Recent Opportunities

  • National Humanities Center Fellowships 2017-2018

    Research Triangle Park | Dates: 02 Aug – 18 Oct, 2016
    The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2017 through May 2018. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career scholars as well as senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work are also invited to apply. The Center does not normally support the revision of a doctoral dissertation. In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects. The Center is international in scope and welcomes applications from scholars outside the United States.

    Areas of Special Interest. Most of the Center’s fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research, including fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian Studies, theology, and a young woman in philosophy. The Center also invites applicants from scholars in inter-disciplinary fields, including African American Studies, area studies, Cultural Studies, and Media Studies.  

    Stipends. The amounts awarded are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center’s ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide at least half salary and covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents.  

    Facilities and Services. The Center provides a rich environment for individual research and the exchange of ideas. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. The stunning Archie K. Davis building includes private studies for Fellows, conference rooms, a central commons for dining, lounges, and reading areas. The Center's unparalleled, comprehensive library service supports Fellows by fulfilling thousands of requests for books and other research materials from out partner institutions in the Triangle, usually within 24 hours, and libraries around the world. Library staff also provide reference assistance and instruction in new online research tools. 

    Support. Fellowships are supported by the Center’s endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    Deadline and Application Procedures. Applicants submit an application form, a curriculum vitae, a 1000-word project proposal, and three letters of recommendation. The application form and instructions may be found at the Center’s website: http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org. Applications and letters of recommendation must be submitted online by October 18, 2016.

    http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org            e-mail <nhc@nationalhumanitiescenter.org>

    The National Humanities Center does not discriminate on the basis of
    race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation, or age. We are dedicated to fair treatment, diversity, and inclusion.
     
  • SESAH Conference Registration

    New Orleans | Dates: 01 Aug – 28 Sep, 2016
    Early Registration for the SESAH Conference ended July 31; Good news though! Registration is open into September! See you in New Orleans.
  • Irving J. Gill: Simplicity and Reform

    Santa Barbara | Dates: 10 Sep – 04 Dec, 2016
    Irving J. Gill (1870-1936) created a distinctive architecture in Southern California, using a refined and abstracted architectural vocabulary which he described as “the straight line, the cube, the arch, and the circle.” This exhibition examines Gill’s architectural language and his experiments with materials and construction. The roots of his idealistic achievement are traced to the social and moral concerns of the Progressive era and the Arts and Crafts movement, and the influence of Chicago architect Louis Sullivan (1856-1924), who argued for a “new architecture in America,” unaffected by the past and based on a transcendental view of Nature.
  • CFP: Institutional Modernism: Public Art and Architecture (Canberra, 1-3 Dec 16)

    Canberra | Dates: 29 Jul – 26 Aug, 2016
    The Annual Conference of the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ) will be held in Canberra from 1 to 3 December 2016.

    Session: INSTITUTIONAL MODERNISM: PUBLIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

    Session chairs: Janina Gosseye & Hannah Lewi

    In 1948 Siegfried Giedion suggested that 'no real civilization exists which did not fulfil the irrepressible longing for institutions where ... a kind of broader [community] life could develop'. He continued: 'In different periods these institutions [have] had different aims, but whether they were called the Greek gymnasion [sic.], the agora, the Roman Thermae or fora, the guilds, the medieval market places or cathedrals, they all contributed in developing human values.' The Swiss architectural historian and exponent of modernism thereby added to his 1943 argument that 'people desire buildings that represent their social, ceremonial, and community life.'

    In the second half of the 20th century, as Australia progressively suburbanized, government and religious institutions responded. An impressive array of new institutional buildings were commissioned and built which were deemed capable of shaping citizens' 'social, ceremonial and community life': municipalities built kindergartens, local public libraries, civic centres and swimming pools; state governments built campuses for mass tertiary education; and the church - seeking to reinvigorate worship - invested in modern church buildings. According to Giedion a close collaboration between architects, landscapers, painters and sculptors was required to ensure that these buildings would function as true civic centres, where the artist's talent 'could touch the great public [and] form the people.'As a result, many of these new institutional spaces featured public artworks that sought to engage the community in interactive and expressive ways.

    This session seeks proposals that critically re-examine how public art developed in conjunction with a new wave of 'institutional' modernism in Australia in the second half of the 20th century, and the ways in which this intended symbiosis between architecture and art was thought capable of representing and indeed coercively forming a new kind of humanist and civil society.

    Send abstracts to: j.gosseye@uq.edu.au<mailto:j.gosseye@uq.edu.au> until 26 August 2016.

    Proposals  should consist of the following:

    1. Completed session participation proposal form, or an email that provides the required information.

    2. A letter or email briefly outlining expertise and interest in the topic of the session and the conference theme.

    3. An abstract of the proposed paper, of no more than 400 words.

    4. A brief cv (last 5 years/ one page maximum).

    More information can be found on: http://aaanz.info/aaanz-home/conferences/2016-conference/work-art-2016-call-papers/
  • CFP: VIRAL, Inaugural Issue of Technology | Architecture + Design

    Dates: 29 Jul – 01 Sep, 2016
    The Call for Papers for the inaugural issue, VIRAL, is open and accepting submissions at editors@TADjournal.org until September 1, 2016. 
     
