Recent Opportunities

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  • IFLA Arts Section Satellite Conference -- August 2016

    Dates: 02 Jan – 12 Feb, 2016
    The digital revolution, space and economics pressures, and a trend towards collaborative work have all stimulated a demand for libraries to re-invent themselves as physical spaces. Art and design libraries face particular challenges in this arena. While aspiring to embody those same, high aesthetic and design standards that are the focus of their collections, art libraries must accommodate the gamut of historic and modern library materials—from printed books and ephemera to digital images. Their patrons are similarly diverse and demanding, ranging from scholarly researchers and creative artists to museum docents and the general public. The Art Libraries Section of IFLA in collaboration with the University of Notre Dame and the Midstates and Ohio Valley Chapters of ARLIS/NA (Art Libraries Society of North America) is organizing a three‐day conference in Chicago that will focus on modern and historic art library facilities. The Art Library as Place: Building on the Past, Building for the Future will consist of papers, panel discussions, site visits to local art museums and libraries, and tours of Chicago area architecture. We are seeking speakers who will highlight various aspects of our theme. Facilities for art, architecture, and design library collections and art archival collections—both stand-alone facilities and those integrated within larger institutions—are of interest. Subjects include, but are not limited to: • New art library construction projects • Art library preservation and renovation projects • Buildings adapted for use as art libraries • History of art library architecture • Art library fixtures and furnishings • Innovative planning methodologies and design collaborations • User studies—what patrons want from art library spaces • Art library facility standards • Environmental control in relation to facility design • Security issues in relation to facility design • Art library design and the digital shift • Speculative approaches to new paradigms of library design Proposals must be submitted by email no later than February 12th to: Sandra Ludig Brooke, Chair of the IFLA Art Libraries Section sbrooke@princeton.edu Viveca Pattison Robichaud, Co-Chair of the Local Organizing Committee vivecarobichaud@nd.edu Proposals must contain: • Email subject line “IFLA Chicago Paper Proposal” • Title of the paper • Author(s) of the paper • Paper abstract (500 words maximum) • Speaker’s name, professional affiliation, postal address, and email address • Biographical note on the speaker (100 words maximum) • Language of the paper • Papers must be original and not have been published or presented elsewhere • Invitations to speakers will be issued by March 1st
  • SESAH Annual Conference

    New Orleans | Dates: 29 Sep – 01 Oct, 2016
    Annual Conference of the Southeast Chapter, SAH in New Orleans, LA, featuring keynote speakers, paper sessions, posters, and architectural tours over three days (Sept. 29th-Oct. 1st 2016)
  • University of Pennsylvania's Change Over Time Issue - Design & History, Spring, 2018

    Dates: 22 Jan – 01 Apr, 2016
    Change is essential to sustaining heritage sites, enabling them to meet new uses and evolving expectations, goals and requirements. Historic settings gain deeper meaning through thoughtful contemporary design, and contemporary design is enriched by rigorous dialogue with historic environs. These premises are fundamental to contemporary heritage planning, yet remain highly controversial within the realms of both cons ervation and design. Can preservation guidelines establish clear expectations without predicting design outcomes? How abstract can design references to the building or context be before they disrupt the integrity of the setting or meaning? And just as important, how should we train designers and regulators to ensure the best possible outcomes? This issue of PennDesign's scholarly journal will explore strategies for design in historic contexts. We welcome submissions on a range of topics: analyzing and documenting character-defining features of heritage settings, particularly those beyond the visual and two dimensional; regulations that promote sensitive yet organic growth and development of conservation areas; and critical analysis of design solutions for landscapes, buildings, neighborhoods and archeological sites. Papers may include theoretical explorations, historical examples or critiques of case studies. Articles are generally restricted to 7,500 or fewer words (the approximate equivalent of thirty pages of double-spaced, twelve-point type) and may include up to ten images. Shorter case studies emphasizing initial design responses and intent will also be considered to explore how designers approach the problem of historical context. Please submit an abstract by 1 April 2016; authors will be notified by 1 June 2016, and papers due early May 2017. Author guidelines will be provided, or email Kecia Fong at cot@design.upenn.edu or Guest Editor Pamela Hawkes FAIA (pwh@scattergooddesign.com) for further information.
  • Friends of Charnley-Persky House Valentine's Reception

    Dates: 11 Feb, 2016
    The Friends of Charnley-Persky House are invited to join us for a special Valentine's reception on February 11. As we thank you for your generous and ongoing support of this National Historic Landmark, we’ll have some exciting announcements about plans for Charnley-Persky House in 2016. Wine and refreshments will be served.

