Recent Opportunities

  • CFP: Digital Cultural Heritage Conference (Brisbane, 19-21 Apr 17)

    Dates: 28 Jun – 25 Jul, 2016
    Conference Announcement and Call for Papers

    digital cultural heritage: FUTURE VISIONS

    19-21 April 2017 in Brisbane, Australia

    Conference convenors Dr Kelly Greenop and Dr Chris Landorf

    Innovative new data collection and digital visualisations captures historic artefacts, places and practices faster, in greater detail and shared amongst a wider community than ever before. Creative virtual environments that provide interactive interpretations of place, archives enriched with digital film and audio recordings, histories augmented by crowdsourced data all have the potential to engage new audiences, engender alternative meanings and enhance current management practice. At a less tangible level, new technologies can contribute to debates about societal relationships with the historical past, contemporary present and possible futures, as well as drive questions about authenticity, integrity, authorship and the democratisation of heritage.

    Yet for many, a gap still exists between these evolving technologies and their application in everyday heritage practice. This conference will focus on the emerging disciplines of digital cultural heritage and the established practice of heritage management, providing a platform for critical debate between those developing and applying innovative digital technology, and those seeking to integrated best practice into the preservation, presentation and sustainable management of cultural heritage.

    Call for papers
    This conference is designed to encourage critical debate across a wide range of heritage-related disciplines. We welcome papers from cultural heritage and tourism practitioners and academics, as well as architecture, anthropology, archaeology, geography, media studies, museum studies and other cultural heritage-related fields. We particularly encourage papers that explore the technical challenges of digitising tangible and intangible cultural heritage, those that identify issues with digitisation and digital interaction, and those that address the philosophical or theoretical challenges posed by digital cultural heritage.

    Submission details
    Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted via the online form by 25th July 2016.
    https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=digher2017

    Authors of accepted abstracts will be invited to submit full papers (5000 words max.) for publication in the peer reviewed conference proceedings. Accepted papers will be published after the conference.

    If you have any difficulties accessing the online submission form or any other queries, please contact Brit Winnen at<b.winnen@uq.edu.au> b.winnen@uq.edu.au<mailto:b.winnen@uq.edu.au>

    Key dates
    Abstracts due: 25th July 2016
    Notification of abstract acceptance: 12th September 2016
    Full papers due: 12th December 2016
    Notification of full paper acceptance: 13th March 2017
    Early bird registration closes: 20th March 2017
    Registration closes: 3rd April
    Conference: 19th-21st April 2017
    Final papers due: 22 May 2017
     
  • Culture Lab Detroit Discussion Series

    Detroit | Dates: 15 – 16 Sep, 2016
    Culture Lab Detroit, an organization that fosters conversations and collaborations between Detroit and the international art, architecture and design communities, announces its 2016 program. For its fourth edition, Culture Lab Detroit explores the theme of “Walls”—be they architectural or theoretical, historical or speculative. Through a two-night discussion series, public art projects, and ongoing collaborations, Culture Lab Detroit 2016 brings together premier artists, architects, curators and theorists to provide groundbreaking alternatives to some of the most entrenched issues of recent times. 
      
    Culture Lab Detroit's discussion series will take place September 15 and 16, 2016. Participants will discuss new ways to move through a city, to visit a museum, to catalyze social change through art, and to negotiate the ever-shifting divide between public and private space. These vital conversations will be held against the backdrop of Detroit, addressing issues of empty space, population shifts, urban blight and renewal, and the struggle to define a new environment of collaboration and respect. 
      
    Each dialogue is free and open to the public. 