    TAD is a peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to the advancement of scholarship in the field of building technology, with a particular focus on its translation, integration, and impact on architecture and design. TAD will solicit, capture, and share new knowledge in the ways we think, make, and use technology within the building arts. Published articles will feature primary research in emerging materials, construction techniques, design integration, structures, building systems, energy, environmental design, information technology, digital fabrication, sustainability and resiliency, project delivery, the history and theory of technology, and building technology education. Aimed at researchers, educators, and practitioners, the journal advances and transforms the current discourse on building based technologies with the goal of expanding, reimagining, and challenging its role for architecture and design.

    Editorial Board 
    Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Chris Ford, Stanford University
    Kyle Konis, University of Southern California
    Clare Olsen, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
    Jeane Ripple, University of Virginia
    Franca Trubiano, University of Pennsylvania
    Marci Uihlein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Andrzej Zarzycki, New Jersey Institute of Technology
     
  • Hidden Traces of Shared History: Rethinking Asia Pacific through 19th and early 20th Century Photographs

    Melbourne | Dates: 29 Aug, 2016
    This symposium brings together leading researchers who are working on 19th and early 20th century collections of Asia Pacific photographs. Alongside a broader consideration of the significance of the history of photography in the region, explorations of visual and built traces of identity formations, globalised trading and agricultural industrialisation, and the envisioning of modernity and nationalism during the late colonial era will be highlighted. The projects featured in the symposium demonstrate different modes of archival research and interpretation methods and a spectrum of geographical connections showcasing different pathways into the photographic collections. As a cross disciplinary platform of research exchange, the symposium aims to generate an overview of new approaches to research into the 19th and early 20th century history of the Asia Pacific region. These are developing through working with the era’s arguably most captivating and rich visual traces.
  • CFP: MD Journal: Synapses. Design and Connectivity

    Dates: 28 Jul – 01 Sep, 2016
    CALL FOR PAPERS
    Dear Distinguished Colleagues and Friends,
    We are delighted to announce the second Issue of the  MD Journal focused on “Synapses. Design and Connectivity, Networks and Interactions among objects, services, environments and people”.
     
    For this MD Journal call, we seek to engage the ongoing design changes on issues of connectivity between objects and environments at different size levels and to promote new ideas on a broad user experience across social interactions and networked systems. The MD Journal second issue aims to reflect on the connectivity as a design focus in the contemporary culture by bridging various stimuli coming from design, architecture and networks sciences. This issue try to emphasise emerging paths and scenarios that are shaping a wider connectivity.
    Adopting the synapses’ concept - often used to indicate the flow among neurons stimuli- we are particularly interested in underpinning those studies and projects that are transforming the ways we design today, merging more and more communication, interaction and technology contexts. The field of Connectivity has been originally practiced for years into the human-machines interaction discipline in response to an increased miniaturization of data transmission technologies. This progression are now radically changing the configuration of the communication and interactions between objects and people as well as possible design concepts and related practices. Moving from the classical Machine to Machine (m2m) ground, the Internet of Things (IoT) design field is becoming a very wide influential phenomena. Nowadays, this evolution lacks the constructive energy between conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches that we really need to increase the awareness of such connectivity development and on what this overall body of design knowledge offers. At the same time, the increasingly growing of mobile pervasive devices and wearable interactions  has opened innovative ways to design everyday objects.
    This call invites diverse communities of theorists and practitioners. We welcome contributions from a range of emphasis: scientific papers, critical review, design methodologies, conceptual and experimental approaches, case studies, prototypes and pilot projects. Areas of interventions could include small and large design sizes. Specifically, with this issue, we hope to explore multidisciplinary approaches across two sides: theoretical and materials. On one side we aims to extend the IoT field of study from the general approach to the more scientific one, bridging research areas on digital objects, services and environments, user-centered design, smart objects, social platforms and networked systems. 
    Possible topics of exploration include, but are not limited to:
    •              Ecosystems of networked objects;
    •              Networked interfaces and new materials for smart buildings;
    •              Wearable technology;
    •              Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environment;
    •              Energy management and networked systems;
    •              Biohacking, healthcare and wellbeing;
    •              Personal informatics and quantified self;
    •              Open source and open hardware;
    •              Open data and infoviz systems;
    •              Interactive experiences in smart exhibition and cultural heritage;
    •              Transportation and public spaces;
    •              Privacy, security and ethics in a connected world;
    •              Social platforms for data sharing.
     
    We seek the presentation of unique, ground breaking, significant case studies, practice of design, prototypes and the review of pilot projects from an academic and not perspective.
    Prospective authors are encouraged to submit an electronic version of original, unpublished manuscripts in English or Italian language. Contributions will be archived digitally on a web-based Open Access publication.
    Deadline for abstract September 1st, 2016. Please submit for a peer review to materialdesign@unife.it.
    Important dates:
    Abstract submission September 1, 2016
    Notification of Abstract Review September 6, 2016
    Submission paper October 30, 2016
    Notification of Peer Review Results November 20, 2016
    Submission of final version December 10, 2016
    Publication December 2016
    For further details, see the Call for Submission announcement 
    http://www.materialdesign.it/en/journal-md//call-for-paper_60.htm.
    Vanessa De Luca, Editor
    SUPSI, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland
    Michele Zannoni, Editor
    Università della Repubblica di San Marino
     
