Recent Opportunities

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  • CFP: Picturing the Nation: Imagining National Identities in 19th Century Art and Architecture in Europe (Giessen, 28-29 Jul 16)

    Giessen | Dates: 13 – 19 Jun, 2016
    Picturing the Nation. Imagining national identities in 19th century art 
    and architecture in Europe

    - international workshop for PhD candidates -

    Especially in the light of current political movements in numerous 
    countries, the 19th century as the "age of nationalism" in Europe 
    demands further study. Following Stefan Germer's diagnosis that images 
    are "the decisive means for the creation of national communities", this 
    workshop for young scholars seeks to investigate phenomena and 
    strategies of nation building in the arts in the long 19th century. By 
    both discussing methodological aspects and examining different case 
    studies, the workshop seeks to reassess constructions of national 
    identities in Europe in all forms of the visual arts, putting a special 
    focus on international perspectives.
    Though primarily addressing PhD candidates in art history, the workshop 
    is open to all young scholars who work on similar phenomena.

    Workshop program:

    The two-day workshop will start off with a reading retreat on the 
    afternoon of July 28. Participants will discuss general and 
    methodological aspects concerning the construction of national 
    identities in the arts and its study. Participants' suggestions for 
    texts to be discussed are encouraged. On July 29, the workshop will 
    focus on case studies presented by the participants. Presentations will 
    be held in English and should not exceed 20 min. Presenters will take 
    turns in chairing each other's presentations. Abstracts of the papers 
    will be pre-circulated.

    Topics of presentations might include, but are not limited to:

    - official State representations 
    - depictions of urban or rural national identities
    - creation of national heroes and reinventions of a national past in 
    the arts
    - popularization of national topics in prints
    - national artists in exile and artists colonies abroad

    Submission of proposals:

    Apart from providing the applicant's name, institutional affiliation 
    and short academic CV (max. 100 words), proposals should include a 
    description of the PhD project (max. 1 000 words) and a short abstract 
    of the particular topic the applicant would like to discuss in his or 
    her paper (max. 300 words + title). Applicants may send their reading 
    suggestions for the retreat along with their proposals.

    Thanks to the generous support of the Gießener Hochschulgesellschaft, 
    accommodation will be provided and travel expenses can partially be 
    reimbursed.

    Applicants are asked to submit their proposals by June 19, 2016 to 
    mara-lisa.kinne@gcsc.uni-giessen.de.

    Important dates:

    Deadline for proposal submission: June 19, 2016

    Notification of acceptance: June 24, 2016

    Deadline for abstract submission (for circulation): July 17, 2016

    Date of workshop: July 28/29, 2016
     
  • Lake Michigan Modern: Miller Beach

    Gary | Dates: 20 Aug, 2016
    Hosted by Indiana Landmarks and the Miller Beach Arts & Creative District, the event showcases Miller Beach, a lakeside area of Gary that has been a summer haven since early in the twentieth century. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. Central Standard Time, when shuttles will transport you to the private homes on the tour. During a lunch break, you’ll hear an expert talk about Mid-Century Modern architecture, followed by a tour of the three mid-century churches. The homes and churches on tour were built between 1949 and 1969. The ticket price includes the tour, lunch and shuttle transportation. Riding the shuttle is required.

    If you’re making a weekend of it, you may wish to attend a separately ticketed VIP reception and exhibit opening on Friday, August 19, at the Marshall J. Gardner Center for the Arts featuring photography, art, period clothing, and furniture associated with mid-century Miller. Tickets to the exhibit opening and reception are available for $35 from the Miller Beach Arts & Creative District and can be purchased by calling 219.938.6278.
  • ABE Journal - Architecture Beyond Europe Issue 8 | 2015

    Dates: 09 Jun – 01 Dec, 2016
    ABE Journal is pleased to announce the release of issue 8 | 2015, available here.

    This issue's thematic section, guest-edited by Le?la el-Wakil (University of Geneva), is devoted to 'Ornamental Tiles' and includes contributions by Anas Soufan, Antonio Bravo-Nieto and Thibault Bechini.

    Founded in 2012, ABE Journal - Architecture Beyond Europe is a scholarly, double blind peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the study of 19th- and 20th-century architecture and urbanism outside of Europe. It focuses primarily on the transfers, adaptations and appropriations of forms, technologies, models and doctrines in colonial and postcolonial situations. Conceived as a place of exchange in an emerging and dynamic field of research, ABE Journal aims to provide a specialist scholarly forum for the discussion and dissemination of ideas relating to architecture in the colonial and postcolonial realms, as well as to local forms of modernism. It publishes articles and contents in five languages (French, English, Spanish, German and Italian) and is edited by the research centre InVisu (CNRS/INHA) in Paris.

    Issue 9-10 | 2016 of ABE Journal is due in December 2016 and features a thematic section on 'Dynamic Vernacular', guest-edited by Mark Crinson (University of Manchester).

    Specific calls for thematic section papers are regularly open, with their own schedule of deadlines.

    Concurrently, we welcome the submission of papers that fit the remit of the journal while being unrelated to specific thematic sections, as well as of new thematic section proposals, at all times.