    Thursday, September 15 – 6:30 p.m. EST 
    Sliding Walls: Reimagining the Architecture of Social Space 
    College for Creative Studies, Benson & Edith Ford Conference Center at the A. Alfred Taubman Center for Design Education 
    460 W Baltimore St., Detroit, MI 
      
    PARTICIPANTS 
    Elizabeth Diller, Founding Partner, Diller Scofidio + Renfro 
    Trevor Paglen, Artist 
    Franklin Sirmans, Director, Pérez Art Museum Miami 
      
    MODERATOR 
    Dennis Scholl, Former VP/Arts, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation 
    Friday, September 16 – 6:30 p.m. EST 
    Stones Thrown: Art and Social Progress 
    The Jam Handy 
    2900 E Grand Blvd., Detroit, MI 
      
    PARTICIPANTS 
    Eva Franch i Gilabert, Director, Storefront for Art and Architecture 
    Glenn Kaino, Artist 
    Adam Pendleton, Artist 
    MODERATOR 
    Salvador Salort-Pons, Director, Detroit Institute of Arts 
      
    “This year, Culture Lab Detroit looks to provide a variety of answers to a central issue of cultural placemaking: how do we allow walls to inform our experiences without limiting us,” says Founder Jane Schulak. “Our participants bring together a wide array of professional and personal diversity, but they are united in the pursuit of social justice. We’re thrilled to hold this globally relevant conversation in Detroit.” 
      
    In addition to the two-night discussion series, Culture Lab Detroit will continue to present world-class public works of art and design to the Detroit community. 
     
  • CFP: Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way? (Lisbon, 5-8 Jul 17)

    Lisbon | Dates: 27 Jun – 31 Aug, 2016
    The ARTIS – Institute of History of Art, School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon and the ICOMOS Portugal are pleased to invite all the researchers, specialists and other stakeholders involved in the process of safeguarding of architectural heritage created in the meeting of cultures, to participate in the International Congress Preserving transcultural heritage: your way or my way?, which will take place in Lisbon, between 05 and 08 July 2017.

    Paper and poster proposals are welcome until 31 August 2016. Please submit your paper or poster by sending the proposal to the email congress.artis@letras.ulisboa.pt (see the submission guidelines on website). The proposals will be selected by the session organisers and the Scientific Committee on the basis of the following criteria: relevance, innovation, scientific quality and theme of the session. On 15 September proposers will be notified regarding acceptance of their paper or poster and will receive further instructions.

    The organisation encourages multidisciplinary and international research on the safeguarding of transcultural heritage (architecture, urbanism, archaeology, landscapes and decorative arts in built heritage).
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve: Session 8

    Gyumri | Dates: 19 – 30 Sep, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district. Read more and register at adventuresinpreservation.org/upcoming-adventures/kumayri-cultural-museum-preserve/.
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve: Session 7

    Gyumri | Dates: 01 – 12 Sep, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district. Read more and register at adventuresinpreservation.org/upcoming-adventures/kumayri-cultural-museum-preserve/.
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve: Session 6

    Gyumri | Dates: 11 – 22 Aug, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district. Read more and register at adventuresinpreservation.org/upcoming-adventures/kumayri-cultural-museum-preserve/.
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve

    Gyumri | Dates: 15 – 16 Sep, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district.
  • Linking Archaeology with Preservation at Fairfield Plantation

    White Marsh | Dates: 14 – 20 Aug, 2016
    Experience the thrill of re-discovering history at Fairfield Plantation. Fairfield was home to one of Virginia’s magnificent manor houses, an architectural enigma once surrounded by 7,000 acres of tobacco fields and forestland at the heart of Gloucester County, just north of Williamsburg. This project is a rare opportunity to try your hand at both archaeology and historic preservation. Volunteers will have a full week of activities, including instruction in excavation techniques, making a “hot mix” mortar from burned shell, and bricklaying techniques.
  • Bitácora 34: Space and Graphic

    Mexico DF | Dates: 15 – 16 Sep, 2016
    This issue of Bitácora seeks papers centered on the thinking of three dimensional architecture, objects, landscapes, and the city as broadly related to two dimensional graphic space. /// Este número de Bitácora provoca a pensar la arquitectura, los objetos, el paisaje y las ciudades –de tres dimensiones–, en estrecha relación con el espacio de la gráfica –en dos dimensiones.
  • Foundation for Landscape Studies 2017 Book Prizes

    Dates: 23 Jun – 01 Dec, 2016
    The Foundation for Landscape Studies invites publishers and authors to submit their books for this year’s John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and David R. Coffin Publication Grant. Please see the list of previous winners of these prizes on the website.
      
