Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • Safe Streets, Great Streets

    New York | Dates: 02 Mar, 2015

    AIA CES 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

    When: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM MONDAY, MARCH 2

    Where: At The Center   

    Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries, is a signature effort of the de Blasio administration. In Polly Trottenberg’s first year as Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT), the agency has undertaken a number of well-publicized initiatives to pursue this goal.

    Other NYCDOT programs are also making the City more accessible for pedestrians, bicyclists and New Yorkers with disabilities. A panel of six professionals from NYCDOT will talk about ongoing and new efforts including Vision Zero, the Plaza Program, Under the Elevated, accessibility, and improved project delivery, that are transforming the streets of New York.

    Presenters:
    Joshua Benson, Acting Assistant Commissioner, Street Improvement Projects, NYCDOT
    Ann Marie Doherty, Senior Director, Research, Implementation & Safety, NYCDOT
    Wendy Feuer, Assistant Commissioner, Urban Design+ Art + Wayfinding, NYCDOT
    Neil Gagliardi, Director Urban Design, NYCDOT
    Juan Martinez, Director of Strategic Initiatives, NYCDOT
    Rosa Rijos, Assistant Commissioner, Roadway Capital Management, NYCDOT
     Organized by: AIANY Transportation and Infrastructure Committee

    Price: Free for AIA members; $10 for non-members

    Register

  • BxW NYC

    New York | Dates: 02 Mar – 11 Apr, 2015

    Built by Women (BxW) is a social and educational initiative, celebrating women’s contributions to the built environment. In addition to recognizing and supporting the diverse women working in these professions, BxW provides both current professionals and students strong role models and mentors.

    Last fall, the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation (BWAF) launched a public competition for submissions of women-built sites. 98 diverse sites, designed, engineered, or constructed by women, reflecting strong design, have historical or cultural significance, or demonstrate substantial social or community impact, were selected by a jury representing the architectural, engineering, and construction professions.

    By profiling and visually mapping women’s work across the US, starting with NYC, BxW raises awareness about the spaces where we live, work, and play. BxW produces educational materials, pop-up exhibitions and panel discussions, walking tours, activity books, merchandise, and more.

    March 2, 2015 will kickstart a month-long BxW NYC exhibition at the Center for Architecture during Women’s History Month, with the support of the Women in Architecture committee of the AIA New York Chapter.

     BxW NYC Jurors:

    Deborah Berke, FAIA, Principal, Deborah Berke Partners
    Joan Blumenfeld, FAIA, Principal & Global Interior Design Director, Perkins + Will
    Aine Brazil, PE, Managing Principal, Thornton Tomasetti
    Fiona Cousins, PE, Principal, Arup
    Cheryl McKissack Daniel, President & CEO, McKissack & McKissack
    Andrea Leers, FAIA, Principal, Leers Weinzapfel Associates
    Audrey Matlock, FAIA, Principal, Audrey Matlock Architects
    Laura Starr, ASLA, Partner, Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects & Planners

    BxW NYC Advisor
    Andrew Dolkart, Director of the Historic Preservation Program and Professor of Historic Preservation, Columbia University

    BxW NYC Winners

    Funding for BxW NYC came from the New York Building Foundation and the New York Council for the Humanities.

    Exhibition Sponsors:
    Evenson/Best
    Knoll

    RELATED PROGRAMS

    Exhibition Opening 
    BxW NYC
    Monday, March 2, 6:00-8:00 PM

  • Chatter: Architecture Talks Back

    Chicago | Dates: 11 Apr – 12 Jul, 2015

    Architecture is a perpetual conversation between the present and the past, knowing full well that the future is listening. So what happens when this dialogue is influenced by contemporary modes of communication such as texting, Twitter, and Instagram? Chatter happens: ideas are developed, produced, and presented as open-ended or fragmented conversations and cohere through the aggregation of materials. Chatter: Architecture Talks Back looks at the diverse contemporary methods and approaches wielded by five emerging architects: Bureau Spectacular, Erin Besler, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, Formlessfinder, and John Szot Studio.