    All submissions should be sent to abe@inha.fr.
    Guidelines are available here.
     
  • CFP: Between Paper and Pixels. Transmedial Traffic in Architectural Drawing (Delft/Rotterdam, 30 Nov-1 Dec 16)

    Delft and Rotterdam | Dates: 09 Jun – 29 Aug, 2016
    3D-modelling on a flat computer screen has revolutionized architectural drawing and representation. It has transformed drawing into spatial script-writing, integrating data sets and blurring boundaries between disciplines and between production modes. Not so long ago, in the 1990s when the computer invaded architectural practice, paperless studios and offices seemed the avant-gardist way forward. Yet currently, the architectural drawing on paper enjoys a surprising and refreshingly new interest from architects, historians and collectors alike. The digital turn in architecture did not result in the abandonment of paper. On the contrary, the predominance of the digital in contemporary communications and architectural production has elicited the rediscovery of the specific qualities of the old-fashioned architectural drawing and its representation techniques. In architecture schools and museums there is a new interest for sketching, drawing, collaging et cetera as a forgotten tool for observing and analysing. At the same time, one can see a new productive, transmedial traffic happening between the realms of electronic representation and the paper drawing. Experiments in digital modelling borrow from classic techniques on paper. Contemporary software enables hand drawing on touch screen devices. Annotation software faciliates immediate interaction creating electronic palimpsests. Immersive representation technologies bring about a refocus on the human body and experience. These new developments raise profound questions concerning the status of the architectural drawing, as a tool for communication, research, design and imagination.

    For its third annual conference, The Jaap Bakema Study Centre, in collaboration with TU Delft and Het Nieuwe Instituut, aims to look closer into this new cross-pollination between the media of paper and pixels. We are interested in contributions that bring to the conference a wide variety of perspectives, both historical and theoretical in nature, and which address, but are not limited to the following questions. What exactly is an architectural drawing today? Can we still talk about clear definitions here, in terms of an object, a medium of representation and communication or a tool to realize an actual building? Hand drawing comes with a draughts(wo)man. The drawing is a space in which an author appears. We might recognize the handwriting, an individual style. How are authorship and originality reconceptualized in an age of electronic reproduction? What happens when drawings become platforms for interaction between multiple actors, for instance in the case of BIM (Building Information Modelling) software? How do we keep the new architectural drawings, where do we store them? Why should we keep and store them? Are they proper 'objects' to collect? How will they transform the archive as a space of memory and knowledge (re)production? How does one exhibit the new drawings? The whole notion of 'exhibiting' seems in need of redefinition here, since the exhibition becomes the staging of a reproduction without original. Can we go beyond the postmodernist notions of simulation and hyperreality to understand the kind of representations we are looking at? And eventually, if the drawing is the ultimate medium of the architect, how is this transmedial traffic effecting the figure of the architect, his or her role, and the architectural discipline?

    ++++ Abstracts of 300-500 words plus a short bio (300 words max) should be sent to Dirk van den Heuvel: d.vandenheuvel@tudelft.nl Deadline: Monday 29 August 2016
  • East-West Center 2016 New Generation Seminar Now Accepting Applications

    Honolulu/Phnom Penh/Yangon | Dates: 18 Sep – 01 Oct, 2016
    Dates: September 18-October 1, 2016
     
    Theme: Cultural Heritage and Identity in a Globalizing, Urbanizing World
    Destinations: Honolulu, Hawaii; Phnom Penh, Cambodia; and Yangon, Myanmar
     
    Application Deadline: Thursday, June 16
     
    Program: Now in its 26th year, the New Generation Seminar is an intensive two-week study, dialogue and travel program that provides the next generation of Asia Pacific and American leaders an opportunity to strengthen their understanding of key Asia-Pacific developments, discuss policy options for common challenges, build an international network, and become leaders with a more international perspective. The first week of the program is held in Hawaii and focuses on key regional policy issues such as international relations, security, economics, population, health and environment. The second week involves field travel to either the United States or Asia Pacific for exploration of the program theme. Please see write up below for details about this year’s theme.

    Who can apply: The New Generation Seminar seeks to engage young leaders aged 25-40, from Asia Pacific and the United States who are in a position to influence policy, shape public opinion and lead action. The strongest candidates for the program will be elected officials and other political, business, law and community leaders or communicators with broad-based policy knowledge and influence and/or demonstrated leadership in their countries and communities. Social and business entrepreneurs also make strong candidates. 

    Funding: Through East-West Center and private funding, up to 14 selected candidates will be offered full or partial funding. Full funding would cover air and ground travel as well as modest meals, lodging and program-related expenses during the two-week program. Participants will be responsible for their own visa fees and visa related expenses, travel/health insurance and personal incidentals. Cost sharing by applicants is strongly encouraged and will be an important consideration for the Selection Committee.
     
    The East-West Center is an internationally recognized independent nonprofit organization established by the US Congress in 1960 to promote better relations and understanding among the people and nations of the United States, Asia and the Pacific through cooperative study, research and dialogue. For more than half a century, the East-West Center has been training global leaders, informing policymakers, advancing education and promoting international understanding in the Asia Pacific region around critical issues of regional and global importance.
     
