Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • 2014 Chicago Prize: The Barack Obama Presidential Library Design Competition

    Chicago | Dates: 03 Feb – 30 Apr, 2015

    In 2015 President Obama will announce the location of his Presidential Library. Two sites in Chicago, one in New York and one in Honolulu were proposed as locations. In the next several months choices made by Obama and his advisors about the library’s location, design, and function will help shape his post-presidential legacy.

    In order to foster debate about the use and purpose of this unique building type, the Chicago Architectural Club challenged local architects to rethink and redefine the Obama Presidential Library on a hypothetical site in downtown Chicago. This exhibition features winners and honorable mentions of Chicago Architectural Club’s 2014 Chicago Prize design competition.

    Winners of the competition were announced at the opening reception of the exhibition at the Chicago Architecture Foundation on February 3, 2015. A live stream video of the program is available here.

  • Joyce Hwang: Ants of the Prairie, Buffalo

    Chicago | Dates: 02 Apr, 2015

    Thursday, April 2, 5:30 p.m.
    Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr., room 203

    Today we see conflicted attitudes toward our relationship with urban "nature." What happens, for instance, when urban wildlife encroaches on more densely populated areas of cities? What happens when they develop habitats outside officially zoned territories, and in residential or commercial neighborhoods? Ants of the Prairie sees these challenges and "conflicts" not as limitations, but as instigators for creative practice. In our work, we are developing a series of projects that incorporate wildlife habitats into constructed environments. Recently completed works include Bat Tower, Bat Cloud, and a second iteration of Bat Cloud installed in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

    Joyce Hwang, AIA, NCARB, is an Associate Professor of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and the Director of Ants of the Prairie. She is a recipient of a 2014 Emerging Voices Award from the Architectural League of New York, a 2013 New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Fellowship, and a residency at the MacDowell Colony, where she was selected as a National Endowment for the Arts Fellow. Hwang received a Master of Architecture degree from Princeton University and a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University, where she received the Charles Goodwin Sands Memorial Bronze Medal.

    This lecture was made possible by the William Bronson and Grayce Slovet Mitchell Lectureship.

    All lectures and events are free and open to the public.

  • Art, Design, and Activism in Contemporary Landscape

    Chicago | Dates: 26 Mar, 2015

    The field of contemporary landscape architecture is rich in interplays between art, design and activism, creating unique possibilities for the impacts of the built environment on politics and culture. Speakers Jane Hutton of the GSD, Melissa Cate Christ of Transverse Studio, and Frances Whitehead of ARTetal Studio and SAIC will present a global and multi-disciplinary review of landscape architecture projects that explore this territory. The panel will include project presentations, discussion, and questions form the audience. 

    Sponsored by Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, Designed Objects at SAIC.

  • Port Urbanism: Recent and Ongoing Projects

    Chicago | Dates: 18 Mar, 2015

    Architect Andrew Moddrell, director of PORT Urbanism, will present the recent work of his urban design and public realm and practice which range in scale from a two-acre plaza in Indianapolis and a fourteen-acre park in Denver to a 51-mile greenway in Los Angeles and a 10,000-acre strategic vision for Cleveland.

    Speaker: Andrew is a founding director of PORT. He is currently leading a diverse range of PORT’s public realm design projects including a multi-disciplinary visioning project to determine an ideal role for the historic Cook County Hospital and surrounding grounds within the broader context of the Illinois Medical District; the design and construction of a civic venue in Denver’s Paco Sanchez Park; and an OpenLands study for the Calumet River region in Southeast Chicago. Andrew recently represented PORT in Washington D.C. as part of the advisory panel for the National Endowment for the Arts inaugural "Our Town" initiative that awarded millions of dollars to communities that are supporting the arts as part of a community revitalization strategy.

    Andrew is also a Clinical Assistant Professor at UIC, and he recently taught at the Architectural Association in London as part of the AA/UIC Visiting School.

    Before founding PORT, Andrew was a project architect and project manager at Garofalo Architects and UrbanLab as well as a Research Associate at IIT. He holds a B.Arch with distinction from The University of Kansas, where he was awarded the Thayer Medal for Architectural Design, and an M.Arch from Yale University, where he was awarded the H.I. Feldman Prize for Design Excellence.

  • David Benjamin: The Living, New York

    Chicago | Dates: 05 Mar, 2015

    David Benjamin, Principal of the award-winning design studio The Living, will present the work of his practice and his research at Columbia University’s Living Architecture Lab, which he directs. Benjamin’s projects include Living Light, a permanent, illuminated pavilion in Seoul that visually reports changes in air quality, and Amphibious Architecture, a floating installation in New York’s East River that enabled participants to communicate with fish and learn about water pollution. Along with his partner Soo-In Yang, he has recently released the book series Life Size, which explores the possibilities of creating open source design processes.