    The John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize is awarded to books published in the last three years that have made a significant contribution to the study and understanding of garden history and landscape design. The David R. Coffin Publication Grant supports the research and publication of a book in the field of landscape studies.  

    Award recipients will be selected by a jury composed of members of the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Landscape Studies. Detailed descriptions of the eligibility requirements and the application procedures for each award may be found on the website. The application deadline for both awards is December 1, 2016.  
     
    We welcome nominations for the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and the David R. Coffin Publication Grant from both publishers and authors. 

    Please submit all inquiries to:

    Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, President
    Foundation for Landscape Studies
    7 West 81st Street
    New York, NY 10024
    elizabethbarlowrogers@gmail.com
  • IFLA Arts Section Satellite Conference in Chicago -- August 2016

    Chicago | Dates: 09 – 11 Aug, 2016
    The Art Library as Place: Building on the Past, Building for the Future will consist of papers, panel discussions, site visits to local art museums and libraries, and tours of Chicago area architecture.
  • CFP: Fabrications 27:2, 'Tropical Zone: People, Practices and Pedagogies'

    Dates: 23 Jun – 10 Oct, 2016
    Two decades of architectural debate on environmental issues have cast new light on climatic responses, with very different interpretations of the meanings and constructions of the *tropical* zone. Colonial, modernist and regional responses have been scrutinised as genealogically linked. Scientific discourses, cultural prejudices and social approaches intertwined to produce a resilient dialectic that has been reproduced, augmented or interrogated in research. This issue of Fabrications invites contributors to address the theme of the tropical zone as an architectural construct created and disseminated by a range of actors including educators, practitioners and their clientele, and state and institutional networks. Who were they/what were these and how did they approach this subject? What was their contribution to architectural production? How was that contribution received? How is it viewed retroactively in the light of new scholarship?

    This issue anticipates papers that interrogate the term, its application and its imprint in regional histories, during the colonial and modern periods and after decolonisation in environments identified by the descriptor *tropical*. However, it also seeks new definitions of the term and its usage, in the context of contemporary environmental debates. It looks for new analyses of discursive trends from metropolitan centres of imperialism, from former colonies and from regions that regard themselves as climatically distinct. This issue is also open to papers that discuss how an understanding of the tropical zone relates to green architecture and new techno-scientific building processes, both in terms of aesthetics and politics.

    Papers should be submitted online at www.edmgr.com/rfab by 10 October 2016

    Papers must conform with the Guidelines for Authors.
  • Making Spaces: Between Studio and Laboratory

