Recent Opportunities

view-of-Edinburgh-from-castle
  • CFP: Cold War Cities: Spatial Planning, Social Politics and Cultural Practices in the Era of Atomic Urbanism, 1945-65

    Dates: 22 Sep, 2016 – 30 Apr, 2017
    We are seeking 10-12 thoughtful and unpublished essays that analyse a substantive thematic area and situate this empirically in a particular city case study. Essays can draw on a range of different evidential bases, archival research, visual methods, media hermeneutics, and personal histories and lived experiences. Book chapters should deploy appropriate theoretical ideas to understand the physical planning, politics and cultures of atomic era urban development. They should be accessible to readers without deep theoretical background in the particular thematic area and little knowledge of the city case study.

    If you are interested in contributing, please provide a tentative title,
    250 words abstract and brief bio (to be used in a formal proposal to publisher). Email to m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk>


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    Co-editors:
    * Richard Brook, Manchester School of Architecture. R.Brook@mmu.ac.uk<mailto:R.Brook@mmu.ac.uk>

    * Martin Dodge, Department of Geography, University of Manchester.
    M.Dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:M.Dodge@manchester.ac.uk>

    * Jonathan Hogg, Department of History, University of Liverpool.
    J.G.Hogg@liverpool.ac.uk<mailto:J.G.Hogg@liverpool.ac.uk>

    Aims:
    In this book we wish to explore how the real threat of nuclear attack through the 1950s and early '60s affected the spatial planning of cities, as well considering how such 'atomic urbanism' was manifest in political processes or expressed through cultural practices. The book is consciously to be based on set of case studies of specific cities, through which we seek understandings, at an urban scale, of how cold war doctrines played out in different thematic areas (e.g. architectural designs for survivable human habitation or anti-nuclear protests). There should also be scope for questioning the degree to which the historical development of individual cities was determined or shaped by atomic threats, thus problematizing 'the Cold War' as general analytical lens.  Rather than focus on the nation state or a whole continent, we believe looking at series of individual cities (or city regions) will provide a distinctive lens through which to reinterpret cold war histories.

    The book is also focused in its time period on the crucial decades after the Second War World because they have interpretative coherence in cold war historiography and were key periods in urban redevelopment across much of the world (such as the rise of suburban consumerism in the West, Soviet directed socialist renewal in the East and decolonialisation in other places). However, contributors may also wish to consider the legacy of actions and decisions made in this period of atomic high tension down to the contemporary city if appropriate. The objective is to have an international set of contributors with a diversity of thematic perspectives, and deploying case study cities not only in North America and Western Europe but also in the former Eastern Bloc, the Soviet Union, the Asian region and, potentially, from the Global South.

    Thematic areas could include (non-exhaustive list):

    * Physical planning in the cold war city: shelters and population survivability; spatial dispersal planning; resilient infrastructures, buildings and engineering (telecommunications, transport, etc); the zoning of land for needs of military, security and the atomic state; enrolment of scientific facilities, commercial R&D and universities; planning health services, and more general welfare planning post-attack.

    * Social / political issues in the cold war city: anti-nuclear protests, passive resistance, active unrest; participation in civil defence and critiques of preparation; public information, propaganda, education; work of news media; political struggles, legal structures.
    * Cultural practices in the cold war city: visual arts, literary responses to nuclear threats; architectural design, landscape aesthetics; religious responses and faith perspective; popular culture and entertainment (television, radio, fiction); civic spaces and the representation of atomic age ideas; design and functioning of the domestic sphere.

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    Practical details:
    * Submission date: April 2017
    * Length: around 7,000 words (exc. bibliography)
    * Language: UK English
    * Format: please try to use the Routledge style guide, esp. for citations and formatting of bibliography to facilitate production
    * Figures: high-quality b/w illustrations desirable. Limited colour figures may be possible in plates section. Please ensure you have copyright or can secure copyright clearance for illustrations. Authors will be responsible for any costs of copyright licensing
    * Delivery: Word document, email to m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk<mailto:m.dodge@manchester.ac.uk>