    Attendance for this event is by invitation only. Please RSVP by February 4th to Carolyn Garrett at cgarrett@sah.org, or 312-573-1365. 

    Date: Thursday, February 11
    Time: 5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Location: 1365 N. Astor Street, Chicago

     
  • Social Science History Association, Annual Meeting

    Chicago | Dates: 17 – 20 Nov, 2016
    CALL FOR PAPERS 40TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCE HISTORY ASSOCIATION The Culture Network invites you to submit panels, papers, and book sessions proposals for the 41st annual meeting of the Social Science History Association , November 17-20, 2016 in Chicago. For more information on the meeting as well as the call for proposals, please refer to the SSHA website: www.ssha.org . The deadline for submissions is February 20, 2016 . The theme for this year's conference is Beyond Social Science History: Knowledge in an Interdisciplinary World We welcome proposals on this theme and on the broader research network’s continuing interests in culture and its relationship to historical processes and phenomena around the globe. In addition to single papers, we also welcome full panel proposals, which should include at least 1) four papers , a 2) discussant , and a 3) chair . Book panel ("Author meets Critics") proposals are also warmly welcomed.
  • Call for Papers

    Chicago | Dates: 23 Jan – 20 Feb, 2016
    CALL FOR PAPERS 40TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCE HISTORY ASSOCIATION
  • 2016 Conference on Illinois History: Call for Papers

    Springfield | Dates: 06 – 07 Oct, 2016
    Proposals for individual papers or panels on any aspect of Illinois’ history, culture, politics, geography, literature, and archaeology are requested for the Conference on Illinois History. The Conference especially welcomes submissions exploring the upcoming bicentennial of statehood. We encourage submissions from professional and avocational historians, graduate students, and those engaged in the study of Illinois history at libraries, historic sites, museums, and historical societies. Proposals for teacher workshops. Are you a teacher who has created an innovative, comprehensive, or timely curriculum on some aspect of Illinois’ history, culture, politics, geography, literature, or archaeology? Share your expertise with other teachers at the Conference on Illinois History. The deadline for proposals is May 1, 2016. To submit your proposal for a paper, panel, or teacher workshop, send: 1. A one page summary of the topic, including a description of the major primary and secondary sources used. 2. A one-page resume of participant(s).
  • Arnold W. Brunner Grant

    New York | Dates: 16 Jan – 01 Feb, 2016
    AIA New York is currently rallying for applicants for the Arnold W. Brunner Grant.This prestigious award is designed for mid-level architects to pursue architectural investigations that will effectively contribute to the knowledge, teaching, or practice of the art and science of architecture. The project must engage in contemporary architectural issues within a local and global context. The sole recipient will be awarded up to $15,000. Deadline: February 1, 2016.
  • VAF Conference Grants

    Dates: 01 – 01 Feb, 2016
    The VAF announces 2 awards to support attendance at its annual meeting, which will take place this year in Durham, N.C., June 1-4: the Access Award for first-time attendees, and the Ambassador Award for groups of students. For more information about the conference visit vafweb.org ACCESS AWARD   In an effort to bring fresh voices to the study of vernacular buildings and landscapes the Access Award supports first-time attendance by scholars and students with limited professional exposure to the fields of architectural history and vernacular studies, as well as by practitioners and independent scholars in the field. There is no geographic restriction on the award and local practitioners, scholars, and students may apply. Winners are not required to give a paper at the meeting, although they may. The award will cover the cost of registration for the conference including tours. Winners who live more than 50 miles from the conference site will also receive a stipend of $300 for travel and lodging, to be presented at the conference. Winners, including those giving papers at the meeting, are required to write an article to be published in the VAF’s newsletter, VAN, discussing what they learned as first-time attendees. Applications are due February 1, 2016. For instructions and more information visit vafweb.org/Access-Award. AMBASSADOR AWARDS The VAF Ambassadors Awards provide funding for student groups (undergraduate and graduate) from North American institutions, with a faculty sponsor, to attend VAF's annual conference. We hope through this program to enhance the VAF's recruitment of students, to diversify the membership and interest in the work of the VAF, to provide support to programs that teach vernacular architecture, and to increase the VAF's visibility on campuses. During the conference, Award recipients are encouraged to use social media to communicate with a broader audience about their experiences as a participant in the conference. Following conference attendance, Award recipients are expected to act as "ambassadors" for the VAF, working to promote the study, documentation, and preservation of ordinary buildings and landscapes.  Each group of Ambassadors must also submit a written summary of its experiences to the fellowship chair.  The summary, as well as a group photograph, will be published in the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s newsletter, VAN.  Applications are due February 1, 2016. For instructions and more information visit vafweb.org/Ambassadors-Awards.
  • Take Note and Remember: The Commonplace Book and its American Descendants

