Recent Opportunities

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  • Culture Lab Detroit Discussion Series

    Detroit | Dates: 15 – 16 Sep, 2016
    Culture Lab Detroit, an organization that fosters conversations and collaborations between Detroit and the international art, architecture and design communities, announces its 2016 program. For its fourth edition, Culture Lab Detroit explores the theme of “Walls”—be they architectural or theoretical, historical or speculative. Through a two-night discussion series, public art projects, and ongoing collaborations, Culture Lab Detroit 2016 brings together premier artists, architects, curators and theorists to provide groundbreaking alternatives to some of the most entrenched issues of recent times. 
      
    Culture Lab Detroit's discussion series will take place September 15 and 16, 2016. Participants will discuss new ways to move through a city, to visit a museum, to catalyze social change through art, and to negotiate the ever-shifting divide between public and private space. These vital conversations will be held against the backdrop of Detroit, addressing issues of empty space, population shifts, urban blight and renewal, and the struggle to define a new environment of collaboration and respect. 
      
    Each dialogue is free and open to the public. 

    Thursday, September 15 – 6:30 p.m. EST 
    Sliding Walls: Reimagining the Architecture of Social Space 
    College for Creative Studies, Benson & Edith Ford Conference Center at the A. Alfred Taubman Center for Design Education 
    460 W Baltimore St., Detroit, MI 
      
    PARTICIPANTS 
    Elizabeth Diller, Founding Partner, Diller Scofidio + Renfro 
    Trevor Paglen, Artist 
    Franklin Sirmans, Director, Pérez Art Museum Miami 
      
    MODERATOR 
    Dennis Scholl, Former VP/Arts, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation 
    Friday, September 16 – 6:30 p.m. EST 
    Stones Thrown: Art and Social Progress 
    The Jam Handy 
    2900 E Grand Blvd., Detroit, MI 
      
    PARTICIPANTS 
    Eva Franch i Gilabert, Director, Storefront for Art and Architecture 
    Glenn Kaino, Artist 
    Adam Pendleton, Artist 
    MODERATOR 
    Salvador Salort-Pons, Director, Detroit Institute of Arts 
      
    “This year, Culture Lab Detroit looks to provide a variety of answers to a central issue of cultural placemaking: how do we allow walls to inform our experiences without limiting us,” says Founder Jane Schulak. “Our participants bring together a wide array of professional and personal diversity, but they are united in the pursuit of social justice. We’re thrilled to hold this globally relevant conversation in Detroit.” 
      
    In addition to the two-night discussion series, Culture Lab Detroit will continue to present world-class public works of art and design to the Detroit community. 
     
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve: Session 8

    Gyumri | Dates: 19 – 30 Sep, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district. Read more and register at adventuresinpreservation.org/upcoming-adventures/kumayri-cultural-museum-preserve/.
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve: Session 7

    Gyumri | Dates: 01 – 12 Sep, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district. Read more and register at adventuresinpreservation.org/upcoming-adventures/kumayri-cultural-museum-preserve/.
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve: Session 6

    Gyumri | Dates: 11 – 22 Aug, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district. Read more and register at adventuresinpreservation.org/upcoming-adventures/kumayri-cultural-museum-preserve/.
  • Conservation of the Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve

    Gyumri | Dates: 15 – 16 Sep, 2016
    Adventures in Preservation (AiP) has been working since 2007 to help develop a project that will lead to repair and restoration of as many historic structures in the district as possible. We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to join this project run by the Kumayri Museum-Preserve. There are session dates to fit everyone’s schedule. Work in 2016 will focus on two areas – documentation within Kumayri Cultural Museum-Preserve and study of the 7th century church located in the heart of this historic district.
  • Linking Archaeology with Preservation at Fairfield Plantation

