Recent Opportunities

  • Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grant Program

    Dates: 22 Oct, 2015 – 15 Jan, 2016
    Each year, the Friends of the Princeton University Library offer short-term Library Research Grants to promote scholarly use of the library’s research collections. Up to $3,500 is available per award. Applications will be considered for scholarly use of archives, manuscripts, rare books, and other rare and unique holdings of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, including Mudd Library; as well as rare books in Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, and in the East Asian Library (Gest Collection). Special grants are awarded in several areas. The Program in Hellenic Studies supports a limited number of library fellowships in Hellenic studies, and the Cotsen Children’s Library supports research in its collection on aspects of children’s books. The Maxwell Fund supports research on materials dealing with Portuguese-speaking cultures. The Sid Lapidus '59 Research Fund for Studies of the Age of Revolution and the Enlightenment in the Atlantic World covers work using materials pertinent to this topic.
  • PastForward Preservation Conference Live Streaming

    Dates: 04 – 06 Nov, 2015
    This year's national preservation conference, PastForward, TrustLive presentations will focus on urban strategies including Main Street approaches to saving historic places, federal innovation and excellence in historic preservation, and telling a more inclusive story of preservation by featuring multiple voices and experiences. Finally, we will launch a rich and engaging discussion about the future as we approach the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act.
  • Wolfsonian Fellowship Program

    Miami Beach | Dates: 31 – 31 Dec, 2015
    The Wolfsonian-FIU Fellowship Program The Wolfsonian–Florida International University is a museum and research center that promotes the examination of modern visual and material culture. The focus of the Wolfsonian collection is on North American and European decorative arts, propaganda, architecture, and industrial and graphic design from the period 1885-1945. The United States, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands are the countries most extensively represented. There are also smaller but significant collections of materials from a number of other countries, including Austria, Czechoslovakia, France, Japan, the former Soviet Union and Hungary. The collection includes works on paper (including posters, prints and design drawings), furniture, paintings, sculpture, glass, textiles, ceramics, lighting and other appliances, and many other kinds of objects. The Wolfsonian’s library has approximately 50,000 rare books, periodicals, and ephemeral items. Fellowships are intended to support full-time research, generally for a period of three to five weeks. The program is open to holders of master’s or doctoral degrees, Ph.D. candidates, and to others who have a significant record of professional achievement in relevant fields. Applicants are encouraged to discuss their project with the Fellowship Coordinator prior to submission to ensure the relevance of their proposals to the Wolfsonian’s collection. The application deadline is December 31, for residency during the 2016-2017 academic year. For information, please contact: Fellowship Coordinator The Wolfsonian-FIU 1001 Washington Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33139 305-535-2613 (phone) 305-531-2133 (fax)
  • CFP: Modernism in New England, March 5th, 2016, Wellesley College

    Wellesley | Dates: 20 Oct – 13 Nov, 2015
    Modernism in New England Saturday, March 5th, 2016 Collins Cinema, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts A symposium funded by the Barra Foundation and co-sponsored by the Grace Slack McNeil Program for Studies in American Art at Wellesley College and Historic Deerfield, Inc.
  • Now Accepting Applications: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures PhD Program:

    Dates: 19 Oct – 15 Dec, 2015
    The Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures doctoral program is now accepting applications! A collaborative effort between the school of Architecture at Milwaukee and the Department of Art History at Madison, BLC is a leader in innovative field-based learning. We pride ourselves on our classes getting students in the field as they expand their methods and hone their research interests. We offer innovative field schools and methods courses and take advantage of the strengths of both of our campuses. BLC PhD Students • Attain skills to explore buildings, landscapes, and cultures as process, lived, and representation • Utilize a range of methods including formal analysis of architecture, fieldwork and documentation, archival research, oral history 
 • Develop multiple forms of literacy such as spatial/architectural, landscape, cultural and visual literacy 
 Applicants may apply to UW-Madison’s Department of Art History (PhD Art History) or UW-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture & Urban Planning (PhD in Architecture). For more about the program and how to apply, visit Like us on Facebook at or follow us on Twitter at
  • Modern Cuba: Continuity of Past and Present