  • CFP: The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture, ICMS (Kalamazoo, MI, May 11-14, 2017) Deadline September 15

    Kalamazoo | Dates: 28 Jul – 15 Sep, 2016
    Call for Papers: The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017 Organized by Lindsay Cook (Columbia University) and Zachary Stewart (Fordham University) Citation, understood in its earliest legal sense, refers not to the act of reiterating or to the act of repeating but rather to a formal process of assembling parties separated by space and time. It is therefore best understood as a complex procedure for forging new relationships between people, places, and things that, though highly structured, are by no means inherently stable. Over the past several decades, a growing number of scholars—including, most notably, Wolfgang Schenkluhn, Hans-Joachim Kunst, Dieter Kimpel, Robert Suckale, Dany Sandron, and Arnaud Timbert—have examined, in explicit terms, the role of citation in architectural production during the Middle Ages. On the one hand, their work has been of great benefit to the field, demonstrating that citation is a productive paradigm for understanding the ways in which isomorphic relationships enable spatial environments to create, support, or subvert social orders. On the other hand, their work has also raised troubling questions about the capacity of buildings to convey meaning, assuming as it does that architecture, like language, functions as a coherent semiotic system. Vitruvius laid the groundwork for the application of this logocentric analogy to classical architecture, but does it necessarily obtain within all modes of architectural production, particularly those considered un- or anti-classical? What are the advantages or disadvantages of choosing citation—versus imitation, replication, appropriation, influence, or habit—as a discursive frame for studying the recurrence of formal elements within architectural ensembles? How does such a visually oriented method address issues of production, perception, technology, function, and value? How might it alter current accounts of the design, construction, and meaning of buildings modeled after famous precedents such as St. Peter’s in Rome, the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, the Great Mosque of Damascus, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, or the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris? This session invites papers that pursue these kinds of questions as they pertain to the diverse building cultures of the Middle Ages, West and East, between c.300 to c.1500. Highly encouraged are contributions that investigate the stimuli for citation, the media that make it possible, and the agents that make it productive. Especially welcome are papers involving case studies that consider the potential volatility of architectural citation across cultures, regions, institutions, audiences, materials, architectural types, art-historical styles, or chronological periods. Contact Lindsay Cook (lsc2140@columbia.edu) and Zachary Stewart (zdstewart@gmail.com) to propose a 20-minute paper. Submissions must include a title, a one-page abstract, a short CV, and a completed Participant Information Form (available here: wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions). Proposals will be accepted through September 15, 2016.
  • CFP: 5th International Conference on Civil, Architectural and Transportation Engineering (CATE-16) (Hong Kong, 17-18 Nov 16)

    Hong Kong | Dates: 27 Jul – 05 Aug, 2016
    5th International Conference on Civil, Architectural and Transportation Engineering (CATE-16) HONG KONG
    17th to 18th November 2016
    Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    Deadline of New Full Paper/Poster/Abstract Submissions: Aug. 5, 2016

    All the submitted conference papers will be peer reviewed. All accepted papers of the conference will be published in the printed conference proceedings with valid International ISBN number & DOI-CROSSREF Indexed. 

    REGISTRATION FEE 
    Author (Student): USD 190
    Author (Faculty/Academic)*: USD 225
    Listener/Co-Author: 175 USD
    Additional Paper(s): 150 USD
    Extra Proceeding: 50 USD

    TOPIC/SCOPE
    Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to:
    ---transportation 
    ---urban studies 
    ---landscape architecture 
    ---architecture 
    ---archaeology 
    ---museums and heritage 
    ---water 
    ---disaster management 
    ---rehabilitation 
    ---GIS 
    ---building design 
    ---sustainable development 
    ---transport 
    ---smart materials 
    --Structural Engineering
    --Construction Engineering 
    ---Urban Planning 

    SUBMISSION METHODS
    1. Electronic Submission System; ( .doc/.docx/.pdf formats): 
    OR
    2. Using Email: cs@caeer.org 

    Enquiries: cs@caeer.org
    Web address: http://caeer.org/conference.php?slug=CATE-16&sid=3&catDid=91
    Sponsored by: International Association of Civil, Agricultural & Environmental Engineering Researchers 
     
  • CFP: Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way? (Lisbon, 5-8 Jul 17)

    Lisbon | Dates: 27 Jul – 31 Aug, 2016
    The ARTIS – Institute of History of Art, School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon and the ICOMOS Portugal are pleased to invite all the researchers, specialists and other stakeholders involved in the process of safeguarding of architectural heritage created in the meeting of cultures, to participate in the International Congress Preserving transcultural heritage: your way or my way?, which will take place in Lisbon, between 05 and 08 July 2017.
    Paper and poster proposals are welcome until 31 August 2016. Please submit your paper or poster by sending the proposal to the email congress.artis@letras.ulisboa.pt (see the submission guidelines below). The proposals will be selected by the session organisers and the Scientific Committee on the basis of the following criteria: relevance, innovation, scientific quality and theme of the session. On 15 September proposers will be notified regarding acceptance of their paper or poster and will receive further instructions.
    The organisation encourages multidisciplinary and international research on the safeguarding of transcultural heritage (architecture, urbanism, archaeology, landscapes and decorative arts in built heritage).