    White Marsh | Dates: 14 – 20 Aug, 2016
    Experience the thrill of re-discovering history at Fairfield Plantation. Fairfield was home to one of Virginia’s magnificent manor houses, an architectural enigma once surrounded by 7,000 acres of tobacco fields and forestland at the heart of Gloucester County, just north of Williamsburg. This project is a rare opportunity to try your hand at both archaeology and historic preservation. Volunteers will have a full week of activities, including instruction in excavation techniques, making a “hot mix” mortar from burned shell, and bricklaying techniques.
  • Foundation for Landscape Studies 2017 Book Prizes

    Dates: 23 Jun – 01 Dec, 2016
    The Foundation for Landscape Studies invites publishers and authors to submit their books for this year’s John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and David R. Coffin Publication Grant. Please see the list of previous winners of these prizes on the website.
      
    The John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize is awarded to books published in the last three years that have made a significant contribution to the study and understanding of garden history and landscape design. The David R. Coffin Publication Grant supports the research and publication of a book in the field of landscape studies.  

    Award recipients will be selected by a jury composed of members of the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Landscape Studies. Detailed descriptions of the eligibility requirements and the application procedures for each award may be found on the website. The application deadline for both awards is December 1, 2016.  
     
    We welcome nominations for the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and the David R. Coffin Publication Grant from both publishers and authors. 

    Please submit all inquiries to:

    Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, President
    Foundation for Landscape Studies
    7 West 81st Street
    New York, NY 10024
    elizabethbarlowrogers@gmail.com
  • IFLA Arts Section Satellite Conference in Chicago -- August 2016

    Chicago | Dates: 09 – 11 Aug, 2016
    The Art Library as Place: Building on the Past, Building for the Future will consist of papers, panel discussions, site visits to local art museums and libraries, and tours of Chicago area architecture.
  • Elocutions, Elaborations and Expositions of Interior Design Creative Scholarship (Journal of Interior Design Special Issue)

