Recent Opportunities

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  • Getty Scholars Program 2018/19 on MONUMENTALITY

    Los Angeles | Dates: 09 Aug – 02 Oct, 2017

    Monumentality (Research Institute)
    2018/2019

    The 2018/2019 academic year at the Getty Research Institute will be devoted to MONUMENTALITY. Monuments and the monumental address fundamental questions of art and architectural history such as size and scale. Applicants are encouraged to address monumentality in all of its distinct forms, as embodied by various cultures and powers throughout history. Research trajectories to consider include the role of monumentality as a tool for nation building, the subversive potential of monument making, and the monumental in buildings, sculptures, installations, murals, and even small-scale objects. 

    http://www.getty.edu/research/scholars/years/pdf/poster_gri18_19.pdf
  • Getty Library Research Grants

    Los Angeles | Dates: 09 Aug – 16 Oct, 2017

    Applications for the 2018 Getty Library Research Grants are now available online at

    http://www.getty.edu/foundation/initiatives/residential/library_research_grants.html

    The deadline to apply is October 16, 2017.

    Getty Library Research Grants provide partial, short-term support to researchers of all nationalities whose projects demonstrate a compelling need to use Getty Research Institute materials, and whose place of residence is more than 80 miles from the Getty Center in Los Angeles.

    Please contact GRI Library Reference with any questions: reference@getty.edu.

  • Special Collection on Digital Architectural History

    Dates: 08 Aug – 01 Oct, 2017
    For a Special Collection on Digital Architectural History, Architectural Histories, the open access journal of the EAHN, in collaboration with the Institute for the History and Theory of architecture at the ETH Zürich (gta), seeks proposals for contributions that set a new benchmark in digital publication in the field of the history of architecture and the built environment.

    The journal intends to offer a platform for articles that explore what a durable and truly digital architectural history could look like. Such history activates various forms of digital visualization, data collection and management, and digital research tools; it questions how these new means affect and shape the work of the historian; and it examines how this work is made available for assessment, consultation and debate. The aim of the issue is to arrive at accessible, sustainable and potentially interactive results that open up new critical perspectives in architectural history.

    Proposals should explain how digital tools are made to engage with historical questions, and how they facilitate assessment, communication and scholarly exchange. Proposals should specify which digital tools are employed and how, with special attention to accessibility (file size/platform), sustainability and interactivity. If the proposal entails the development of new tools, a brief and a budget should be specified, and it should be detailed how the tools will be implemented. In total, proposals should not exceed 1000 words, excluding the brief and budget.

    Selected proposals will have access to limited funding for research and development. Means will be granted according to the potential for innovation of the proposal. Authors will be invited to a take-off workshop hosted by the Chair in the History and Theory of Architecture (Maarten Delbeke) and the Institute of Digital Architectural History (Thomas Hänsli) at the gta.

    Deadline for submission is 1 October 2017, authors will receive notification by 20 October 2017. The workshop will take place in January 2018. Publication of the issue should start in June 2018.
    Proposals should be submitted to the AH Editorial Team (editorial@journal.eahn.org) and Prof. Maarten Delbeke (maarten.delbeke@gta.arch.ethz.ch).
  • Mediating Architecture and its Audiences: the Architectural Critic

    Tallinn | Dates: 08 Aug – 30 Sep, 2017
    This session, to be held at the 5th European Architectural History Network (EAHN) Conference, in Tallinn, Estonia, June 13-16, 2018, interrogates the emergence of architectural criticism as a key site for the production, circulation, and transformation of architectural ideas and practices in the twentieth century. Abstracts are due by September 30, 2017.

    Responsible for bringing architecture into public discourse, architectural critics like Montgomery Schuyler, Lewis Mumford, Nikolaus Pevsner, John Summerson, Catherine Bauer, Jane Jacobs, Bruno Zevi, Ada-Louise Huxtable, and François Chaslin – to mention a few names of global significance – had transformative effects on the field. Each engaged a remarkable diversity of practices including historical scholarship and preservation advocacy, becoming leaders in cultivating public opinion and in fostering a resemantization of the relationship between the built and the textual. In many ways their practices were divergent, yet together they articulate the often overlooked gaps between the built, the projective, and the public.

    The investigation examines these transformative, yet little-studied figures, querying their historical role in the development of new audiences for architecture, their impact on the development of architectural journalism as a field distinct from the academy, and their influence on contemporaneous architectural practice. The session has potentially important ramifications for the history of architecture, cultural history, and histories of media. There is little existing scholarly literature on the topic, though recent research projects have begun to address the issue.

    The chairs encourage non-biographical and non-descriptive approaches to the topic, instead inviting scholars, architects, and critics to respond to historically specific questions such as:
    • How did the role of the architectural critic emerge, transform, and come to be highly specialized over the course of the twentieth century?
    • How has criticism adapted to its many media forms or engaged media systems beyond the textual?
    • What types of audiences does criticism engage or produce?
    • What historical relationships have criticism and journalism had with building practices and with scholarly production?
    • How does architectural journalism relate to political structures and institutions? What role has censorship played? How might we account for histories of repression of the architectural press?
    • What role does criticism play in non-Western contexts?
    • How have the dictates of journalism run counter to those of criticism? Where has the friction between criticism as an ethic or as an esthetic become apparent?
    • What becomes of the critic as the object of critique?
    • How has architectural criticism been treated historiographically, and what kinds of historiography might emerge from scholarly attention to architectural criticism?
    • What does it mean to make historical evidence of criticism?

    Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted directly to Maristella Casciato (mcasciato@getty.edu) and Gary Fox (garyrfox@ucla.edu) by 30 September 2017. Please include your name, affiliation, title of paper, a C.V. of no more than five pages, home and work addresses, e-mail addresses and telephone numbers. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance or rejection no later than 31 October 2017.
  • Special Issue for International Journal of Islamic Architecture: Boundaries, Flows, and the Construction of Muslim Selves through Architecture

    Dates: 07 Aug – 30 Oct, 2017
    CALL FOR PAPERS
    Special Issue: Boundaries, Flows, and the Construction of Muslim Selves through Architecture
    Thematic volume planned for June 2019
    Proposal submission deadline: October 30, 2017


    This special issue of the International Journal of Islamic Architecture takes as its starting point how a new sense of ‘boundary’ emerged from the post-nineteenth-century dissolution of large, heterogeneous empires into a mosaic of nation-states in the Islamic world. This new sense of ‘boundary’ has not only determined the ways in which we imagine and construct the idea of modern citizenship, but also redefines relationships between the nation, citizenship, cities and architecture. Whereas political debates today question the compatibility of Islam with the concept of the nation-state, the construction of the twentieth-century Islamic world was embroiled in debates around the nature of the modern state itself. Such debates oscillated between Islam as a political ideology and Islam as a personal belief system. These debates were often troubled by novel uses of ‘boundary’ in both physical and conceptual forms linked to the phenomenon of the nation-state. These boundaries were further challenged by flows of persons, materials, and ideas that destabilized the political configuration of the nation-state itself.


    Hence, in this special issue of the International Journal of Islamic Architecture we invite papers that bring critical perspectives to our understanding of the interrelation between the accumulated flows and the evolving concepts of boundary in predominantly Muslim societies, and within the global Muslim diaspora. This special issue seeks to investigate how architecture mediates the creation and deployment of boundaries and boundedness that have been devised to define, enable, obstruct, accumulate and/or control flows able to disrupt bounded territories or identities. More generally, it proposes to explore how architecture might be considered as a means to understand the relationship between flows and boundaries.


    Questions of nationhood and boundary-making critically define the modern era. This is particularly true for global Muslim communities. Nation-building efforts have gone through phases of creativity and disillusionment ranging from the Israel-Palestine question, the creation and fragmentation of Pakistan as a spatiotemporal utopia, the Islamic revolution in Iran, to the post-oil prosperity in the Gulf countries, the repercussions of 9/11, the disenchantment of the Arab Spring, and the rise of South East Asian countries as global powerhouses. The plausible image of an ideal Islamic society vis-à-vis the nation-state has shifted along with these major transformations, and an incongruity between ideals and realities has informed resulting spatial expressions as well.


    This special issue seeks to explore alternative definitions of bounded identities, facilitating new approaches to spatial and architectural forms. ‘Boundary’ can be ‘hard’, such as the geopolitical boundaries regulated by states. These boundaries often result in conflicts over the ownership of territory and geological resources or even over history, authenticity, and the nature of the past. Yet boundaries can also be ‘soft’ such as those demarcated by religious, cultural, and linguistic differences among different Muslim factions, or associations of a Muslim population within a predominantly non-Muslim society or vice-versa. Through the transition from empires to nation-states, ‘boundary’ has acquired new ideological meanings in response to questions about Muslim selves and citizenship.


    The concept of boundary is further intricately entangled with the concept of flows. In the era of global flows of information, commodities, resources and people, boundaries work together with flows as two corresponding factors in constructing the spatial experience of Islamic societies. Several issues nevertheless complicate the relationship between boundaries and flows. For instance, Muslim diasporic movements, through voluntary migration seeking a better life elsewhere or forced displacement due to war, genocide or climate change, challenge our normative view of Islamic architecture outside of the normative Islamic world. The Muslim diaspora creates its own niches that confront and conform to complex global flows of socio-cultural dynamics, ranging from hate crimes and political resentments to a global awareness of diversity and minority.


    Against this context of global flows, several phenomena prompt us to rethink the relationship between architecture, urban planning and boundaries. For instance, the transnational flows of heterogeneous Islamic groups as radical as the Taliban and as moderate as Tablighi Jamaat problematize notions of national ‘hard’ boundaries. Or, while the contemporary media presents the international networks of madrasas and mosques as nothing more than a breeding ground of Islamic radicalism, other roles that these spaces play in serving as transnational nodes in an expanding spatial network remain largely unexplored. This special issue seeks to explore how architecture and urban discourses can shed light on these new forms of identity politics and resulting internal dissonances within Muslim and global communities. How, for example, could an architectural imagination bring a critical perspective to the idea of jihad, notions of the umma, and potentials for a pan-Muslim society?