    Asheville | Dates: 17 – 20 Jul, 2016
    How do we manage information overload and make sense of the world? Early attempts are found in commonplace books sketchbooks and scrapbooks. Explore this topic at an NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers in Asheville NC.
  • inter≈ photography and architecture

    Pamplona | Dates: 02 – 04 Nov, 2016
    International Conference inter≈ photography and architecture Museo Universidad de Navarra, 2-4 November 2016 CFP Deadline February, 15th
  • The Future of the Past: Digitizing Cultural Property in an Era of Destruction

    New York | Dates: 22 – 23 Jan, 2016
    Symposium associated with the exhibition “The Missing: Rebuilding the Past” Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice City University of New York This symposium offers a roundtable conversation among scholars, artists, and technological pioneers working at the leading edge of digital cultural heritage. They will discuss the promises and perils of new technologies – what will we gain? what might we lose? – as well as explain their visions for the most crucial projects and the most interesting technologies and strategies. Audience participation is expected and encouraged.
  • American Council of Learned Societies Public Fellows Program

    Washington | Dates: 14 Jan – 24 Mar, 2016
    The National Park Service, National Capital Region (NPS-NCR) is pleased to announce its selection as a host organization for the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Public Fellows Program, a career-building fellowship designed to expand the reach of doctoral education in the humanities. In 2016, the Public Fellows Program will place up to 21 recent PhDs from the humanities and humanistic social sciences in two-year staff positions at partnering organizations in government and the nonprofit sector. Fellows will participate in the substantive work of these organizations and will receive professional mentoring, an annual stipend of $65,000, and health insurance. The NPS fellow will serve as the "Cultural Resources Public Outreach Coordinator" in the Cultural Resources Division of the Office of Resource Stewardship & Science at the headquarters of the National Capital Region in Washington, DC. The fellowship competition will begin accepting applications on January 14. The application deadline is March 24, 2016 (8pm EDT). For more information, please visit http://www.acls.org/programs/publicfellowscomp/. ACLS Public Fellows is a fellowship program offered by the American Council of Learned Societies with generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Please direct all inquiries about the fellowship program to ACLS.
  • ROB | ARCH 2016

    Sydney | Dates: 14 – 19 Mar, 2016
    The ROB | ARCH2016 conference offers a unique and dynamic hands-on experience of cutting-edge robotic technologies with application for the design, architectural and creative industries. In a series of workshops, you can engage with live robots and observe robots working with each other. It will bring together architects, artists, designers, fabricators and industry leaders and act as a platform for researchers and industry to exchange expertise, explore methods, compare techniques and forge new connections.
  • Apply for Summer NEH Institute for College and University Teachers

    New York | Dates: 12 Jan – 01 Mar, 2016
    The American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York Graduate Center will host a two-week NEH Summer Institute for college and university teachers in July 2016 on the Visual Culture of the American Civil War and its Aftermath. Applications to participate will be accepted via mail, e-mail, and our online application system until March 1, 2016. The Institute will focus on the era's array of visual media--including the fine arts, ephemera, and photography--to examine how information and opinion about the war were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans' understanding on both sides of the conflict. Guided by a team of four faculty that represents the range of work in the field, Institute participants will hear daily lectures and presentations by noted historians, art historians, and archivists; take part in hands-on sessions in significant museums and collections; and attend new media lab workshops. These Institute activities will introduce participants to the rich body of scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War era visual culture, encourage them to explore avenues for further research in the field, and assist them in developing their own research and/or teaching projects. Reading assignments preceding and during the Institute will prepare participants for full engagement in the Institute¹s discussions and activities. And time will be provided to prepare individual projects, undertake research at local archives, and meet with the four principal institute faculty members as well as guest speakers.
  • Current Issue Studies on Art and Architecture 2015

    Dates: 12 Jan – 31 Dec, 2016
    Current issue of Kunstiteaduslikke Uurimusi / Studies on Art and Architecture 2015, vol. 24, no. 3/4. Text in English, German and Estonian. All articles are accompanied with a lengthy summary of ca. 4 pp.
  • IIT PhD Program Spring 2016 Research in Progress Lecture Series