    Dates: 24 Jun – 01 Jul, 2016
    “Stiffened from long sleep in the background of scholarly life, the scholar’s body yearns to exercise its muscles. Sleepy from long inactivity, it aches to restore its sensibilities.” (Paul Stroller, Sensuous Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997, p. 21) Whether one adheres to the terminology of creative scholarship, research-creation, practice-based research, practice-led research or artistic research, qualititative research in art, design and the creative arts in general, has shifted in recent decades to embrace a wide range of practices, approaches and expressions that acknowledge the generation of new knowledge through creative modes of inquiry. In this paradigm, creative works such as durational performances, architectural projects, interactive media installations, films, and interior designs, have the capacity as affective spatial experiences and/or materially constructed environments to generate, in and of themselves, new understanding. If we take this potential seriously, as Natalie S. Loveless suggests, it will give artists and designers the opportunity “to marshall new methods that allow us to tell new stories, stories that demand new research literacies and outputs”; “to revision and re-craft—to re-story—our disciplinary practices.” (RACAR: revue d'art canadienne / Canadian Art Review, Vol. 40, No. 1 (2015), pp. 53) This special issue of the Journal of Interior Design welcomes visual essays and design research papers that embrace, demonstrate and test these ambitions as elocutions, elaborations or expositions, in other words, via contributions that render new insights to the creative work and tell new stories. Both modes of contribution focus on a creative work or set of creative works specific to interior design and include a written text that reaches beyond mere description, documentation and reporting. The text operates to support, expand and question the creative work, reveal its underpinnings and speculate upon what unforseen understandings and sensibilities the work pries open as new knowing. In both cases the opportunity is ripe to explore the use of voice, style and format as a means of complimenting the creative work or investigating a new narrative. The creative work can be new, recent or historic in nature; it can be created by the author or not. The creative work can be published previously, but the textual narrative should be new, unpublished and advance our understanding of interiors and/or interior design practice or education. Visual essays are understood to communicate the ideas by using visual and verbal language. They will often also have written elements which are integrated and linked with the visual elements of the text. While demonstrating and presenting speculative research and practice-based visual media, the visual elements of the essay form an integral part of an argument, interpretation, reading or idea expressed in an interior design. Rather than rely on the authority of textual languauge, images, photographs, drawings, sketches and diagrams play a pivotal role in shaping an intellectual inquiry; it is important that the visual essay maintains a level of criticality. Visual essays should target 1-8 high resolution images and 2000-4000 words depending on the image-word relationship at play. Examples abound in recent years, though explicit to interior design/architecture and offering a range of approaches and strategies, one might refer to: • Julieanna Preston, “Dear Rosa”. IDEA Journal: Design Activism, guest edited by Dr. Lorella Di Cintio, 2014, pp. 4-13. (http://idea-edu.com/journal/2014-idea-journal/) • Chapters 4-8, by Hammond, Preston, Leski, Weinthal and Chee respectively in Lori Brown (ed.), Feminist Practices: Interdicisplinary approaches to women in architecture, Ashgate, 2001, pp. 83-168. Design research papers are those that demonstrate development and engagement with interior design/interior architecture history, theory and practice through analysis, critique and synthesis. Images serve to reference the constructed environment under discussion. It is important that such design research papers also reach to generate new understandings that have the potential to re-tell the stories of interior design and offer trajectories for its future as a making-thinking-doing practice. This mode of contributions should be no more than 5,000 words and include 1-8 high quality images. Note: The Journal of Interior Design has a print and online presence. The latter can host videos. DUE DATES FOR SPECIAL ISSUE: July 1, 2016 Registration of Interest – Authors are asked to register their intent to submit a paper by sending a 150-word abstract to Julieanna Preston at j.preston@massey.ac.nz. Please put your surname and “JID On Creative Practice Issue” in the subject line. Registration of interest is not refereed, nor is it requirement to submit. However, the acknowledgement of registration facilitates development of a proposal to full research paper by providing confirmation of fit with the special issue. Recognition of fit does not guarantee publication. April 1, 2017 Full visual essays and papers are due. See submission guidelines below. March 2018 Publication of JID Special issue: Elocutions, Elaborations and Expositions of Interior Design Creative Scholarship For questions regarding the call for papers, submission deadlines, or anything related to the content of the Special Issue contact Julieanna Preston at j.preston@massey.ac.nz. Please put your surname and “JID On Creative Practice Issue” in the subject line. (In regards to correspondences, please be aware of the time difference as the guest editor is located in New Zealand.) GUIDELINES FOR JID SUBMISSIONS: Authors should follow the author guidelines found on JID’s website at Wiley Blackwell. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1939-1668). Technical questions regarding the submission of documents through the ScholarOne website should be addressed to John Turpin at jid.editor@icloud.com. In addition to the visual essay or design research paper, contributions should also include a 250-word abstract formatted in APA or Chicago Manual of Style. The paper should be aligned with the topic of the special issue and comply with the descriptors above. Authors must submit papers via the ScholarOne Manuscripts system on the JID website (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/interiordesign). Papers must be original work of the author or authors and are not being considered for publication in other journals. Submissions may be checked for originality using plagiarism-detection software. The Journal of Interior Design is a scholarly, refereed publication dedicated to issues related to the design of the interior environment. Scholarly inquiry representing the entire spectrum of interior design theory, research, education and practice is invited. Submissions are encouraged from educators, designers, anthropologists, architects, historians, psychologists, sociologists, or others interested in interior design. GUEST EDITOR: Julieanna Preston Dr. Julieanna Preston (PhD RMIT 2013, MARCH Cranbrook 1991, BARCH VA Tech 1983) is Professor of Spatial Practice at the College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. She is currently the Research Coordinator for the School of Design, a member of Interior Design/ Architecture Educator’s Association (IDEA) and a peer-reviewer for Journal of Interior Design; Interiors: Design, Architecture, Culture; IDEA Journal; Journal of Architecture and Planning; Journal of Asia-Pacific Pop Culture and Journal of Architectural Education, as well as numerous international art and design related conferences, symposiums and publishers. Julieanna’s creative practice extends across architecture, interior design, spatial art and contemporary philosophy. Recent works explore concepts of vitality, agency and hospitality in durational and site responsive works such as water-logged (Performance Arcade, NZ 2016), IN COLD HEAT (MELT minus20degrees Art and Architecture Biennale, Austria 2016), Reading Labours (with Mick Douglas, Urban Dream Brokerage, NZ 2016), bit-u-men-at-work (with Jen Archer-Martin, Performing Mobilities, Melbourne 2015), Stirring Stillness on a Concrete Plane (Daughters of Chaos, Stockholm 2015), becoming boulder (Water and Peace Festival, NZ 2014), Aue (Puke Ariki Museum, NZ 2014) and Carboniferous Accretions (NIEMME, Newcastle Upon Tyne UK 2014). (See www.julieannapreston.space) As an advocate for creative practice research, its intellectual inquiry and its capacity to pose new concepts and theories, Julieanna maintains an active writing practice that is both scholarly and experimental in nature. Her recent written works include Performing Matter: Interiors, Surface and Feminist Actions (AADR 2014), “Dear Rosa” (IDEA Journal 2015), “Reconciling Carboniferous Accretions: A Performative Script” (Architecture and Culture 2015), and “Stratified Matter” (Drawing On Journal 2015) proceeded by guest editor of IDEA Journal: Interior Economies (2011) and AD: Interior Atmospheres (2008) and co-editor with Mark Taylor of Intimus: Interior Design Theory Reader (2006).
  • Building the Outer Boroughs: Architecture and Urbanism beyond Manhattan