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    Intellectual background:
    Cities across the world were the primary target of strategic atomic weaponry in the early cold war period. Post-war urban planning, politics and cultural practice became a central part of Cold War battlefront. For instance, important mechanisms to try secure cities against atomic attack were created, and social space was re-designed to contain the threat of Communism or Capitalism, or to offer an ideologically-informed vision of the modern, high-tech and consumerist or socialist future. However, the focus of historical studies of these decades has traditionally been on international relations, continental blocs and geopolitical struggles at the global scale. While there has been some historical work published in recent years on cold war planning, politics and culture at the national level, which is often strongly urban in focus (e.g. monographs by Andrew Burtch, Jennifer Light, Matthew Grant, Matthew Farish), there has been less analysis of the context of the city as site in which physical plans, social politics and cultural practices played out in distinctive ways (exceptions include theme issue of Urban History (2015) and the May 2016 Cold War Cities workshop at the University of Sheffield). One of the major features of intellectual growth in the humanities, especially history, is interdisciplinary interest in space and place. Here, the city is viewed a significant context in which to explore place, landscape and locational attributes under a set of specific imperatives of defence from an unprecedented new threat.  This edited collection will be a unique contribution that looks at how the cold war unfolded in different cities across the world.

    We intend authors to come from more than North America and Europe; they may include scholars in Japan, Russia, China and elsewhere.  Contributors will be drawn from cogent disciplinary backgrounds including, for example, architectural history, planning, history of science, economic and social history, human geography, political science, cultural studies, and other cognizant fields of scholarship.


    Proposed book structure:
    The volume will include an introductory overview essay by the editors and series of chapters grouped into three major sections: physical, social-political, cultural. Each chapter will tackle a substantial thematic issue and make use of a specific city for empirical evidence.  We expect that some contributions may speak across this threefold structure and will deal with this by section overviews.
     
  • CFP: Interartive, Issue #87: Street Art and its Languages

    Dates: 08 – 20 Sep, 2016
    Issue #87 of Interartive aims to focus on street art in the following 
    topics:

    - Street art, architecture and urban spaces
    - The role of digital media in project communication
    - Styles, methods of intervention and practices of action
    - Participatory and urban regeneration processes
    - Institutionalization forms of the phenomenon.

    Submissions must be made by the deadline of September 20, 2016.

    All material intended for publication in InterArtive should be sent to 
    the attention of Modesta Di Paola and Marco Mondino by mail at: 
    info@interartive.org with mail subject: "Street art And Its Languages".

    The text should be in Spanish and/or English.

    Texts should be around 800 to 3000 words: PUBLISHNG GUIDELINES Texts

    The works and art projects will be published in the form of Online 
    Exhibition (images and short text): PUBLISHING GUIDELINES Artworks
    The 87th issue of Interartive will be published at the end of September 
    2016.
     
  • CFP: 2017 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference (Minneapolis, 30 Mar-2 Apr 17)

    Minneapolis | Dates: 08 – 15 Sep, 2016
    Hyatt Regency Minneapolis, 30 March — 2 April 2017
    Proposals due by 15 September 2016 to basile.baudez@paris-sorbonne.fr or basile.baudez@gmail.com

    Color in Eighteenth-Century Architecture
    Basile Baudez, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV

    Although associated with baroque exuberance born after the Counter Reformation movement or the nineteenth-century rediscovery of polychromy in Greek architecture, color was far from absent from eighteenth-century architecture—even if critics like Quatremère de Quincy, or draftsmen like Boullée, favored monochromy on built structures and their representation. At a moment when color was invading every aspect of daily life, when artists and printers were developing new ways to diffuse color reproductions, when authors from Roger de Piles to Goethe were revalorizing the evocative and sensualist effectiveness of color, how did architects respond to this pressure, both in their drawings and buildings? The geographic breath of this session is left deliberately open, but proposals should be unified by their close attention to the complex and paradoxical relationship between theory and practical use of color in architecture in the eighteenth-century. Key issues will include comparisons of attitudes towards color in different national traditions, the decision to hide or reveal colored materials, the place of color in architectural definitions of beauty or connotations of color within typologies, spaces or specific periods.
     
  • CFP: MDCCC 1800, No. 6: Arts on Display

    Dates: 08 Sep – 12 Oct, 2016
    Call for papers
    International on-line scientific peer reviewed journal MDCCC 1800
    http://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/it/edizioni/riviste/mdccc-1800/
    Deadline for abstracts: 12 October 2016 
    Deadline for submission of papers: 30 December 2016.