    Montréal | Dates: 27 – 30 Oct, 2016
    Please submit proposals to session chairs Emily Doucet (emily.doucet@mail.utoronto.ca) and Amy Wallace (amy.wallace@mail.utoronto.ca) by June 30, 2016. The artist’s studio is fundamentally a site of material transformations. However, since the sixteenth century it has equally been perceived as a site of intellectual endeavour, uniting the hand and the mind of the artist in the pursuit of representation. Likewise, the idea of the laboratory has been understood as both a space of knowledge production and creative experimentation. This session will examine the manifest and latent conventions of artists’ studios that have informed artistic production. In what ways have the spaces of scientific and artistic experimentation overlapped? How have artists manipulated the studio as an instrument of artistic practice? What role have technological advancements played in changes to the studio? How have artists transcended the physical and conceptual limits of the studio? What lines can be drawn between the material conditions of the studio and an artist’s work? Proposals that address artistic production in any time period or geographic area will be considered. UAAC-AAUC Conference Regulations: 1. Applicants may only submit one proposal. 2. Proposals should be sent directly to the session chair(s). 3. Submissions must include: the name and email address of the applicant; the applicant’s institutional affiliation and rank; the paper title; an abstract (150 words maximum); and a brief bio (150 words). 4. Proposals may be submitted by current members or non-members of UAAC. Non-members must become members of UAAC and pay registration fees in order to present a paper at the conference. Membership dues and registration fees must be received by October 1, 2016. 5. The conference is open to post-secondary faculty in all fields of the visual arts (art history, fine arts, visual culture, material culture, museum studies, art conservation, etc.), visual artists, curators, practitioner/researchers, as well as independent scholars in such fields. 6. Student members of UAAC who are pursuing a terminal degree (examples: a PhD in art history or related disciplines, an MFA, a Masters of Design) may submit proposals. MA students are not permitted to give papers at the conference. 7. Session chairs may not present a paper in their own session. However, they may submit a proposal to another session. 8. Session chairs are responsible for the selection of the papers to be included in their session, and must inform all applicants to that session whether or not their paper has been accepted.
  • Elocutions, Elaborations and Expositions of Interior Design Creative Scholarship (Journal of Interior Design Special Issue)