    These questions also disrupt typical approaches to architectural history. The architectural forms of twentieth- and twenty-first-century nation building is often narrated through the pivotal forces of the Cold War, Bretton Woods financial policy, the emergence of development studies, and contested theories of modernization, Islamization, and postcoloniality. Within such a context, the global flows of ideas, money and technical expertise took place through intergovernmental agencies such as the United Nations, the European Union, Commonwealth and Muslim League, and the economic and political interest of funding agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, European Development Fund and USAID. These contested groups of international stakeholders aimed at creating local technical experts and cultivated architects as development agents. The constituent forces of boundaries and flows eventually materialized to disrupt these forces, as architectural and urban projects ranging from small-scale community development schemes such as low-cost housing and rural development programs to large-scale modernization efforts such as the establishment of nuclear research centers.


    Gradually, the flows of architectural philosophies regarding the meaning of Islamic architecture in contemporary time created their own sphere of intellectual debate within Islamic societies. Views were exchanged through symposia, professional meetings, architectural magazines and manifestoes. In addition to Euro-American pedagogical and professional establishments, a parallel educational infrastructure – the madrasa – also enabled formidable transnational flows of knowledge and people across the Islamic world.


    The focus of the contributions to this special issue of IJIA should follow these variant forms of disruptive flows and address the question of how architecture – defined broadly – creates nuanced definitions of Muslim selves. With an objective to better understand how, in the age of global capital, architecture mediates the forces that constitute flows and boundaries, the contributions should address architecture not only as the byproduct of socio-political forces, but also as the active promulgator of those forces.
    Themes that might be addressed include, but are not limited to, the following:

    1. How might architecture be used to explore the ways in which the diverse formation of nationalism within Islamicate worlds cater to trans-local exchanges of ideas, ideologies, and human migration across geopolitical borders? Historically, how were different experiences of partition (i.e. in the Indian subcontinent or the Middle East) and nation-building efforts informed by architectural developments and urban planning?
    2. Who are the agents of the exchanges of architectural knowledge and expertise? How are the international flows of ideas, money and expertise defined in competition and collaboration between local and international professionals? In the global context, how do practicing architects tackle the challenges of boundaries? Questions to address include refugee housing or strategies for negotiating cultural identities of immigrant populations in a ‘foreign’ land.
    3. How could the architecture of the Muslim diaspora be used as a means to better understand Islamicate societies in the contemporary world? How is architecture located at the junction of the experience of war, genocide, migration, and partition? What might the architectural expression of a migrant Muslim community tell us about the politics of construction and destruction of the Muslim self?
    4. How do flows of discourse and expert knowledge navigate between institutions (universities, NGOs, intergovernmental agencies etc.) within and beyond Islamic countries? What is the role of architecture in that process? How do these flows work at the intersection of the training of ‘local’ experts in international institutions and thus contribute to the discourse on ‘modern Islamic architecture’?

    Essays that focus on historical and theoretical analysis (DiT papers) should be a minimum of 6,000 words but no more than 8,000 words, and essays on design and practice (DiP papers) can range from 3,000 to 4,000 words. Contributions from practitioners are welcome and should bear in mind the critical framework of the journal. Contributions from practitioners and scholars of art history, anthropology, diaspora studies, sociology, and geography and building construction are particularly welcome.


    Please send a 400-word abstract with essay title to the guest editor, Farhan Karim, University of Kansas (fskarim@ku.edu), by October 30, 2017. Those whose proposals are accepted will be contacted soon thereafter and requested to submit full papers to the journal by May 15, 2018. All papers will undergo full peer review.


    For author instructions regarding paper guidelines, please consult: www.intellectbooks.com/ijia

    Contact Info:
    Farhan Karim

    Assistant Professor

    Department of Architecture

    University of Kansas

    Contact Email:
    fskarim@ku.edu
    URL:
    https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=204/view,page=2/
  • Cass Gilbert: Life and Work in a Changing Region

    St. Paul | Dates: 11 – 11 Aug, 2017
    Dr. Katherine Solomonson presents a talk on Gilbert as part of the Grand Opening of the newly renovated Minnesota State Capitol.

    2 p.m. in the Cass Gilbert Room, State Capitol
  • Call for Proposals: Archeworks Agendas 02

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 08 Aug, 2017

    Archeworks seeks emerging leaders, change-makers and critical thinkers to submit proposals to present at Archeworks Agendas 02. Last year, we launched Agendas as a platform for sharing ideas and projects that inspire change in Chicago and beyond. It was a huge success! We were able to highlight work that challenges convention, approaches dilemmas, and/or defines new tools and methods. YOU can help us make this year even better!

    Presentations will be limited to 10-minutes followed by a moderated discussion. The event will culminate with a reception and opportunity to meet others with shared interests. If you would like to present at Archeworks Agendas 02 please submit a short description of your presentation (200 words) and 2-3 supporting images (jpgs) to agendas@archeworks.org by August 8, 2017.  A total of 5 presentations will be accepted and applicants will be notified by August 10 if their presentation is selected.  Agendas 02 will take place at Archeworks on August 24, 2017 from 6:00 - 8:30 pm

    This event is free and open to the public. RSVP required. Please direct all questions to agendas@archeworks.org.
  • Rethinking Frank Lloyd Wright at 150

    New York | Dates: 13 – 15 Sep, 2017

    Featuring 18 architects, critics, architectural historians and conservators, this international symposium—organized by the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy in cooperation with the Museum of Modern Art with major sponsorship support from Morgan Stanley and the Maddalena Group at Morgan Stanley—will highlight new thinking about Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture and its ongoing interest to contemporary architectural history, culture and practice. Sessions ranging from historiography to preservation to critical reception and influence will look backward and forward in time to offer a framework for reassessing the meaning of Wright’s architecture and its broad impact over the past century and a quarter. How have perceptions of his work changed and evolved? How can its effects on contemporaries be better understood? Is his architectural thought still relevant today? And how were Wright’s ideas about preservation different from those at work today? These are just some of the questions to be debated.