    Call for papers
    The call for papers for the 6th issue of the MDCCC1800 journal is now 
    open.

    Arts on display: the 19th century international expositions.
    The international online peer reviewed journal MDCCC1800 wishes to 
    celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Exposition universelle held in 
    Paris in 1867 with an issue dedicated to the phenomenon of the 
    international exhibitions set up during the 19th century.?We welcome 
    original, unpublished articles offering in-depth analysis of the 
    developments, significance and legacy of this phenomenon starting from 
    the Universal Exhibition of London (1851).

    Contributors are free to propose any topic related to the general 
    theme, such as the study of single national participations, the impact 
    of the events on public opinion, the display architectures, the 
    diffusion of decorative arts and photography etc.

    A list of suggested topics, by no means exhaustive, includes:?
    - The national participation to the events (committees, single artists, 
    works of art) 
    - The art market: private collectors and museum acquisitions?
    - The divulgation of the arts: publicity, magazines, exhibitions 
    catalogues?
    - The social and pedagogical role of international exhibitions?
    - Architecture, outfitting, national pavilions?
    - The use of decorative arts and photography at the events?
    - Colonialism and the influence and reception of non-European cultures
    - Literature and the arts: the narration of the exhibitions?
    - Correspondence (relationships among artists, architects, art critics 
    etc)?
    - The role played by the Antiquities at the exhibitions (as models for 
    inspiring artists; means for showing prestige; physical emblems for the 
    building of identity; political propaganda etc)

    Papers in Italian, English, French, Spanish and German are welcome.

    ABSTRACT SUBMISSION | Please submit an abstract concerning the topic 
    you propose with a provisional title and a short autobiography. The 
    abstract should not exceed 3,000 characters (spaces included). Files 
    should be submitted by 12 October 2016. The authors of selected 
    abstracts will receive a reply within two weeks (by 26 October 2016).

    The editorial rules concerning the text and any images the author might 
    wish to include are available (in Italian, English and Spanish) at the 
    following link: 
    http://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/it/edizioni/norme-redazionali/

    We suggest that articles should be of a length between 20,000 and 
    40,000 characters. All articles will undergo a double peer review 
    process prior to publication.

    Articles should be uploaded on the MDCCC1800 platform before 30 
    December 2016.

    To obtain the credentials which will allow authors to register to the 
    platform, please send an e-mail to the editorial board at the following 
    address: mdccc1800@unive.it.?
    Please do not hesitate to contact us with any queries you might have 
    regarding the application or any further stage of the process.
  • Building Optimism: Public Space in South America

    Pittsburgh | Dates: 10 Sep, 2016 – 13 Feb, 2017
    Spanning projects in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Peru, and Venezuela, Building Optimism: Public Space in South America investigates ways that emerging architects and designers instigate change through design in public space. Using photography, video, drawings, and models, the exhibition immerses visitors in inventive ways that public spaces become social spaces—sites that respond to the unique circumstances and pressures of their communities.

    Related Programming:
    Friday, September 9: NIGHTIME — Enjoy a sneak preview of Building Optimism: Public Space in South America during CMOA's all-night party.
    Friday, October 7: Architecture Against All Odds: Architect Talk and Discussion — Join CMOA for an architecture talk and discussion with Marialuisa Borja, prinicipal for the architecture firm Al Borde.
  • CFP: Modern Living in Asia 1945-1990 (Brighton, 10-11 Apr 17)

    Brighton | Dates: 06 – 30 Sep, 2016
    We are pleased to announce that Professor Gyan Prakash (Princeton University) and Dr. Duanfang Lu (University of Sydney) will the keynote speakers for the conference. Professor Gyan Prakash's work ranges from sub-altern and postcolonial studies, colonial genealogies of modernity to urban history. Dr Duanfang Lu's research includes architectural history and theory, urban planning and Modern Chinese architecture, and planning history. She is the editor of Third World Modernism.
     
    New extended deadline 30th September 2016.
     
    CALL FOR PAPERS

    Modern Living in Asia 1945-1990

    Dates: 10-11 April 2017

    Venue: City Campus, University of Brighton

    Hosted by University of Brighton, UK

    Supported by University of Brighton’s Rising Stars Award, Internationalising Design History Research Cluster and College of Arts and Humanities.

