Recent Opportunities

  • The Eye's Mind: Visual Imagination, Neuroscience and the Humanities

    Norwich | Dates: 21 – 22 May, 2016
    The visual imagination is one of the most powerful human capacities.
    It plays a vital role in art and literature, religion and science, and has been studied and celebrated by artists, writers, philosophers, psychologists, and, now, neuroscientists.
    The event, which is the culmination of the AHRC-funded research project, ‘The Eye’s Mind’, will bring together leaders in all these fields to shape a new and more integrated understanding of this mysterious mental resource.

    Keynote speakers include:
    Paul Broks (psychology), John Onians (art history),
    Joel Pearson (neuroscience), Michael Tye (philosophy)
    and Adam Zeman (neurology)
  • CFP: Domestic Space in France and Belgium (Belfast, 16-17 Sep 2016)

    Belfast | Dates: 29 Apr – 31 May, 2016
    Domestic Space in France and Belgium: Art, Literature and Design

    Modernity in many respects is exemplified through the development of the domestic interior in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, which was characterized by an evolving relationship between public and private, a progressive relationship with technology, an embracing of the mass media and the marketplace and a new prioritisation of individualism and interiority. Despite its centrality to the history of modernity, it is only in the last decade or so that the domestic interior has begun to be the subject of a body of criticism largely thanks to the work of cultural and design historians such as Hilde Heynen, Anne Massey, and Penny Sparke. These critics have emphasised the need for modern interior to be positioned in a multidisciplinary context in order to allow its rich history to become visible. This conference seeks to bring together specialists from a wide range of areas, including art history, literature, French studies, cultural geography, the history of design and gender studies to discuss the conceptualisation and representation of the domestic interior.  It aims to bring together speakers from different backgrounds in the humanities and social sciences and draw on a variety of disciplinary tools and methodologies. Submissions for 20-minute papers or panels (of 3 people) are invited across a wide range of topics, including but not limited to:

    Art Nouveau
    Apartment Living
    Interiority as a dimension of space
    Materials of Modernity
    The Literary Salon
    Space and Identity
    Gendered spaces
    Workspace/home space
    Linguistic landscapes
    Domestic Conflict
    Representing Rooms
    Interior Designers
    In-between spaces
    Domestic Objects
    Liminal spaces
    Public and private
    Cultural crossroads
    Home as Microcosm
    Shared spaces

    Keynote Speakers:

    Professor Anne Green, King’s College, London Professor Hilde Heynen, KU Leuven Dr Janet McLean, National Gallery of Ireland Submissions should be sent to by 31st of May 2016

    *A selection of papers will be published with an International Press and a special issue of a Peer-Reviewed Journal.
  • Biographies & the Production of Space (Stuttgart, 19-21 May 16)

    Stuttgart | Dates: 19 – 21 May, 2016

    Akademie Schloss Solitude, May 19 - 21, 2016 Registration deadline: May 13, 2016

    Geographies are intense zones of human action and interaction – from market places to migration, and homes to cyber communities. Spaces are not simply containers within which people live and work; spaces are a product of human lives and the actions that take place in those spaces. 

    Exploring the relationship between the physical armature of a place and the larger sphere of political and cultural action and production is something that this theme proposes to engage with. In this exploration, we propose to engage with biographies – the vectored lives of people and things. Biographies are complex journeys of individuals within multiple lives and spaces. The biography is proposed as a means to exploring the culture of spaces and the sciences of its production.

    Biographies could be »channels of communication by means of which subjectivity and facticity engage in a constant nervous process of dialogue.« [1]

    Places and geographies are active zones of politics and cultural processes and it is in the attempt to understand the complexity of what makes a place that we propose to work with the lives of people and objects that are part of these places – their structure, their composition, their occupation, and their journeys. What is the relationship between life and places, politics and spaces in the everyday lives of people and their societies, their objects and their stories?
  • CFP: Object Lessons and Nature Tables (Reading, 23 Sep 16)

    Reading | Dates: 28 Apr – 15 Jun, 2016
    University of Reading, September 23, 2016
    Deadline: Jun 15, 2016

    Object Lessons and Nature Tables: Research Collaborations Between Historians of Science and University Museums

    With the 'material turn' in the humanities, historians of science are paying greater and greater attention to collections of all kinds, and to their complex structures and histories. University museum collections in the UK and across Europe form a singular meeting point in humanities discourses for which history of science is highly significant – such as environmental history, histories of colonialism, and information histories.

    What exactly does this new landscape of university researchers and their science collections look like now? How do we approach the material culture of science? What are the research projects taking place in this arena, and what is its future potential? How do collaborations between curators and historians of science function – especially inside university contexts? What are the examples of innovative research conjoining university collections and historians of science? When do teaching and research in history of science come together in collections contexts? What public histories of science are being co-produced in university- based science museums? These epistemological and practice-based questions will be the focus of this one-day conference co-sponsored by the Centre for Collections Based Research and the Department of History of the University of Reading, and supported by the British Society for the History of Science.