    For full information about the program and how to apply please visit: http://www.eastwestcenter.org/seminars-and-journalism-fellowships/policy-dialogue/new-generation-seminar

    EWC Contact: Ann Hartman, hartmana@eastwestcenter.org; 808-944-7619
     
    26th NGS Theme: Cultural Heritage and Identity in a Globalizing, Urbanizing World
    Over the past 20 years, the increasing pressures of intensive urbanization, globalization and a trend toward modernization have been threatening cultural and architectural heritage around the world. In many urban areas, the legacy of the past is rapidly disappearing. In October 2016, global leaders will meet at the UN international Conference on Housing and Sustainable Development (Habitat III) to create a new urban agenda for the world, and, for the first time, issues of cultural heritage and its importance to cities will be part of the agenda. There is growing recognition that cultural heritage and architecture can be a key resource and asset for building sustainable, livable, and dynamic cities, with evidence that conserving unique heritage can bring significant economic value through tourism and creative industries. Beyond that, it also plays an important role in fostering national and local pride and a sense of identity for its residents. In communities across the world, but especially in rapidly modernizing and globalizing developing countries, government leaders and officials are expressing a strong interest in placing culture at the core of development strategies, to consider what is important to keep for future generations before it is lost forever. But doing this is not easy as leaders must also meet the enormous pressures to provide efficient infrastructure, housing, sanitation, commercial development and jobs for their communities.  
     
    The 2016 NGS participants will explore the role of cultural heritage in economic development, urban planning, tourism, and in preserving and promoting a sense of local and national identity through meetings and visits with leaders and policymakers, private sector representatives, civil society organizations, academic experts and practitioners in Honolulu, Phnom Penh, and Yangon. Honolulu will provide an example of a US city struggling to preserve its local identity and culture in its tourism development and as it upgrades its aging infrastructure and revitalizes its urban core. Phnom Penh and Yangon represent common challenges in developing nations of rapid urbanization, a need for development and threats to preserving their urban culture, including both colonial and post-colonial architectural heritage. Both are at a critical juncture in their development strategies. Phnom Penh is on a rapid growth trajectory after many years of war and internal conflict; Yangon is emerging from decades of economic and social isolation with a new democratically elected government. All three cities must manage break-neck growth, provide infrastructure and services to growing populations, attract outside investment and industry, and manage burgeoning tourism, while trying to figure out how to maintain and preserve that which represents and can foster their sense of national identity, culture and place.
     
  • Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise

    Nashville | Dates: 29 Jul – 07 Nov, 2016
    The Frist Center for the Visual Arts presents Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise, the largest and most comprehensive exhibition of Newcomb arts and crafts in more than a quarter century. Created and organized by the Newcomb Art Museum, Tulane University, and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), the exhibition is making the final stop of its nine-city tour at the Frist Center. The public opening on July 29 will be celebrated with a lecture by the distinguished Newcomb Pottery authority Sally Main, former senior curator at the Newcomb Art Museum, and a special Frist Friday concert of New Orleans music. 
     
    Newcomb pottery is one of the most significant of all American art potteries, critically acclaimed and highly coveted. With more than 180 works that span 45 years of production (1895–1940), Women, Art, and Social Change offers new insights into the Newcomb community’s enduring mark on American art and industry. The exhibition examines the role played by H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, Tulane University’s coordinate institution for women, in promoting art for the advancement of women and, in turn, New Orleans’ business and cultural communities, which were still struggling from the effects of the Civil War. 
     
    “Women, Art, and Social Change brings together a variety of objects created during the lifespan of the Newcomb enterprise,” explains Sally Main. “The finest examples of the pottery art form will be displayed alongside pieces that will come as a revelation to many—not only a rich variety of crafts but also photos and artifacts that breathe life into the Newcomb legacy.”
     
    What began as an educational experiment flourished into a quasi-commercial venture that offered unprecedented opportunities for Southern women to support themselves financially during and after their training as artists. “When seen against the backdrop of social history, which this exhibition emphasizes, these beautiful works of art and the women who made them appear even more remarkable,” observes Frist Center curator Trinita Kennedy. The Frist Center’s presentation will include an educational component that demonstrates production techniques employed by Newcomb potters and decorators through a series of in-progress vessels made by Nashville ceramicists Danielle McDaniel, co-owner of the Clay Lady Studios, and Lyndy Rutledge. 
     
    Many works of the Newcomb Pottery enterprise were inspired by the native flora and fauna of the Gulf South, a distinctive hallmark that made them immediately recognizable and popular with collectors, curators and tastemakers across the country. This exhibition features iconic examples of the pottery, including a majestic daffodil motif vase by Harriet Coulter Joor recently acquired by the Newcomb Art Museum, and jewelry, such as the silver and moonstone necklace attributed to Mary Williams Butler, the head of Newcomb’s metalwork department, along with textiles, metalwork, bookbinding, works on paper, and other historical artifacts.
     