    Sessions
    Session 1: Heritage values and management of African and American historic cities and sites with European influences
    Session 2: Transcultural heritage, musealisation and memory: preservation of the Indigenous minorities’ heritage in Americas and in the Pacific region formerly under Western rule
    Session 3: Contextualizing the (un)wanted: tourism and management of the architecture of totalitarian regimes in Europe
    Session 4: Globalisation as generator of new transcultural heritages: preserving migrants’ architectural heritage
    Session 5: Greeks, Romans and Byzantines in the Mediterranean region and Near East: guarding transcultural remains containing ancient classical influences
    Session 6: Preserving shared heritage along the Silk Road, a major creator of cultural encounters
    Session 7: Memories to remember and (not) forget: slaves’ heritage outside their homelands
    Session 8: The “Indian melting pot” for religions and cultures: challenges concerning transcultural heritage preservation
    Session 9: West versus East: differences and difficulties to the conservation of their shared heritage (European colonies in Far East / “Asiantowns” in the West)
    Session 10: The discovery of ancient cultures: safeguarding of native architectural heritage in European colonies
    Session 11: Religious, political and ideological fanaticisms as destroyers of “different” heritages throughout History
    Session 12: European heritage as Imperialist statements in colonies: (un)desirable memories whish must be protected or to be forgotten?
    Session 13: Between Far East and the Indian Sea: Indochinese and Insulindian cultures (influences, fusions and heritage safeguarding)
    Session 14: The Ottoman Empire in the crossroad between Europe, Asia and Africa: fusion of cultures and heritages to preserve
    Session 15: Questions, controversies, idiosyncrasies and case studies on authenticity between different cultures, when focusing the safeguarding of transcultural architectural heritage
    Session 16: Should be followed or ignored? Reception of European heritage theories within non-Western cultures
    Session 17: Safeguarding of architectural heritage belonging to ethnic and religious minorities inside countries with dominant cultures
    Session 18: Other relevant themes

    SUBMISSION  GUIDELINES
    Download the submission template, and fill it with the following data:
    Paper or poster?
    Name of the session (only for papers)
    Title of the paper, with 15 words maximum;
    Abstract with 250 words maximum;
    Three to five keywords;
    Personal data (name, professional affiliation, mail and email addresses, and telephone contact of the authors);
    The acceptance notification for submitted papers and posters will be known by 15 September 2016. After being accepted, preliminary versions of paper texts and poster drafts should be submitted until 30 November 2016, for peer-review.
    Researchers can submit simultaneously a paper and a poster, but only with different subjects (paper and poster cannot be both about the same subject). Therefore, it must be submitted an abstract for each proposal.
    Dimension of posters should be AO (841 x 1189 mm) vertical. Posters should be printed by their authors and delivered in the first day of the congress (in the registration) or by mail (should arrive until 30 June 2017).
    For further questions, please contact the organisation. Download here the pdf of the call for papers and posters.
  • CFP: Picturesque Modernities: Architectural Regionalism as a Global Process (1890-1950) (Paris, 30 Nov-2 Dec 16)

    Paris | Dates: 27 Jul – 15 Aug, 2016
    Call for Papers (Deadline: 15 August 2016)
    PICTURESQUE MODERNITIES.
    Architectural Regionalism as a Global Process (1890-1950)

    30 November - 2 December 2016

    Venue: German Center for Art History, Hôtel Lully, 45, rue des Petits-Champs, 75001 Paris/France

    International conference of the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” (Global Art History) at Heidelberg University, the German Centre of Art History in Paris, CRIHAM/Department of Art History and Archaeology at University of Poitiers, the Centre André Chastel (CNRS/University Paris-Sorbonne) and the Association d’Histoire de l’Architecture (A.H.A.)

    Concept: Michael Falser (Heidelberg University)

    In the last twenty years, architectural historiography approached regionalism as a pan-European movement between 1890 and 1950 which, as a flipside of the International Modern Movement with its rationalist and cosmopolitan agenda, helped to reinforce regional identities through the language of regionalist building styles. When European nation states such as France, Great Britain, Netherlands, Germany etc. entered a late-modern phase of political saturation and a stronger need of cultural self-definition, architectural regionalism emerged as a polymorphic set of artistic strategies: fostered either by centralist regimes to stabilize the national project through a higher (however controlled) valorisation of its peripheral elements, or by centrifugal forces towards provincial independence. In France, for example, this regionalist movement was particularly developed through a whole range identity-building structures in neo-Basque, neo-Breton etc. styles, but also in a kind of regionalist eclecticism for seaside architecture.

    Latest projects to write a 'global history of architecture' or a canon of 'world architecture' comprised of rather additive architectural case-studies around the globe with an ordering system along geographic and political entities (Europe or Non-Europe), but did not yet transpose the above-mentioned scenario to the global arena: in comparing the strategies of political and cultural stabilization, negotiation and/or resistance through architectural regionalism, a structural analogy of the centre-periphery model can also be detected between the European metropole and its overseas colonies, resp. between those colonies’ capitals and their own provinces. If 'area studies' identified similar regionalist policy changes from cultural assimilation (direct transfer) to association (regional adaptation) for European colonies in Asia and Africa during the same period (1890-1950), then the emerging 'neo-vernacular styles' in the colonies (such as the Style indochinois in French Indochina or the 'neo-Mauresque' style in French North Africa, the Indo-Saracenic Style in British India, or the Indische Stijl in the Dutch East Indies etc.) – can be read as Non-European variants of 'regionalist styles' in the European nation states. This 'trans-cultural' approach frames the diverse regionalist formations of architectural styles and forms as one globally connected process.