    This conference hopes to attract historians of science of all fields and career levels, from doctoral students including CDAs through to early career researchers and senior figures, as well as curators, archivists, collections managers and research funders. The conference addresses both methods and findings, and will therefore have both formal papers in panel structures and presentations of actual collections objects.

    We are soliciting proposals for conference participation in the form of conventional papers (15 – 30 minutes) and also proposals for 'object animations' (20 minutes).

    Object animations will involve the presentation of actual collection objects, demonstrating just what incisive and relevant work can be done with material culture investigations in the history of science. 
    Proposals will be selected through a peer review process.

    The 'object animations' participants will be offered flexible support to enable their participation. This will include the option of arriving the night before as a guest of the conference in order to facilitate couriering of objects, as well as the assurance that the conference venue (Special Collections/Museum of English Rural Life, University of
    Reading) is a collection-secure area. We will also provide appropriate AV technologies (object camera with overhead data projection) for demonstrating objects close-up.

    Proposals of up to 750 words (and images of objects) are solicited in the following suggested areas and beyond:

    - practices and methods of material culture in history of science
    - history of science research projects in university collections: 
    practices, processes, experiences and outcomes
    - university scientific museums as arenas for the public history of science and for history of science impact joint appointments, curatorships and embedded research in history of science and university museum collections
    - Collaborative Doctoral Awards in history of science and collections
    - university museums as training grounds for new practices in history of science

    Please send your proposal by 15/06 to the co-convenors of the

    Dr Martha Fleming, Programme Director, Centre for Collections-Based Research, University of Reading : Dr Rohan Deb Roy, Lecturer in South Asian History, Department of History, University of Reading :

    The conference will be preceded by an optional afternoon on the previous day (22/09) during which collections visits to the University of Reading's Herbarium, Geology Collections, and the Cole Museum of Zoology will be possible.  Please note that this conference will take place concurrently with the University Museums Group 2016 Conference at University of Reading, and that there will be opportunities for synergy between the two events. Thanks to the generosity of the British Society for the History of Science, a number of stipends will be available to enable the participation of students.
  • The Human in Architecture and Philosophy: Towards an Architectural Anthropology

    Bamberg | Dates: 20 – 23 Jul, 2016
    Human beings normally live in buildings – structures built specifically for this function. This raises interesting questions. Why do we build dwellings (such as the ones we do)? And for whom do architects build houses? These questions view the same phenomenon from two different perspectives: architecture can tell us something about the human condition (in general or in a particular culture) and we can derive insights about architecture from our understanding of human beings.

    This topic is inspired by two observations and two related questions:

    1) Many architects, contemporary and historical, claim to focus on the needs of human beings. The resulting architecture, however, often does not meet the needs and desires of the people who live there. For whom should architecture actually build?

    2) Architecture, traditionally, has played a negligible role in our philosophical understanding of human beings (as also for our sociological, psychological, and other anthropological analyses). Although it has always been generally acknowledged that human beings need built dwelling places, more careful analysis of this need is surely necessary. What does it say about human beings that they depend upon the buildings they construct for their own habitation?

    These observations point to a deficit both in philosophical analysis and in the practical application of philosophy of architecture. A more systematic analysis of both areas could contribute to a better understanding of human beings and to future architectural endeavour better satisfying the needs and wishes of human beings.

    The 3rd ISPA International Conference seeks to answers these questions (and to pose some new ones) by bringing together architecture and philosophy with a variety of other disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, civil engineering, design, law, and psychology.
  • CFP: The Genesis of a Window: Methods, Preparations and Problems of Stained Glass Manufacture (York, 26-27 May 16)

    York | Dates: 28 Apr – 08 May, 2016
    University of York, King's Manor, May 26 - 27, 2016
    Deadline: May 8, 2016

    The University of York
    Stained Glass Research School
    PhD Summer Symposium
    Call for Papers

    The Genesis of a Window: 
    Methods, Preparations and Problems of Stained Glass Manufacture

    Thursday 26th - Friday 27th May 2016, King's Manor, York

    The University of York’s Stained Glass Research School will be hosting its annual PhD conference on 26th and 27th May 2016. From the early medieval period stained glass design and manufacture has evolved and reacted to changing tastes, styles and technological advances. The conception and creation of stained glass windows are influenced by factors as diverse as their architectural settings, pictorial and textual sources, and the politics of their patrons and custodians.

    Proposals are invited for papers presenting research into any aspects of stained glass design and creation from the  development of iconographic and structural design, to production methods and craftsmanship.