    Please see the attached press release for a listing of public programs associated with this exhibition or read it online
     
  • The Arts & Science in Early Islamic Spain

    London | Dates: 15 – 15 Jun, 2016
    There is a symbiotic relationship between design, art and visual culture, and the exact sciences, which is attested in early scientific objects from al-Andalus and in medieval Arabic texts. In this talk I explore the objects, spaces, and figures that illuminate this relationship, focusing on ‘Abbas Ibn Firnas (d. ca. 887), the celebrated polymath of the Cordoban Umayyad court, and on al-Andalus and its contemporaries between the 9th-11th centuries.

    Glaire D. Anderson is a historian of Islamic art of the caliphal period, with a focus on the art and court culture of Umayyad Cordoba. She is the author of The Villa in Early Islamic Iberia (Ashgate, 2013), co-editor with Mariam Rosser-Owen of Revisiting al-Andalus (Brill, 2007), and recent articles on the Islamic west in architectural history, women and the arts of Cordoba, and material culture and caliphal sovereignty.
  • CFP: Challenges in the Historiography of Architectural Knowledge (Brussels, 9-10 Feb 17)

    Brussels | Dates: 08 – 15 Jun, 2016
    In recent international literature addressing the history of 20th century architectural theory, the year 1968 is indicated as a decisive moment, giving rise to a ‘new’ architectural theory. From that moment onwards, emphasis was no longer placed on the aesthetics of architecture, but on its critical potential. Yet, according to some scholars, this intensification of theory was short-lived. A presence of coexisting and even contradictory paradigms derived from very different epistemic domains (anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, social sciences, etc.) led to a setback of theory, resulting in an end-of-theory atmosphere in the 1990s.

    It is not a coincidence that the so called death of architectural theory concurred with the upsurge of anthologies on architectural theory that collect and classify referential texts. Instead of burying theory, these anthologies had an additional effect, namely to institutionalise it. In other words, they offered both closure to a past period and also defined the locus of a next period of theorisation, invoking a ‘historical turn’. At the same time architectural discourses, and especially architectural historiography, were engaging with new theoretical fields such as gender studies or postcolonial studies, giving rise to a continued production of theoretically informed books and articles.

    The goal of this conference is to discuss the methodological challenges that come along with this historical gaze towards theory, by focusing on the concrete processes in which knowledge is involved. By screening the unspoken rules of engagement that the accounts of post-war architectural theory have agreed to and distributed, we want to point at dominant assumptions, biases and absences. While anthologies inevitably narrate history with rough meshes, we believe it is time to search for those versions of theory formation that have slipped through these nets of historiography, in order to question the nature of theory and the challenges it poses to historians. How do you do historical research on something as intangible as theory, or in a broadened sense, the knowledge of architecture?

    We are in other words not only interested in what theorists and practicing architects were arguing for, but also how, why and where they did so. Looking at case-studies, the singular and ‘minor’ expressions of theory, the local discourses and the different formative contexts (e.g. education, publication culture) can be subjected to careful scrutiny. We particularly welcome case-studies from the 1960s to the 1990s that deal with one or more topics formulated in the full CFP:

    A) THE PLACE OF KNOWLEDGE

    1. Theory’s Geography
    2. The Expressions of Knowledge
    3. The Agendas of Theory

    B) THE FIGURE OF KNOWLEDGE

    1. Minor Historiography
    2. The Making of the Architectural Theorist

    C) THE TIME OF KNOWLEDGE

    1. Problems of Periodization
    2. Architectural Theory and Postmodernity
    3. Problems of Historical Distance

    This two-day conference aims to bring together both young and established scholars from every discipline that is able to engage with the topics outlined above. Confirmed keynotes are Joan Ockman, Ákos Moravánszky and Łukasz Stanek.

    We’re happy to receive abstracts of up to 300 words until the 15th of June, 2016. Abstracts will be anonymously reviewed by an international scientific committee. Authors will be notified of acceptance on the 15th of July 2016. In order to provide a solid conference, we expect full papers one month in advance of the conference, i.e. 1st of January, 2017.

    Please note that there will be a conference fee for participants of maximum €150 and a reduced price for students.
  • Architecture, Media, Politics, Society

    London | Dates: 08 Jun – 01 Jul, 2016
    Architecture_MPS is calling for articles for forthcoming editions in 2016 and 2017. Journal themes revolve around the relationship of architecture and the built environment with questions of the politics, media and society. Multidisciplinary papers are welcomed as particularly pertinent to the journal’s diverse perspective. Areas of interest include (but are not restricted to): architecture, urbanism, regeneration, new technologies, heritage, cultural and political identity, socio-cultural symbolism, mediated representation and environments. Historical papers should seek to draw contemporary issues into their debates. The journal publishes two volumes per year. Each volume is contains four issues. Individual issues are published on the first day of each month during the publication cycle. Articles submitted for peer review should be between 5,000 – 7,000 words in length. You should also submit a full CV and a 300 word abstract. For complete submission instructions visit: http://architecturemps.com/submissions/ Abstracts and works in progress can be submitted for preliminary consideration.
  • Call for Participants: American Library Association Program on Art & Architecture in Literature