    Transnational approaches to set the different European colonial contexts within the first half of the 20th century in relation to each other can also help to conceptualise the recent inter-related effects between globalisation and decentralisation (like in France) where the notions of the global and the local are often enmeshed simultaneously in contemporary architecture.

    Conceptualizing Global Connectivity in Architectural History

    Requested case studies can focus on regionalist and (neo-)vernacular architectural style formations either within European nation states or in European colonies. In order to conceptualize a transcultural matrix of global connectivity between the different forms of regionalist expressions beyond the strict divide of West or Non-West, Europe or Non-Europe, metropole or colony, colonizer or colonized, the different presentations will be set in direct relation to each other (e.g. France vs. French Indochina etc.). To facilitate the discussion of structural analogies and connections across those divides, the presentations should address the following questions on agency and process beyond a mere stylistic analysis:

    - In which centre-periphery constellation was the particular regionalist project embedded?
    - Which individual actors (architects, engineers, ethnographers, politicians) and institutions participated (or not) in the project?
    - To which kind of regional/vernacular expressions and traditions was referred to, and how were those collected, valorised, hybridized or (re)invented, and finally applied?
    - Did the different projects, institutional agencies and individual agents (cultural brokers) cross the lines between the divides of the national vs. regional, metropole vs. colony etc.?
    - Where there any platforms of knowledge exchange involved across those divides (scientific journals, national/colonial congresses, exhibitions and fairs, individual networks etc.)?

    The international conference in French, English and German will take place from 30 November to 2 December 2016 at the German Center for Art History in Paris. It is a collaborative exercise between the Cluster of Excellence 'Asia and Europe in a Global Context – The Dynamics of Transculturality' at Heidelberg University (and its project "Picturesque Modernities", directed by Michael Falser/Global Art History), the German Centre of Art History in Paris (directed by Thomas Kirchner), the University of Poitiers (Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en histoire, histoire de l’art et musicologie/CRIHAM, with its project "Corpus numérique du patrimoine architectural en région", directed by Nabila Oulebsir), the Centre André Chastel (CNRS/University Paris-Sorbonne, directed by Alexandre Gady) and the Association d’Histoire de l’Architecture (directed by Jean-Baptiste Minnaert/University Paris-Sorbonne).

    This conference is the second event after the International Conference "Picturesque Eye. Framing Regionalist Art Forms in Late Empires (1900-1950)" which took place in Vienna/Austria in December 2015.

    After this 1,5-day conference and half-day workshop for PhD-candidates is planned. Proposals for this workshop are also welcome.

    Applicants are asked to send a proposal (max. 300 words, one to two illustrations) to falser@asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de, by the deadline of 15 August 2016. Please include the title of the contribution, an abstract and a short bio-sketch of the speaker with affiliation and contact details. The decision about the selection of contributions will be announced in September 2016.
  • CFP: Decoding Destruction and Decay

    New York | Dates: 27 Jul – 30 Aug, 2016
    This is a call for papers for a session to be held at the College Art Association's Annual Meeting in New York City in February of 2017. In recent years, theoretical concepts of the ruin as memorial, as inspiration, and as symbol have generated scholarly inquiry and public fascination alike. The physical study of ruinous buildings tends to be overshadowed by the current emphasis on meaning and morality, and yet ruins and their conservation or restoration have long been sources for both new scholarship and the reevaluation of existing scholarly constructs. By making visible what was never intended to be visible, fragmentation provides significant insight into structure, materials, and architectural practices. Divergent interpretations of architectural fragments can lead to vastly different constructs of the history of style; processes of cleaning and restoration provide opportunities to examine building materials with new technology while simultaneously preventing—perhaps permanently—the chance for future scholars to perform the same kinds of evaluations. Restoration may create substantively new buildings that await incorporation into the history—and historiography—of architecture and the built environment. We propose a session that examines loss, destruction, fragmentation, and restoration in the context of intellectual inquiry. Potential questions include: what are the ramifications of studying buildings in their less-than-complete states? How does decay, disaster, or resurgence lead to the reordering of architectural canons? What are we able to see, understand, or imagine in architectural fragments that would otherwise be impossible in a complete or restored structure? What can we learn from buildings via processes of preservation or restoration, and how do such processes open or close different means of investigation? Session sponsors: Sarah Thompson, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Maile Hutterer, University of Oregon. Interested applicants should visit http://www.collegeart.org/news/2016/07/05/2017-call-for-participation-now-open/ to download submission instructions, which are listed on the call for papers.
  • CFP: The Politics of Environments: Architectures, Natures and Data (Tallinn, 20-23 Apr 17)

    Tallinn | Dates: 21 Jul – 01 Nov, 2016
    Two themes stand out prominently in discussions, projects and strategies that are at the forefront of contemporary urbanisation. It is, on one hand, the question of ecology, where the city and architecture are reconceptualised in "green" terms such as sustainability, resilience, metabolic optimisation and energy efficiency. On the other hand is the cybernetic question, where the futures of architecture and urbanisation are staked upon the pervasive use of digital communication, interactive technologies, ubiquitous computing, and the "big data". Moreover, these two questions have become increasingly intertwined as two facets of a single environmental question: while real-time adjustments, behaviour optimisation and "smart" solutions are central to urban environmental agenda, the omnipresent network of perpetually interacting digital objects constitutes itself a qualitatively new environment within which urban citizens are enfolded. But as digital networks become our "second nature," we also hark back to the models derived from the "first nature".