    Please send proposals for 20 minute papers (no more than 300 words, including title and name of corresponding author) to Katie Harrison
    ( and Oliver Fearon ( by Sunday 8th May.
  • CFP: Lanes and Neighbourhoods in Cities in Asia (Singapore, 30 Jun-1 Jul 16)

    Singapore | Dates: 28 – 30 Apr, 2016
    This conference is jointly organised by the Asian Urbanisms Cluster at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore, and the International Institute of Asian Studies (IIAS), The Netherlands.

    The purpose of this conference is to focus attention on the concept and social meanings of one of the smallest social spheres of the city, the neighbourhood.  The immediacy of this topic can be found in recent urban research positing that the neighbourhood is at substantial risk of fading into history as global mega-projects with vast footprints, master plans, and large-scale privatization of urban space are “kill[ing] much of the urban tissue” of smaller urban spaces (Sassen, 2016:1). These are the place-based geographies of the city that have long provided for cosmopolitan diversity and in which marginalized populations are able to assert their agency in city-making. Pursuing the “art of being global” (Roy and Ong, 2011), cities in Asia fall more and more within what can be called an “urbanism of projects” (Goldblum, 2015: 374), leading to a rupture with their historic organic urban growth. In that context, iconic buildings are given priority over urban texture:  “While the pieces of cities are occasionally spectacular, the parts do not add up to anything larger nor do they contribute to the extended setting” (Chow, 2015: 4). The urbanism of projects also acknowledges the primacy of a “super urban network” over local urban territories, opening the way for a “splintering urbanism” (Graham and Marvin, 2001). Once low rise and organic, cities in Asia have engaged into a verticalization process in a functionalist perspective, especially in new urbanized areas flourishing at its edge. These steady transformations affect social cohesion and lead to re-compositions of the historical and structuring forms of lanes and neighbourhoods.

    The richness of the highly polysemous notion of “neighbourhood” is linked with its reference both to built and social environments. It corresponds to the smallest social unit for urban place-making, a dimension that John Friedmann synthesizes as “a small urban space that is cherished by the people who inhabit it (2009: 5). This universal definition focuses on three main criteria: its small scale, its inhabited dimension and its local attachment and appropriations by local communities. It can be seen both as an intimate place of social encounters and a field of expression of social forces, which is practiced – and thus performed – on a daily basis (Lefebvre, 1991). As such, appropriated lanes and neighbourhoods generate local centralities in the city they belong to.

    The conference seeks to reflect on the specificity of the socio-spatial production – and its current evolutions – of neighbourhoods in the Asian context. Theoretically, the objective is to question the everyday nature of the urbanisation process, from the specific perspective of cities in Asia, historically characterized by the “smallness” of their plots division and the richness of lanes’ appropriations, both of them leading to a specific sense of local territoriality. Beyond this theoretical frame, the conference seeks to broaden the debate from a civil society perspective and to engage the discussion with locally rooted activism experiences, working on “reclaiming [the] cities neighbourhood by neighbourhoods” (Friedmann, 2009). In doing so, we are eager to revalue the productions of everyday urbanism and to decipher the richness of local urban and social fabrics from historical as well as contemporary perspectives.   

    Focusing on an in-depth exploration of neighbourhood formations in city-making, the conference will address the following three lines of inquiry. We encourage papers and narratives that engage with one or several of the following themes.

    1. Questioning Neighbourhood “production of space” (Lefebvre, 1991) in cities in Asia
    • In historicising the notions of neighbourhoods in Asia and contextualizing palimpsest games in the “neighbourhood-making” process, how can we identify and decipher the meanings of various morphological patterns of neighbourhoods in Asia?
    • How can we report and theorize the interactions between urban networks (e.g., lanes) and neighbourhoods as territories in cities in Asia?
    • What can we learn from comparative reflections on the various “back-alley neighbourhoods” in cities in Asia through history?
    • How does the concept of neighbourhood relate to such terms as slum, squatter settlement, kampung, informal settlement?

    2. Everyday Urbanism
    • Does the formation of neighbourhoods offer possibilities for radical citizenships? How can the dwellers potentially “reclaim their city, neighbourhood by neighbourhood” (Friedmann, 2009)?
    • Can we conceptualize local forms of resilience to ecological, political and economical challenges at the scale of the neighbourhood?
    • How are neighbourhoods managed and governed within themselves and in the context of higher levels of government?
    • How are neighbourhood identities formed, contested, and projected beyond the neighbourhood through media, literature, art, theatre or other practices?