    Sponsored by the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, Designed Objects at SAIC.

  • Van Evera Bailey and Regional Modernism

    Irvington | Dates: 08 May, 2015

    Van Evera Bailey was one of the architects who developed the Northwest Regional Style of architecture popularized in the Pacific Northwest, along with Pietro BelluschiJohn Yeon and Saul Zaik. Born in Portland in 1903, Bailey apprenticed locally and then traveled the world working in New Zealand and Southern California before returning to Portland in 1936. in 1940, California architect Richard Neutra hired him as the local supervising architect for the Jan de Graaff house in Dunthorpe, a Portland suburb. The house, which included some of Bailey’s ideas, received national exposure and gave him his first big break.

    Bailey’s modern homes include large windows and deep overhanges. He designed a new and beautiful type of stilt system to deal with the challenges of hillside construction.

    Our program will provide insights on Bailey and the scope of his career, along with disucussions on interior design & preservation of Modern architecture and it all takes place in the beautiful Pietro Belluschi designed Central Lutheran Church. Featured speakers will include:

    • Anthony Belluschi, FAIA, – Central Lutheran Church and its design and restoration;
    • Becca Cavell, FAIA – Bailey’s Life and Work;
    • Jack Bookwalter, freelance writer and architectural historian onBailey’s work in Pasadena and Palm Springs;
    •  21st Century Interpretations of Modern Interiors
    • Peggy Moretti, Executive Director of Restore Oregon on the Preservation of Mid-Century Buildings;

    Those interested in personally experiencing Van Evera Bailey’s residential designs may want to participate in our Mid-Century Modern Home Tour the following day, featuring several Portland area homes by Van Evera Bailey, many of which have never been open to the public before. This is the first time such a collection of his residential work has been available for viewing.

  • Public Art 101: Commissioning Works of Art for Community Settings

    Wilkinsburg | Dates: 07 Mar, 2015

    Are you an artist, an art connoisseur, a neighborhood and community activist, or just an individual that is interested in the addition of public art in your area?

    If so, join us at Public Art 101: Commissioning Works of Art for Community Settings, a symposium partnership of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation and the Pittsburgh Office of Public Art.

    This session will provide a discussion platform looking at the basic framework of how neighborhood groups, organizations, or even entrepreneurial individuals, think about and approach commissioning and completing public art projects.

    The session will feature presentations by the staff of the Office of Public Art, along with artists and organizations that commissioned and completed art projects in public places.

    Attendees and participants will learn how to structure a public art project, work with an artist, and develop a public art plan.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    RSVPs are appreciated. Click here to register.

  • Lecture: The History of Masonry

    Wilkinsburg | Dates: 03 Mar, 3015

    We take a comprehensive and retrospective look at the application of masonry in building and architecture and illustrate how a fundamental understanding of masonry helps us restore the fabric of our built environment.

    This workshop will also discuss and look at masonry in various forms and applications, from stone to brick and concrete and also explore how masonry has developed over time from the construction of landmarks like the Great Sphinx of Egypt to its modern day application and restoration.

    About the presenter: Stephen Shelton has 40 years of experience working in the building trades.  For 12 of those years, he was the president of one of the city’s premier masonry companies; known for its high level of craftsmanship and the mark it left on many of the beautiful and historic homes in Pittsburgh.  He is the founder and executive director of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh, which is a non-profit training facility.  The Institute’s goal is to give individuals, who have been incarcerated or had troubled pasts, an opportunity to learn a trade and secure a living-wage employment.

    This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Click here for more information about PHLF membership and please join!
    Non-members: $5

    RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny at 412-471-5808 ext. 527

  • Safe Streets, Great Streets

    New York | Dates: 02 Mar, 2015

    AIA CES 1.5 LU | 1.5 HSW

    When: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM MONDAY, MARCH 2

    Where: At The Center   

    Vision Zero, the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries, is a signature effort of the de Blasio administration. In Polly Trottenberg’s first year as Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT), the agency has undertaken a number of well-publicized initiatives to pursue this goal.

    Other NYCDOT programs are also making the City more accessible for pedestrians, bicyclists and New Yorkers with disabilities. A panel of six professionals from NYCDOT will talk about ongoing and new efforts including Vision Zero, the Plaza Program, Under the Elevated, accessibility, and improved project delivery, that are transforming the streets of New York.