    Convenors: Dr. Yunah Lee and Dr. Megha Rajguru (University of Brighton)

    Extended deadline for proposals: 30 September 2016

    This conference aims to develop the study of modern living in Asia between 1945 -1990 from a transnational perspective. Scholarship on Modernism in architecture, interior design and ideas of modern living in Asian countries in post-civil war, postcolonial and pre-globalised years of 1945-1990 has been steadily rising. Most research, however, focuses on certain geographical pockets and within particular national boundaries such as China, India, Japan, and Korea, examining major architects and key architectural projects. In the midst of acutely debated theoretical positions of globalization, transnationalism and multiple modernisms, in works by Arjun Appadurai (1996), Homi Bhabha (1994), Shumei Shi (2013), Duanfang Lu (2011), we will explore cultural flows beyond borders (national, regional and political) that informed notions of modern living in Asian countries. We also aim to expand the discourse to include geographical areas or countries in Asia that have been under-explored or entirely ignored in scholarly debates.  

    Key themes that will be explored in the conference include the introduction and adaptation of Euro-American ideas of Modernism in local contexts, the development of ‘critical regionalism’ (Kenneth Frampton, 1983) and inter-Asian exchanges of ideas of modernity and modern design in living spaces. The conference will also consider methodological approaches in examining the notion of the 'modern' within an Asian context, from postcolonial perspectives and within the context of the Cold War. It will develop theoretical understandings of modernity and modernism, whether the term 'modern' was employed within these culture-specific contexts and the variations in the 'modern' or modernisms across these.

    We seek papers that will examine one or more of these areas. We also welcome suggestions.

    ·         Adaptation of vernacular forms of architecture and interior spaces into modern models of living such as apartments.
    ·         Relation of culture-specific living practices to new forms of modern and modular lifestyles.
    ·         Interior design magazines and their consumption.
    ·         Women and modern lifestyles.
    ·         Standardisation in housing and interior design.        
    ·         Modernity, modernisation and Modernism: theoretical trajectories in relation to living space.
    ·         Modern living and modernity in postcolonial contexts. 
    ·         Cold War and Modern living.
    ·         Architecture and Interior Design professions.
    ·         Exhibitions of modern living spaces and modern life.
    ·         Art in the modern home.
     
    The call for papers can also be found online: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/research/design-art-history/idh/internationalising-design-history-events/modern-living-in-asia-1945-1990

    Please submit a 300-word abstract and 100-word biography to modernlivingasia@brighton.ac.uk by 30th September 2016. All proposals will be peer-reviewed. Papers will be given in English. We also welcome a panel proposal with three or four papers. Please do contact us if you have any questions.
  • "The Art of Architecture: Hand Drawing and Design" Conference

    Notre Dame | Dates: 29 Sep – 01 Oct, 2016
    Join the Notre Dame School of Architecture for the “Art of Architecture: Hand Drawing and Design” Conference, Sept. 29-Oct. 1, 2016.

    The conference comes at a crucial time.  NCARB is considering deleting drawing from the Architectural Exam, while others are touting “programs which can design buildings without architects.” At the same time, many claim hand drawing is essential to the design process. In the last five years we have seen an outpouring of interest in the subject through books, websites, and sketching trips. 

    The conference will explore the continued vitality of hand drawing in the practice of architecture, education, and scholarship. We are bringing together over 150 academics, architects, historians, and students. 
     
  • Building the Outer Boroughs: Architecture and Urbanism beyond Manhattan (Brooklyn College, March 23, 2017)