    Chicago | Dates: 14 Jan – 05 May, 2016
    The PhD Program's Spring 2016 Research in Progress speakers series has been announced. The series brings to IIT Architecture the latest research by faculty, PhD candidates, visiting scholars and scholars from throughout Chicago and around the world.
  • International Conference / inter: photography and architecture

    Pamplona | Dates: 02 – 04 Nov, 2016
    Modern architecture cannot be altogether understood without the dissemination of its images. The blending between photography and architecture proved to be particularly fruitful in constructing the modern visual discourse. Architects became conscious of the full potential of photography beyond its documentary value, and photographers of architecture —architects themselves occasionally—, shortly became important composers and broadcasters of that narrative. Simultaneously, the discourse around photography has become more and more complex, expanding its scope and surpassing a more traditional approach. XIXth century photographic documentation gradually gave in its way to new forms of exploration of reality, opening a wide range of possibilities and raising photographic and visual culture to a different level. Photographers do not develop their work in a documentary sense as much as they seek to build a new reality perceived in subjective terms. They are involved in creating a new way of understanding the world. There is some consensus —as well as a subtler criticism— on the overflowing of their disciplinary boundaries. Those boundaries seem to be blurred bringing photography closer and closer to visual arts, claiming this way that same autonomy and their own place in the construction of contemporary discourse. The question arises as to whether the relationship between photography and architecture provides new creative processes, not just simple combinations, and whether they affect and experience each other in such a way they bring to light new ways of understanding both fields. The committee encourages experienced and junior scholars to send abstracts, Spanish and English, exploring any of the above-mentioned topics. Selected authors will have the opportunity to present their contributions during the Conference. Accepted papers will appear in the conference proceedings publication that will be indexed in major international databases. Authors could be also awarded and invited to submit an extended version to be published as a chapter in a future publication edited by the organization. Please send a 400-word abstract along with a short CV by the on-line platform at the Conference website. Info by e-mail: inter2016@unav.edu Abstracts deadline submission: February 15th, 2016. Notification: March 14th, 2016 Paper submission deadline: September 1st, 2016 Sessions will take place at Museo Universidad de Navarra Scientific Committee Iñaki Bergera, Universidad de Zaragoza, Proyecto FAME Maristella Casciato, Getty Research Institute Valeria Carullo, RIBA Library Photographs Collection Horacio Fernández, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha Manolo Laguillo, Universidad de Barcelona Pedro Leâo Neto, Universidade do Porto Rafael Llano, Museo Universidad de Navarra Alberto Martín, Universidad de Salamanca Martino Stierli, MoMA Chief Curator of Architecture and Design
  • One-semester fellowships offered by the Mellon Initiative in Urban Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks, DEADLINE FEBRUARY 1, 2016

    Washington | Dates: 01 Sep, 2016 – 01 Jun, 2017
    As part of a new program in urban landscape studies funded by the Mellon Foundation, Dumbarton Oaks is offering fellowships for historians and designers pursuing advanced research in urban landscape topics, both historic and contemporary. The program is funded through the Foundation’s initiative in “Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities,” intended to foster the joint contributions that the humanities and the design and planning disciplines may make to the understanding of the processes and effects of burgeoning urbanization. Two fellowships will be offered each fall and spring, and are available to humanities scholars, landscape architects and urban designers. Field research funds are also available. The application deadline for the 2016-17 academic year is February 1, 2016. The Mellon Fellowships are intended to build constructive dialogue between them about the history and future of urban landscapes, encouraging them to bridge the gap between their professional modes of thinking. To foster this interchange, Dumbarton Oaks seeks candidates with a demonstrated capacity for cross-disciplinary work, and encourages collaborative applications from designers and historians working on similar topics or the same city. For additional information on the urban landscape initiative, see www.doaks.org/research/garden-landscape/mellon-initiative-in-urban-landscape-studies/overview. For fellowship terms and applications, see www.doaks.org/research/fellowships-and-grants/fellowships/mellon-fellowships-in-urban-landscape-studies. Any questions related to the Mellon Fellowship Program or to the suitability of proposed fellowship applications should be directed to Mellon@doaks.org. Preference will be given to candidates with final degrees such as PhD or MLA.
  • Anthropology and Architecture: Misplaced Conversations

    Dates: 01 – 30 Mar, 2016
    Anthropology and Architecture: Misplaced Conversations

    According to anecdote, Claude Levi-Strauss hosted Le Corbusier for a night when he was cultural counselor to the French Embassy in New York. The anthropologist and the architect, both notoriously voluble, had much to discuss, however all that is preserved of their conversation is a word of advice about interior design: Corbusier allegedly advised Levi-Strauss to leave an ornate salon designed by Stanford White untouched. Now is the time, for better or worse, to reconstruct two centuries of missing conversations.

