Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • Architecture on Display: The Architecture Exhibition as Model for Knowledge Production

    Delft | Dates: 12 Jun – 31 Aug, 2015
    We now recognize the architecture exhibition as a medium of its own, including its own history. It cannot therefore be treated as a neutral vehicle for the presentation of best practices, the dissemination of innovative ideas, or for the propagation of a singular architectural style or ideology. Exhibitions have a power to frame architectural discourse by exploring the larger cultural conditions that shape the discipline. In the same way as a world's fair communicates a global condition, an exhibition of architectural drawings communicates the existence of archives and their institutional memory, while a model interior of a house conveys that the private, everyday realm also belongs to the sphere of culture and its politics. Architecture exhibitions come in many variants, as we know. A dominant exhibition format has tended to showcase the latest developments of masterpiece architecture to a larger audience, as was the case with the now iconic Modern Architecture: International Exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1932, which launched the International Style. Other formats such as biennials stage debates on the state of architecture in relation to urgent societal or urban issues, e.g. The Greater Number at the Milan Triennale in 1968 curated by Giancarlo De Carlo. Last year’s Venice Biennale entitled Fundamentals, curated by Rem Koolhaas, proposed another kind of format that dominated the various presentations: the exhibition as a platform for the presentation of research. From Beatriz Colomina’s Radical Pedagogies to the Korean pavilion by Minsuk Cho of Mass Studies that won the Golden Lion, the exhibition was not simply a product of research: research itself was on display. For its second annual conference, The Jaap Bakema Study Centre, in collaboration with TU Delft and Het Nieuwe Instituut, wants to look closer into this relationship between research and the exhibition medium. We are interested in contributions that bring to the conference a wide variety of perspectives, both historical and theoretical in nature, and which address, but are not limited to the following questions. Formats and Typologies Which formats and typologies of display can play a key role in establishing a profound relationship between exhibition and research? Where and who is the audience, and what is its role within the exhibition as a site of knowledge production? What are the classical and innovative narratives, what are the successful formats? What sort of exhibition design is involved? From installations and 1:1 models to chronologies, from archive presentations to 3D-animations. Archives and Knowledge Production Exhibitions often combine original sources such as historical drawings, photographs and models, with new materials that are especially produced for the exhibition. If the exhibition is a site of knowledge production, what is the relation between original sources and newly produced material? What kind of objects and materials are put on display? What is the role of institutional archives and private collections when making an exhibition? What sort of products are the specially produced materials in terms of didactics, analysis, mapping, documentation, survey, data-mining, synthesis, or even propaganda? How are the different modes and standards of 'research' (e.g. scholarly research, design research) compatible with the exhibition format? Analysis and Speculation Exhibitions as platforms of research seem to hold the capacity to alternate between analysis and speculation. How can exhibitions combine the accumulation of historical experience in the archive with speculations about the future? Does the exhibition as a site of knowledge production play a special role in relating historical and archival research to contemporary questions of architecture and urban planning? And finally, what does turning an exhibition into a platform for research tell us about the state of the discipline and where it is heading? Abstracts of 300-500 words plus a short bio (300 words max) should be sent to Dirk van den Heuvel: d.vandenheuvel@tudelft.nl Dates: Deadline: Monday 31 August 2015 Notification of selection: Monday 14 September 2015 Dates of the conference: 30 November – 1 December 2015 Organizing Committee: Dirk van den Heuvel (Jaap Bakema Study Centre) Tom Avermaete (TU Delft) Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen (Yale University) Guus Beumer (Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam) Dick van Gameren (TU Delft)
  • Le Corbusier - What Moves Us ...?