    Brooklyn | Dates: 23 Jun – 12 Sep, 2016
    Venue and Dates: Brooklyn College, March 23, 2017 Organizers: Anna Jozefacka (Fellow, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2015-17) and Malka Simon (Brooklyn College) Co-sponsored by the Wolfe Institute for the Humanities and the Art Department at Brooklyn College Before they were the “outer boroughs,” the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island developed as cities, towns, and villages in their own right, independent of New York City. Though these so-called outer boroughs comprise most of today’s New York and are part of its architectural identity, the bulk of existing scholarship in architecture is persistently Manhattan-centric. However, there remains much to be said about New York City’s outer boroughs and their neighborhoods. The different pace of growth and initial political independence of these parts of the city have yielded architecturally varied urban landscapes well worth examining. This symposium seeks to highlight the study of New York City’s architecture and urban development outside of Manhattan. We invite papers that expand beyond the existing field of scholarship on the city’s built environment. We aim to discuss the variety of building types, styles, and urban patterns evident in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island and to consider their roles in shaping the city. We welcome interdisciplinary papers that address architecture within the context of other fields. Papers might examine topics that include but are not limited to the following: Early colonial settlements Urban archeological sites Industrial architecture and infrastructure Civic, cultural, and religious centers past and present Housing typologies across the outer boroughs Gentrification and architectural style Intersections of the natural and built environments The skyscraper outside of Manhattan Adaptive reuse of buildings and sites Preservation in the face of real estate development Building with the “The Other”: voices of immigrants, women, and architects of color In recent years, native and new residents alike have “discovered” the richness of life outside Manhattan, leading to a wave of fast-paced development and neighborhood transformations. The time is right for a closer scholarly examination of the places and spaces of New York City’s outer boroughs. Please send a 500-word paper proposal and an academic CV to: outerborougharchitecture@gmail.com Deadline for submissions is September 12, 2016. Successful applicants will be notified by September 30, 2016.
  • Restoring a Greenhouse to Grandeur

    Moray, Scotland | Dates: 10 – 17 Jun, 2017
    A one- or two-week historic preservation volunteer vacation on the Burgie Estate in Moray, Scotland, with the option to pursue either architectural or environmental conservation.
  • SAH Member Patrick Pinnell featured at Traditional Building New Haven Conference