    Presenters:
    Joshua Benson, Acting Assistant Commissioner, Street Improvement Projects, NYCDOT
    Ann Marie Doherty, Senior Director, Research, Implementation & Safety, NYCDOT
    Wendy Feuer, Assistant Commissioner, Urban Design+ Art + Wayfinding, NYCDOT
    Neil Gagliardi, Director Urban Design, NYCDOT
    Juan Martinez, Director of Strategic Initiatives, NYCDOT
    Rosa Rijos, Assistant Commissioner, Roadway Capital Management, NYCDOT
     Organized by: AIANY Transportation and Infrastructure Committee

    Price: Free for AIA members; $10 for non-members

    Register

  • BxW NYC

    New York | Dates: 02 Mar – 11 Apr, 2015

    Built by Women (BxW) is a social and educational initiative, celebrating women’s contributions to the built environment. In addition to recognizing and supporting the diverse women working in these professions, BxW provides both current professionals and students strong role models and mentors.

    Last fall, the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation (BWAF) launched a public competition for submissions of women-built sites. 98 diverse sites, designed, engineered, or constructed by women, reflecting strong design, have historical or cultural significance, or demonstrate substantial social or community impact, were selected by a jury representing the architectural, engineering, and construction professions.

    By profiling and visually mapping women’s work across the US, starting with NYC, BxW raises awareness about the spaces where we live, work, and play. BxW produces educational materials, pop-up exhibitions and panel discussions, walking tours, activity books, merchandise, and more.

    March 2, 2015 will kickstart a month-long BxW NYC exhibition at the Center for Architecture during Women’s History Month, with the support of the Women in Architecture committee of the AIA New York Chapter.

     BxW NYC Jurors:

    Deborah Berke, FAIA, Principal, Deborah Berke Partners
    Joan Blumenfeld, FAIA, Principal & Global Interior Design Director, Perkins + Will
    Aine Brazil, PE, Managing Principal, Thornton Tomasetti
    Fiona Cousins, PE, Principal, Arup
    Cheryl McKissack Daniel, President & CEO, McKissack & McKissack
    Andrea Leers, FAIA, Principal, Leers Weinzapfel Associates
    Audrey Matlock, FAIA, Principal, Audrey Matlock Architects
    Laura Starr, ASLA, Partner, Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects & Planners

    BxW NYC Advisor
    Andrew Dolkart, Director of the Historic Preservation Program and Professor of Historic Preservation, Columbia University

    BxW NYC Winners

    Funding for BxW NYC came from the New York Building Foundation and the New York Council for the Humanities.

    Exhibition Sponsors:
    Evenson/Best
    Knoll

    RELATED PROGRAMS

    Exhibition Opening 
    BxW NYC
    Monday, March 2, 6:00-8:00 PM

  • Chatter: Architecture Talks Back

    Chicago | Dates: 11 Apr – 12 Jul, 2015

    Architecture is a perpetual conversation between the present and the past, knowing full well that the future is listening. So what happens when this dialogue is influenced by contemporary modes of communication such as texting, Twitter, and Instagram? Chatter happens: ideas are developed, produced, and presented as open-ended or fragmented conversations and cohere through the aggregation of materials. Chatter: Architecture Talks Back looks at the diverse contemporary methods and approaches wielded by five emerging architects: Bureau Spectacular, Erin Besler, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, Formlessfinder, and John Szot Studio.

    Using a range of representational methods and formats—from drawings done by hand to those enabled by robots, from graphic novels to digital simulations—these practitioners embrace both age-old and cutting-edge technologies to engage with the architectonic timeline. Jimenez Lai of Bureau Spectacular references architectural history to develop a “mash-up” of ideas through which he opens up and re-theorizes architecture. The process and mission of Formlessfinder depend on the same fetishizing of form undertaken by previous generations of architects, while Fake Industries relies on copies to re-present work through a critical lens. Erin Besler questions the immediate acceptance of new technologies and explores issues of drawing and translation in architecture, and John Szot Studio produces digital videos that simulate possibilities for architecture to draw on overlooked social contexts.

    Today’s society has had a profound influence on the discipline of architecture, yet despite the utilization of current technologies, these contemporary works are not divorced from history. Chatter: Architecture Talks Back is about just that—having a dialogue, talking back to architecture of the past. Works from the Art Institute’s vast collection of architecture and design are presented alongside these five ultra-current practitioners to highlight this conversation. As these architects apply new technology to a confluence of historical influences and theories in order to conceive new designs and ideas, they are constantly expanding the dialogues within the legacy of their field. This dynamic installation makes readily apparent how each studio recognizes that the architectural past, though a shared language, is sometimes best understood with modern punctuation.