    With the growing pressure on architects, urbanists and planners to deliver ecological and techno-informational solutions, with (self-)monitoring of citizens "behaviour", optimisation of the buildings "performance", and smoothing of urban "flows", and with the respective substitution of democratic politics by automated governance models, it is ever more important to interrogate the historical, theoretical, methodological and epistemological assumptions beneath the above set of processes that can be described, following Michel Foucault, as environmental governmentality. These questions will be explored under three thematic tracks: Optimised urban ecosystems, Architectural turn to nature?, and "Big data" and urban subjectification."

    Authors are welcome to submit analytical papers, theoretically well-grounded case studies, or architectural counter-projects for presentations while indicating their preference for one of the above tracks. At the same time we ask that their contributions consider specifically how natures and data are intertwined in architectural and urban politics today, how the politics of environments is ecological and cybernetic simultaneously.

    Please submit your proposal (max 400 words) and a short bio (max 50 words) to architecturesnaturesdata@gmail.com by the November 1st, 2016.
  • CFP: 105th ACSA Annual Meeting | Brooklyn Says "Move to Detroit" (Detroit, 23-25 Mar 17)

    Detroit | Dates: 21 Jul – 21 Sep, 2016
    ACSA invites paper submissions under 18 thematic session topics plus an additional open category. Authors may submit only one paper per session topic. The same paper may not be submitted to multiple topics.

    Submission Requirements
    All authors submitting papers must be faculty or staff at an ACSA member schools; Individual Members; Student Members or become supporting ACSA members at the time of paper submission. If you are not a member, you can join ACSA here.

    Authors may submit only one paper per session topic. The same paper may not be submitted to multiple topics. An author can present no more than two papers at the Annual Meeting. Papers must report on recently completed work, and papers cannot have been previously published or presented in public except to a regional audience.

    Paper formatting requirements: 

    Papers should be no longer than 4,000 words, excluding the abstract and endnotes.
    No more than 5 images may be used in the paper. Images (low resolution) and captions should be embedded in the paper.
    Omit all author names from the paper and any other identifying information to maintain an anonymous review process. 
    Papers must be written in English.
    Do not include an abstract in the paper file. 
    Papers may be uploaded in Word, RTF, or PDF formats.
     
    Submission Process
    The deadline for submitting a paper to a session for the Annual Meeting is September 21, 2016 (extended). Authors will submit papers through the ACSA online interface. 

    All submissions will be reviewed carefully by at least three reviewers. The session topic chairs make official acceptance. Selection is based on innovation, clarity, contribution to the discipline of architecture, and relevance to the session topic. All authors will be notified of the status of their paper and will receive comments from their reviewers. 
  • CFP: Footprint 21: Trans-bodies / Queering Spaces

    Dates: 20 Jul – 01 Dec, 2016
    Call for Papers Footprint #21
    Trans-Bodies / Queering Spaces

    This issue of Footprint aims to introduce the latest developments in the field of queer theory into the realm of architecture and urban design – and vice versa, to make architectural and urban design concerns an element of queer studies. Next to uncovering hitherto hidden or repressed histories and practices as part of an agenda of inclusiveness, we consider an introduction of queer theory to architecture as engendering a radical reconceptualisation of the architectural discipline: That is, to upset and replace any conception of architecture as an embodiment of essentialist identities, forms or types, in order to move towards an understanding of architecture as a practice engaged in consistent transformation. Such a reconceptualisation of architect ure views difference in terms of process, foregrounds liminal situations, their metamorphosis and transgression. 

    Within queer theory one finds various contesting propositions regarding the very definition of ‘queer’ and acts of queering, especially now LGBTQI identities have become part of mainstream culture in western societies. Generally speaking, these propositions range from the mapping of queer identities – sometimes as another category in a taxonomy of essentialisms – to the idea of queering as performative acts of activist subversion and subjectivation. Such acts of queering resist the establishment of stable identities, while they promote transitory assemblages that are embedded within an unfolding process of differencing. 

    A first concern is here the ‘logics’ in which these differences are produced and conceptualised, the concomitant disciplinary power structures and the epistemological frameworks that sustain these logics. The most radical variants of queering seek to undermine any bipolar, mutually exclusive opposition as in the case of heterosexist normativity and any other hegemonic discourse based on classic structuralist ‘twin-phenomena’ such as male-female, inside-outside, centre-periphery et cetera. Arguably, the recent coming-into-mainstream of transgender issues placed full attention on bodily transitioning processes themselves. In their fierce act of self-displacement, trans-bodies overcome dualist logics by exploring t he transgressive dimensions involved in forms of becoming.