    Dates: 04 – 12 Sep, 2016
    Building the Outer Boroughs: Architecture and Urbanism beyond Manhattan Brooklyn College, March 23, 2017 Organizers: Anna Jozefacka (Fellow, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2015-17) and Malka Simon (Brooklyn College) Co-sponsored by the Wolfe Institute for the Humanities and the Art Department at Brooklyn College Before they were the “outer boroughs,” the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island developed as cities, towns, and villages in their own right, independent of New York City. Though these so-called outer boroughs comprise most of today’s New York and are part of its architectural identity, the bulk of existing scholarship in architecture is persistently Manhattan-centric. However, there remains much to be said about New York City’s outer boroughs and their neighborhoods. The different pace of growth and initial political independence of these parts of the city have yielded architecturally varied urban landscapes well worth examining. This symposium seeks to highlight the study of New York City’s architecture and urban development outside of Manhattan. We invite papers that expand beyond the existing field of scholarship on the city’s built environment. We aim to discuss the variety of building types, styles, and urban patterns evident in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island and to consider their roles in shaping the city. We welcome interdisciplinary papers that address architecture within the context of other fields. Papers might examine topics that include but are not limited to the following: -Early colonial settlements -Urban archeological sites -Industrial architecture and infrastructure -Civic, cultural, and religious centers past and present -Housing typologies across the outer boroughs -Gentrification and architectural style Intersections of the natural and built environments -The skyscraper outside of Manhattan -Adaptive reuse of buildings and sites -Preservation in the face of real estate development -Building with the “The Other”: voices of immigrants, women, and architects of color In recent years, native and new residents alike have “discovered” the richness of life outside Manhattan, leading to a wave of fast-paced development and neighborhood transformations. The time is right for a closer scholarly examination of the places and spaces of New York City’s outer boroughs. Please send a 500-word paper proposal and an academic CV to: outerborougharchitecture@gmail.com Deadline for submissions is September 12, 2016. Successful applicants will be notified by September 30, 2016.
  • Dialogue in Architecture: An Evening with Toshiko Mori

    Chiacgo | Dates: 29 – 29 Sep, 2016
    The Frank Lloyd Wright Trust's annual Thinking Into the Future: The Robie House Series on Architecture, Design and Ideas presents a conversation with acclaimed architect Toshiko Mori, FAIA, who will discuss how architecture develops languages and dialogues that reflect and respond to complex circumstances and contexts.
  • Monuments Made of Words: Text and Architecture, from Antiquity to Modernity

    Durham | Dates: 08 – 11 Sep, 2016
    From Horace’s odes to the sonnets of Shakespeare and beyond, the idea that the written word outlasts even the grandest of monuments has long been a literary topos. In the case of antiquity it rings particularly true. Despite their apparent vulnerability during centuries of transmission in manuscript form, classical accounts of architecture have almost always outlived their subjects; of brick and stone, often only words survive. This conference seeks to explore the diverse content and legacy of ancient descriptions of architecture. Modern studies have tended to concentrate on specific accounts or periods. The present conference addresses a much broader selection of classical texts and the various ways they were perceived over a wider geographical compass and timeframe. It situates these accounts – such as Greek reports of architecture in the Near East and Latin poetry on the architectural wonders of Rome – within the intellectual and aesthetic discourse of their time but also, importantly, in the context of later ages, when they came to fire the imagination of new generations of architects, artists, writers and scholars. With contributions drawn from an international group of scholars, ranging from classicists to architectural historians and specialists in other fields, the intention of this conference is to elicit a richer understanding of the contribution of these ‘literary monuments’ to thought and visual culture from antiquity onwards, as well as of the dialogues between these monuments over time.
  • Singapore Archifest 2016

    Singapore | Dates: 23 Sep – 09 Oct, 2016
    Archifest 2016 returns with a Pavilion designed with ‘Exhale’ as its theme at Raffles Place Park. Celebrating its 10th edition, Archifest’s theme for this year ‘Exhale’ seeks to challenge the rapidity and density of activities that define our pace of life, weigh in on the state of Singapore’s built environment and breathe new life into it. The annual architecture festival not only celebrates Singapore’s urban environment but also sets the stage for a wider discussion about our city, spaces and life. From exhibitions, conversations, workshops, markets to architecture tours, the Archifest Pavilion will host an exciting programme that is diverse, informative, thought-provoking and fun.
  • Call for Applications: Millard Meiss Publication Fund

    Dates: 01 – 15 Sep, 2016
    Twice a year, CAA awards grants through the Millard Meiss Publication Fund to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits, but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy. Thanks to the generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss, CAA began awarding these publishing grants in 1975.

    Books eligible for a Meiss grant must currently be under contract with a publisher and be on a subject in the arts or art history. The deadlines for the receipt of applications are March 15 and September 15 of each year. Please review the Application Guidelines and the Application Process, Schedule, and Checklist for complete instructions.
  • Landmarks Experience: Century of Progress

    Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore | Dates: 16 Oct, 2016
    On Oct. 16, Indiana Landmarks provides the answer at Landmarks Experience: Century of Progress, a morning of interesting talks followed by lunch and tours of the five homes that made their way from the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago across Lake Michigan to the Indiana Dunes.