    Sponsors
    Support for this exhibition is provided by Celia and David Hilliard, the Butler-VanderLinden Family Fund for Architecture and Design, and the Architecture & Design Society.

  • The Midcentury Mood: Milton Schwartz in America, 1953–1965

    Chicago | Dates: 21 Mar – 11 Jul, 2015

    Despite his significant contributions to the Chicago skyline and groundbreaking early hotel design for the Las Vegas Strip, Milton Schwartz remains an under-recognized figure from an important period in American architecture. The son of an engineer, Schwartz studied at the University of Illinois, where he was inspired to become an architect by the lectures of Frank Lloyd Wright. After a few years in the construction industry during World War II, Schwartz founded his own Chicago architectural practice and soon completed his first project—a visionary co-op building, 320 Oakdale, combining passive solar technology with a dynamic aesthetic of glass, aluminum, and modern brise-soleil. Schwartz went on to specialize in high-rise apartment buildings and designs for leisure and hospitality, most notably his iconic tower and restaurants for the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. 

    With their modern forms, advanced engineering, and innovative materials, Schwartz’s award-winning hotels and motels reflect the attitude of the automobile and jet ages. For his work in Las Vegas, he paired this vocabulary of concrete, metal, and glass with fantastic new environments integrating water, color, lighting, and scenography. Among the first large resorts of the modern Las Vegas, the Dunes Hotel became a symbol of midcentury American decadence in both popular culture and the iconoclastic architectural theory of the postmodern era. Together, Schwartz’s beautifully rendered drawings of towers, hotels, signage, and interiors present images not only of heroic midcentury construction, but of the expanded languages of modern architecture in America.  

  • Arts, Humanities, and Complex Network at NetSci2015

    Zaragoza | Dates: 02 – 02 Jun, 2015
    We are delighted to invite submissions for Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks — 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015 taking place at the World Trade Center Zaragoza (WTCZ) in Spain, on Tuesday, June 2, 2015. Submission: For submission instructions please go to: http://artshumanities.netsci2015.net/ Deadline for submission: March 29, 2015. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 6, 2015. Abstract: For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneer work in the overlap of arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe, leveraging interaction between those areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion. In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focusing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences. Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations. As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q Keynote: As in previous years, we will feature a high-profile keynote from the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and/or network art. Best regards, The AHCN2015 organizers, Maximilian Schich*, Roger Malina**, and Isabel Meirelles*** artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com * Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA ** Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA *** Professor, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada
  • Cultural & Historic Preservation Conference -- The Remembered and the Forgotten: Preserving and Interpreting the Americas to 1820

    Newport | Dates: 22 – 24 Oct, 2015
    The Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island will hold its annual conference Oct. 22-24, 2015. The conference will focus on the preservation and interpretation of pre-1820 buildings, objects, and sites in the Americas, particularly in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy. As a key center of global trade, Newport occupied a principal place in the American landscape in the 17th and 18th centuries. Indeed, the social and economic relationships emanating from Newport spread out, linking Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and shaping the histories of millions of people throughout the colonial and into the early national period. Today, the legacy of this shared American past is materialized in buildings, furnishings, curated objects, and archaeological sites. The preservation and interpretation of these treasured resources poses challenges, but also provides many opportunities to connect professionals and the public and to improve our understanding of the “forgotten” experiences of groups whose voices are keenly absent in current histories. This public conference will include presentations, tours, student lightning talks and networking opportunities. The conference is presented by Salve Regina University in partnership with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Information on the conference is available at: www.salve.edu/chp2015.
  • The Remembered and the Forgotten: Preserving and Interpreting the Americas to 1820