    Dates: 24 Jun – 01 Jul, 2016
    “Stiffened from long sleep in the background of scholarly life, the scholar’s body yearns to exercise its muscles. Sleepy from long inactivity, it aches to restore its sensibilities.” (Paul Stroller, Sensuous Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997, p. 21) Whether one adheres to the terminology of creative scholarship, research-creation, practice-based research, practice-led research or artistic research, qualititative research in art, design and the creative arts in general, has shifted in recent decades to embrace a wide range of practices, approaches and expressions that acknowledge the generation of new knowledge through creative modes of inquiry. In this paradigm, creative works such as durational performances, architectural projects, interactive media installations, films, and interior designs, have the capacity as affective spatial experiences and/or materially constructed environments to generate, in and of themselves, new understanding. If we take this potential seriously, as Natalie S. Loveless suggests, it will give artists and designers the opportunity “to marshall new methods that allow us to tell new stories, stories that demand new research literacies and outputs”; “to revision and re-craft—to re-story—our disciplinary practices.” (RACAR: revue d'art canadienne / Canadian Art Review, Vol. 40, No. 1 (2015), pp. 53) This special issue of the Journal of Interior Design welcomes visual essays and design research papers that embrace, demonstrate and test these ambitions as elocutions, elaborations or expositions, in other words, via contributions that render new insights to the creative work and tell new stories. Both modes of contribution focus on a creative work or set of creative works specific to interior design and include a written text that reaches beyond mere description, documentation and reporting. The text operates to support, expand and question the creative work, reveal its underpinnings and speculate upon what unforseen understandings and sensibilities the work pries open as new knowing. In both cases the opportunity is ripe to explore the use of voice, style and format as a means of complimenting the creative work or investigating a new narrative. The creative work can be new, recent or historic in nature; it can be created by the author or not. The creative work can be published previously, but the textual narrative should be new, unpublished and advance our understanding of interiors and/or interior design practice or education. Visual essays are understood to communicate the ideas by using visual and verbal language. They will often also have written elements which are integrated and linked with the visual elements of the text. While demonstrating and presenting speculative research and practice-based visual media, the visual elements of the essay form an integral part of an argument, interpretation, reading or idea expressed in an interior design. Rather than rely on the authority of textual languauge, images, photographs, drawings, sketches and diagrams play a pivotal role in shaping an intellectual inquiry; it is important that the visual essay maintains a level of criticality. Visual essays should target 1-8 high resolution images and 2000-4000 words depending on the image-word relationship at play. Examples abound in recent years, though explicit to interior design/architecture and offering a range of approaches and strategies, one might refer to: • Julieanna Preston, “Dear Rosa”. IDEA Journal: Design Activism, guest edited by Dr. Lorella Di Cintio, 2014, pp. 4-13. (http://idea-edu.com/journal/2014-idea-journal/) • Chapters 4-8, by Hammond, Preston, Leski, Weinthal and Chee respectively in Lori Brown (ed.), Feminist Practices: Interdicisplinary approaches to women in architecture, Ashgate, 2001, pp. 83-168. Design research papers are those that demonstrate development and engagement with interior design/interior architecture history, theory and practice through analysis, critique and synthesis. Images serve to reference the constructed environment under discussion. It is important that such design research papers also reach to generate new understandings that have the potential to re-tell the stories of interior design and offer trajectories for its future as a making-thinking-doing practice. This mode of contributions should be no more than 5,000 words and include 1-8 high quality images. Note: The Journal of Interior Design has a print and online presence. The latter can host videos. DUE DATES FOR SPECIAL ISSUE: July 1, 2016 Registration of Interest – Authors are asked to register their intent to submit a paper by sending a 150-word abstract to Julieanna Preston at j.preston@massey.ac.nz. Please put your surname and “JID On Creative Practice Issue” in the subject line. Registration of interest is not refereed, nor is it requirement to submit. However, the acknowledgement of registration facilitates development of a proposal to full research paper by providing confirmation of fit with the special issue. Recognition of fit does not guarantee publication. April 1, 2017 Full visual essays and papers are due. See submission guidelines below. March 2018 Publication of JID Special issue: Elocutions, Elaborations and Expositions of Interior Design Creative Scholarship For questions regarding the call for papers, submission deadlines, or anything related to the content of the Special Issue contact Julieanna Preston at j.preston@massey.ac.nz. Please put your surname and “JID On Creative Practice Issue” in the subject line. (In regards to correspondences, please be aware of the time difference as the guest editor is located in New Zealand.) GUIDELINES FOR JID SUBMISSIONS: Authors should follow the author guidelines found on JID’s website at Wiley Blackwell. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1939-1668). Technical questions regarding the submission of documents through the ScholarOne website should be addressed to John Turpin at jid.editor@icloud.com. In addition to the visual essay or design research paper, contributions should also include a 250-word abstract formatted in APA or Chicago Manual of Style. The paper should be aligned with the topic of the special issue and comply with the descriptors above. Authors must submit papers via the ScholarOne Manuscripts system on the JID website (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/interiordesign). Papers must be original work of the author or authors and are not being considered for publication in other journals. Submissions may be checked for originality using plagiarism-detection software. The Journal of Interior Design is a scholarly, refereed publication dedicated to issues related to the design of the interior environment. Scholarly inquiry representing the entire spectrum of interior design theory, research, education and practice is invited. Submissions are encouraged from educators, designers, anthropologists, architects, historians, psychologists, sociologists, or others interested in interior design. GUEST EDITOR: Julieanna Preston Dr. Julieanna Preston (PhD RMIT 2013, MARCH Cranbrook 1991, BARCH VA Tech 1983) is Professor of Spatial Practice at the College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. She is currently the Research Coordinator for the School of Design, a member of Interior Design/ Architecture Educator’s Association (IDEA) and a peer-reviewer for Journal of Interior Design; Interiors: Design, Architecture, Culture; IDEA Journal; Journal of Architecture and Planning; Journal of Asia-Pacific Pop Culture and Journal of Architectural Education, as well as numerous international art and design related conferences, symposiums and publishers. Julieanna’s creative practice extends across architecture, interior design, spatial art and contemporary philosophy. Recent works explore concepts of vitality, agency and hospitality in durational and site responsive works such as water-logged (Performance Arcade, NZ 2016), IN COLD HEAT (MELT minus20degrees Art and Architecture Biennale, Austria 2016), Reading Labours (with Mick Douglas, Urban Dream Brokerage, NZ 2016), bit-u-men-at-work (with Jen Archer-Martin, Performing Mobilities, Melbourne 2015), Stirring Stillness on a Concrete Plane (Daughters of Chaos, Stockholm 2015), becoming boulder (Water and Peace Festival, NZ 2014), Aue (Puke Ariki Museum, NZ 2014) and Carboniferous Accretions (NIEMME, Newcastle Upon Tyne UK 2014). (See www.julieannapreston.space) As an advocate for creative practice research, its intellectual inquiry and its capacity to pose new concepts and theories, Julieanna maintains an active writing practice that is both scholarly and experimental in nature. Her recent written works include Performing Matter: Interiors, Surface and Feminist Actions (AADR 2014), “Dear Rosa” (IDEA Journal 2015), “Reconciling Carboniferous Accretions: A Performative Script” (Architecture and Culture 2015), and “Stratified Matter” (Drawing On Journal 2015) proceeded by guest editor of IDEA Journal: Interior Economies (2011) and AD: Interior Atmospheres (2008) and co-editor with Mark Taylor of Intimus: Interior Design Theory Reader (2006).
  • Building the Outer Boroughs: Architecture and Urbanism beyond Manhattan