    Dates: 14 – 23 May, 2016
    Docomomo US is pleased to announce registration for this educational travel tour of modern architecture in Havana, Cuba. Guests will experience the rich architectural past of this long elusive Caribbean island located just 90 miles south of U.S. soil. Modern Cuba offers a unique travel opportunity in a small group setting featuring access to modern homes and buildings considered off the beaten path or not ordinarily open to the public.
  • Call for Papers: Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage

    Taipei | Dates: 20 Oct – 20 Nov, 2015
    Inheriting the City: Advancing Understandings of Urban Heritage March 31 – April 4, 2016, Taipei, Taiwan Call for Papers deadline: 20 November. In the context of rapid cultural and economic globalisation, over half of the World’s population now live in urban areas. This dramatic expansion poses many challenges to a city’s character and identity, shifting the way in which cities preserve, present and promote their pasts and traditions against fierce and competitive demands for space. Urban heritage, as the valued tangible and intangible legacies of the past, would appear to be an increasingly important asset for communities and governments alike, allowing cities to mark their distinctiveness, attract tourists and inward investment and, retain a historical narrative that feeds into the quality of life. At the same time, new heritage – the heritage of the future – is being created in cities and towns across the globe from ‘starchitecture’ and the creation of new iconic structures, to communities that are protecting and nurturing buildings and practices that have meaning and value to them. In this context we ask: What will future residents and tourists inherit from their towns and cities? This conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and seeks to bring together researchers, policy makers and academics from a wide range of disciplines and fields including: anthropology, architecture, archaeology, art history, cultural geography, cultural studies, design, ethnology and folklore, economics, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, philosophy, political science, sociology, tourism studies, urban history and urban/spatial planning. Topics of interest to the conference include, but are not limited to, the following:  Innovative modalities of protection and planning urban heritage  Community approaches to and uses of, urban heritage  City based tourism and visitor economies of urban heritage  Urban heritage as a form of social resistance  Heritage as city memory  Cosmopolitan urban heritage and re-creating identities  Global and mega-city competition through heritage  Revitalising the city through heritage  Sub-urban and sub-altern heritage  Urban spaces, traditions and intangible heritage Further information and full Call for Papers can be found on the website Please submit a 300 word abstract by 20 November details:
  • Back to the City - Urbanism, Density, and Housing 1976-2016

    Glasgow | Dates: 05 – 06 May, 2016
    Proposals are invited for papers and posters on topics relating to the conference themes. Abstracts of up to 300 words should be sent to Ambrose Gillick ( by 16 November 2015, along with contact details and a CV/biographical information (1-2 pages). The conference is supported by the Leverhulme Trust. A limited number of travel bursaries are available.
  • 53rd IMCL Conference on Caring for Our Common Home: Sustainable, Just Cities & Settlements

    Rome | Dates: 18 Oct – 20 Dec, 2015
    We must make our cities healthy, just and sustainable for all humans and for the earth. We must adopt wiser strategies and practices­ in architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, planning, transportation planning ­ that lead to genuine social, environmental and economic sustainability, a healthy environment for humans and for the earth. We must do this NOW. We can wait no longer. At this conference, we will share knowledge of the effects of the built environment on the health of humans and the earth; foster interdisciplinary collaboration on real sustainable and equitable practices; and define a universal charter (or road map) for improving the built environment. Paper proposals are invited from elected officials, scholars and practitioners concerned with the following issues: Topics for Caring for Our Common Home: · Achieving Healthy, Just, Sustainable Cities · Prioritizing Urban Health Equity · Healing Forgotten Neighborhoods · Sociable Squares and Special Places · Making Poor Neighborhoods Beautiful · Regeneration Projects · Caring for Green and Blue in the City · Strategies to Improve Air and Water Quality · Lifetime Communities · Constructing Cities to Last · Ensuring a Truly Sustainable Urban Fabric · Impact of the Built and Natural Environment on Health · Strategies to Achieve a Green Healthy City for Children · The Common Good, Urban Design, and the Public Realm · How Public Health and Urban Design Collaborate · Prioritizing Low Energy Use Cities · The City of Short Distances · Community-led Neighborhood Planning · Integrated Strategies to Combat Poverty and Protect Nature
  • Call for Application for Three Short-Term Fellowships for New Research on Local Renaissances