    Aarhus | Dates: 12 Jun – 01 Aug, 2015
    This call invites students and scholars of architecture and art history to contribute to the following three sections: Section A: Turnabout: Le Corbusier, Architect Artist in Postwar Europe Section B: Crossroads: Le Corbusier and Asger Jorn Section C: Transgressions: Le Corbusier in Danish Architecture and Urbanism The purpose of this conference is to instigate a discussion and to draw up perspectives for further research on the specific subject matters listed above. Your abstract (500 words)must give an overview of a proposed 20 minute paper presentation. Abstracts will undergo a review process. Submissions should be saved in Word or PDF format and be submitted by 1 August 2015 via the conference email address: Lecorbu@aarch.dk Any queries about the format of submissions etc. can be addressed to Ruth Baumeister and Hanne Foged Gjelstrup via the conference email address. For more information read the full call on www.aarch.dk
  • Miles Through History

    Dates: 21 Jun, 2015

    See the southern end of the Rogue Valley as it was in 1872 through the lens of Jeff LaLande’s research and experience. Jeff LaLande, archaeologist and historian, dusts off the layers of modern times with his words and reveals historic landscapes at 10 historic sites including Tunnel 13, the Siskiyou Toll Road Gatehouse, the Dollarhide House, Steinman’s Loop and others.

    Caravan is limited to eight vehicles because some of the stops are on narrow byways and historic roads. Participants will meet up at the start of the road trip and drive their own vehicles in a caravan. Preregistration and prepayment is required, $40/vehicle for members and $50/vehicle for nonmembers. For more information and to register, call 541-773-6536 x202.

  • After Hours at Robie House - Nights at the Museums

    Chicago | Dates: 20 Aug, 2015

    Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural masterpiece will open its doors this summer for a special After Hours event. Gather with friends for a festive and casual evening of music, drinks and light hors d’oeuvres. Enjoy this icon of modernism and wander its celebrated spaces. Guides will be available to give tours and answer questions.

    Frederick C. Robie House is one of six Chicago South Side cultural institutions opening their doors after regular hours this summer for Museum Campus South’sNights at the Museums series, which marks the inauguration of the Museum Campus South Passport: a project designed to encourage visitors to explore all that Museum Campus South has to offer. Visitors who receive passport stamps from Robie House, the DuSable Museum of African American History, Oriental Institute Museum, the Renaissance Society, Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts and Smart Museum of Art by December 31, 2015 will receive an exclusive Museum Campus South mug. Passports will be available at all Nights at the Museums series events and downloadable here.

  • 25th International Sculpture Conference: New Frontiers in Sculpture

    Phoenix | Dates: 04 – 07 Nov, 2015
    The International Sculpture Center will travel to Phoenix, Arizona this November 4-7, 2015 for its first conference in the American Southwest. Inspired by exploration in art and architecture in desert landscapes, the 25th International Sculpture Conference will bring together artists, arts administrators, curators, patrons, students, and sculpture enthusiasts for new discoveries in the field of sculpture. Registration opens soon! This four day conference will include 14 conference sessions including panels, keynotes, mentor sessions, and ARTSlams; evening receptions at Bentley Gallery, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, and the David and Gladys Wright House, among others; a gallery and studio hop on Grand Avenue and Roosevelt Row; and much more. Pre- and post-conference hands-on workshops and optional trips will also be available (additional fees apply). Visit www.sculpture.org/az2015 to register and for more information.
  • Architecture 101: Newport Mansions

    Washington | Dates: 26 Jul, 2015

    Newport County, Rhode Island, one of the most historically intact cities in North America, is home to fourteen historic properties and landscapes, of which seven are National Historic Landmarks. Trudy Coxe, CEO and executive director of The Preservation Society of Newport County, discusses the “Newport Mansions,” which represent three centuries of America’s architectural, social, and landscape history.

    The Museum’s Architecture 101 lecture series, which provides professionals, students, and the general public alike with the opportunity to learn about historical architectural movements every summer, continues this year with a dip into a few types of beach architecture in celebration of the Museum’s summer installation. Come to class in 2015 to learn about lighthouses on July 12the Sea Ranch on July 19, and Newport Mansions on July 26.

    1.5 LU (AIA)

    $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member.
    Special series pricing for all three lectures:  $30 Member | $25 Student | $50 Non-member.

    Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Photo: Marble House, exterior. Photo by Gavin Ashworth, courtesy of The Preservation Society of Newport County.