    “At this major international symposium a varied and highly talented group of architects, architectural historians, critics, and conservationists will sidestep conventional opinion in discussing how thinking about Wright’s work has evolved over the past decades and how—and if—it can continue to shape the course of modern architecture,” says Neil Levine, Emmet Blakeney Gleason Research Professor of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University and chair of the symposium. “Sessions will be devoted to historiography, preservation and influence. A round table of the most significant younger critics writing today will conclude by offering perspectives on where things now stand and what issues may come into play in the future.”

    Symposium Committee

    Neil Levine, chair
    Richard Longstreth
    Dietrich Neumann
    Jack Quinan

    Location

    The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 1 at The Museum of Modern Art
    11 W. 53rd St. (The Ronald S. and Jo Carole Lauder Building entrance)
    New York, NY 10019

    Symposium Schedule

    Wednesday, Sept. 13, 6:30 p.m. – Keynote Address

    Barry Bergdoll, Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, Museum of Modern Art

    Thursday, Sept. 14, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

    Neil Levine
    , Emmet Blakeney Gleason Research Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

    Jean-Louis Cohen, Professor, Collège de France, Paris; Sheldon H. Solow Professor in the History of Architecture, New York University

    Cammie McAtee, Architectural historian

    Jack Quinan, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, State University of New York at Buffalo

    Kathryn Smith, Architectural historian

    Richard Longstreth, Professor of American Studies and Director of the Graduate Program in
    Historic Preservation, George Washington University

    Alice Thomine-Berrada, Senior Curator, Musée d’Orsay, Paris

    Daniel Bluestone, Director, Preservation Studies; Professor History of Art and Architecture, Boston University

    T. Gunny Harboe, Founder and Principal, Harboe Architects; Vice President, ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on 20th Century Heritage

    Ellen Moody, Assistant Projects Conservator, Sculpture Conservation, Museum of Modern Art
    Friday, Sept. 15, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

    Dietrich Neumann, Professor of History of Art and Architecture and Director of Urban Studies,
    Brown University

    Tim Rohan, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    Aaron Betsky, President, the School of Architecture at Taliesin

    Critics Roundtable, moderated by Michael Kimmelman (New York Times) and featuring Reed Kroloff ( jones | kroloff ), Mark Lamster (Dallas Morning News) and Alexandra Lange (Curbed)

    How to Attend

    Attendees of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy’s annual conference receive priority reserved seating at the symposium. The rest of the theater is open seating free to the public on a space-available basis. We encourage you to RSVP but admission is not guaranteed.

  • Speech Balloons and Thought Bubbles: Architecture and Cartoons

    Dates: 21 Jul – 14 Aug, 2017
    Society of Architectural Historians
    Speech Balloons and Thought Bubbles: Architecture and Cartoons
    Chair(s): Andreea Mihalache, Clemson University, amihala@clemson.edu ; Paul Emmons, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, pemmons@vt.edu

    The intersections of architecture and comics have a history that has been increasingly documented in recent years. A mode of representation and communication becoming popular as a counterpart to mainstream depersonalized computer-generated drawings, cartoons and comic strips offer opportunities otherwise missing from conventional architectural drawings: storytelling, conciseness, immediacy, irony, and humor. Conversely, cartoons, comic strips, and graphic novels often foreground architecture as a main character that embodies the anxieties of the modern world, a discontent with the status quo, or representations of visions of the future. We are interested in work that examines the particular worldviews revealed between the lines of speech bubbles and thought balloons. As drawing conventions strive to eliminate subjectivity for the sake of clarity, how do comic strips build architectural atmospheres charged with emotion and feeling? How do cartoons and comic strips question the boundary between real and imaginary, between the concrete nature of architecture and its storytelling potential? What are their limitations? With closeup images often focusing on people in movement, what is the role of the body in unfolding graphic stories about architecture and cities? If tweets, texts, and instant messages now constitute universal forms of conversation, how do these drawings become time and place specific and create complicities based on shared worldviews? We invite papers and artwork that discuss critically the interactions of architecture, cartoons, and comic strips across time and space.
  • Speech Balloons and Thought Bubbles: Architecture and Cartoons

    Dates: 03 – 14 Aug, 2017
    Society of Architectural Historians
    Speech Balloons and Thought Bubbles: Architecture and Cartoons
    Chair(s): Andreea Mihalache, Clemson University, amihala@clemson.edu ; Paul Emmons, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, pemmons@vt.edu