    The day begins with talks at Portage Lakefront Pavilion in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore about Chicago’s 1933 Century of Progress World’s Fair, the fair exhibit houses that migrated to the Indiana Dunes, and the preservation project that has saved the buildings. 

    You’ll hear about plans for the House of Tomorrow, the most influential of the houses at the fair and the only one of the five not yet restored.  You’ll also hear from the National Trust about its work to restore and preserve Modernist houses, including Philip Johnson’s Glass House and the Mies Van der Rohe-designed Farnsworth house in nearby Plano, IL.

    After lunch at the Pavilion, you’ll tour all five of the houses in the Century of Progress historic district in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, seeing areas not open during the annual public tour, including the observation decks at the Florida Tropical House, Armco Ferro House and Rostone House. Four of the houses have been restored by private leaseholders. At the House of Tomorrow, three floors will be open to view the “before” conditions. Indiana Landmarks will start the restoration in 2017.

    Landmarks Experience: Century of Progress runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and costs $50 per Indiana Landmarks member; $65 for the general public. The cost includes lunch, lectures and tours and shuttle transportation. Register by October 6 at centuryofprogressexp16.eventbrite.com or call Indiana Landmarks at 317-639-4534.
     
  • CFP: Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) Conference (Madison, 31 May-3 Jun 17)

    Dates: 01 Sep – 02 Dec, 2016
    The EDRA48Madison Conference Committee invites you to submit your work and participate in the 2017 conference. As you plan for submission, please read the full Call for Proposals.

    EDRA48Madison invites you to share your findings, best practices and ideas around the meeting theme of "Voices of Place: Empower, Engage, Energize." A list of suggested themes are as follows:

    • Voices across Generations 
    • Voices from the Margins 
    • Voices of Culture and Globalization 
    • Voices from the Earth 
    • Voices from the Past 
    • Voices from the Future 
    • Making Voices Heard 
    • Other Voices (open ended)–Do you have research or a project to share, but it doesn't seem to fit into the theme of a specific track? This track is for you. 

    Learning objectives and participant biographies are a required component of the submission process so that EDRA can request continuing education credits from the AIA CES, EDAC, IDCEC, LA CES, and PAPA CM.

    Individuals can only participate in a maximum of three submissions total across ALL submission types. Any submissions of authors/presenters over the allowable maximum number will be disqualified.

    All accepted presenters must be registered to attend the conference by the presenter deadline dates listed in the Call for Proposals to confirm their participation and to be included in the program.

    SUBMISSION KEY DATES
    Monday, August 1, 2016 Submission site opens: www.edra.org/edra8madison
    Friday, September 23, 2016 Submission Deadline for Pre-Conference Intensives, Individual or Group Presentations, and Mobile Session
    Friday, December 2, 2016 Submission Deadline for Display Posters and EDRA Shorts
    Monday, December 19, 2016 Acceptance notification for Pre-Conference Intensives, Individual or Group Presentations, and Mobile Sessions
    Monday, January 16, 2017 Authors/Presenters' Deadline to accept presentation, register for the conference, and send any edits of proposed Pre-Conference Intensives, Individual or Group Presentations, and Mobile Sessions
    Monday, January 16, 2017 EDRA48Madison Early Bird Registration opens
    Wednesday, January 25, 2017 Acceptance notification for Display Posters and EDRA Shorts
    Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Authors/Presenters' Deadline to accept, register for the conference, and send any edits for Display Posters and EDRA Shorts
    May 31-June 3, 2017 EDRA48Madison at the Monoma Terrace in Madison, WI
     
  • Impressionism: American Gardens on Canvas

    Bronx | Dates: 01 – 11 Sep, 2016
    Experience the horticultural inspiration behind American Impressionism.

    American Impressionism, a prominent artistic style that flourished at the turn of the 20th century, comes to life in a captivating Garden-wide exhibition. In the Conservatory, stroll through an American Impressionist garden, a stunning interpretation by Francisca Coelho, NYBG's renowned curator and designer, of the alluring gardens that influenced iconic artists such as Childe Hassam and John Singer Sargent. In the Art Gallery, view a beautiful complementary display of more than 20 paintings and sculptures by these famed artists and their contemporaries that capture the colors, shadows, and ephemeral quality of light they observed in the natural world and infused in their distinctive imagery; the collection has been assembled by Guest Curator Linda S. Ferber, Ph.D., Director Emerita and Senior Art Historian of the New-York Historical Society.
  • Colloquium: Shifts in the 19th-Century American Cultural Landscape

    Bronx | Dates: 09 Sep, 2016
    Friday, September 9, 2016
    Humanities Institute Luesther T. Mertz Library; 2–4 p.m.