    Using a range of representational methods and formats—from drawings done by hand to those enabled by robots, from graphic novels to digital simulations—these practitioners embrace both age-old and cutting-edge technologies to engage with the architectonic timeline. Jimenez Lai of Bureau Spectacular references architectural history to develop a “mash-up” of ideas through which he opens up and re-theorizes architecture. The process and mission of Formlessfinder depend on the same fetishizing of form undertaken by previous generations of architects, while Fake Industries relies on copies to re-present work through a critical lens. Erin Besler questions the immediate acceptance of new technologies and explores issues of drawing and translation in architecture, and John Szot Studio produces digital videos that simulate possibilities for architecture to draw on overlooked social contexts.

    Today’s society has had a profound influence on the discipline of architecture, yet despite the utilization of current technologies, these contemporary works are not divorced from history. Chatter: Architecture Talks Back is about just that—having a dialogue, talking back to architecture of the past. Works from the Art Institute’s vast collection of architecture and design are presented alongside these five ultra-current practitioners to highlight this conversation. As these architects apply new technology to a confluence of historical influences and theories in order to conceive new designs and ideas, they are constantly expanding the dialogues within the legacy of their field. This dynamic installation makes readily apparent how each studio recognizes that the architectural past, though a shared language, is sometimes best understood with modern punctuation.

    Sponsors
    Support for this exhibition is provided by Celia and David Hilliard, the Butler-VanderLinden Family Fund for Architecture and Design, and the Architecture & Design Society.

  • The Midcentury Mood: Milton Schwartz in America, 1953–1965

    Chicago | Dates: 21 Mar – 11 Jul, 2015

    Despite his significant contributions to the Chicago skyline and groundbreaking early hotel design for the Las Vegas Strip, Milton Schwartz remains an under-recognized figure from an important period in American architecture. The son of an engineer, Schwartz studied at the University of Illinois, where he was inspired to become an architect by the lectures of Frank Lloyd Wright. After a few years in the construction industry during World War II, Schwartz founded his own Chicago architectural practice and soon completed his first project—a visionary co-op building, 320 Oakdale, combining passive solar technology with a dynamic aesthetic of glass, aluminum, and modern brise-soleil. Schwartz went on to specialize in high-rise apartment buildings and designs for leisure and hospitality, most notably his iconic tower and restaurants for the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. 

    With their modern forms, advanced engineering, and innovative materials, Schwartz’s award-winning hotels and motels reflect the attitude of the automobile and jet ages. For his work in Las Vegas, he paired this vocabulary of concrete, metal, and glass with fantastic new environments integrating water, color, lighting, and scenography. Among the first large resorts of the modern Las Vegas, the Dunes Hotel became a symbol of midcentury American decadence in both popular culture and the iconoclastic architectural theory of the postmodern era. Together, Schwartz’s beautifully rendered drawings of towers, hotels, signage, and interiors present images not only of heroic midcentury construction, but of the expanded languages of modern architecture in America.  

  • Arts, Humanities, and Complex Network at NetSci2015

    Zaragoza | Dates: 02 – 02 Jun, 2015
    We are delighted to invite submissions for Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015 taking place at the World Trade Center Zaragoza (WTCZ) in Spain, on Tuesday, June 2, 2015. Submission: For submission instructions please go to: http://artshumanities.netsci2015.net/ Deadline for submission: March 29, 2015. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 6, 2015. Abstract: For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneer work in the overlap of arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe, leveraging interaction between those areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion. In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focusing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences. Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations. As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q Keynote: As in previous years, we will feature a high-profile keynote from the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and/or network art. Best regards, The AHCN2015 organizers, Maximilian Schich*, Roger Malina**, and Isabel Meirelles*** artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com * Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA ** Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA *** Professor, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada
  • Cultural & Historic Preservation Conference -- The Remembered and the Forgotten: Preserving and Interpreting the Americas to 1820