    Dates: 07 Jun – 01 Jul, 2016
    Are you a Chicago-area art historian? Have you researched or written about Chicago’s rich art and architectural history? Have you explored the city’s many museum and academic art collections, particularly special or rare books or artists books? The ACRL Arts Section and Literatures in English Section are co-sponsoring a program for the 2017 American Library Association annual conference in Chicago, IL, to be held June 22-27, 2017. We are looking for speakers interested in presenting on anything within the realm of Chicago-based art and architecture in literature. You will be given between 20 minutes to a half-hour to present followed by engaging discussion with audience members (academic, public, and special collections librarians). There is funding available for non-librarian speaker expenses, including hotel and transportation. Please submit your ideas to us by Friday, July 1. We will notify you of acceptance no later than Friday, July 15. Conference program proposals are due September 1, 2016. Thank you for your consideration, ACRL Arts Section 2017 Conference Program Planning Committee Shannon Marie Robinson, smr87@drexel.edu Kimberly Lesley, klesley@uarts.edu Mallory Sajewski, ML-Sajewski@wiu.edu
  • Books and the City Symposium

    Maastricht | Dates: 22 – 24 Jun, 2016
    Maastricht University and Van Eyck Academie, Netherlands, June 22 - 24,
    2016

    Books and the City Symposium

    Books and the City is an interdisciplinary conference that investigates the relationships between books and urban city spaces.  Cities are complex networks that exist in a constant state of transformation. More than just the built environment of the metropolis, cities are constituted through a range of cultural, geographic, social, political and economic dynamics. Drawing together a range of interdisciplinary perspectives, the symposium seeks to investigate the ways in which these aspects of the city have been articulated by books: their production, distribution and collection.

    Keynote speaker: Odile Heynders, Professor of Comparative Literature, Tilburg University, Netherlands.
     
    The full conference programme can be found at http://booksandthecity.nl

    To register please follow this link: 
    http://booksandthecity.nl/registration/

    Books and the City is a collaboration between Maastricht University, NL, the Van Eyck Academie, NL, and the University of Canterbury, NZ.
     
  • Where is the History of Design Going?

    Paris | Dates: 23 Jun, 2016
    June, 23 2016
    Salle Jullian room
    Institut national d’histoire de l’art, Galerie Colbert 2, rue Vivienne 75002 Paris, France

    Organized by Stéphane LAURENT
    University Pantheon-Sorbonne
    The history of design gradually established as a specific domain of research with dedicated publications since the late 1970s. It differentiated from the history of decorative arts and architecture and anchored to the field of the history of art. At that time, design as practice began to span after developing since the beginning of the industrial revolution in England in the Eighteenth century. Thus, the affirmation of the design as a creative industry and the sufficient consistency of its own history made possible to make observations and analysis.

    The first publications remained in the wake of engaged writers such as Nikolaus Pevsner and Siegfried Giedon, who struggled to advocate modernity by using a methodology rather controversial than scientific. 
    The first graduate courses in design history were often delivered by art historians in art history programs or in art schools. The approach was rationally based on “heroes” actors and “masterpieces” objects, while taking into account other factors including technical, artistic, social and economical aspects. The discipline strengthened until being able to establish, develop and support academic journals, programs and societies dealing with the history of design. The richness of the analysis, and the will to open the history of design to a cross-cultural vision brought up a new thinking. The change happened at a time when new methodologies like gender studies, post-colonialism, material history significantly modified the interpretation of art and contemporary art. Hence, part of the history of design rooted into a history of material culture.

    In France, where the history of design came later and in a more limited way, the influence of philosophy or "French theory" remained dominant after the outstanding works of Roland Barthes and Jean Baudrillard and the intellectual debates from the Sixties to the Eighties about the relations of sociology, anthropology, semiotics, aesthetics or psychoanalysis to art. However, a history of design based on sources such as archives is also active and aims to a better acknowledgment. It leads to a comprehensive and innovative approach of a rich heritage of design, which remains widely unknown and requires a close connection with museums, sources and collections.

    The purpose of the symposium is to demonstrate the relevance of the history of design as a research field and the accuracy of its various readings. Experts will share their experience and vision. Benefiting from the advanced research in the UK and from diverse contributions, the conference will also shed light on a nascent and scattered but active and rich discipline in France.

    Speakers
    Mr. Alain Barbaret, Direcrtor of the Mobilier National et des manufactures des Gobelins, de Beauvais et de la Savonnerie.
    Dr. Hab. Françoise Ducros, curator at the Mobilier national.
    Dr. Cloé Fontaine-Pitiot, curator at the Musée national d’art moderne-Centre de création industrielle, Centre Georges Pompidou.
    Dr. Hab. Stéphane Laurent, University Pantheon-Sorbonne.
    Dr. Asdis Olafsdottir, Administrator of the Maison Louis Carré and Editor of ArtNord journal.
    Dr. Penny Sparke, professor and pro vice-chancellor, Kingston University, UK.
    Dr. Jonathan Woodham, professor, University of Brighton, UK.

    Program

    9h00 Welcome of participants.

    9h30 Introduction by Hervé Barbaret.

    10h Stéphane Laurent, L’Histoire du design en France, états des lieux.