    Florence/Naples | Dates: 17 – 30 Oct, 2015
    The aim of the call for applications is to create an international team formed of three scholars, either PhD candidates at the end of their research or postdoctoral fellows, to work together for three months to explore different notions of antiquarian culture and artistic patronage in different areas in Europe during the early modern period. Working on the assumption that a universal and monolithic Renaissance is increasingly seen to be a superseded concept, the research group will be encouraged to investigate the idea of “local Renaissances”, as well as crucial historiographical concepts such as “antiquity”, “identity” and “style”. Over a very long period the idea that Florence and Rome represent the canon of Renaissance art and architecture has led to a deep misunderstanding of the specific artistic cultures found in other contexts, which have often been relegated to the margins of scholarship as backward-looking peripheries. It is now well known that different local all’antica styles developed across Italy, such as those in Venice and Milan, and more attention has been devoted to the multiple ‘antiquities’ which informed also the artistic and literary cultures of Florence and Rome. The ERC-HistAntArtSI project has been working for four years on rediscovering the specific character of antiquarian culture and artistic patronage in the Kingdom of Naples between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and on redefining the concept of Southern Renaissance. This concept, once used in local historiography to indicate a phenomenon of uniformity and backwardness, is gradually being reshaped and revised, reinforcing the idea of another Renaissance, one which belongs more coherently to the regional histories presently being uncovered throughout Italy and the rest of Europe. Furthermore, recent research has demonstrated how a new fascination with the classical past was a widespread phenomenon in early modern Europe. While work has been done on the reception of antiquity in France, Germany and the Netherlands, there are other contexts that still remain at the margins of Renaissance historiography and need to be investigated. As a result of collaboration between the ERC/HistAntArtSi project and the Kunsthistorisches Institut, three research scholarships are being offered to investigate the reception of the classical past in selected areas and regions of Europe. We seek for proposals that, taking an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, look at single regions or areas which for historical or cultural reasons were connected to southern Italy, such as Spain, Dalmatia, Greece or Flanders. It is possible that other areas in northern or eastern Europe will also be considered. A particular requirement will be that the candidates investigate not only single examples of local Renaissances but also the possible connections, networks and dialogues which existed among different contexts. Scholars are encouraged to present proposals which explore local concepts of the antique in the form of archaeological excavations, works of art, architecture, antiquarian literature, and history, and which address the problem both of how the contemporary “identity” of cities and regions was formed by a local notion of the “antique” as well as how local antiquities were used to construct a sense of identity for civic institutions or individuals. We welcome cases which question the idea of a “single antiquity”, considering instead how the idea of antiquity varied widely, including not only Roman, but also Greek and pre-classical indigenous antiquities, as well as monuments and objects from the more recent medieval past. Proposals may consider aspects of the local reception of antiquity, such as the notion of competing ‘antiquities’, the character and priorities of local conceptions of the antique, the merge and clash of imported modes of classical revival with local idioms or relationships between concepts of antiquity in various regions. Candidate profile: Potential candidates will be scholars who are already working on a European area at a doctoral or postdoctoral level. In line with the approach and methodology of the HistAntArtSI research project, the selected group of scholars would work together sharing an interdisciplinary and comparative approach and maintaining constant contact with the research team hosted at the University of Naples Federico II. In addition to their individual and specific research skills, each candidate should be able to demonstrate her/his capacity to cooperate as part of a research group. Candidates should also have a good knowledge of spoken and written Italian and English. Work description: Scholarships will begin in January 2016 and end in March 2016. Fellows will be expected to live in Florence and to work at the Kunsthistorisches Institut. Each scholar will work individually on her/his research topic, but will be expected to engage closely and continuously in seminars and discussions with the other two selected scholars and with the ERC HistAntArtSI research group. The group of scholars will be expected to organize a workshop in which they will present the results of their work at the Kunsthistorisches Institut and to submit a proposal for a panel to be held in the following RSA (2017). Stipend: Each scholar will receive circa 2000 € monthly. There are no additional funds for travel to Florence. Application: Applicants must submit a thousand-word length project proposal, together with a curriculum vitae and a cover letter. The names of two established scholars ready to support the application must be listed at the end of the cover letter. Applicants are required to merge all the documents in a single PDF (max. 2 MB) and submit it via e-mail to +
  • CFP: (AAS-in-Asia 2016): Cities by Experts for the People