    Date: Sunday, July 26, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

  • Architecture 101: The Sea Ranch

    Washington | Dates: 19 Jul, 2015

    Recently having celebrated its 50th anniversary, the Sea Ranch development in coastal Sonoma County, California, is internationally known for its distinctive architecture and ecologically-sensitive land planning. Donlyn Lyndon, FAIA, Eva Li Professor Emeritus of Architecture and Urban Design and Professor of the Graduate School (Architecture) at UC Berkeley, discusses the unique aspects of this development.

    The Museum’s Architecture 101 lecture series, which provides professionals, students, and the general public alike with the opportunity to learn about historical architectural movements every summer, continues this year with a dip into a few types of beach architecture in celebration of the Museum’s summer installation. Come to class in 2015 to learn about lighthouses on July 12, the Sea Ranch on July 19, and Newport Mansions on July 26.

    1.5 LU (AIA) / 1.5CM (AICP) / 1.5 PDH (LA CES)

    $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member.
    Special series pricing for all three lectures:  $30 Member | $25 Student | $50 Non-member.

    Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Date: Sunday, July 19, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

  • Architecture 101: Lighthouses

    Washington | Dates: 12 Jul, 2015

    Lighthouses are familiar sights along coastlines around the world. James Hyland, president and founder of The Lighthouse Preservation Society, presents a stylistic and functional history of lighthouses, which have assisted seafarers as entrance markers for ports and as warning signals for dangerous conditions and underwater geography and which represent a wide variety of styles and designs.

    The Museum’s Architecture 101 lecture series, which provides professionals, students, and the general public alike with the opportunity to learn about historical architectural movements every summer, continues this year with a dip into a few types of beach architecture in celebration of the Museum’s summer installation. Come to class in 2015 to learn about lighthouses on July 12, the Sea Ranch on July 19, and Newport Mansions on July 26.

    1.5 LU (AIA)

    $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member.
    Special series pricing for all three lectures:  $30 Member | $25 Student | $50 Non-member.

    Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Date: Sunday, July 12, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

  • Facing East: Chinese Urbanism in Africa

    New York | Dates: 17 Jun – 01 Aug, 2015

    Facing East: Chinese Urbanism in Africa
    June 17th – August 1st, 2015

    Exhibition Opening: June 16th, 2015
    Storefront’s Members’ Preview: 6 to 7 pm
    Discussion with the Curators and Global Experts: 7 to 8 pm
    Opening Reception: 8 to 9 pm

    China’s influence in Africa is growing quickly on many levels. All across the continent, Chinese companies are creating new highways, light rail systems, Special Economic Zones, and mass housing developments. Cities have received brand new skylines “made in China”: designed by Chinese architecture firms, financed by Chinese banks, and built by Chinese contractors. From foundational elements such as concrete, window frames, and fire extinguishers, to decorative ones such as carpets and curtains, many of the basic items used to construct these skylines have been sourced directly from China.

    On June 16th, 2015, Storefront for Art and Architecture will open 
    Facing East: Chinese Urbanism in Africa, an exhibition by journalist Michiel Hulshof (Tertium, Amsterdam) and architect Daan Roggeveen (MORE Architecture, Shanghai). Facing East investigates the impact of Chinese development on fast-growing African cities, and is built around personal stories of individuals involved in the urbanization process.

    Hulshof and Roggeveen have traveled to six African cities, from Accra to Addis Ababa to Kigali, in order to research the Chinese impact that exists on the ground. They interviewed over a hundred Chinese and African architects, politicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, students, developers, artists, and individuals who are involved in or touched by Africa’s rapid process of urbanization.

    China’s influence in Africa often goes even further than what we perceive through the lens of the built environment. China’s state-owned CCTV Africa is broadcasting throughout the continent, and many African capitals have Confucius Institutes, in which an increasing number of African students are learning Mandarin Chinese.