    The intersections of architecture and comics have a history that has been increasingly documented in recent years. A mode of representation and communication becoming popular as a counterpart to mainstream depersonalized computer-generated drawings, cartoons and comic strips offer opportunities otherwise missing from conventional architectural drawings: storytelling, conciseness, immediacy, irony, and humor. Conversely, cartoons, comic strips, and graphic novels often foreground architecture as a main character that embodies the anxieties of the modern world, a discontent with the status quo, or representations of visions of the future. We are interested in work that examines the particular worldviews revealed between the lines of speech bubbles and thought balloons. As drawing conventions strive to eliminate subjectivity for the sake of clarity, how do comic strips build architectural atmospheres charged with emotion and feeling? How do cartoons and comic strips question the boundary between real and imaginary, between the concrete nature of architecture and its storytelling potential? What are their limitations? With closeup images often focusing on people in movement, what is the role of the body in unfolding graphic stories about architecture and cities? If tweets, texts, and instant messages now constitute universal forms of conversation, how do these drawings become time and place specific and create complicities based on shared worldviews? We invite papers and artwork that discuss critically the interactions of architecture, cartoons, and comic strips across time and space.
  • CFP: Beyond the Camp: The Unbounded Architecture and Urbanism of Refugees (20th-21st century)

    Rome | Dates: 01 Aug – 05 Oct, 2017
    Session SS48 EAUH 2018
    International Conference on Urban History

    Rome, Italy
    August 29 - September 1, 2018

    Deadline: Oct 5, 2017

    Website: https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/

    Session SS47. Beyond the Camp: The Unbounded Architecture and Urbanism of Refugees (20th-21st century)

    Chairs: Eliana Abu-Hamdi Murchie (emurchie@mit.edu), Yael Allweil (allweil@ar.technion.ac.il)
  • Living Heritage Symposium

    San Antonio | Dates: 06 – 08 Sep, 2017
    The San Antonio Living Heritage Symposium is a collaborative forum bringing international and local heritage professionals, policy-makers, grassroots preservationists and academics together for an exchange of ideas leading to the development of best practices for safeguarding cultural heritage.
    Experts will present relevant work and attendees will work together in World Cafe style workshops to draft recommendations that San Antonio and other U.S. cities can utilize.
    Historic Preservationists, Heritage Management Professionals, Urban Planners, Architects, Cultural Properties Specialists, Cultural Resources Managers, Tribal Leaders, Grassroots Preservationists, Diversity Officers, Academics working in relevant fields, and municipal employees engaged in economic departments, urban planning, development services and sustainability.
    The expectation is participants will bring a level of expertise and experience which will advance heritage tools in policy and regulation in the United States.
    http://bit.ly/LivingHeritageSymposium
  • Garden Speaker Series Chinese Houses in Southeast Asia: The Eclectic Architecture of Sojourners and Settlers, with Dr. Ronald G. Knapp

    Vancouver, BC V6B 5K2 | Dates: 17 – 17 Aug, 2017
    Expert of the cultural and historical geography of China, Dr. Ronald G. Knapp will talk about the eclectic Chinese houses he visited during his research for the book Chinese Houses in Southeast Asia: The Eclectic Architecture of Sojourners and Settlers.
  • IMPERIAL ISLANDS: VISION AND EXPERIENCE IN THE AMERICAN EMPIRE AFTER 1898

    Los Angeles | Dates: 29 Jul – 14 Aug, 2017
    The empire of the United States began with a bang in 1898. The US Navy docked the Maine battleship in Havana’s bay to protect Americans living in war-torn Cuba. It exploded under mysterious circumstances. The US blamed Spain and joined rebel forces to liberate the island in the Spanish-American War. Three months later, the US (not Cuban) flag replaced Spain’s atop Havana’s Morro Castle. Cubans soon found themselves under the power of a new American Imperium. By the end of the so-called “Splendid Little War,” the United States had taken possession of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines. Massive infrastructural investments and bureaucratic overhauls from the United States redefined the ex-colonies of Spain, creating a visible confrontation of local indigenous, Spanish, and US imperial cultures. This session invites papers that reconsider how the United States and the island nations of the Americas and Southeast Asia were transformed through histories of visual, spatial, and material culture after 1898; including, but not limited to, studies on photography, print culture, popular media, performance, urbanism, and architecture. Papers might address embodied and artistic forms of resistance to US cultural presence; the role of architecture in expressions of state power; visual regimes of race and racism; or gendered representations of the United States and its foreign holdings in the Pacific and Caribbean. Papers examining the consumption and production of art in support or critique of US imperialism at the turn of the century in Havana, Manila, and San Juan are particularly welcome.

    SUBMISSION DEADLINE AND PROCEDURE:
    Proposals for participation in sessions should be sent no later than August 14 to the chair listed below. Every proposal should include the following items:
    1. Completed session participation proposal form. Make sure your name appears as you would like it listed in the conference program and conference website. Please make sure your affiliation appears as the official, recognized name of your institution and do not list multiple affiliations. http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf
    2. Paper abstract (strict 250 word maximum). Please make sure your paper title and abstract appear exactly as you would like them published in the 2018 conference program.
    3. Letter explaining your interest, expertise in the topic, and CAA membership status. All participants must be current members by August 28, 2017.
    4. CV
  • Richard Nickel and the Lost Drawings of the Town of Pullman

    Chicago | Dates: 29 – 29 Jul, 2017
    Richard Nickel and the Lost Drawings of the Town of Pullman 
    Historic preservation advocate Richard Nickel is best known for his life-long work protecting, documenting, and salvaging the works of architect Louis Sullivan. However, a lesser known fact is that Nickel also played an important role in documenting and preserving Pullman's original architectural drawings.