    Dates: 16 – 25 Oct, 2015
    CALL FOR PAPERS, AAS-in-ASIA 2016 Conference, KyotoCities by Experts for the People: In search of spaces of hope in the intersections of power and knowledge * Critical urban theorists have often given short shrift to bureaucracies as possible sites for emancipatory politics. Since Max Weber?s rendition of the ?iron cage of bureaucracy? and Herbert Marcuse?s critique of the ?one-dimensional man,? academic writing tends to portray professional experts working within bureaucracies as extensions of the coercive state and increasingly as collaborators of corporate powers amidst accelerating neoliberalization. Against this context, ?spaces of hope? have been largely couched in the informal and the autonomous, where ?local knowledge? and ?bottom-up? initiatives are seen as key for generating alternative futures that resist the top-down, generic solutions imposed by technical experts.

    Recent studies on the nature of expertise suggest that the assumed dichotomy between expert and indigenous knowledge has at times been overstated. Although expert practices have been central to the rise of modern statecraft and hence the normative configuration of power/knowledge, experts are constantly required to make pragmatic accommodation in projects and policies in actual operations. Despite being increasingly subjected to managerialist initiatives and market-based solutions, growing skepticism about the ?reach of the state? has also promulgated new forms of reflexivity and aspirations amongst professionals and bureaucrats.

    This panel will examine the roles of professional experts whose agencies are both augmented and restricted by bureaucratic structures. These may include urban planners, architects, development consultants, systems analysts and others whose epistemologies and interventions are spatial in nature. Research that explores the techno-politics of practice, the cultural world of expertise and performativity of administrative apparatuses are especially welcome. By examining how expertise has been reconfigured in ongoing reshaping of political formations, we ask whether there are potentials for emancipatory politics in the unlikeliest of places.

    Interested participants should submit a 250-word abstract to Lee Kah-Wee (, National University of Singapore and to Cecilia L.
    Chu (, The University of Hong Kong, by *25 October 2015*. We hope to hear from you!

    For more information on AAS-in-Asia 2016, please visit
  • CFP: Boston University Graduate Symposium (Boston, 26-27 Feb 16)

    Dates: 16 Oct – 21 Nov, 2015
    Boston University and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, February 26 - 27, 
    Deadline: Nov 21, 2015

    The 32nd Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium on the History of 
    Art & Architecture

    Submissions Due: November 21, 2015
    Symposium Dates: February 26 – 27, 2016

    Serious Fun: Expressions of Play in the History of Art and Architecture

    In all of its forms, play is a vital expressive force. Whether 
    theatrical or athletic, rollicking or subversive, play has enacted a 
    pivotal role in shaping cultural life. The 32nd Annual Boston 
    University Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Art & 
    Architecture invites submissions that consider aspects of play as form, 
    content, process, and methodological framework.

    Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, the following: 
    representations of play;  entertainment, games, and toys; spaces of 
    play, leisure, and recreation; play as practice; political control of 
    play; play as dissent or activism; word play; the naughty and the 
    bawdy; revelry and whimsy; play and performance; and play as creative 

    We welcome submissions from graduate students at all stages of their 
    studies, working in any area or discipline.

    Please send an abstract (300 words or less), paper title, and a CV to 
    the Symposium Coordinator, Catherine O’Reilly, at The deadline for submissions is 
    Saturday, November 21, 2015. Selected speakers will be notified before 
    January 1, 2016.  Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be 
    followed by a question and answer session.