    Facing East
     allows visitors to experience the fascinating consequences of shifts in geopolitical power from the perspectives of those living it. The visitor finds himself in the same unstable position as Hulshof and Roggeveen during their research trips, and is forced to make associations between narratives, navigate existing and new relationships, and attempt to tie these together to comprehend the next chapter of globalization: one in which many African cities are beginning to face eastward.

  • LADF River Series: Riverly Reflections with Carol Armstrong, Mia Lehrer, Deborah Weintraub

    Los Angeles | Dates: 13 Jun, 2015

    Planners, designers, real estate developers, engineers, and anyone with a vested interest in Los Angeles are buzzing with ideas on how to restore the LA River to it former glory, turning it into an urban greenway and opening it up to new recreational opportunities, leading to potentially billions of dollars of investment and eventually transforming it into a regional amenity for Los Angeles. 

    The LA Design Festival is curating a three-part series of conversations with some of the leading designers who are re-imagining what the LA River could be, hosted at locations along the LA River that showcase its diversity and variation.

    Industrial designer Brendan Ravenhill will host LARiverWorks Director Carol Armstrong, ML+A’s Mia Lehrer, and City of LA Chief Deputy City Engineer Deborah Weintraub at his riverside studio for a conversation about their perspective on urban ecology and the future of our river, moderated by editor of Planetizen and contributor at The Architect’s Newspaper, James Brasuell.

  • Call for Papers: Architecture and Experience in the Nineteenth Century (17 and 18 March 2016)

    Oxford | Dates: 10 Jun – 05 Nov, 2015
    Call for Papers: Architecture and Experience in the Nineteenth Century 17-18 March 2016 - St John’s College, University of Oxford Submission deadline: 5 November 2015 Victorians constructed their buildings to be more than just seen; they were made to be inhabited. This seemingly obvious statement raises an important but often overlooked question: how was architecture experienced in the nineteenth century? This period witnessed unprecedented urban growth, radical new materials, invented building types and sometimes dangerous technologies. Now more than ever buildings embodied the cultural values of their patrons, architects, and builders. The aesthetics of churches were shaped by desires to secure particular responses from congregations. The architecture of scientific laboratories could be intended to guide specific approaches to knowledge production. Of course once complete, the meanings of such works were unstable and subject to an audience’s interpretation. Architectural history has traditionally focused on questions of style and form. However in recent years the discipline has demonstrated a growing interest in the social history of architecture, with attention paid to how buildings were used. This has led to the analysis of building as more than merely a passive background to human activity. The question that this conference addresses is, what were the purposes of architectural projects and how did they perform? Clubs, debating chambers, schools, cathedrals, houses, hotels and laboratories were all built to perform specific functions. Once constructed, they were all experienced by audiences who inhabited these spaces. At a basic level, how did people hear, breath, see, and smell these structures? Ventilation, acoustics, and lighting were all vital considerations for architects. But also, how did these buildings convey meaning? How did they instruct and educate? Nineteenth-century buildings were not just works of art, but mechanisms of function, utility, and performance. We welcome submissions from all disciplines, and are keen to encourage interdisciplinary applications from scholars and architectural practitioners. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length. Please send proposals of up to 250 words and a one page CV to victorian.architecture@history.ox.ac.uk by 5 November 2015.
  • Is Preservation Elitist?

    New York | Dates: 20 Jul, 2015

    While many of New York’s designated historic districts are known for their grand architecture (such as Brooklyn Heights and the Upper East Side), an increasing number of others – including Tin Pan Alley, Flushing, Weeksville, and Chinatown– are famed for their distinctive cultural character.  But how exactly do you preserve a “culturally distinctive” place? In some cases is formal preservation actually a hindrance to saving what a community loves best about its neighborhood? What are the other protective strategies to ensure such places retain tradition, culture and even its population? Join a panel of community activists, preservationists and architects as they discuss the challenges of preserving these unique neighborhoods, whose greatest asset lies in the histories they contain, rather than the quality of their buildings. This program delves into the themes of our exhibition Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks.

    Reception to follow!