    Brooklyn | Dates: 23 Jun – 12 Sep, 2016
    Venue and Dates: Brooklyn College, March 23, 2017 Organizers: Anna Jozefacka (Fellow, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2015-17) and Malka Simon (Brooklyn College) Co-sponsored by the Wolfe Institute for the Humanities and the Art Department at Brooklyn College Before they were the “outer boroughs,” the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island developed as cities, towns, and villages in their own right, independent of New York City. Though these so-called outer boroughs comprise most of today’s New York and are part of its architectural identity, the bulk of existing scholarship in architecture is persistently Manhattan-centric. However, there remains much to be said about New York City’s outer boroughs and their neighborhoods. The different pace of growth and initial political independence of these parts of the city have yielded architecturally varied urban landscapes well worth examining. This symposium seeks to highlight the study of New York City’s architecture and urban development outside of Manhattan. We invite papers that expand beyond the existing field of scholarship on the city’s built environment. We aim to discuss the variety of building types, styles, and urban patterns evident in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island and to consider their roles in shaping the city. We welcome interdisciplinary papers that address architecture within the context of other fields. Papers might examine topics that include but are not limited to the following: Early colonial settlements Urban archeological sites Industrial architecture and infrastructure Civic, cultural, and religious centers past and present Housing typologies across the outer boroughs Gentrification and architectural style Intersections of the natural and built environments The skyscraper outside of Manhattan Adaptive reuse of buildings and sites Preservation in the face of real estate development Building with the “The Other”: voices of immigrants, women, and architects of color In recent years, native and new residents alike have “discovered” the richness of life outside Manhattan, leading to a wave of fast-paced development and neighborhood transformations. The time is right for a closer scholarly examination of the places and spaces of New York City’s outer boroughs. Please send a 500-word paper proposal and an academic CV to: outerborougharchitecture@gmail.com Deadline for submissions is September 12, 2016. Successful applicants will be notified by September 30, 2016.
  • Restoring a Greenhouse to Grandeur

    Moray, Scotland | Dates: 10 – 17 Jun, 2017
    A one- or two-week historic preservation volunteer vacation on the Burgie Estate in Moray, Scotland, with the option to pursue either architectural or environmental conservation.
  • SAH Member Patrick Pinnell featured at Traditional Building New Haven Conference