    After all, Anthropology and Architecture have a filial history. Both occupy comparable positions within national academies, as autonomous but applied disciplines. However whereas architecture is understood as culturally intrinsic, the anthropologist usually studies culturally extrinsic phenomena. Perhaps as a result, the anthropologist has only been permitted limited entry into architectural discourse, and then often merely for the discussion of externalities such as “shelter”, myths of origin, or vernacular (and therefore untheoretical) architecture. This is a relationship that could be made much more nuanced, and more interesting.

    In the last century, both anthropology and architecture have both undergone what have been described as "linguistic turns". The adoption of Saussure's structuralist linguistics as an ordering schema by anthropologists, and anthropology's subsequent re-articulation of structuralism was not so much a "turn" as an act of intellectual anthropophagy—the complete incorporation of what had been a specific approach (applied to the study of kinship) and its re-emergence as a universal principle. In architecture, the linguistic turn has been much condemned, and yet its influence was arguably just as profound. Can a comparative disciplinary history of anthropology and architecture be written?

    We explicitly invite anthropologists to write about architecture, and architecture theorists to write about anthropology. What we seek is that deferred (but not deferential) conversation between Levi-Strauss and Corbusier, between Mary Douglas and Bruno Taut, between Semper and Warburg, between Latour and Doxiadis, between Mead and Neutra.
     
    Historically, architecture's techniques have often been put to the service of either political gesture, or commercial manipulation (or both). How can these gestures and manipulations be studied using anthropological techniques? What insights do contemporary in situ ethnographic methods offer to the design process, and how might they be more intelligently applied, from the first sketch to the post-occupancy survey? From Kon to Lefebvre to Lucius Burckhardt, what can field research teach the designer or the historian?

    Anthropology is particularly well equipped to study everyday transactions, as well as the rituals and ceremonies with which we mark life transitions—from the private to the public, from domestic life to death. These are also domains to which the design process feels itself called. In spite of shifting social norms around families, work and the distinction between private and public life, architectural typologies are surprisingly long lived. When the half life of a social form and its architectural expression do not match, what can be learned from their asynchrony?

    Global architectural history also calls for the inclusion of new critical perspectives. In the wake of the Great Kantō Earthquake, the Japanese anthropologist Wajiro Kon invented new methods of field research in order to document the response of the city to a traumatic event. In the process, he founded the mock discipline of "Modernologio", which took seriously the need to investigate  the hidden logic in everyday life. For Kon, anthropology was not a technique for examining alien cultures, but rather an alien perspective from which he could defamiliarise his own culture. Whether introverted, extroverted or reversed, what can the perspectives of anthropology offer this new global history?

    Figures of interest to authors might include, but are not limited to (in no particular order): Christopher Alexander, Konstantinos Doxiadis, Bruno Taut, Tim Ingold, Alfred Gell, Lucius Burckhardt, Wajiro Kon, Terunobu Fujimori, Andre Malraux, Tony Bennett, Jean-Louis Cohen, Gottfried Semper, Giancarlo Cataldi, Abby Warburg, Richard Neutra, Pierre Bourdieu, Mary Douglas, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Georges Canguilhem, Bruno Latour, Margaret Mead, Ernst Gombrich, Henri Lefebvre, Gregory Bateson, J. L. Austin, Marilyn Strathern

    The Architectural Theory Review, founded at the University of Sydney in 1996 and now in its twentieth year, is the pre-eminent journal of architectural theory in the Australasian region. Published by Taylor & Francis in print and online, the journal is an international forum for generating, exchanging, and reflecting on theory in and of architecture. All texts are subject to a rigorous process of blind peer review.

    Enquiries about this special issue theme, and possible papers, are welcome, please email the editor, Adam Jasper: adamjasper@gta.arch.ethz.ch

    The deadline for the submission of completed manuscripts is Monday, 30 March 2015. Please submit manuscripts via the journal’s website: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ratr When uploading your manuscript please indicate that you are applying for this special issue, for example: vol. 21.2 – Architecture and Anthropology.

    Manuscript submission guidelines can be found at: www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ratr20&page=instructions ——
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