    3. Neighbourhoods as sites of resistance and alternative city-making
    • What happens to the idea of “neighbourhood” in super-scale urban projects such as gated housing enclaves, smart cities, eco-cities or similar corporate production of urban space (Tedong and al, 2014)?
    • How can threatened neighbourhoods effectively respond to processes of gentrification and/or corporatization of urban space?
    • In an era in which tourism and cultural economy are put forth as ways to boost urban economies, can heritage or historical preservation be used as an effective platform for countering the dissolution of neighbourhoods as life-spaces (Friedmann, 1988)?
    • What are the tools for action that neighbourhoods under siege innovate to create alternatives to the emergent super-scale functional city of consumption?

    Paper proposals should include a title, an abstract (250 words maximum) and a brief personal biography of 150 words for submission by 30 April 2016. Please send all proposals in word document to Successful applicants will be notified by 15 May 2016 and will be required to send in a completed draft paper (5,000-8,000 words) by 20 June 2016.

    Dr Marie Gibert
    Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
    E |
    Prof Mike Douglass
    Asia Research Institute, and Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore
    E |
    Dr Philippe Peycam
    International Institute of Asian Studies (IIAS), The Netherlands
    E |

    Ms Sharon Ong
    Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
    E |,sg

    Contact Person(s) 
    Sharon ONG 
  • Drucker Prize

    Dates: 28 Apr – 01 Jul, 2016
    Previously known as the Peter F. Drucker Award for Nonprofit Innovation, the program has now moved in a bold new direction. The Drucker Prize has been turned into a resource-rich learning platform—one that blends the timeless wisdom of Peter Drucker with the thinking of some of today’s brightest management minds.

    In addition to the possibility of winning $100,000, The Drucker Prize offers every applicant an invaluable resource: a host of practical insights to help them become more innovative and more effective.

    All 501(c)(3) organizations are eligible. Application closes on July 1, 2016, at 5pm Pacific Time.

    The application and more information are available at

    Questions? Please contact Laura Roach at
  • Reflecting on the Future - Policy through Poetry

    Chicago | Dates: 12 – 12 May, 2016
    Through poetry, public housing residents speak about their experience in public housing in the era of the Plan for Transformation. 

    5:30 doors open, 6:00-7:30 pm program

    Welcome provided by Pastor James M. Moody, Quinn Chapel, 
    Public housing resident poems, supported by Poetry Foundation workshop,
    Policy moderation provided by Charlie Barlow,
    PhD, University of Chicago
  • 1st Homes-uP International Conference on Single-Family Homes under Pressure? (Mannheim, 13-14 Oct 16)

    Mannheim | Dates: 28 Apr – 31 May, 2016
    The conference will bring together international researchers from different disciplines who work on single-family housing. Objective is to scrutinize the effects of demographic, socio-cultural and structural change on the utilization of single-family housing in industrialized countries from an interdisciplinary perspective. We understand single-family homes as a generic term for free standing or serial buildings containing one dwelling, including detached, semi-detached and terraced (row) houses.

    We welcome contributions from architects, economists, geographers, social scientists, urban and regional planners on:
    Single-family home building stock characteristics and dynamics of spatial development,
    Land use, material flow analysis, ecological aspects,
    Emergence of new user groups and user preferences,
    Market mechanisms, pricing, vacancies and their resource-related implications,
    Housing policies and single-family homes,
    Distressed single-family homes: identification and counteractive measures.

    Submissions on these and other aspects regarding single-family homes as an economic, ecological and cultural resource are encouraged. Inclusion in the program will be based on a high-quality peer-review process. Contributions are welcome from both established and junior researchers.

    Submission deadline: May 31, 2016
  • CTBUH Offering Summer Internship Opportunities

    Chicago | Dates: 28 Apr – 13 May, 2016
    The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) is looking for talented individuals to join our growing team in several paid summer internship positions at our Downtown Chicago Headquarters Office.

    Candidates will have the very highest organizational skills, excellent written English language ability, and very good graphic design skills. The roles will be supporting the CTBUH team working on publications, events, research, website, administrative and office organization projects, etc. All internships are 40 hours per week over the summer.

    If you work closely with students and young professionals, or know someone who does, please help spread the word about these paid opportunities! 

    Applications should be submitted no later than May 13 to be considered for summer positions. Interested parties should email the following information to 
    1. Brief cover letter explaining why the candidate would be ideal for this role (include anticipated graduation date and current GPA).
    2. Résumé
    3. Evidence of something the candidate has written (e.g., a short paper or essay), graphically designed (e.g., a book or brochure), and something they’ve organized (e.g., an event, project, or publication).