    New Haven, CT 06511 | Dates: 19 – 20 Jul, 2016
    Grab your walking shoes, camera and note books; the “summer school” version of the traditional building conference makes its way to the Connecticut coast this July. The Traditional Building Conference Series makes its second stop in 2016 at the New Haven Lawn Club. This handsome colonial revival building is the setting for the July 19-20 event. Attendees will meet and greet sponsors who specialize in products and services for historic preservation and traditionally inspired new construction. There are seven courses and tours offering 11 American Institute of Architects’ Learning Units, mostly Health, Safety and Welfare credits. Adjacent to the Yale campus and downtown New Haven, many notable buildings are within easy walking distance of the New Haven Lawn Club. SAH member Patrick Pinnell will lead a tour and lecture titled, Yale's and New Haven's Architectural and Urban Legacy: Form, Ideals, Preservation and Change over Four Centuries. To register for the New Haven, CT conference, visit www.traditionalbuildingshow.com. Group discounts for three or more registrants for both days are available by contacting Carolyn Walsh cwalsh@aimmedia.com or call (781) 779-1560. For questions about education, please contact Judy Hayward jhayward@aimmedia.com or call (802) 674-6752.
  • Call for host institutions for Visual Resources Association Foundation's Internship Award

    Dates: 20 – 29 Jun, 2016
    The Visual Resources Association's (VRA) Foundation is offering its fourth Internship in visual resources and image management, thanks to the generosity of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. The award grants $3,000 to support an internship in archives, libraries, museums, visual resources collections, or other appropriate settings. It also provides a professional development account of $1,000 to be used for attending conferences, including the VRA Annual Conference and/or Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management (SEI). The student will provide 200 hours of service over the course of their internship. In order to be eligible for the internship, the student must have completed at least ten credits of graduate coursework in Library/Information Science, Art History, Architecture or Architectural History, Visual or Studio Art, Museum Studies, or other applicable fields of study. Although this internship is available to non-US residents, the work must take place at an institution within the USA. While Canadian institutions are not eligible to host a VRAF intern, such internships might be of interest to any number of people who are seeking VR-related internships and can be included in our list of available opportunities. If you and your institution are interested in hosting a student during the Fall, Winter, or Spring of the 2016-2017 academic year, please email me (alazet@collegeforcreativestudies.edu) the following information: *Institution name* *Contact person* *Address* *Telephone* *Email* *URL* *Brief description of internship* With this information, a list of potential internship sites will be compiled and added to the VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) website to help student applicants find an internship in their geographical area. To get this list posted online in time for potential applicants to access it before applying, we need this information by *June 29th, 2016* (apologies for the short deadline). We are excited that the VRA Foundation was able to provide the internship again this year and hope that you will consider being a host site for this wonderful opportunity for students just starting out in the fields of visual resources and image management. More information about the internship can be found here: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/internship_award/ (in the process of being updated)
  • INTERSTICES: Journal of Architecture and Related Arts Issue 17 - Call for Postgraduate Creative Design Research Projects

    Dates: 20 Jun – 08 Aug, 2016
    OPEN ISSUE: Return to Origins

    Call for Creative Design Research Projects In 2016, after many years of publishing the work of emerging and established researchers, Interstices: Journal of Architecture and Related Arts is resuming its earlier commitment to the publication of postgraduate student research design projects. Recent or ongoing postgraduate researchers in architecture and related art and design fields are invited to submit projects for a new peer-reviewed section of the journal.
    Projects should be complete at the time of submission and are to include a design synopsis of 1500 words.
    Project documentation and the synopsis should meet the following criteria:

    Be original and unpublished previously

    In the case of visual material, include no more than six indicative views of the proposal

    In the case of moving image, animated sequences, or audio works, not exceed 4 minutes duration

    Include a scholarly and critically contextualising synopsis for the project coauthored by both the project's creator and the supervisor(s) involved. The synopsis should bear the name of the researcher as the primary author and the supervisor as the secondary author.

    Establish an overt relationship with a particular journal issue thematic (where this exists).

    While there is no specific thematic for issue 17, project authors may choose in this case to focus on the issue?s sub-theme, Return to Origins, when considering submissions.

    Please submit full project documentation for the Interstices 17 journal issue to Dr Sue Hedges (shedges@aut.ac.nz<mailto:shedges@aut.ac.nz>) by 8 August 2016.
    All submission will be blind refereed by an invited panel.

    Visit our website to view the Guidelines for Submissions for details about the reviewing process, copyright issues and formatting: http://interstices.ac.nz/information-for-contributors/guidelines-for-submissions/.