    Join us for an exciting discussion about how architect S.S. Beman's drawings for the Model Town of Pullman were discovered after sitting forgotten for nearly a century in a dusty corner of the Pullman Factory Administration "Clock Tower" Building in the late 1960s. Hear from Pullman residents and PNMPS members Charles E. Gregersen and Paul Petraitis how their friend Richard Nickel was chosen to photograph these drawings, what their role was in the process, and where these drawings (and Nickel's photographs) are today.

    Saturday, July 29, 2017 from 3:00-5:00 p.m. at Pullman's Historic Greenstone United Methodist Church, 11211 S. St. Lawrence Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

    Tickets: $10 Suggested Donation
  • SAHANZ 2018

    Wellington | Dates: 29 Jul – 02 Oct, 2017
    Historiographies of Technology and Architecture
    The 35th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand

    Hosted by the School of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and Design, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    4-7 July 2018

    SAHANZ is an international peer-reviewed conference that explores themes in architectural history and theory. The theme for the 2018 conference is “Historiographies of Technology and Architecture.” The privileging of technology within architecture had its most obvious manifestation in the modernist period, when architects borrowed knowledge, practices and imagery from other technical fields. But the projection of architecture as technology has been ever present and has its own deep history. The Greek root “tekhnē” – meaning “art” or “craft” – reminds us that conceiving and making are inextricably linked. This dependency suggests that “tekhnē” lies at the core of architectural practice: the task of creating architecture has always been subject to modes of representation and analysis that can be thought of as “technical”. Equally, the discipline of architecture is responsive to changes in manufacturing, engineering and the other applied sciences. Frequently, this reflexiveness is mediated by the social changes that are wrought by these new technologies.

    SAHANZ18 calls for investigations into the changing manifestations of this relationship. This conference welcomes papers exploring historiographies of architecture and technology considered within the global context. We are particularly interested in papers examining the deployment of architecture as a technology of colonization and resistance in Asia and the Pacific. However, the term will be interpreted widely to include not just technologies in the structural and environmental sense, but also:
    • Technology, indigeneity and the vernacular
    • Cross-cultural transfer of technology
    • Sustainable and ethical technologies
    • Individual architects and their preferred technologies
    • Future technologies
    • Histories and theories of architectural representation
    • Technology and heritage practices
    • Oppositions to technology

    ABSTRACT SUBMISSION
    Submit your abstract of no more than 300 words to the following address by October 2nd 2017:
    https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sahanz18

    Abstracts will be blind reviewed by at least two members of the Conference Academic Committee. Full papers (4500 words, including notes) will be double blind peer reviewed and those accepted for presentation at the conference will be published on the conference website, with downloadable editions of the full conference proceedings available after the conference.

    For inclusion in the proceedings, a paper must be presented at the conference. Authors may only present one paper as a sole author, although they may present an additional paper as a co-author.

    Work submitted for review and for publication in the conference proceedings should be original research that has not previously been published elsewhere, or work that has undergone substantial development from a prior publication.

    TIMELINE
    Abstracts due: 2 October 2017
    Abstract acceptances sent out: 13 November 2017
    Papers due for refereeing: 16 February 2018
    Referees' reports forwarded to authors: 23 March 2018
    Final papers due: 11 May 2018
    Conference: 4-7 July 2018

    CONFERENCE CONVENORS
    Prof. Joanna Merwood-Salisbury
    Dr. Chris McDonald
    Michael Dudding
  • CFP: Charrette 6(1) - Flipping the Script: Foregrounding the Architecture Student

    Dates: 27 Jul – 27 Oct, 2017

    Charrette (ISSN 2054-6718) is the journal of the Association of Architectural Educators. Volume 6, issue 1 (Spring 2019) will have the theme 'Flipping the Script: Foregrounding the Architecture Student.' We invite papers and essays that foreground the experiences and perspectives of architecture students.

    Guest Editor ? James Thompson, University of Washington, Seattle.

    Editor ? James Benedict Brown, De Montfort University, Leicester.

    Assistant Editor ? Amanda Hufford.

    THEME

    Traditionally, educational theories have foregrounded teaching by focusing on aspects like pedagogy and curriculum from the position of the educator.

    Whereas learning has certainly been stated as a chief objective of education, the assumption has been that learning can be expected to occur if teachers are knowledgeable and passionate. Consider Donald Sch?n?s infamous portrayal of Petra as an (uncritical) architecture student who models the behavior of her tutor Quist. In the time since this publication, a paradigm shift within higher education has engendered theories of learning and practices that acknowledge the agency of students in the learning process. Education is frequently conceptualized as more than transactional but as a narrative of personal and social transformation.