    New Haven, CT 06511 | Dates: 19 – 20 Jul, 2016
    Grab your walking shoes, camera and note books; the “summer school” version of the traditional building conference makes its way to the Connecticut coast this July. The Traditional Building Conference Series makes its second stop in 2016 at the New Haven Lawn Club. This handsome colonial revival building is the setting for the July 19-20 event. Attendees will meet and greet sponsors who specialize in products and services for historic preservation and traditionally inspired new construction. There are seven courses and tours offering 11 American Institute of Architects’ Learning Units, mostly Health, Safety and Welfare credits. Adjacent to the Yale campus and downtown New Haven, many notable buildings are within easy walking distance of the New Haven Lawn Club. SAH member Patrick Pinnell will lead a tour and lecture titled, Yale's and New Haven's Architectural and Urban Legacy: Form, Ideals, Preservation and Change over Four Centuries. To register for the New Haven, CT conference, visit www.traditionalbuildingshow.com. Group discounts for three or more registrants for both days are available by contacting Carolyn Walsh cwalsh@aimmedia.com or call (781) 779-1560. For questions about education, please contact Judy Hayward jhayward@aimmedia.com or call (802) 674-6752.
  • CFP: Ficto-Critical Approaches to a Writing Architecture

    Brisbane | Dates: 20 Jun – 08 Jul, 2016
    Call for Papers
    A Colloquium on Ficto-Critical Approaches to a Writing Architecture
    Supported by the ATCH (Architecture Theory Criticism History) Research Centre
    School of Architecture, The University of Queensland, Brisbane
    To be held Friday 5 August 2016 in Brisbane, Australia

    Due date for abstracts: 8 July 2016

    Abstracts are sought from those wishing to participate in a colloquium exploring ficto-critical approaches to a "writing architecture". Selected papers from the colloquium will be published in a book. Early career researchers, from any field, are particularly encouraged to submit.

    Description:
    Both architects and fiction writers imagine new worlds into being. Both architects and fiction writers describe and document these worlds, they projectively inhabit and occupy them. They each produce settings - for lives and narratives. Every architectural proposition is a kind of fiction, before it ever becomes a built fact; likewise every written fiction relies on setting, the construction of a coherent milieu and context in which a story can take place.

    But what, then, of the role of fiction, and writing, in criticism ? of architecture and other things? Ficto-criticism fuses the forms and genres of essay, critique, and story. It combines the techniques of fiction and critical theory with the aim of challenging assumptions about our contemporary social and political realities. Although fiction is never obliged to be faithful to reality, when combined with the emancipatory potential of criticism it holds the power to disrupt habitual ways of seeing and acting amidst our everyday lives.

    This colloquium brings ficto-criticism together with experimental approaches to architecture as a world-making or constructive practice. Ficto-criticism is a method that innovatively combines the disciplines of architecture, philosophy and literature in order to enable both the critique of, as well as speculative explorations of world-making practices (Gibbs 2005; Meuke 2002).

    The a-grammatical construction of "a writing architecture" acknowledges a debt to architectural theorists such as Jane Rendell and Katja Grillner (Rendell 2005; 2010) who have explored how far experimental approaches to writing can be used to alter and expand architectural design thinking.

    While fiction is a powerful means by which we can speculatively propel ourselves into other imagined worlds, criticism offers the situated capacity to ethically cope with what confronts us.

    Ficto-criticism for architecture assumes the constructive, creative and critical situatedness of the thinking-designer in the midst of their problematic field, suggesting both means of speculating on near futures as well as the capacity to critique the present where it has become oppressive (Petrescu 2007). The power of conjoining fiction and criticism across the linking punctuation of the hyphen as a ficto-critical practice provides opportunities for writers both within and without the discipline to explore "a writing architecture."

    ***

    Format: The colloquium will take the form of twenty minute presentations ? either manifesting or reflecting on methods of ficto-critical writing in architecture ? followed by extended discussion and readings by other participants. Given the nature of this format, the number of speakers (and abstracts accepted) will be limited.