    Such tension between essentialism and becoming can already be observed in earlier attempts at connecting queer theory and architecture: in Queer Space (1997) Aaron Betsky proposed familiar gay tropes such as the closet and the interior, or hedonistic urban lifestyles as the ultimate spaces of queer identities, whereas Stud (1996) edited by Joel Sanders suggested a more complicated relationship between space and gay identities by clarifying that there is no ‘queer space’, only space put to queer use (Chauncey, in Sanders 1996, 224).

    Another vector of productive debate regarding this queering can be located between the discursive and the body, between language and matter. Judith Butler famously understands the formation of gendered identities, their enactments and possible undoing as performative. Alternatively, Rosi Braidotti’s feminist re-reading of Gilles Deleuze's concept of becoming starts with an emphasis on the conditioning, generating and accommodation of difference as belonging to situated material processes from one moment of actualisation to another. The difference that bodies make is here no longer seen as a formation ‘in’ space or ‘in’ an environment, but actualised as a figuration ‘of’ its material milieu (Bar ad, Bennett). A body (architecturally or otherwise) is understood as a transient and  reciprocal form-taking of a milieu – unlike a singular entity contained by and acting in a neutral ‘space’ or ‘environment’. Such trans-bodies are not just in a state of transition themselves, they also trigger a transformation of the environment they traverse and populate, a queering of spaces indeed.

    We welcome papers that embrace LGBTQI and gender-theoretical debates, in order to go beyond essentialist conceptualisations of architecture. Methodologically speaking, there are obvious overlappings with feminist and post-colonial theories, as well as with contemporary urban geography, cultural studies and sociology. Therefore, an intersectional and transdisciplinary approach is highly encouraged, from the queering of high modernism in architecture to queer migrant histories to female queer urban lifestyles to the current debates on the place of transgender in public spaces. 
    Authors are invited to explore and subvert theoretical frameworks, research methods and analytical instruments, including the archive and historiography, all in order to demonstrate queer modes of thinking and operating, and to enlighten us on the operations of trans-bodies, what trans-architecture could be, what a queer architect might do. 

    Footprint #21 will be published in Autumn 2017. 
    Authors interested in submitting a contribution are requested to submit an abstract of 1000–1500 words to the editors before 1 December 2016. The Footprint editors will then select papers that are considered on topic, innovative and demonstrate an explorative academic level. The notification of acceptance will be sent before 15 January 2017.

    Deadline for selected full papers is 1 April 2017 after which these papers will enter the peer-review process. Please note: the ultimate selection of papers for publication will not be based on the abstracts, but will be based on the double blind peer-review of full papers. 

    In case of review articles (2000–4000 words) or visual reports related to the topic, these will be selected on the basis of a short summary (500 words max) which the authors are requested to submit to the editors before 1 November 2016. 

    Please, also include a short bio of 300 words max. 

    For submissions and inquiries, please contact editors Robert Gorny and Dirk van den Heuvel at fp21@footprintjournal.org.
  • The Discipline of Nature: Architect Alfred Browning Parker in Florida

    Miami | Dates: 24 Sep, 2016 – 15 Jan, 2017
    HistoryMiami Museum is proud to announce its upcoming exhibition, The Discipline of Nature: Architect Alfred Browning Parker, which will examine the 60-year career of the famed Miami architect whose organic tropicalist designs made him a regional leader and a national icon. 

    Opening on the 100th anniversary of the architect’s birth, The Discipline of Nature will celebrate Parker’s rich and prolific life. Featuring original drawings, archival photographs, and models and furnishings, the exhibition will illustrate Parker’s evolving designs and illuminate his use of natural principles, forms, and materials to create an organic structure for his work. 

    The exhibition, running from September 24, 2016 – February 26, 2017, brings new relevance to Parker as the activist architect, writer, speaker, teacher and philosopher of Miami. 

    “Parker has a remarkable legacy in Miami. He was an original thinker who emphasized environmentally friendly design and sustainability longer before the “green movement” even existed," said Stuart Chase, President and CEO of HistoryMiami.  “This exhibition not only celebrates his remarkable designs, but highlights the ecological and environmental basis to his work.” 

    Parker designed more than 500 projects in his 60-year career, many of which were award-winning designs, and was the recipient of the American Institute of Architects Florida Association’s inaugural Award of Honor in 1967.  

    "As an architect deeply rooted in Florida, Parker designed and built singular works directed by a coherent system of values that directly address issues of place," said co-Curator Allan Shulman. "Central to his ethos was respect for the earth and its resources, and moral and aesthetic interest in the power of nature."

    HistoryMiami Museum will host a Grand Opening party for The Discipline of Nature on September 24th with a special conversation with curators Randolph C. Henning and Allan Shulman that will bring to light the indelible impact Parker had on Florida's built landscape. 

    “Without question Alfred Browning Parker is Florida’s most renowned and celebrated architect,” Curator Randolph C. Henning said. “What better day to open this exhibition, a celebration of his passionate creative energy and commitment to living in harmony with the environment, than on the day marking the centennial anniversary of his birth.”

    For more information visit www.historymiami.org. Tickets to see the exhibition cost $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, $5 for children, and free for children under 6 years old. 
     