    Learn more about the CTBUH at
  • CFP: 5th Creative Cities International Conference (Porto, 25-27 Jan 17)

    Porto | Dates: 28 Apr – 15 Jun, 2016
    Porto (Portugal), January 25 - 27, 2017
    Deadline: Jun 15, 2016

    About the 5th Creative Cities International Conference

    The Creative Cities International Conference is an event idealized and organized by the Scientific Association
    ICONO14 (Spain), which aims to approach innovative actions conducted within cities by all sorts of agents (public, private, governmental, nongovernmental, individuals and collectives). It intends to be a presentation and discussion space for perspectives and solutions on different challenges related to urban contexts, exploring different resources and possibilities for major and minor world cities. 
    After four previous editions of significant success (2009, 2011 and
    2016 in Madrid; 2013 in Campinas, Brazil), the 5th Creative Cities International Conference will be held in Porto (Portugal) between January 25th to 27th2017. It will be co-organized by CITCEM – Transdisciplinary «Culture, Space and Memory» Research Centre of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Porto, and by the Scientific Association ICONO14.

    The 5th edition aims to maintain and extend the multidisciplinary and multicultural debate that, under this formexists since 2009 and that has involved participants from all over the world in the construction and sharing of a plural, crosscut and diversified debate on the characteristics, difficulties, successes and several paths performed by different types and scales of cities. Being Porto an European and international destination of great relevance, the organisation also intends to turn the city into the centre of this scientific and cultural exchange of origins and destinies for the life that defines every city which the congress will potentiate.

    Thematic lines

    - The constructed city: theory and History of the cities
    - The inherited city: patrimony and the city. 
    - The palimpsest city: destruction, reconstruction and the memory of the city. 
    - The represented and imagined city: culture, art and the city. 
    - The playful city: leisure and sports in the city. 
    - The lived city: neighbourhoods, associativism, security, mobility and freedom. 
    - The moving city: policies and strategies for transportation and public services in the city. 
    - The inhabited city: architecture and urbanism in the city. 
    - The solidary and accessible city: social services and disability integration in the city. 
    - The market city: industry, commerce and economy in the city. 
    - The visited city: tourism and the city. 
    - The communicated city: media and advertisement in the cities. 
    - The identifiable city: the city as identity and brand
    - The sustainable city: health, water, ecology and the city. 
    - The virtual and real city: technology and the city. 
    - The 2.0 city: social networks and the city. 
    - The future city: youth and the city. 
    - The creative city: tradition, personality and innovation in the city. 
    - The wise city: education and the city. 
    - The equalitarian city: gender and the city. 
    - The political city: management and administration of cities and policies for the citizens

    Submissions must include: title (English and Portuguese/Spanish), name of the author(s), filiation, abstract (maximum of 2000 characters), correspondent thematic line indication, 3 to 5 keywords and a short biography of  each author (maximum of 800 characters).

    To know more:
  • CFP: Border Regimes: Confrontations, Configurations, Transpositions (Kandersteg, 4-9 Sep 16)

    Kandersteg | Dates: 28 Apr – 20 May, 2016
    Kandersteg (CH), Seminarhotel Alpha Soleil, September 4 - 09, 2016
    Deadline: May 20, 2016

    Border Regimes: Confrontations, Configurations, Transpositions

    The notion of the border as a clear cut geopolitical division of national territories has been challenged for quite some time in multiple disciplines, including history, art history, literature, philosophy, anthropology, and cultural theory engaged in the field of postcolonial studies. Even though state borders prove effective in terms of inclusion and exclusion, they can never be reduced to one single meaning.

    The transposition of persons, commodities, materialities, and imaginaries involved in border regimes both reflects and affects the transpositioning nature of borders. Such a dynamic and fluid notion of the border shifts our focus beyond geopolitical landscapes with its fences of death, barbed wire, walls, mountains or swamps, towards a more complex notion of border regimes. This implies all sorts of triages of socio-cultural inclusion and exclusion (such as those found within financial markets, art markets, schools, and health check centers), but also the connecting, collaborative, and creative aspects of “contact zones” (Pratt), “-scapes” (Appadurai), “trading zones” 
    (Galison) or interstitial “third spaces” (Bhabha, Soja). Although never free from confrontations, the border can be seen as “not that at which something stops but […] from which something begins its presencing” 
    (Heidegger). Moreover, it generally complicates dichotomies between natural/real/factual and conceptual/imaginary/fictional borders, those inside our heads and those outside. Borders are always to be understood as highly complex configurations of difference and identity, inside and outside, inclusion and exclusion, diachrony and synchrony, imagination and its real effects. The analysis of border regimes, therefore, requires a plurality of methodological approaches as well as an inter- and transdisciplinary dialogue.

    The Summer School invites doctoral and postdoctoral scholars from all disciplines of the Humanities and the Social Sciences to contribute to a critical interdisciplinary discussion on borders and analogous concepts. It addresses the following questions:

    - What are the idiosyncrasies, constitutive elements and specific discursive, socio-cultural or political conditions of borderlands, borderscapes, contact zones, liminal spaces, margins etc.? Which institutions, agents or actants are involved?