    10h30 Penny Sparke, The History of the History of Design: A Personal Perspective.

    11h Break.

    11h30 Asdis Olafsdottir, La recherche sur le design finlandais en
    France: Alvar Aalto, d'Artek à la maison Louis Carré.

    12h Discussions.

    12h30 Lunch break.

    14h Jonathan Woodham, Globalizing Design History in the 21st Century: 
    remapping and repositioning design history and culture.

    14h30 Françoise Ducros, L’Archipel créatif du Mobilier national et des manufactures nationales.

    15h Cloé Pitiot, Conserver, exposer, diffuser le design.

    15h30 Discussions & Conclusions.

    16h45 Visit of the design collections and resources of the Musée National d’art moderne-Centre de création industrielle, Centre Georges Pompidou.

    With the support of the Society of Friends of the Musée national d’art moderne Centre Pompidou and the Design History Society.
     
  • CFP: Minimalism: Location Aspect Moment (Southampton, 14-15 Oct 16)

    Southampton | Dates: 06 – 29 Jun, 2016
    University of Southampton/Winchester School of Art, October 14 - 15,
    2016
    Deadline: Jun 29, 2016

    Minimalism: Location Aspect Moment

    14-15 October 2016

    University of Southampton/Winchester School of Art

    Confirmed Keynote Addresses:
    Dr Renate Wiehager (Head of the Daimler Art Collection,
    Stuttgart/Berlin)
    Professor Keith Potter (Reader in Music, Goldsmiths, University of
    London)
    Professor Redell Olsen (Professor of Poetics, Royal Holloway, University of London) (Keynote Performance Lecture)

    When the object comes to itself, abstracting can end, and so can expressiveness. This is one of the thoughts underpinning minimalism in art, but far from the only one, as minimalist sculpture, in particular, began reconfiguring the gallery space, or even the space in which art could happen. The minimalist impulse is to drive creativity into forms so simple, or more accurately, so formal they had to reflect upon themselves while reflecting the viewer in a specular frenzy under cover of nothing happening. The paradoxes of minimalism suggest an equal possibility of de-formation, of formless process. For some time, critics were not happy, understandably, given the rejection of reflection that the radically simplified objects presented. But a consensus has emerged, one that focuses on, and repetitively/compulsively reproduces, a unifying vision of American key artists (Judd, Morris, Flavin, Andre…) of the 1960s. Likewise, a seamless tie binds this art with American minimalist music (Glass, Reich, Adams); but the reality of artistic production across media and forms was far more varied and geographically widespread.

    One of the purposes of this Minimalism: Location Aspect Moment is to expand our conception of what minimalism was, where it happened, who was making it, why, and how it extends through time until now. It is clear that the minimalist impulse happened in cross-national encounters (such as the 1967 show Serielle Formationen in Frankfurt) and that Europe was fertile ground for explorations in serial works, in playing with the prospect of singular forms and systematic thinking. Admitting the significance of the naming of the idea of minimalism in the 1960s, we want to look back to earlier versions of the reductionist, repetitive, singularising or multiplying intents of core minimalist endeavour. In short, we wish to see what an expanded field of minimalism looks like, sounds like.

    We want to hear about literature (& writing ABC), dance, building, interior design (& Good Design), gardens (& total fields), science, cybernetics, philosophy, painting, politics, installation, video, cinema, bodily exercise. We want to think about minimalism’s relation to modernism, and how exactly post-minimalism works. We want to think about the softening of minimalism in the 1980s, a twisting of modernist ideals into décor-discipline. We want to recognise the broad scope of projects of reduction, of elimination of the conformities of difference in favour of radical recurrence and stasis.

    Contributions are sought from all disciplines; collaborative, creative and cross-media proposals are welcome. Conceived and curated by Dr Sarah Hayden (English, Southampton), Professor Paul Hegarty (University College Cork) with Professor Ryan Bishop (Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton).

    Please send an abstract of <300 words to minimalismLAM@gmail.com by June 29th 2016.
  • Ornament by Design

    London | Dates: 08 – 13 Jun, 2016
    Ornament by Design examines the interplay between ornament and architecture in drawing.   It traces the manifold ways in which the subtle, seductive lines of ornament can transform the surface of buildings and things into objects of desire.  The display presents a range of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French drawings: architectural elevations and sections, designs for ceilings and garden ornaments, capriccios and studies for specific motifs such ornamental brackets and frames.

    In the on-line catalogue below you will find additional information and extended discussion of the works exhibited.  Also included, is a brief anthology of eighteenth-century perspectives on ornament and a corresponding selection of voices provided in podcasts by scholars, curators and conservators today.  The section terms will introduce you to the vocabulary of ornament and sources will direct you to historical and critical writing on ornament and design to develop your interest.  In games you will discover resources to make your own architectural and ornament drawings.
  • CFP: Universities Art Association of Canada Conference (Montreal, 27-30 Oct 16)

    Montreal | Dates: 03 – 24 Jun, 2016
    Proposals for papers shall not exceed 150 words and are to be submitted to the individual Session Conveners for consideration (please see below under “Conference Regulations” for further guidelines about proposals). 