    Confirmed speakers: Anna Gibbs, Katrina Schlunke, Andrew Steen, H?l?ne Frichot, Naomi Stead

    Convenors: Dr H?l?ne Frichot
    Associate Professor Docent - Critical Studies and Gender Theory in Architecture
    School of Architecture KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Stockholm

    Dr Naomi Stead
    Associate Professor ? Deputy Director of the Research Centre ATCH
    School of Architecture, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

    Enquiries: Naomi Stead n.stead@uq.edu.au

    Submission details:
    Abstracts of 300 words
    Plus a biographical note of 100 words
    Should be emailed directly to n.stead@uq.edu.au and helene.frichot@arch.kth.se
    Before Friday 8th July 2016
     
  • Art Deco & Adaptive Re-Use

    Adelaide | Dates: 29 Jun, 2016
    A presentation with local architects, local heritage, and local solutions.

    Adrian Evans, JPE Design Studio

    Douglas Alexander, Flightpath Architects

    with convenor David O?Loughlin, Mayor of Prospect



    Including a tour of the newly extended Adelaide High School, West Terrace, Adelaide

    Wed 29th June 6.15 pm ? 8pm

    Bookings Essential : $10 (or $5 students)

    Tea & Coffee provided
    Bookings Online at: https://www.trybooking.com/Booking/BookingEventSummary.aspx?eid=203829

    This is a rare opportunity to tour the Art Deco influenced Adelaide High School and see the $22million extensions with the architect.

    Enquiries: Alison 0408 850 234 adelaidechapter@gmail.com
  • Avenue of American History

    Philadelphia | Dates: 20 Jun, 2016 – 16 Jun, 2017
    Assist in the development of a project described in the following website: www.avenueofamericanhistory.org Work can be performed from the intern's home location.
  • Save the Date: "Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture" at Fifty

    New York and Philadelphia | Dates: 10 – 12 Nov, 2016
    A symposium marking the fiftieth anniversary of Robert Venturi's 'gentle manifesto'

    co-organized by
    David Brownlee, University of Pennsylvania
    Martino Stierli, The Museum of Modern Art

    More information to be announced.
  • CFP: 2nd SEAARC (Southeast Asia Architecture Research Collaborative) Symposium (5-7 Jan 17)

    Dates: 17 Jun – 05 Jul, 2016
    CALL FOR PAPERS

    Modernity’s ‘Other’ – Disclosing Southeast Asia’s built environment across the colonial and postcolonial worlds  

    Dates: 5-7 January 2017

    Venue: Department of Architecture, SDE, National University of Singapore

    Convenors: Dr. Lee Kah-Wee, Dr. Imran Tajudeen, Dr. Chang Jiat-Hwee

    Abstract Submission Deadline: 5 July 2016

    ____________________________________________________________

    Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
    Abidin Kusno, Institute of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia
    Carl Trocki, Fellow, Australian Academy of the Humanities

    Across various disciplines, attention on the category of the “Other” has shone light on women, minorities, the poor, profane, criminal and mundane. But what and where is the category of “Others” in architectural studies? Is it to be attached to the spaces and buildings associated with these marginalized social categories? Or are there intrinsically architectural “Others” – subjects within the discipline that undergird its internal discourse through contrast and opposition – that should be opened up to interdisciplinary scrutiny? Finally, what can Southeast Asia offer to the larger intellectual debates in which the category of the “Other” has played a critical role in the last few decades?