    - What are the impacts of knowledge transfer, the circulation and flows of persons, objects, images, and information on the transpositioning of borders, whether physical or imaginary?

    - In which ways can ‘border thinking’ or ‘border knowledge’ (Mignolo) inform us about our own disciplinary positions when analysing border regimes? What are the consequences of the claim that we tend to invoke/produce the borders we describe (Mezzadra/Neilson)?

    Keynote speakers and possible foci of their lecture:

    Mary C. Fuller
    (Head of the Literature Section, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
    Early modern European and North American literature and culture, history of early modern voyages, exploration and colonization, cultural encounters, cartographies

    Monica Juneja
    (HCTS Professor “Global Art History”, Universität Heidelberg) Global art history, transcultural visuality, cultural translation, transcending boundaries

    Sandro Mezzadra
    (Associate Professor, Department of Political and Social Sciences, Università di Bologna) Political philosophy, colonial and postcolonial studies, frontiers of citizenship, border struggles, inclusion and exclusion, global governance, transit labour

    Bernhard Siegert
    (Gerd-Bucerius-Professor für Geschichte und Theorie der Kulturtechniken, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar) Media philosophy, comparative visual and cultural theory, medial and cultural triages (grids, filters, doors, passages)

    Please provide us with the following application material:
    - a letter of motivation, indicating how you expect to benefit from participating in this Summer School and how you can contribute, in turn, to the discussions (mentioning your specific interest in the
    - a CV of max. two pages
    - an abstract (500 words) of your current research project
    - one referee we might contact

    Please apply electronically (PDF) to Melanie Altanian who is happy to answer questions regarding the application: For further questions please contact

    The full CfP (PDF) can also be found on our website:
  • Big Ben Bash at the Drake Hotel

    Chicago | Dates: 15 May, 2016
    Historic Chicago architect Benjamin Marshall, who created E. Lake Shore Dr. and The Drake Hotel, will be feted at “The Big Ben Bash,” hosted by The Benjamin Marshall Society. Festivities take place Sunday, May 15, from 5pm to 8pm at The Drake Hotel, 140 E. Walton Place, in Chicago. 

    The dual celebration salutes the 95th Anniversary of The Drake Hotel and the just-published, first-ever book on legendary Benjamin H. Marshall-Chicago Architect. The four-color, tabletop book of Marshall’s incredible work was a key mission of The Benjamin Marshall Society. (Author signings of the book will be available at the party). 
    The renowned Stanley Paul and his musicians will provide dancing and festive music in the Gold Coast Room. 

    A VIP Champagne party is offered pre-event for Marshall connoisseurs from 4pm to 5pm in The Drake Room. Guests are guaranteed a copy of the Benjamin Marshall book, included in ticket price, plus a chance to meet the family of Benjamin Marshall (who will autograph your book). Admission to the 5pm to 8pm celebration is also included. 

    Benjamin Marshall was a celebrity in his heyday, renowned for his extravagant Gatsby-like parties (filled with Hollywood celebrities, and even the Prince of Wales) at his Shangri-La studio and home on Lake Michigan in Wilmette. His compelling architectural style joined classic tradition with modern 21st century. Marshall created a new landscape of living.

    Several Benjamin Marshall buildings have 100th anniversaries this year--the South Shore Country Club (now South Shore Cultural Center), the Polish Consulate at 1530 N. Lake Shore Dr. plus the Edgewater Beach Hotel (formerly on Lake Shore Dr.)  The South Shore Cultural Center features original Benjamin Marshall buildings from 1909 to 1916 and later. (The original 1906 building was demolished).

    Those interested in Chicago history, Benjamin Marshall designs, discovering cultural gems, or catching up with friends, are invited to join in the fun at The Big Ben Bash. 
    Ticket price is $80 for the Sunday, May 15, 5pm – 8 pm party in the Gold Coast room, including wine and hors d’oeuvres, plus live music by Stanley Paul and his musicians.  For an added experience, there is a $250 VIP ticket, including above, plus a 4pm-5pm pre-event private Champagne party. The Champagne event includes hors d’oeuvres, an autographed copy of the Benjamin H. Marshall—Chicago Architect book and a chance to meet Benjamin Marshall’s relatives (and have your book autographed).

    Books will be available for sale at the event. The limited print run cannot be reprinted and only 1,000 books exist. Sale price is $45.