    Most sessions are composed of three or four 20-minute papers. This leaves time in the 90-minute slot for formal responses or questions from the audience. Each session must have one or a maximum of two Chair(s) who are not also speaking in the session.
    Therefore, if present Session Conveners (to whom prospective participants should submit their abstracts for consideration) wish to give a paper in their session, they must find a Chair for that session. Other formats, such as roundtable discussions, must also
    have a Chair who stands outside the discussion and moderates it.

    In order to permit the widest possible variety of sessions, double sessions are not usually permitted. Decisions to permit double sessions lie with the Session Planning Committee for the conference, who will inform chairs/conveners who petition for such sessions whether or not this will be possible within the program structure.
  • CFP: The Historiography of Early Modern Architecture (Chicago, 30 Mar-1 Apr 2017)

    Chicago | Dates: 01 – 04 Jun, 2016
    Renaissance Society of America (RSA) 2017 Conference, Chicago, The Palmer House Hilton

    Session Sponsored by the European Architectural History Network
    Contributor: Elizabeth Merrill

    Since the Renaissance itself, the history of early-modern architecture has been a multifaceted discipline. Antonio Manetti established the biographic format in his Life of Brunelleschi, an approach that was later developed in Vasari’s Lives.  In the same period, individuals like Giuliano da Sangallo and Francesco di Giorgio sought to elucidate architectural history through their discovery, or one might say reconstruction, of Roman antiquities. Similarly, the overwhelming interest in Vitruvius not only generated new histories of architecture, but also drove architectural practices and colored the way in which architects were perceived. The modes of scholarly inquiry initiated in the Renaissance have had long afterlives. The great interest in architectural proportions, based both on ancient models and long practiced building traditions, preoccupied theorists like Serlio and Palladio, and centuries later, was resumed by Erwin Panofsky, Rudolf Wittkower and Branko Mitrovic, among others. Correspondingly, the concern with prolonged building processes and the historical valuation of the resultant architecture has captured significant attention. The problems involved in “building-in-time” were outlined in Alberti’s theory of architecture, commented upon by Michelangelo, and in recent decades have been explored by Howard Burns and Marvin Trachtenberg.

    This session invites papers that consider the historiography of Renaissance architecture – that is, the history of scholarly understandings of early-modern European architecture (c.1400 – 1700). 
    What are the sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches that have directed the history of Renaissance architecture and what implications do they carry? How do regional or national traditions of early-modern architectural history vary? On what are these traditions based and what are their biases? Papers might also discuss architect-historians like Inigo Jones, Christopher Wren, John Webb, Jacques-François Blondel, and Tommaso Temanza, and how they translated the history of Renaissance architecture in practice. In a similar vein, papers might reflect on how Renaissance architectural history been taught. What is the training of the architectural historian and how does this impact the discipline? 
    How have developments in digital technology redirected early-modern architectural history? And what might future developments bring?

    Paper proposals that stem from original research should be submitted as a Word document or PDF to Saundra Weddle (sweddle@drury.edu) and Elizabeth Merrill (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com) by June 4, 2016. 
    Please include the following information: presenter’s full name; academic affiliation and title; e-mail address; paper title (15-word maximum); paper abstract (150-word maximum); and a short bio (300-word maximum). For CV guidelines and models see: 
    http://www.rsa.org/page/2017Chicago.
     
  • City of the Soul: Rome and the Romantics

    New York | Dates: 17 Jun – 11 Sep, 2016
    Rome exists not only as an intensely physical place, but also as a romantic idea onto which artists, poets, and writers project their own imaginations and longings. City of the Soul examines the evolving image of Rome in art and literature with a display of books, manuscripts, prints, photographs, and drawings.

    This groundbreaking exhibition considers the ever-evolving identities of Rome during a pivotal period in the city’s history, 1770–1870, when it was transformed from a papal state to the capital of a unified, modern nation. Venerable monuments were demolished to make way for government ministries and arteries of commerce. Building projects and improvements in archaeological techniques revealed long forgotten remnants of the ancient metropolis. A tourist’s itinerary could include magnificent ruins, ecclesiastical edifices, scenic vistas, picturesque locales, fountains, gardens, and side trips to the surrounding countryside.

    The exhibition juxtaposes a century of artistic impressions of Rome through a superb selection of prints and drawings by recognized masters such as Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778), J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851), and Edward Lear (1812–1888) along with lesser known artists whose work deserves greater attention.

    The invention of photography also influenced the image of the city. Photographers consciously played on the compositions of Piranesi and earlier masters of the veduta tradition, while at the same time exploiting the expressive potential of this new medium. As the meditative, measured pace of the Grand Tour gave way to the demands of organized tourism, they supplied their new clientele with nostalgia as well as novelty in their views of the Eternal City.
  • Reading the Walls: From Tombstones to Public Screens

    Glasgow | Dates: 01 – 06 Jun, 2016
    From dedicatory inscriptions on Greek architectural monuments to the three-dimensional lettering affixed to the fac?ade of the Bauhaus, the neon signs of Las Vegas, and the unofficial marks left by cans of spray paint, words on buildings can both overcome and augment the limits of architecture?s ability to communicate to a broad public. Scholars working in a variety of contexts have begun to explore the ways in which text informs historical interpretations and understanding of buildings and urban spaces but typically position their analysis within the confines of relatively narrow historical and disciplinary boundaries. This session seeks to build on that body of work by exploring the relationship between architecture and its inscriptions in a variety of political, geographical, and historical contexts.