    We look forward to your contribution!
    Journal editors: Andrew Douglas, Ross Jenner, Sue Hedges
     
  • CFP: Ficto-Critical Approaches to a Writing Architecture

    Brisbane | Dates: 20 Jun – 08 Jul, 2016
    Call for Papers
    A Colloquium on Ficto-Critical Approaches to a Writing Architecture
    Supported by the ATCH (Architecture Theory Criticism History) Research Centre
    School of Architecture, The University of Queensland, Brisbane
    To be held Friday 5 August 2016 in Brisbane, Australia

    Due date for abstracts: 8 July 2016

    Abstracts are sought from those wishing to participate in a colloquium exploring ficto-critical approaches to a "writing architecture". Selected papers from the colloquium will be published in a book. Early career researchers, from any field, are particularly encouraged to submit.

    Description:
    Both architects and fiction writers imagine new worlds into being. Both architects and fiction writers describe and document these worlds, they projectively inhabit and occupy them. They each produce settings - for lives and narratives. Every architectural proposition is a kind of fiction, before it ever becomes a built fact; likewise every written fiction relies on setting, the construction of a coherent milieu and context in which a story can take place.

    But what, then, of the role of fiction, and writing, in criticism ? of architecture and other things? Ficto-criticism fuses the forms and genres of essay, critique, and story. It combines the techniques of fiction and critical theory with the aim of challenging assumptions about our contemporary social and political realities. Although fiction is never obliged to be faithful to reality, when combined with the emancipatory potential of criticism it holds the power to disrupt habitual ways of seeing and acting amidst our everyday lives.

    This colloquium brings ficto-criticism together with experimental approaches to architecture as a world-making or constructive practice. Ficto-criticism is a method that innovatively combines the disciplines of architecture, philosophy and literature in order to enable both the critique of, as well as speculative explorations of world-making practices (Gibbs 2005; Meuke 2002).

    The a-grammatical construction of "a writing architecture" acknowledges a debt to architectural theorists such as Jane Rendell and Katja Grillner (Rendell 2005; 2010) who have explored how far experimental approaches to writing can be used to alter and expand architectural design thinking.

    While fiction is a powerful means by which we can speculatively propel ourselves into other imagined worlds, criticism offers the situated capacity to ethically cope with what confronts us.

    Ficto-criticism for architecture assumes the constructive, creative and critical situatedness of the thinking-designer in the midst of their problematic field, suggesting both means of speculating on near futures as well as the capacity to critique the present where it has become oppressive (Petrescu 2007). The power of conjoining fiction and criticism across the linking punctuation of the hyphen as a ficto-critical practice provides opportunities for writers both within and without the discipline to explore "a writing architecture."

    ***

    Format: The colloquium will take the form of twenty minute presentations ? either manifesting or reflecting on methods of ficto-critical writing in architecture ? followed by extended discussion and readings by other participants. Given the nature of this format, the number of speakers (and abstracts accepted) will be limited.

    Confirmed speakers: Anna Gibbs, Katrina Schlunke, Andrew Steen, H?l?ne Frichot, Naomi Stead

    Convenors: Dr H?l?ne Frichot
    Associate Professor Docent - Critical Studies and Gender Theory in Architecture
    School of Architecture KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Stockholm

    Dr Naomi Stead
    Associate Professor ? Deputy Director of the Research Centre ATCH
    School of Architecture, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

    Enquiries: Naomi Stead n.stead@uq.edu.au

    Submission details:
    Abstracts of 300 words
    Plus a biographical note of 100 words
    Should be emailed directly to n.stead@uq.edu.au and helene.frichot@arch.kth.se
    Before Friday 8th July 2016
     
SAH-200x152-ad-Glasgow

Driehaus_SH_Horizontal_RGB_275_100
SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
1365 N. Astor Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
312.573.1365
Copyright - (c) 2012