    In conjunction with the exhibition Impressionism: American Gardens on Canvas, this afternoon’s discussion will highlight the cultural-philosophic forces and changing perceptions of nature that impacted American landscapes, garden design, and horticulture during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Three experts in American history, art, and horticulture will guide the audience through these rapidly shifting realities and thoughts, as expressed in actual and painted American landscapes, from grandiose wildernesses to suburban scenes and more intimate garden settings. Following the program, participants will have the opportunity to visit the exhibition in the Mertz Library Art Gallery and the Conservatory.
  • New Aging with Matthias Hollwich and Wojtek J. Chodzko-Zajko

    Dates: 15 Sep, 2016
    mas_context_new_aging

    Thursday September 15, 2016. Event starts at 6:00 pm.
    $10 RSVP HERE

    Architect Matthias Hollwich, co-founder and principal of Hollwich Kushner, and Wojtek Jan Chodzko-Zajko, Ph.D., Head of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will lecture on Thursday, September 15, as part of MAS Context’s 2016 Fall Talks series. The lecture is organized in collaboration with the Society of Architectural Historians and will take place at the International Museum of Surgical Science (1524 N Lake Shore Dr, Chicago, IL 60610).

    New Aging


    This event will explore the topic of aging with presentations and a conversation between Matthias Hollwich, author of the book New Aging, and Wojtek Jan Chodzko-Zajko whose primary research interests are in the area of aging and health. For the past twenty-five years, Chodzko-Zajko has focused on the effect of exercise and physical activity on health and quality of life in old age.

    In New Aging, Matthias Hollwich outlines smart, simple ideas to help us experience aging as a gift that we receive with life. New Aging invites us to take everything we associate with aging—the loss of freedom and vitality, the cold and sterile nursing homes, the boredom—and throw it out the window. As an architect, Hollwich is devoted to finding ways in which we can shape our living spaces and communities to make aging a graceful and fulfilling aspect of our lives. He began his research into aging as part of a collaboration between HWKN, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Bauhaus Foundation Dessau. Now he has distilled his research into a collection of simple, visionary principles that will inspire us to think creatively about how we can change our habits and environments to suit our evolving needs as we age. The book New Aging has been designed by Bruce Mau Design and published by Penguin Random House. You can find more information about the book at new-aging.com.

    Copies of the latest issues of MAS Context will be available for purchase.

    MAS Context is supported by a grant by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and by private donations. For information about how to support MAS Context, please visit: www.mascontext.com/support

    Matthias Hollwich is the co-founding principal of progressive New York architecture firm Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) and Architizer, the largest platform for architecture online. Having previously led design teams within internationally acclaimed firms such as Rem Koolhaas’ Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Eisenman Architects, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Matthias has established himself at the forefront of a new generation of ground-and rule-breaking international architects. Combining his understanding of how architecture and cities can perform better with his research as a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Matthias has developed a new line of thinking about how to make aging an empowering process. He has since shared this message at events for TEDx, PICNIC, the World Health Organization, and the New Aging conference at University of Pennsylvania.
    www.hwkn.com | @HWKN_arch | @hollwich

    Wojtek Jan Chodzko-Zajko, Ph.D. earned a bachelors degree in Exercise Science from the University of London and a Ph.D. degree from Purdue University, also in Exercise Science. Chodzko-Zajko’s primary research interests are in the area of aging and health. For the past twenty-five years he has focused on the effect of exercise and physical activity on health and quality of life in old age. Chodzko-Zajko is the Shahid and Ann Carlson Khan Professor in Applied Health Sciences and Head of the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    http://labs.kch.illinois.edu/Faculty/Bios/ChodzkoZajko.aspx
  • Call for Expressions of Interest in 2017 PhD Scholarship at QUT Urban Informatics Research Lab

    Brisbane | Dates: 30 Aug – 30 Sep, 2016
    The Urban Informatics Research Lab @ QUT Design Lab is calling for expressions of interest from prospective PhD students to apply for candidature and/or scholarship. QUT's annual scholarship round closes on 30 September 2016, for entry at the start of 2017.