    We especially welcome papers that explore the following questions: How does epigraphy influence a building?s form and composition? What is its role within discourses of power, democratic, or totalitarian? Does it simply ?fill the gap? between intention and reception in architecture?s quest to convey meaning? What can faded, deleted, re-contextualised or overwritten inscriptions tell us of a building?s pasts, its successive uses and shifting meanings? How can it control memory as a self- conscious effort to harness the past? How did the interplay of text/abstraction vs. representation/ornament shape avant-garde modernist discourse and practice? How is its use and form related to larger cultural shifts? Can branding, advertising and public screens be considered contemporary forms of this ancient practice? And if so, how do they operate?

    Session Chairs: Flavia Marcello, Swinburne University of Technology, and Lucy Maulsby, Northeastern University

    Deadline: June 6, 2016 at 5 pm CDT
     
  • CFP: Architecture and the Environment (RSA Session) (30 Mar-1 Apr 17)

    Chicago | Dates: 26 May – 01 Jun, 2016
    Deforestation, air pollution, endangered species, depleted natural resources and other environmental concerns were on the mind of early modern architects, patrons, and all those concerned with the art and act of building. During the age of exploration, ports and shipyards, cities and buildings were built through the manipulation and management of natural resources. This panel invites papers that investigate new building enterprises (cities and buildings, landscape architecture, ships and ports, mines, water basins, etc.) in terms of their effects on the environment.

    Scholars working in and on any geographical region are welcome to propose a paper.

    Papers might consider case studies analyzing single individuals and their ideas, for example, in 1582, Philip II, the builder of the Escorial, expressed to his government minister his concern for the conditions of the forests during his travel to central Castile. He called for the conservation of forests and voiced his fear “…that those who come after us will have much to complain of if we leave them depleted, and please God we do not see it in our time.” (Cited in Henry Kamen, The Escorial: Art and Power in the Renaissance, p. 73).

    Other topics might include eco-critical interpretations of primary documents and texts, poetry, and/or drama; re-examining architectural treatises for environmental concerns; or looking at buildings and landscapes themselves in different ways.

    Please send proposals with CV to Katie Jakobiec, katie.jakobiec@ed.ac.uk by June 1.
  • CFP: Utopia: Whither the Future? ICLS Graduate Conference (New York, 22-23 Sep 16)

    New York | Dates: 26 May – 30 Jun, 2016
    Institute for Comparative Literature and Society Graduate Conference
    Columbia University, New York
    September 22nd & 23rd, 2016

    With keynote speaker Michael Hardt, Duke University Professor and Director of the Marxism & Society Certificate Program and Bass Fellow

    What are the stakes of utopia today? How can we understand utopia in history, whether in theory or practice? Are utopias possible, or even desirable? This year's Columbia ICLS Graduate Conference will confront some of the challenges posed by various utopian visions and projects: we want to emphasize the value of comparative perspectives in thinking about utopias, whether across historical periods, societies and imaginaries, or from different academic angles.

    Those interested in participating may want to consider the following categories:

    The Past. What can we learn from historical utopias? Why have so many utopian visions produced dystopian realities? How have utopian theories related to attempts to put them into practice? To the extent that we can talk about discrete utopian models, how can we learn from them? Are they always predisposed to fail?

    The Present. From Athens to Cairo to Hong Kong to New York, discontent with the present order has been palpable. But where are the alternatives? Where are the potential, and perhaps even practicable, visions for a better world? How is our present conditioned by past visions of the future? Reflexively, what is the role of academia in utopia? Is there a tension between the rigor of academic approaches and the drives of utopian desires? 

    The Future?

    The Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS) at Columbia University invites a variety of approaches, both applied and theoretical, from the worlds of academia, art and activism for its Graduate Conference 2016. The panels will be moderated by Columbia faculty.

    Possible subjects include:
    Planetary studies; The Politics of Cosmos; Religion; Justice;
    Posthumanism; Animal Studies; Vegetable life; Ecology, Cybernetics;
    Political Economy; History of Economic Thought; Capitalism; Communism;
    Society; Empire; Commonwealth; Nationalism; Cosmopolitanism; Democracy;
    New media and technologies; Science and Technology Studies; Technophilia;
    Premodern utopias; Ancient radicals; Utopias in Antiquity; 
    The afterlife of More’s Utopia;
    Dystopia; Heterotopia;
    Human Rights; NGOs; Humanitarianism; Philanthropy; New Utilitarianism; ...

    Please send a 300-word abstract and 100-word bio to iclscolumbia2016@gmail.com by June 30, 2016. Decisions will be made and successful applicants informed by mid-July. Successful applicants will be required to submit the final draft of their papers by September 1, 2016. 
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