    Despite the growth of scholarship in this area within professional fields like medicine and social work, educators in architecture have been relatively slow to adopt this perspective. In addition to our general lack of reflection on our teaching and learning practices, most of what still gets considered ?research? on architectural education celebrates bloviating over empirics, product over process, and ostensibly educators over learners. Students typically appear much like clients do in accounts of architectural design projects?as recipients more than contributors, objects more than subjects. Yet change is evident. Parallel to new educational approaches in architecture programs around the world, scholars are beginning to take into account themes and methods appropriate for examining how students navigate architecture school and transition into the complex professional world. This issue seeks to exhibit and build on the momentum of this work while further fostering scholarship on architectural education that considers learners? points of view.

    QUESTIONS

    This issue of Charrette seeks to foreground the student experience in architectural education?including themes of learning, student agency, and identity transformation. How can the perspectives of learners help inform and improve our teaching practices? What role do students themselves actually play?in operative, performative, or normative terms?in shaping architectural education? (How) has this changed over the past several decades? How do levels of student participation differ based on different cultural contexts within academia, and what effect does this have? What can we learn from case studies of student governance and models of self-education? How do architecture students sustain their identity and wellbeing while developing a sense of purpose and belonging? In what ways can the perspectives of traditionally underrepresented voices challenge dominant preconceptions of the (ideal) architecture student? What impact have attempts to expose architecture?s ?hidden curriculum? had on design education? What are the most effective ways to elicit perspectives of architecture students given inherent power differentials and typical shortcomings of strategies like course evaluations? How can research be designed to position students as protagonists in the story of architectural education? Do the first-person accounts and concerns of students compel us to revise existing theories of architectural education?

    POSSIBLE TOPICS FOR ARTICLES

    Based on the issue?s theme and the preceding questions, contributions are invited from teachers, mentors, and learners (past and present) that address one or more of the following:

    - Becoming and being an Architecture Student; Becoming and being an

    Architect: Professionalization as Identity Transformation

    - Student Agency, Participation, and Governance in Architectural Education

    - Access, Diversity, and Gatekeeping in Architectural Education

    - Approaches to Student-centred Teaching and Curricula in Architectural Education

    - Novel Approaches to Research and Teaching Related to Learning and Learners

    SUBMISSION FORMATS

    In their expression of interest, authors should clearly indicate which of the following formats they are submitting under:

    - Conventional Essays 5,000 ? 8,000 words (including all references and endnotes). Essays will explore a topic or topics on architectural education and connect to contemporary scholarship. Authors must demonstrate their intellectual and theoretical context, as well as their methodological approach, and have a clear conclusion.

    - Personal Narratives 3,000 ? 5,000 words (including all references and endnotes). Submissions to this section will substitute traditional ?academic? data with descriptive and reflective content related to personal experiences of architectural education. Authors are welcome to submit their narrative work in written and/or graphic form.

    PUBLICATION TIMELINE

    Queries regarding the theme of this special issue should be directed to the Guest Editor, Dr. James Thompson - jamest27@uw.edu

    500 word expressions of interest should be submitted in the body email, containing author name(s), affiliations and contact details to charrette@architecturaleducators.org according to the timeline below.

    Selected authors will then be invited to submit a full paper for double blind peer review and editorial review.

    July 2017 ? Call for contributions disseminated 12:00GMT 27 October 2017 ? Expressions of interest due

    8 December 2017 ? Notification of selected contributions

    4 May 2018 ? Submission of full articles due

    3 August 2018 ? Notification of reviewers? comments

    2 November 2018 ? Submission of final revised articles due Spring 2019 ? Publication of Volume 6 ? Issue 1

    Download a PDF version of this call here:

    https://architecturaleducators.wordpress.com/2017/07/20/charrette-61-call-for-contributions-flipping-the-script-foregrounding-the-architecture-student/

    Read all issues of Charrette (ISSN 2054-6718) open access here:

    http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/arched/char

    James Benedict Brown

    Editor, *Charrette*

    Amanda Hufford

    Assistant Editor, *Charrette*

    James Thompson

    Guest Editor, *Charrette* 6(1)

  • The Gardens Trust West Midlands Autumn Lecture: Pleasure and Production

    Birmingham | Dates: 11 – 11 Oct, 2017

    Dianne Long will explore the landscapes of eighteenth century industrialists, whose gardens have attracted little attention compared with those of the landed gentry and aristocracy. Proximity to their industrial activity was crucial for such entrepreneurs, especially in the initial growth period, but what influenced the development of their pleasure landscapes alongside the productive, did the two interact in any way and was there anything distinctive in what they created? Dianne will discuss these themes with particular reference to the Midlands and ceramic manufacturers in Staffordshire.

    Doors open at 6.30pm, complimentary glass of wine/soft drink and the lecture starts at 7pm.