    URBAN INFORMATICS RESEARCH ALB
    We are an internationally recognised research and development lab. As a key part of the QUT Design Lab, our vision is to go beyond disciplinary boundaries to generate and harness actionable knowledge focusing on urban contexts. As such, our team consists of researchers and practitioners from a wide range of backgrounds across people, places, technologies: humanities and social sciences; design, planning, and architecture; human-computer interaction, information technology and computer science. We are always keen to connect with individuals and organisations who share the passion for transdisciplinary research and development to together create better urban futures. For more information, see www.urbaninformatics.net

    PHD SCHOLARSHIPS @ QUT
    QUT offers a limited number of scholarships to research students of exceptional research potential. To be eligible, you need to have a minimum first-class honours (H1) or equivalent and be undertaking a PhD, masters by research, or professional doctorate project that is closely aligned with our current key research areas. For more information about the current scholarship offerings at QUT, see www.qut.edu.au/research/scholarships-grants-and-funding/annual-scholarship-round 

    In the Urban Informatics Lab, we are looking for curious and passionate people with excellent track records in academic research.

    - Co-creative urban futures
    - Civic participation & hacking
    - Social entrepreneurship & urban change
    - Self care & mutual aid
    - Community engagement & placemaking
    - Enabling smart cities & smart citizens
    - Participatory urban data
    - Media architecture
    - Playful cities
    - [One blank slot: Do you have a radical idea you'd like to propose? Insert here]

    Please note that more broadly, the QUT Design Lab has five priority research areas:
    - Social Entrepreneurship
    - Design, Health, and Wellbeing
    - Design & Community
    - Design and Sustainability
    - Design, Culture, and Environment

    INTERESTED? NEXT STEPS
    - Check if you are eligible and other requirements for application: www.qut.edu.au/research/scholarships-grants-and-funding/annual-scholarship-round 

    - Email Dr. Jaz Hee-jeong Choi (h.choi[at]qut.edu.au.au), Director of the Urban
    --- Informatics Lab with the following:
    --- Your cv
    --- A brief outline of your proposed project in the format outlined here: https://www.qut.edu.au/study/applying/phd-and-research-degree-applications/step-7-write-your-research-proposal

    - We will then review your submission and contact with you to further discuss the next steps.
     
  • 2017 Japan Study Grants at the National Library of Australia

    Canberra | Dates: 30 Aug – 30 Sep, 2016
    Applications for 2017 Japan Study Grants opened on 1 July and close 30 September 2016

    The National Library offers annual Japan Study Grants supported by the Harold S. Williams Trust Fund. The Grants were established to support scholars and researchers resident in Australia whose work would benefit from access to the rich Japanese language and Japan-related collections of the National Library. Grants are offered for periods of up to four weeks.
  • Online Graduate Certificate in Historic Preservation at University of Kentucky

    Dates: 29 Aug, 2016 – 29 Aug, 2017
    The Department of Historic Preservation in the College of Design at the University of Kentucky is pleased to announce a new online graduate certificate in Historic Preservation beginning the fall 2016 semester. The 12-credit certificate has been distilled to provide practitioners in a broad range of fields with an understanding of historic preservation that will enhance existing careers and open new doors for all those with an interest in the built environment.

    Two courses are required and two courses can be selected from the list of electives to serve the needs of people with a wide variety of backgrounds. A brief description of the certificate courses and when they will be offered is listed below. One feature of the new certificate is Field Methods in Historic Preservation, an optional course that provides 5-day, intensive hands-on experience using different types of preservation technology and producing professional reports.

    Through a grant from the University of Kentucky eLearning, we are providing a limited number of scholarships to people taking the first course this fall.
    Because we are offering this certificate at short notice, the UK Graduate School will process applications in time for fall enrollment. Interested students should apply immediately. The Graduate Certificate Program does not require GRE scores or official transcripts.

    Please apply at: https://app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantConnectLogin.asp?id=ukgrad

    For more information, contact Dr. Allison Carll White, Chair of the Department of Preservation, at 859-257-7663 or hedcarll@uky.edu.
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