    The Symposium will be held Friday, February 26 – Saturday, February 27, 
    2016, with a keynote lecture (TBD) on Friday evening at the Boston 
    University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery and graduate presentations 
    on Saturday in the Riley Seminar Room of the Museum of Fine Arts, 

    This event is generously sponsored by The Boston University Center for 
    the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & 
    Architecture; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Boston University 
    Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association; and the 
    Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery.
  • CFP: Visioning Technologies - The Architectures of Sight

    Dates: 16 Oct – 31 Dec, 2015
    An opportunity has arisen to include one extra chapter in this book. The section of the book for this chapter is "Digital Technologies and the Architecture of the 21st Century"

    Below are the book details and contact information.

    Publisher: Ashgate publishing, UK
    Editor: Dr. Graham Cairns
    Copy: hardback followed by paperback and online.
    Chapter Word limit (including footnotes): 5-7000 words Those interest contact: Dr. Graham Cairns:<>

    Book theme:

    Visioning Technologies - The Architectures of Sight is a collection of texts from theorists that examine how architecture has been, and is, reframed and restructured by the visual and theoretical frameworks introduced by different ?technologies of sight? ? understood to include orthographic projection, perspective drawing, telescopic devices, photography, film and computer visualization etc. Each author will deal with their own area and historical period of expertise.

    The premise of the book is that ?visioning technologies? have tended, in their incipient moments, to repeat one aim ? the reproduction of reality. Perspective froze space visually, photography captured it momentarily, film presented it in time, and virtual reality immerses us in it holistically. Even parametricism can be said to reproduce a ?reality? on screen ? it allows us to watch the real time process of form formation (what we previously called design).

    However, more than just reproducing reality, these technologies influence architectural design, theory, and intellectual / spatial conceptualisations in a way that evolves over time. In the case of perspective drawing, the influence of the ?new mechanical drawing technique? would manifest itself in single point perspective images of Brunelleschi. In the context of photography, architecture had at its disposal a technology of hi-fidelity realism whose reproductive potential was, for Reyner Banham, what made the International Style, international. In turn, photography?s position as the visioning technology of ?the real? soon superseded by film and its introduction of ?movement and time? into the lexicon of architectural theory. Contemporary digital technologies in their turn continue this evolution, mimicking the design process, prefiguring the experience of spaces yet to be built and fundamentally alter the way we actually design.

    This call is primarily for papers that will deal with the contemporary ?digital turn?. Authors of papers on perspective, photography or film may also enquire.

    More details:<
  • Taliesin West Preservation Master Plan

    Scottsdale | Dates: 21 Oct, 2015
    Guided by the Foundation Board and the Taliesin West Preservation Oversight Committee, an international team of preservation experts, the Taliesin West Preservation Master Plan outlines the overarching philosophy and direction for the present and future preservation of Frank Lloyd Wright's desert masterpiece in Scottsdale, Arizona.

    At the evening event, Sean Malone, CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, will be joined by Gunny Harboe, FAIA, internationally recognized preservation architect and founder of Chicago-based Harboe Architects. Mr. Harboe, the plan's primary author, will present the tenants of the Taliesin West preservation plan. He has overseen the preservation of some of America's most significant historic buildings including Wright sites such as Chicago's Rookery, the Robie House and Unity Temple.

    Wednesday, October 21, 2015
    7:00-8:30 pm
    Lecture and community dialogue. Reception to follow.

    By reservation only. Seating is limited.

    RSVP to Sally Russell at or 480-237-8055.
  • Replica of Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House Opening Nov. 6

    Sarasota | Dates: 06 – 08 Nov, 2015
    The Sarasota Architectural Foundation has constructed a full-size replica of Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House. The replica's grand opening is Nov. 6, the first day of SararasotaMOD Weekend, a celebration of mid-century modern architecture, which focuses on Rudolph this year.
  • Art History 40: Image and Memory: 40 Years of Art-Historical Writing