    Net proceeds from the event benefit the Benjamin Marshall Society, a 501c3 charity, whose mission is to educate the public on the life and works of Benjamin Marshall and to revive the discussion on the civic responsibility of the urban architect and the role of architecture, planning and design in the urban environment and in society as a whole.
  • Architect Tom Kubala Presents the FLW Alfred Adelman House Restoration

    Rockford | Dates: 23 – 23 Apr, 2016
    Architectural lecture followed by appetizers and an optional tour of the Frank Lloyd Wright Laurent House.
  • Digital Open Source Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage

    Evora | Dates: 04 – 15 Jul, 2016
    The registration for the participation in the two courses in the area of Open Source Digital Technologies applied to Cultural Heritage opened on April 4. I. 2D documentation Methodologies with Management through GIS II. Methodologies of 3D Documentation The two courses will have both theoretical and practical classes and are preferentially oriented towards students and professionals with training in the fields of Archaeology, History, Architecture, Art History, Museology, Conservation and Restoration, and Multimedia, as well as experts who are involved in Digital Technologies applied to Cultural Heritage. From a transdisciplinary point of view, the training aims to combine the knowledge of the material culture of our past with technology and innovation. The courses are designed to introduce the participants to the concepts of Open Source and to acquaint them with the use of open source software as a resource for documentation, dissemination and exploitation of Cultural Heritage. Each course lasts 5 days (40h), an intensive week on which the trainees will learn to master the initial concepts, working directly with several software and in case studies. At the end, the trainees should be able to start their own projects and master the concepts that will enable them to develop knowledge in this area.
  • Fulbright Scholar Program: Opportunities in the Fine Arts

    Dates: 13 Apr – 01 Aug, 2016
    The Fulbright Scholar Program offers teaching, research or combination teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty, administrators as well as for professionals, artists, journalists, scientists, lawyers, independent scholars and many others.  
    This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 65 awards in the field of Art, including all specializations: Architecture, Art History, Dance, Drama/Theater, Film Studies, Music, as well as the Visual and Performing Arts. Opportunities include:
    Canada: Research Chairs in Arts and Humanities
    China or Europe: Fulbright-Terra Foundation Award in the History of American Art
    Egypt: Visual and Performing Arts
    Guinea: Open to All Disciplines, with a preference for scholars in the Visual Arts and Dance
    Nepal: All Disciplines
    For additional awards in the field of Art, please visit our discipline highlights webpage. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in the Arts, as well as scholar testimonials which highlight the outcomes and benefits associated with completing a Fulbright Scholar grant.
    For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link: You may also wish to register for one of our webinars or join our mailing list, My Fulbright, a resource for applicants interested in receiving program updates and application tips. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.

    Please contact Beth Anderson at or reach any of our regional program staff for more information. We are happy to answer any questions you may have on applying.
    The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world.
  • LOST AND TRANSFORMED CITIES: A digital perspective

    Lisbon | Dates: 12 Apr – 30 Jun, 2016
    LOST AND TRANSFORMED CITIES: A digital perspective International Conference, November 17-18, 2016 Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Nova University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal The city is by definition a living entity. It translates itself into a collectiveness of individuals who share and act on a material, social and cultural setting. Its history is one of dreams, achievements and loss. As such, it also bears a history of identity. To know the history of cities is to understand our own place in the contemporaneity. The past is always seen through the eyes of the present and can only be understood as such. Time erases memory through development and disaster. Cities can simply disappear because they lost their status in society, suffered severe catastrophes or transformed themselves so radically that their history is no longer materially traceable. They can also exemplary absorb the built and cultural heritage through rehabilitation and re-use. Archaeologists, historians, art historians, geographers, anthropologists and sociologists try to decipher and interpret a diverse but comparable amount of data in order to translate remote realities into a contemporaneous discourse. The more interconnected the research is the more efficient it becomes. Digital technology is playing a major role in the study of the city and the preservation of its built and cultural heritage. It allows the collecting, processing and testing of an extensive amount of data in a swift and proficient manner. It also enables interdisciplinary research teams to work collaboratively, often in real time. Digital technology applied to the study of cities and their cultural heritage not only widens the scope of the research, but also allows its dissemination in an interactive fashion to an extensive and diverse audience. Through the intersection of digital technology with historical practice it is possible to convey a perspective of the past as a sensorial-perceptive reality. The resulting knowledge furthers the understanding of the present-day city and the planning of the city of the future. Cities in the digital realm are, therefore, presented in their historical continuum, in their comprehensive and complex reality and are opened to interaction in a contemporary social context. On the occasion of the 261st anniversary of the 1755 earthquake in Lisbon, we invite scholars and experts in the fields of heritage studies, digital humanities, history, history of art and information technology to share and debate their experience and knowledge on digital heritage. We aim for an integrative perspective of the study of lost or transformed urban realities stressing its multidisciplinary character and the impact of the digital in this equation. We especially welcome papers that address (but are not necessarily limited to) the following topics: The historic city from 2D to virtual and augmented reality; Cities as virtual museums; Cities, tourism and digital heritage; Digital Heritage: methodological and epistemological challenges; The contemporary city and digital citizenship. Abstracts: Paper title, abstract (maximum 350 words), 5 keywords, author(s), affiliation (s). Length: 350 words Language of submission: English Abstracts Submission limit: only 1 paper submission per author. Deadline: June 30, 2016 Notification of acceptance: July 31, 2016 Submission link:
  • CFP: Theory’s history (Brussels 9-10 February 2017)