    Newport | Dates: 22 – 24 Oct, 2015
    The Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island will hold its annual conference Oct. 22-24, 2015. The conference will focus on the preservation and interpretation of pre-1820 buildings, objects, and sites in the Americas, particularly in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy. As a key center of global trade, Newport occupied a principal place in the American landscape in the 17th and 18th centuries. Indeed, the social and economic relationships emanating from Newport spread out, linking Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and shaping the histories of millions of people throughout the colonial and into the early national period. Today, the legacy of this shared American past is materialized in buildings, furnishings, curated objects, and archaeological sites. The preservation and interpretation of these treasured resources poses challenges, but also provides many opportunities to connect professionals and the public and to improve our understanding of the “forgotten” experiences of groups whose voices are keenly absent in current histories. This public conference will include presentations, tours, student lightning talks and networking opportunities. The conference is presented by Salve Regina University in partnership with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Information on the conference is available at: www.salve.edu/chp2015.
  • The Remembered and the Forgotten: Preserving and Interpreting the Americas to 1820

    Newport | Dates: 24 Feb – 01 Mar, 2015
    The Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island will hold its annual conference Oct. 22-24, 2015. The conference will focus on the preservation and interpretation of pre-1820 buildings, objects, and sites in the Americas, particularly in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy. As a key center of global trade, Newport occupied a principal place in the American landscape in the 17th and 18th centuries. Indeed, the social and economic relationships emanating from Newport spread out, linking Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and shaping the histories of millions of people throughout the colonial and into the early national period. Today, the legacy of this shared American past is materialized in buildings, furnishings, curated objects, and archaeological sites. The preservation and interpretation of these treasured resources poses challenges, but also provides many opportunities to connect professionals and the public and to improve our understanding of the “forgotten” experiences of groups whose voices are keenly absent in current histories. This public conference will include presentations, tours, student lightning talks and networking opportunities. Papers in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy are especially encouraged. Proposals will be accepted for individual papers, complete panels and student lightning talks. The deadline to submit proposals is March 1, 2015. Notice of acceptance will be made on a rolling basis and no later than May 15, 2015.The conference is presented by Salve Regina University in partnership with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Information on the conference is available at: www.salve.edu/chp2015.
  • Mount Lebanon's North House: History and Legacy of a Shaker Masterpiece

    New York City | Dates: 19 – 19 Mar, 2015
    This illustrated lecture at the National Arts Club will explore a remarkable building from its construction in 1818 to its demolition in 1973. The Shakers built hundreds of buildings, each uniquely suited to its geography and function. While the village meetinghouse was revered as the architectural center of Shaker faith and practice, the family dwelling house was the building to which individuals felt most attached – their Shaker home. It was where they slept, ate, kept their clothing, and worshiped together as a family in daily religious exercises. The Mount Lebanon North Family Dwelling, often called simply “the North House,” was one such Shaker home. An interior room is preserved in the American Wing of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  • Sustainable Cities Design Academy

    Washington | Dates: 24 – 27 Feb, 2015
    Technical design assistance for public-private partnership teams who are working on conceptually designed projects that advance the sustainability goals for the neighborhoods / municipalities / regions where they are located.
  • VAF Chicago 2015

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 07 Jun, 2015

    Registration Now Open for VAF Chicago 2015!

    Please join us for the Vernacular Architecture Forum's 35th Annual Conference in Chicago from June 3 – 7, 2015.

    Click Here for Registration

    We will go “Out of the Loop” to explore new dimensions of Chicago’s built environment.  Our tours will go to unexpected places, including the sprawling industrial Calumet region, the ethnic crossroads of Devon Avenue, and the community building efforts of the Dorchester Project

    Our special events will take place in remarkable but relatively unknown vernacular venues, including Salvage One, Jazz Showcase, Miller Bathouse, and Boni Vino.

    For more, please visit the VAF Chicago 2015 website and subscribe to our Blog.  