    London | Dates: 12 – 12 Dec, 2015
    This day of papers brings together for the first time the past and present editors of the Association of Art Historians journal, Art History, in a collective engagement with the role of memory and the image in art-historical writing.  As a celebration of the journal approaching 40 years of publication history, the papers will present a range of perspectives on the problem of images and memory, as arguably key to defining the conceptual practice of the discipline.  Looking both back onto the journal’s history and forward to prospective avenues of enquiry, the papers are variously concerned with situating art-historical or visual memory across a spectrum of disciplinary concerns. The papers will pursue issues of recollection, reminiscence and memory such as the affect of nostalgia, the play of temporalities, echoes and reflections, oblivions and forgettings, or conversely the afterlives of forms, whether ephemeral or archival, in their survivals and half-lives, absences and presence; and objects such as monuments, anti-monuments or memorials, mnemonic objects or displays, souvenirs, mementoes, replicas and reproductions, fragments or ruins.

    Organised by Dr Genevieve Warwick (Editor, Art History) Dr Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
  • CFP: Creative Placemaking and Beyond (London, 30 Aug-2 Sep 16)

    London | Dates: 25 Oct, 2015
    Creative Placemaking and Beyond: Continuing and re-invigorating the arts-led conversation

    Royal Geographical Society 2016 Annual Conference: Nexus Thinking

    30 August -2 September 2016
    London, UK

    Convenors: Cara Courage, University of Brighton and Anita McKeown, SMARTlab, University College Dublin.

    This session will continue the interrogation of notions of creative placemaking started at the RGS 2015 annual conference, aiming to take this conversation to the US and broaden international and sectora/practice discussion.

    The creative placemaking (Landesman 2009) term has entered the arts-driven placemaking sector narrative presented as a ?new [U.S.] policy platform across all levels of government? (Markusen and Gadwa 2010:26) with a particular ethos; a cross-sectoral approach to arts-led regeneration (Markusen and Gadwa 2010) and of including non-arts stakeholders within community revitalisation (Poticha, 2011).

    With contemporary debates around creative placemaking and its relations now reaching a moment in maturity and diversity a critique and a deeper understanding of practice is necessary.

    Persistent questions arise around issues of arts practice/process, power relations, individual and community agency and creative placemaking?s relation vis-?-vis the neoliberal. As such, this session encourages a re-consideration of the role of the arts and creativity within socially-engaged placemaking practices for their potential to encourage self-organisation and how citizens can take the initiative in effecting their lived spacetime (McCormack 2013). It seeks to broaden the constituents in the creative placemaking discourse through presenting an international conversation that focuses on socially practiced, co-produced and citizen-led placemakings, addressing issues of scale, interdisciplinarity and radical practices within creative place production and co-production.

    Given the vital need also for theorists to be in dialogue with practitioners, this session is seeking abstracts from both constituencies, with papers spanning theory and practice and examples of where the two intersect in the academy or in the field. It thus aims to provide a critical assessment of creative placemaking and of community driven placemaking (Hou and Rios 2003) and social design across all settlement types and conceptual, empirical, methodological papers papers are invited.

    Papers might address, but are not limited to:

    ? Challenges to the concepts of creative placemaking and citizen-driven placemaking ? Examination and re-imagination of radical practices within arts-led community regeneration.
    ? The role of the individual and the artist/practitioner and other professionals in ?open source? placemaking ? Performing and un-performing place ? Systemic approaches to creative placemaking and Place-based design - Dealing with complexity.
    ? The role of administrations and policy development effected by grassroots placemakings ? The personal is political ? behavourial related interventions of placemaking beyond party political agendas.

    Please submit an abstract for consideration, of no more than 250 words, by 25th October, to<> and<>. Successful applicants will be informed by 27th October for their timely registration to AAG 2016.
  • Please take the 2015 VRA Professional Status Survey!

    Dates: 14 – 30 Oct, 2015

    You are invited to participate in the 2015 Visual Resources Association (VRA) Professional Status Survey. The VRA is a multidisciplinary organization dedicated to furthering research and education in the field of image management within the educational, cultural heritage, and commercial environments. The purpose of the survey is to gather information that will assist VRA in understanding and responding to recent changes in the profession.