    Brussels | Dates: 12 Apr – 15 Jun, 2016
    In recent international literature addressing the history of 20th century architectural theory, the year 1968 is indicated as a decisive moment, giving rise to a ‘new’ architectural theory. From that moment onwards, emphasis was no longer placed on the aesthetics of architecture, but on its critical potential. Yet, according to some scholars, this intensification of theory was short-lived. A presence of coexisting and even contradictory paradigms derived from very different epistemic domains (anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, social sciences, etc.) led to a setback of theory, resulting in an end-of-theory atmosphere in the 1990s. It is not a coincidence that the so called death of architectural theory concurred with the upsurge of anthologies on architectural theory that collect and classify referential texts. Instead of burying theory, these anthologies had an additional effect, namely to institutionalise it. In other words, they offered both closure to a past period and also defined the locus of a next period of theorisation, invoking a ‘historical turn’. At the same time architectural discourses, and especially architectural historiography, were engaging with new theoretical fields such as gender studies or postcolonial studies, giving rise to a continued production of theoretically informed books and articles. The goal of this conference is to discuss the methodological challenges that come along with this historical gaze towards theory, by focusing on the concrete processes in which knowledge is involved. By screening the unspoken rules of engagement that the accounts of post-war architectural theory have agreed to and distributed, we want to point at dominant assumptions, biases and absences. While anthologies inevitably narrate history with rough meshes, we believe it is time to search for those versions of theory formation that have slipped through these nets of historiography, in order to question the nature of theory and the challenges it poses to historians. How do you do historical research on something as intangible as theory, or in a broadened sense, the knowledge of architecture? We are in other words not only interested in what theorists and practicing architects were arguing for, but also how, why and where they did so. Looking at case-studies, the singular and ‘minor’ expressions of theory, the local discourses and the different formative contexts (e.g. education, publication culture) can be subjected to careful scrutiny. We particularly welcome case-studies from the 1960s to the 1990s that deal with one or more topics formulated in the full CFP: A) the Place of Knowledge 1. Theory’s Geography 2. The Expressions of Knowledge 3. The Agendas of Theory B) the Figure of Knowledge 1. Minor Historiography 2. The Making of the Architectural Theorist C) the Time of Knowledge 1. Problems of Periodization 2. Architectural Theory and Postmodernity 3. Problems of Historical Distance Practical information Please visit our website for up to date information: This two-day conference will be held in Brussels on Thursday and Friday 9th - 10th February 2017. The conference aims to bring together both young and established scholars from every discipline that is able to engage with the topics outlined above. Confirmed keynotes are Joan Ockman, Ákos Moravánszky and Łukasz Stanek. We’re happy to receive abstracts of up to 300 words until the 15th of June, 2016. Information on how to submit is provided on our website. Abstracts will be anonymously reviewed by an international scientific committee. Authors will be notified of acceptance on the 15th of July 2016. In order to provide a solid conference, we expect full papers one month in advance of the conference, i.e. 1st of January, 2017. Please note that there will be a conference fee for participants of maximum €150 and a reduced price for students. For any other questions, please contact Organising committee: Hilde Heynen Yves Schoonjans Rajesh Heynickx Maarten Delbeke Ricardo Agarez Elke Couchez Sebastiaan Loosen (KU Leuven/UGent) Scientific committee: Hilde Heynen (chair, KU Leuven) Maarten Delbeke (UGent) Rajesh Heynickx (KU Leuven) Yves Schoonjans (KU Leuven) Joan Ockman (University of Pennsylvania) Ákos Moravánszky (ETH Zürich) Łukasz Stanek (University of Manchester) Teresa Stoppani (Leeds Beckett University) Hélène Jannière (Université Rennes 2) K. Michael Hays (Harvard) (TBC)
  • Residential Fellowships in Architecture

    Bogliasco, Genoa | Dates: 08 – 15 Apr, 2016
    The Bogliasco Foundation, located in a small coastal town near Genoa,Italy, provides one-month residencies for gifted individuals working on projects in all the disciplines of the arts and humanities, and encourages cross-pollination in a diverse community comprised of some of the world's most innovative minds. Applications for the next deadline - April 15th, 2016 - can be submitted online at the Foundation's website. The Foundation is actively searching to increase representation in architecture.

SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
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