    For further information: ilex@advolly.co.uk

  • CFP: Women and the City: The Changing Role of Women in Urban Renewal since 1989 (EAUH 2018) (Rome, 29 Aug-1 Sep 2018)

    Rome | Dates: 27 Jul – 05 Oct, 2017
    Rome, August 29 - September 1, 2018
    Deadline: Oct 5, 2017

    Session SS48 EAUH 2018
    International Conference on Urban History

    Women and the City: The Changing Role of Women in Urban Renewal since
    1989

    Chairs: Caterina Franchini (Politecnico di Torino) and Helena Seražin
    (Research Centre of Slovene Academy of Sciences and Arts)

    The contribution of women architects, urban planners and designers to
    their profession has been for long minimised or overlooked by ‘seminal’
    and mainstream histories, despite the fact that all over the world and
    to different extents, women have reacted with inventiveness to their
    profession’s restrictive and sometimes discriminatory practices by
    engendering innovations to the field. This topic is timely as proved by
    the European cultural cooperation project “MoMoWo – Women’s creativity
    since the Modern Movement”.
    This session aims reveal the professional achievements of individual
    women practitioners who worked and are still working in Europe and
    beyond by illuminating the many commonalities among female architects,
    urban planners and landscape designers who wanted to change things for
    the better. The topics of interest may include: changing outdated
    legislation; improving or replacing failed urban models that over time
    do not serve cities as communities in terms of ethnicities; ages and
    gender's needs such as making safer cities for women. Furthermore, this
    section intends to provide a historical overview of urban policies and
    public administrations that have been forward-thinking in investing in
    renewal without gender biases, thus contributing in breaking down the
    ‘glass ceiling’ for women in urban practices.
    This session invites papers that might explore both the work of women
    innovators in urban renewal and urban resilience regarding gender.
    Papers are encouraged to provide a multidisciplinary picture on the
    role of women in reshaping cities in Europe and beyond from the fall of
    the Berlin Wall until the present. They might take into account the
    main paths that women professionals took in expressing their skills in
    fields and practices that were initially dominated by men.
    The underlying ethical challenges of the specialists working together
    across cities, towns, neighbourhoods and urban public spaces face both
    genders. Nowadays, women and men in the design professions are actively
    working alongside each other as never before, given the growing numbers
    of young women graduates entering the field. In this case, how are
    women changing cities? Are there chief assets, strategies and tactics
    commonly embraced by women in order to change the status quo?

    Keywords: women; gender; urban renewal; urban resilience; urban
    policies; public spaces; safer cities

    Paper proposals can only be submitted online, via the EAUH2018 website.
    To submit a paper proposal, registration is required at
    https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/.

    Abstracts of paper proposals should not exceed 450 words.
    Deadline for paper proposals submission: October 5, 2017.
    Notification of paper acceptance: December 1, 2017.

  • CFP: Spaces of Fear in the 20th Century City (EAUH 2018) (Rome, 29 Aug-1 Sep 2018)

    Rome | Dates: 27 Jul – 05 Oct, 2017
    Rome, 29.08. - 01.09.2018
    Eingabeschluss: 05.10.2017

    Session M28 EAUH 2018
    Urban Renewal and Resilience. Cities in Comparative Perspective
    14th International Conference on Urban History

    Spaces of Fear in the 20th Century City

    Chairs: Mikkel Høghøj (Aarhus University), Monika Motylinska (Leibniz
    Institute for Research on Society and Space IRS, Erkner)

    At first sight, a badly lit pedestrian underpass in a mass housing
    estate, a city park in the night, a slum district dominated by gangs, a
    horror theatre or a prison have little in common – but for being
    'spaces of fear'.

    Inspired by recent theories on ‘emotional geographies’, this session
    aims to approach ‘fear’ as a historical phenomenon within the spatial
    settings of 20th century cities. Though touched upon within disciplines
    such as sociology and human geography, this relationship remains
    relatively underexplored within the field of urban history.
    By addressing different aspects, roots and shades of the tension
    between fear and urban space, this session seeks to explore dynamics
    and impacts of fear in the production of 20th century urban space. In
    an urban context, fear has always been associated with certain types of
    urban areas – from slum districts in the industrial city to mass
    housing complexes in the periphery of the post-industrial city. Urban
    segregation has increased tremendously during the 20th century,
    materialising in suburban development as well as gated communities
    around the globe. Such processes have often been interconnected with
    issues of class, race and the fear of ‚otherness’ – and arouse in
    relation to different political and social crises. It is to assume that
    due to regional specifics, even similar urban settings might evoke very
    different kinds of fear – for instance, when we compare the discursive
    perceptions of mass housing estates in the East and West in the
    post-war period. Yet, the patterns of urban fear are not limited to the
    negative context – as many places of fascination with fear such as
    dungeons as tourist attractions or horror theatres have evolved across
    the 20th century.

    We invite papers investigating 'spaces of fear' from different
    perspectives and through different methodological and theoretical
    approaches. Questions that papers might consider include:
    • Which urban temporalities and cycles of fear can be identified in the
    20th century? How are they intertwined with real and imagined danger
    (e.g. fear of terrorism or epidemics)?
    • How did cities themselves trigger fear? How was this reflected in the
    mass media and popular culture?
    • What gender issues occur in an urban context of fear?

    Thus, by addressing different facets of fear, this session seeks not
    only to uncover new political, social and cultural dimensions of the
    20th century city, but also to further enhance dialogue between urban
    history and emotional history.

    Keywords: fear; urban segregation; slum districts; mass housing;
    emotional history; emotional geography

    Paper proposals can only be submitted online, via the EAUH2018 website.
    To submit a paper proposal, registration is required
    (https://eauh2018.ccmgs.it/users/).
    Abstracts should not exceed 3000 characters
    Deadline for paper proposals submission: October 5th, 2017
    Notification of acceptance: December 1st, 2017

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