    This series of questions forms the intellectual agenda of the Southeast Asia Architecture Research Collaborative (SEAARC) Symposium 2017. It is of course not new. One might say that the category of the ‘Other’ is inherent to every discipline’s capacity to reflect on and renew itself. Its generative power lies in how it lends a critical and corrective perspective to the grand narratives of modernity and the internal structures of scholarly discourse. With the postmodern turn towards the everyday, for example, architectural studies have jettisoned the cathedral for the bicycle shed, giving rise to studies in vernacular architecture, counterculture and domestic environments. Studies into the relationship between nationalism and architecture shuttled between, on the one hand, an imperial imperative to establish architectural exemplars of new national identities and on the other, critical inquiries aimed at demystifying this will-to-essentialize by revealing its violence and contingencies. Post 1960s, anthropology, postcolonial and feminist theory, cultural studies and new historicism have all left an indelible imprint on the internal and external reorientation of architectural studies.

    Nevertheless, this conference contends that more can be gained by interrogating the concept of the “Other”. It asks not only that we broaden the types of buildings that merit serious scholarly interest, but to question if the field itself can be broadened – the range of discourses, settings, politics and practices wherein the built environment becomes a foil for understanding the hidden and suppressed aspects of societies. It seeks fresh collaboration with allied disciplines that might throw up promising directions in how one can theorize and analyze the “Other”, as well as the challenges of such projects. And finally, by positioning the inquiry in Southeast Asia, this conference takes the world-historical patterns of colonial and postcolonial development, nationalism, economic globalization and cultural change as the broad canvas on which the historical and contemporary transformations of this region are writ large.

    The ambition of this conference extends from the first SEAARC symposium, “Questions in Southeast Asia’s Architecture/Southeast Asia’s Architecture in Question”. We see this firstly as a stocktaking of current research on architecture and urbanism in Southeast Asia and secondly as an opportunity to provoke dialogue around an infamously (re)generative concept. The SEAARC is also committed to encouraging discourse amongst and giving visibility to scholars from regions that may not be well represented in major conferences, and as such, we continue to provide financial assistance to these participants. Details on financial assistance are given at the bottom of this CFP.
  • Icebergs

    Washington | Dates: 02 Jul – 05 Sep, 2016
    Visit ICEBERGS in the Museum's Great Hall. Designed by James Corner Field Operations, the installation opens as part of the annual Summer Block Party series, July 2 - September 5.

    Visitors will:
    Explore a fantastical glacial sea designed by landscape architects
    Ascend to a viewing area inside the tallest berg
    Traverse an undersea bridge or slide down an ice chute
    Sample Japanese kakigori shaved ice provided by the restaurant Daikaya
    Learn about how design can transform spaces and lives

    ICEBERGS is built from re-usable construction materials, such as scaffolding and polycarbonate paneling, a material commonly used in building greenhouses. The 20' high "water line" allows panoramic views from high above the ocean surface and down below among the towering bergs. The tallest “bergy bit,” at 56', reaches to the third story balcony of the Museum. ICEBERGS occupies a total area of 12,540 square feet.
  • CFP: New Directions in Film-Architecture

    Dates: 15 Jun – 15 Jul, 2016
    The relationship between the scholarly interrogation of cinema and architecture has an established history. This symposium seeks to do two things: first, to chart this history from both disciplinary perspectives and their sometime mutual engagement, in the process offering rejuvenation; and second, to suggest new directions for research in this area, taking on both historical and recent developments in the relationship between film and architecture. We are seeking symposium papers that go beyond citing the representation of famous architecture and built environments on film, and instead look at the mutual impact of each art form and their scholarly analysis.

    The symposium will be organised as plenary sessions comprising panels of three papers running 30 minutes each followed by generous discussion, so that all participants can attend each paper. Presenters are invited to propose abstracts for papers starting from diverse points of entry and background in cinema studies, architecture studies, or a mixture of both, with a focus on the combination of critical and theoretical work with specific filmic-architectural examples and analysis.

    General topic areas for possible papers include, but are not limited to, the following:

    Examining the role 1920s cinema has played for film-architecture scholarship, and how best to productively understand this ?foundational? heritage today.

    Assessing the productive role played by the study of 1940s & '50s film noir (and later "neo" iterations) in film-architecture scholarship.

    Examining the importance of 1950s & '60s post-war modernist art cinema in relation to late modernity's transformation of urban space, and its radical impact on human experience.