  • Call for Applications: 2017 Grants to Individuals

    Dates: 15 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    Application available online: August 15, 2016
    Deadline: September 15, 2016

    Since 1956, the Graham Foundation has provided direct funding to individuals for projects that foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society. As one of the few funders of individuals in the field of architecture, the foundation's grants provide important support for the work of emerging and established architects, scholars, writers, artists, designers, curators, filmmakers, and other individuals.

    To apply for an individual grant, applicants must submit an Inquiry Form—the first stage of a two-stage application process. The online Inquiry Form will be available on our website from August 15 until the deadline on September 15, 2016.  
     
    Download the Inquiry Form Worksheet here to prepare your responses and gather requested materials before August 15.   

    For more information about the Graham Foundation's grants and to learn if your project is eligible for funding, please see our grant guidelines.
     
  • Endless Images: A SoCal Summer Program

    Laguna Beach | Dates: 14 – 15 Aug, 2016
    ENDLESS IMAGES: A SoCal Summer Program organized by the Visual Resources Association (VRA), Society of CA Archivists (SCA), and Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS-SC) on Sunday, August 14 & Monday, August 15, 2016 at the Laguna College of Art & Design.  Sessions and Lightning Round talks will take place on Monday; optional tour of the Laguna Art Museum and attendance at the Pageant of the Masters are organized for Sunday.  

    For more information and to register, please see: 
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1x1kGEyubbWxIViXd5xGSxCdMtHhGdkA4ObxkgJRm0Ko/viewform

    The early bird deadline to obtain the best value is this Wednesday, July 20th.  If you would like to attend the Pageant of the Masters performance Sunday night, you need to register and pay for your ticket by the early bird deadline. 
     
  • Brick x Brick

    St. Paul | Dates: 18 Aug – 30 Dec, 2016
    Brick x Brick is a group exhibition that foregrounds the slow and deliberate process of building as a way to understand the social and cultural topographies of cities and the built environment. Artists represented in the exhibition use a diversity of media—including photography, painting, sculpture, drawing, and craft—to show how building contributes to and disrupts the features of local, national, and international urban landscapes.
     
    Architecture is an endlessly fascinating lens through which to observe dramatic changes in the history and texture of contemporary cities. From Robert Polidori’s photographs of pastel-hued Havana to Carolyn Swiszcz’s paintings of St. Paul’s aging retail landmarks, buildings reflect how communities change and adapt, while creating more diverse layers of social and architectural history. Allan McNab’s woodcuts show houses sprouting up like mushrooms that spread over a hillside. Mike Lynch’s painting of abandoned grain silos, Elevator – 29th and Harriet from 1988, is a haunting reminder of Minneapolis’s past as the “Flour Milling Capital of the World.”
     
    Artists also use building blocks of form and color to comment on the formal and conceptual construction of art itself. Julie Mehretu’s lithograph Entropia contains 32 layers of colorful ink that recall architectural plans and swirling topographical maps. George Morrison’s Cube is a sculptural collage of finely polished wooden puzzle pieces. Rob Fischer’s Industrial Revolution salvages a high-Modernist color palette and old panes of glass in order to build something new from something old. Each work in the exhibition reveals how art and architecture share the same reflex—to construct a new relationship to the world around us. 

    Brick x Brick showcases works by over 30 artists from across the country, including 12 from Minnesota. The majority of the works in the show come from the permanent collection of the Minnesota Museum of American Art, and are complimented by generous loans from artists and private collections.
  • The Architectural Heritage of the Piscataqua, A Photographic Reflection, In tribute to John Mead Howells

    Portsmouth | Dates: 22 Jul – 05 Nov, 2016
    It has been nearly eighty years since the publication of Architectural Heritage of the Piscataqua by the architect John Mead Howells. This summer’s exhibition is a photographic reflection of the book and the houses that inspired Howells to record them for posterity. The twentieth century proved tumultuous for the buildings and residents of Portsmouth. The 1920s saw the sale of historic interiors and the resulting destruction of their edifices. The Depression of the 1930s slowed this trend and allowed Howells to photograph buildings viewed as architecturally important to his audience. Urban renewal emerged from the victories of World War II with mixed results for the built environment and residents of Portsmouth when neighborhoods were destroyed or moved in an effort to “improve’ the living arrangements and structures of the city. On the brink of these changes, the images in Architectural Heritage of the Piscataqua offer a nostalgic hold on the imagination, but perhaps more importantly they provide a visual clue to the historical architectural importance of Portsmouth to the nation. William Laurence Bottomley in his introduction to the book regarded Charleston, Annapolis and Portsmouth as a trinity of eighteenth-century towns, “with much of their early work complete and extant,” but of these, he wrote, Portsmouth “was the most complete.” In 1937 this book brought that vision to the rest of the country. Architectural fragments and objects associated with the properties will also be on view. The photographs in the exhibit have been reproduced in a process that converts them from digital into silver gelatin prints. Through this process, a close approximation of the originals has been realized that utilizes the chemistry light and silver to capture the effect of light and shadow on 18th Century architecture. The exhibit is located in the Randal Gallery of the Portsmouth Athenaeum, 9 Market Square, Portsmouth, NH 03801 from July 22 through November 5, 2016. Gallery hours are Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday from 1-4 P.M. The gallery is also open for Portsmouth Arts Around Town on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 P.M.
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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