    Newport | Dates: 24 Feb – 01 Mar, 2015
    The Noreen Stonor Drexel Cultural and Historic Preservation Program at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island will hold its annual conference Oct. 22-24, 2015. The conference will focus on the preservation and interpretation of pre-1820 buildings, objects, and sites in the Americas, particularly in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy. As a key center of global trade, Newport occupied a principal place in the American landscape in the 17th and 18th centuries. Indeed, the social and economic relationships emanating from Newport spread out, linking Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans and shaping the histories of millions of people throughout the colonial and into the early national period. Today, the legacy of this shared American past is materialized in buildings, furnishings, curated objects, and archaeological sites. The preservation and interpretation of these treasured resources poses challenges, but also provides many opportunities to connect professionals and the public and to improve our understanding of the “forgotten” experiences of groups whose voices are keenly absent in current histories. This public conference will include presentations, tours, student lightning talks and networking opportunities. Papers in the fields of architecture, archaeology, material culture, museum studies, and preservation planning/policy are especially encouraged. Proposals will be accepted for individual papers, complete panels and student lightning talks. The deadline to submit proposals is March 1, 2015. Notice of acceptance will be made on a rolling basis and no later than May 15, 2015.The conference is presented by Salve Regina University in partnership with the Newport Restoration Foundation. Information on the conference is available at: www.salve.edu/chp2015.
  • Mount Lebanon's North House: History and Legacy of a Shaker Masterpiece

    New York City | Dates: 19 – 19 Mar, 2015
    This illustrated lecture at the National Arts Club will explore a remarkable building from its construction in 1818 to its demolition in 1973. The Shakers built hundreds of buildings, each uniquely suited to its geography and function. While the village meetinghouse was revered as the architectural center of Shaker faith and practice, the family dwelling house was the building to which individuals felt most attached – their Shaker home. It was where they slept, ate, kept their clothing, and worshiped together as a family in daily religious exercises. The Mount Lebanon North Family Dwelling, often called simply “the North House,” was one such Shaker home. An interior room is preserved in the American Wing of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  • Sustainable Cities Design Academy

    Washington | Dates: 24 – 27 Feb, 2015
    Technical design assistance for public-private partnership teams who are working on conceptually designed projects that advance the sustainability goals for the neighborhoods / municipalities / regions where they are located.
  • VAF Chicago 2015

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 07 Jun, 2015

    Registration Now Open for VAF Chicago 2015!

    Please join us for the Vernacular Architecture Forum's 35th Annual Conference in Chicago from June 3 – 7, 2015.

    Click Here for Registration

    We will go “Out of the Loop” to explore new dimensions of Chicago’s built environment.  Our tours will go to unexpected places, including the sprawling industrial Calumet region, the ethnic crossroads of Devon Avenue, and the community building efforts of the Dorchester Project

    Our special events will take place in remarkable but relatively unknown vernacular venues, including Salvage One, Jazz Showcase, Miller Bathouse, and Boni Vino.

    For more, please visit the VAF Chicago 2015 website and subscribe to our Blog.  

  • SECAC Panel: Photographing Industry: Pittsburgh and Beyond

    Dates: 21 – 24 Oct, 2015
    Over the years, Pittsburgh and its industries have played host to several key photographic surveys. Beginning in 1907 as part of the pioneering Pittsburgh Survey, documentary photographer Lewis Hine recorded the complex relationship between the city's factories and its citizens. Roughly forty years later, W. Eugene Smith made nearly twenty thousand images of Pittsburgh, creating what he considered his finest work. In keeping with the spirit of these important projects, this panel seeks papers exploring the rich and complicated relationship between photography and industry. Topics of exploration may reflect the broad range of the subject, from the Industrial Revolution to the Information Age. The panel welcomes papers examining not only art and documentary, but also casual and vernacular photographic records of industry. Session chairs: Emily Morgan, Iowa State University, and James Swensen, Brigham Young University. Contact: emorgan@iastate.edu
  • Tour: Frank Lloyd Wright and Modernism in Indiana

    Indianapolis | Dates: 02 – 02 May, 2015
    Central Indiana holds a trove of architectural treasures. Some, like Frank Lloyd Wright’s Richard Davis House (1950) and John E. Christian House–Samara (1954) are tucked away in leafy enclaves, and some, like the midcentury modern wonders of Columbus, hide in plain sight. On the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy’s annual Out and About Wright tour, you’ll get to see both of Wright’s distinctive central Indiana works as well as several highlights around Indianapolis. We’ll depart from the Omni Severin Hotel starting at 8:30 a.m. to tour the local landmark Christian Theological Seminary (Edward Larrabee Barnes, 1966) and the 2012 AIA Honor Award-winning Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion (Marlon Blackwell Architects, 2010) in the 100 Acres Art & Nature Park at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. After a brief stop at local icon The Pyramids (Roche Dinkeloo and Associates, 1967), we’ll head out to Wright’s Samara house in West Lafayette, a copper fascia-adorned Usonian still occupied by its original owner, and Davis House in Marion, with its unique 38-foot central octagonal teepee (we are one of the very few groups to tour this unique Wright work!). All transportation and a seated lunch is included. We’ll return to the hotel around 6:30 p.m.
SAH2015