    Explorations of film-architecture research on suburban built environments in the cinema.

    Explorations of (and the need for) scholarly work on small-town, village, and rural built environments on screen.

    Assessments of the extent to which post-colonial interrogations and increasingly urgent calls for a "world cinema" approach are reflected in film-architecture scholarship.

    The symposium convenors invite interested scholars from around the world to send proposals for proposed papers related to the above topics, or to suggest others. Please send a 300-word abstract and 100-word biography (including university staff or other relevant webpage link) to hamish.Ford@newcastle.edu.au, using the email subject line "New Directions in Film-Architecture abstract", by 15 July, 2016. The symposium convenors will send out formal acceptance emails at the beginning of August.

    We look forward to hearing from you!

    Symposium convenors:
    Hamish Ford (University of Newcastle), Michael Chapman (University of Newcastle), Charles Rice (University of Technology, Sydney), Sam Spurr (University of NSW).
     
  • M+ / Design Trust Research Fellowship 2017

    Hong Kong | Dates: 16 Jun – 22 Jul, 2016
    The M+ / Design Trust Research Fellowship programme supports an original research project investigating issues relating to design and architecture in the Greater Pearl River Delta region, and between the region and other parts of the world. In addition to expanding the current body of knowledge in these areas, the findings from the fellowship will inform future acquisitions and other programmes at M+. Applicants should engage in advanced research on historical or contemporary topics relating to either a single discipline (such as architecture, graphic design, industrial design, and urbanism) or cross-disciplinary developments, taking into consideration the region’s cultural, social, economic, and political milieus as well as its international and cross-cultural networks. Although post-1949 topics are preferred, exceptional proposals focusing on issues related to the beginning of the twentieth century will also be considered. The successful applicant will be attached to M+ for three to six months in 2017, conducting independent research, preferably on a full-time basis. The fellow is encouraged to engage in intellectual exchanges with the museum’s curatorial staff and participate in its programmes. While outcomes may vary, the fellowship should at minimum result in 1) a paper (5,000 words or more) disseminated digitally or in print through M+ and Design Trust’s platforms and 2) a lecture as part of the museum’s public programme. Eligibility Applications are welcome from individuals of all nationalities whose areas of research are in design, architecture, or a related field. Applicants should either hold a post-graduate degree in a relevant discipline or an undergraduate degree with minimum three years relevant professional work or academic research experience. Proficiency in spoken and written English is also required. Stipend The M+ / Design Trust Research Fellow will receive a lump-sum stipend of up to $40,000 HKD per month for three to six months to cover research-related and living costs. (The monthly stipend may be prorated for a part-time fellow, depending on individual circumstances.) An overseas fellow may request a one-time travel subsidy of up to $10,000 HKD, covering transportation to and from the place of origin and Hong Kong. The deadline for submitting the application is 22 July 2016. Please send all application materials digitally and address enquiries to designfellow@wkcda.hk. For the application form and further information, visit www.westkowloon.hk/designfellow About M+ A cornerstone of the ambitious West Kowloon Cultural District, M+ is Hong Kong’s new museum for visual culture, encompassing twentieth and twenty-first century art, design and architecture, and moving image from Hong Kong, China, Asia, and beyond. From its vantage point in one of the world’s most dynamic regions, M+ documents the past, informs the present, and contributes to the future of visual culture within an even more interconnected global landscape. The museum takes an interdisciplinary approach that both challenges and respects existing boundaries, while creating a meeting point for a multiplicity of perspectives, narratives, and audiences. About Design Trust Design Trust is a network of individuals passionate about design and its powerful role in societal transformation. The Trust supports creative projects that promote design talent, research initiatives, and content related to Hong Kong and the Greater Pearl River Delta Region. Across a multiplicity of design disciplines from graphics, media, fashion, to the built environment, the Trust aims to actively accelerate the creative design and development of meaningful projects.
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
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