    You should participant in the survey if you work with or have worked with or are planning to work with: Image Media [Digital Images, Slides, Photographs, Film/Video, Multimedia, PDFs]

    As a: 
    Cataloguer / Curator / Librarian / Archivist / Instructor/ Instructional Designer / IT Specialist / Digital Media Specialist / Photographer / Vendor / Support Staff 
    And/ or with expertise or responsibilities in any of these areas:
    Collection Development / Collection Management / Database Management /        AV Support / Tech Support / Instructional or Research Support / Metadata /          Administration / Rights and Reproductions / Graphic Design / Social Media /          Web Development  

    You should take the survey if the above describes you even if you are a student, unemployed, or retired. There are questions that will be relevant you.

    The survey will take 10 to 30 minutes to complete. 
    The Survey is here:
    The survey will close at 11:59 pm CT, Friday, October 30.

    If you experience technical difficulties with the survey please contact Rebecca Moss at
  • Call for Papers: Design Research - History, Theory, Practice (2016 Design Research Society Conference)

    Dates: 14 Oct – 09 Nov, 2015
    Dear list members, with apologies for cross posting ******** DRS2016 ******** DESIGN + RESEARCH + SOCIETY | FUTURE – FOCUSED THINKING Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference 27-30 June 2016, Brighton UK Deadline for full papers: 9th November 2015 We are pleased to announce the following panel theme, now seeking paper submissions as part of the 2016 DRS conference in Brighton. *Design Research - History, Theory, Practice: histories for future-focused thinking* Design historians continually revise and reflect upon their preoccupations, omissions, emerging methodologies and interdisciplinary approaches to design and research. Since design history’s emergence in the 1970s both as an academic discipline and as an intellectual practice concerning the past, present and future of design, this reflexive impulse has included several areas of critical discourse, including gender, material anthropologies, global narratives of design, histories of pedagogy, among others, with this panel’s added preoccupation with histories of design research. The Design Research Society 2016 conference offers an opportunity to examine overlapping constituencies and interests between design history, design research and current practice and asks, what has changed over the last 50 years in the field of design research? This panel takes the anniversary occasion of the DRS, the first multi- disciplinary society for the international design research community, as a starting point and extends the question to include geographies, histories, figures, practices and new models. What can historians contribute to the understanding of design research as a methodology of history, theory and practice? How do social, cultural frameworks influence design research methods? This theme aims to contribute to the formation of new knowledge about design research over the past 50 years in a global context. We invite contributions from a range of constituencies that take histories of future-focused design thinking as their remit. Proposals of interest include (but are not limited to): Translation and shared vocabularies of design research (including geographic, disciplinary, theoretical and practice-led approaches to design and design language); Experiments in and histories of design pedagogy; Emergent constituencies of design research methodologies, agency and trans- national design; Texts and contexts related to design research; Gender in histories of design research and design practice. Information regarding submission, the conference and further themes available via the DRS2016 conference website: Or contact the sub-chairs: Livia Rezende, Royal College of Art, UK & Maya Oppenheimer, London College of Communication, UK Maya Oppenheimer, PhD Teaching & Learning Officer, Design History Society Senior Lecturer & Support Coordinator Contextual & Theoretical Studies School of Design, London College of Communication Elephant & Castle, London SE1 6SB Livia Rezende, PhD Treasurer, Design History Society Tutor in History of Design Lecturer and Tutor in Critical and Historical Studies School of Humanities, Royal College of Art Kensington Gore, London SW7 2EU
  • Architecture and Inequality

    Chicago | Dates: 07 – 07 Nov, 2015
    The Aggregate Architectural History Collaborative presents at the Chicago Architecture Biennial a lecture and discussion panel to examine issues of architecture and inequality from both historical and contemporary perspectives. The event will included a series of speakers presenting original research on subjects ranging from the American welfare state and capitalism, to contemporary race and biopolitics. Featured work will include the 'Black Lives Matter' project from the Aggregate website ( The panel's work is framed by the following questions: What can architectural history teach us about the history of inequality in the United States? What might be learned from architectural history and architecture about paths forward out of the current situations of inequality?
SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
1365 N. Astor Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
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