  • SECAC Panel: Photographing Industry: Pittsburgh and Beyond

    Dates: 21 – 24 Oct, 2015
    Over the years, Pittsburgh and its industries have played host to several key photographic surveys. Beginning in 1907 as part of the pioneering Pittsburgh Survey, documentary photographer Lewis Hine recorded the complex relationship between the city's factories and its citizens. Roughly forty years later, W. Eugene Smith made nearly twenty thousand images of Pittsburgh, creating what he considered his finest work. In keeping with the spirit of these important projects, this panel seeks papers exploring the rich and complicated relationship between photography and industry. Topics of exploration may reflect the broad range of the subject, from the Industrial Revolution to the Information Age. The panel welcomes papers examining not only art and documentary, but also casual and vernacular photographic records of industry. Session chairs: Emily Morgan, Iowa State University, and James Swensen, Brigham Young University. Contact: emorgan@iastate.edu
  • Tour: Frank Lloyd Wright and Modernism in Indiana

    Indianapolis | Dates: 02 – 02 May, 2015
    Central Indiana holds a trove of architectural treasures. Some, like Frank Lloyd Wright’s Richard Davis House (1950) and John E. Christian House–Samara (1954) are tucked away in leafy enclaves, and some, like the midcentury modern wonders of Columbus, hide in plain sight. On the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy’s annual Out and About Wright tour, you’ll get to see both of Wright’s distinctive central Indiana works as well as several highlights around Indianapolis. We’ll depart from the Omni Severin Hotel starting at 8:30 a.m. to tour the local landmark Christian Theological Seminary (Edward Larrabee Barnes, 1966) and the 2012 AIA Honor Award-winning Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion (Marlon Blackwell Architects, 2010) in the 100 Acres Art & Nature Park at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. After a brief stop at local icon The Pyramids (Roche Dinkeloo and Associates, 1967), we’ll head out to Wright’s Samara house in West Lafayette, a copper fascia-adorned Usonian still occupied by its original owner, and Davis House in Marion, with its unique 38-foot central octagonal teepee (we are one of the very few groups to tour this unique Wright work!). All transportation and a seated lunch is included. We’ll return to the hotel around 6:30 p.m.
  • Art Deco Architecture of Camaguey, Cuba

    Chicago | Dates: 07 – 07 Mar, 2015
    Lecture on the Art Deco Architecture of Camaguey, Cuba Date: March 7, 2015 Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States Address: Roosevelt University, Wabash Building, 425 S. Wabash, Room 611 Website: chicagodeco.org/events
  • Designing a Home for Snow Monkeys

    Chicago | Dates: 23 Apr, 2015

    What does it take to design a brand-new zoo habitat? More than just manpower and money, creating a new exhibit also involves intensive training for zookeepers who will care for the animals and time for educators to develop a suite of enriching programs. In the case of Regenstein Macaque Forest—the zoo’s new home for Japanese snow monkeys—it also means hiring a specialized scientist to study the behavior and cognition of the resident monkeys. Learn how this amazing exhibit took shape from concept to construction and beyond.

    6–8 p.m.
    $17 ($14 for Lincoln Park Zoo members)
    18 and older
    Café at Wild Things
    Cash bar on site, light hors d’oeuvres served

    Register for Wine & Wildlife: Designing a Home for Snow Monkeys

    For more information, please email educationprograms@lpzoo.org or call 312-742-2056.

  • Rooms You May Have Missed: Bijoy Jain, Umberto Riva

    Montréal | Dates: 04 Nov, 2014 – 19 Apr, 2015

    To look at most architecture today is to be left wanting. Normalized forms smooth over cultural differences, seemingly intent on vacating the practices of everyday life. Interiors, once hidden worlds supporting our particular needs, have suffered a similar fate. An unshakable feeling of emptiness, a deep void, is all that returns one’s gaze.

    Rooms You May Have Missed reclaims the significance of inhabitation and is for that reason a collection of domestic spaces—entry porticos, kitchens, bedrooms, closets, dining rooms, courtyards, gardens, vestibules, living rooms, offices, dens and washrooms—as reinvented in the work of two very different architects: Umberto Riva in Milan and Bijoy Jain in Mumbai. Common to their practices is a genuine concern for the details that support living in and our common rituals of waking, bathing, eating, entertaining and sleeping.

    Riva, who has operated for the past fifty years almost exclusively within his native city and country, dismantles the traditional organization of space as a sequence of individually defined rooms in order to achieve a fluid interior landscape. Jain, conscious of local customs and the ever-present Indian climate, shapes the volumes that characterize his work by considering their relationships with the courtyard, where inhabitants gather under open sky.

