designed by Hans Scharoun, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall (2003) in Los Angeles, designed by Frank Gehry. Both buildings have captured the public's imagination and become signature features of the urban landscape of each city. Focusing on the buildings' extraordinary interiors, this exhibition brings together original drawings, sketches, prints, photographs, and models to convey each architect's design process. Berlin/Los Angeles demonstrates how the Berlin Philharmonic and the Walt Disney Concert Hall were pivotal in fostering a strong resonance between architecture and the city.
  • CFP: UCLA's Critical Planning Journal - Vol. 24, Spaces of Struggle

    Dates: 07 – 30 Apr, 2017
    Urban regions are catalysts of change. They foster pragmatic politics that
    enables more progressive governance. ?Progress,? however, has to contend
    with histories and structures that grew from exclusionary logic, uneven
    development, and the systematic exploitation of labor. Progress does not
    happen on its own; it emerges from the continued efforts of activists,
    engaged citizens, intellectuals, and professionals that strive for a more
    just city. It requires developing common platforms to facilitate the
    conflicts that inevitably come with differences. Spaces of Struggle is
    about creating spaces that harness differences and transforms them into
    momentum for progressive change.

    This special issues amplifies the discussions that grew out of ?The Space
    of Struggle: A Mini-Conference on Radical Planning
    <https://radicalplanning.wordpress.com/2016-cfp/>,? a pre-conference to the
    annual Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP) Conference in
    November 2016 (Portland, OR), organized by urban planning graduate students
    from around the US. We believe radical planning plays a crucial role in
    creating spaces of struggle but equally solicit submissions from outside
    urban planning to open up pathways beyond exclusionary developments.

    The developments taking place since the inauguration of Donald Trump?s
    administration in the US require rapid and assertive intellectual
    engagement. The rise of Trump illustrates a unique moment when
    exclusionary, anti-labor politicians give the neoliberal system a ?face?
    that can serve to unify activists, policy actors, and intellectuals behind
    concrete goals. This is a global issue and we strongly encourage
    submissions that engage with the international context of the overlap
    between far-right politics and neoliberalism. CPJ is particularly
    interested in papers that address the following themes:

      -

      Historical systems and practices reproducing/spatializing inequality,
      injustice
      -

      Gentrification, displacement, evictions, exclusion, housing, redlining,
      -

      Labor, precariat, bodies, biopower, reproduction, informality
      -

      Domination, depoliticization, neoliberalism, financialization, austerity
      -

      Social movements, insurgency, collaboration/alliances across
      communities, activists, professionals and academics
      -

      Radical planning, community action research, policy, law, the state
      -

      Anarchist, socialist, feminist and queer planning
      -

      Sanctuary cities, commons, occupy, dissensus, democracy, agonistic
      pluralism
      -

      Race, Black Lives Matters, color-blindness, white supremacy
      -

      Environmental justice, political ecology, natures


    *PLEASE SEND SUBMISSIONS TO* *CRITPLAN@UCLA.EDU* <critplan@ucla.edu>* BY
    APRIL 30, 2017.*


    CRITICAL PLANNING JOURNAL is a peer-review journal founded and run by
    graduate students at the University of California, Los Angeles, and housed
    within the Department of Urban Planning. Please, consult the guidelines for
    authors <https://criticalplanning.squarespace.com/guidelines> for more
    detail on how to submit to the journal.
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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