    Whereas Riva works within the artisanal culture of craft production for which Italy was known in the 60s and 70s, Jain, who returned to India in the mid-90s having studied in the United States, has slowly absorbed the tacit knowledge of local materials and traditional construction methods left unclaimed by rampant industrialization. Riva is preoccupied with designing every detail of the spaces he creates, from lamps and doorknobs to pergolas and skylights, conferring dignity to even the poorest of materials. Jain surrounds himself with a wealth of resources both human and material, inserting his work into existing economies and systems of architectural production.

    These “rooms,” located in Milan, Mumbai, Otranto or Ahmedabad and evoked in Riva and Jain’s installations at theCCA, are glimpses of thoughtful efforts to negotiate the intricacies of the everyday. Even if these interiors alone cannot redeem our private life, more and more in danger of disappearing, they offer holds on which to hang our most human practices, individual identities and desires.

  • Mackintosh Architecture

    London | Dates: 19 Feb – 23 May, 2015
    Celebrated worldwide, Charles Rennie Mackintosh is one of the leading figures of late 19th and early 20th Century architecture. Mackintosh Architecture charts a career marked as much by its difficulties as by its successes. It is the first substantial exhibition to be devoted to his architecture and features over 60 original drawings and watercolours, as well as models, films and portraits.Seen together they reveal the evolution of his style from his early apprenticeship to his later projects as an individual architect and designer.
  • Total Design: Wright's Dana House

    Chicago | Dates: 16 – 16 Apr, 2015
    Landmarks Illinois' Preservation Snapshots lecture presents: Wright’s Dana House and the Preservation of Houses Created as Complete Works of Art In his richly illustrated book Total Design: Architecture and Interiors of Iconic Modern Houses, George H. Marcus writes: “More than any other modern architect, Frank Lloyd Wright created his houses as complete works of art.” In talking about his new book, Professor Marcus will discuss how Wright realized his vision by unifying all aspects of design at the Dana House in Springfield—architecture, furnishings, decorative objects, materials, and color—and reflect on the importance of considering the integrity of the complete work of art when these houses are preserved. More: http://www.landmarks.org/snapshots.htm
  • Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago

    Chicago | Dates: 26 – 26 Mar, 2015
    Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago On the eve of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s 129th birthday, writer Robert Sharoff and photographer William Zbaren will discuss Mies’s final commission, the IBM Building, as well as his Chicago legacy. “Mies spent the last three decades of his life living and working in Chicago and his style eventually came to define the city in much the same way Baron Haussmann’s does Paris and Bernini’s does Rome,” said Sharoff. The 52-story IBM Building, the drawings for which were completed several weeks before Mies’s death in 1969, was the most expensive office building in the city’s history. It also represented the culmination of a half-century spent exploring the possibilities of steel and glass design. During its construction, New York Times critic Ada Louise Huxtable posited that the IBM Building “may well be the most important skyscraper in the country.” The IBM Building came midway through a legendary period in Chicago architecture – the decade-long building boom between 1965 and 1975 when Mies’s influence was at its most pervasive and his students and acolytes produced such enduring landmarks as McCormick Place, Lake Point Tower and the John Hancock Center. These buildings continue to dominate the city’s skyline and are at the heart of Chicago’s claim to be the founding city of American modernism. More:http://www.landmarks.org/snapshots.htm
  • Talk & Tour: The House that Branch Built

    Richmond | Dates: 08 Mar, 2015

    Join the Virginia Center for Architecture for an architectural tour of its historic home, the Branch House. See rooms rarely opened to the public and discover the distinctive architectural features that make this Tudor-Revival home, designed by renowned architect John Russell Pope, an important historic and cultural landmark. The tour may last up to 90 minutes.

    Spaces are limited and tours sell out quickly. Reservations are strongly recommended.

    Register online. $12; $10 for members

  • Richmond Auf Deutsch

    Richmond | Dates: 21 Jan – 01 Mar, 2015
    Richmond Auf Deutsch explores surviving Germanic heritage which began to take shape in Richmond in the early 19th Century. Revisit the lasting legacy of art and architecture through this exhibition of photography and research.
SAH2015