    Tia Powell Harris, Weeksville President & Executive Director
    Nikolai Fedak, YIMBY Founder
    Claudette Brady, Bedforf-Stuvesant and one of the essayists for Saving Place book
    Kerri Culhane, Two Bridges’ Associate Director
    Laurie Beckelman (moderator), Founding Partner of Beckelman+Capalino

    Co-sponsored by Weeksville.

  • Late Modern/Post Modern Architecture: The New Frontier

    New York | Dates: 30 Jun, 2015

    Late modern and postmodern architecture (c. 1970 on) present a whole new frontier in landmark preservation.  While the preservation of postwar modern architecture is already well established in NYC, late modern and postmodern buildings, landscapes, and interiors have only recently become eligible for landmarks protection.  This panel will explore the complexity of -- and controversies over – potential landmarks from this era, as well as evolving concepts about the presentation and interpretation of history and context in urban architecture. This program delves into the themes of our exhibition Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks.

    Reception to follow!

    Annabelle Selldorf, FAIA, Principal of Selldorf Architects
    Robert A. M. Stern, FAIA, Founder Robert A.M. Stern Architects & Dean, School of Architecture, Yale University
    John Kriskiewicz, Associate Professor Parsons School of Design
    Michael Gotkin, Landscape architect and preservation advocate
    Paul Makovsky (moderator), Editorial & Brand Director, Metropolis magazine

    The event is co-sponsored by Metropolis magazine.

    1.5 LU AIA CES will be offered for attending this event.

  • The 52nd IMCL Conference on Achieving Green Healthy Cities

    Bristol | Dates: 29 Jun – 03 Jul, 2015

    At this conference, we will examine creative strategies, tools and design solutions for Achieving Green Healthy Cities. We will review how the built and natural environment can be designed and managed to increase social and physical health and well-being, and to foster ecological, social and economic sustainability.These goals cannot be achieved by professionals in one field alone. They require collaborative efforts and insights from many disciplines. We will hear from world-renowned experts working at the interface between planning, public health, urban design, architecture, landscape architecture, transportation planning, and social sciences, and review outstanding projects from the UK, Europe, North America and around the world.

    For questions, contact: Suzanne.Lennard@LivableCities.org

  • Call for Papers: Int|AR Journal Volume 07, Art in Building Interventions and Adaptive Reuse

    Dates: 10 Jun – 15 Jul, 2015
    In Volume 07 of Int|AR we seek essays, built or unbuilt projects and ideas that investigate the relationship of art and building reuse. We seek proposals of no more than 250 words interpreting and investigating art and its intersection with the existing built environment. How does the scale of an artwork uniquely relate to existing buildings and structures? How can art transform the economics of a built context? How and when is art influenced by the existing built environment? When and how is material from an existing building /structure the catalyst for art? When does art create function and program within adaptive reuse projects? In adaptive reuse, when and where does art become building and building become art? SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS: Send a Word document of 250 words and images/captions by deadline: July 15, 2015 Notification of abstract acceptances: August 17, 2015 Full Paper 1000-3000 words: October 12, 2015 Articles will only be accepted with images of minimum 300dpi at 8.5”x11”. Selection will be based upon the submission’s relationship to a specific question of inquiry and how it relates to Building Reuse.
  • Tour NW Portland’s Historic Goldsmith Addition Homes

    Portland | Dates: 21 Jun, 2015

    NW Children’s Theater & School (NWCT) and NW Neighborhood Cultural Center (NNCC) present, the 4th Annual Walking Tour of Historic Homes — Restored City Homes of the Historic Goldsmith Addition. 

    The tour begins at NNCC (originally known as the First Church of Christ, Scientist, 1909), located at: 1819 NW Everett St., Portland, Oregon.

    Tickets for this walking tour are $25 and are available at NWCT’s website: www.nwcts.org or at NNCC/NWCT the day of the event. The tour includes six historic homes in NW Portland. All proceeds will be utilized for improvements to accessibility for the disabled, in the Historic NW Neighborhood Cultural Center, home of NW Children’s Theater & School and other organizations which draw thousands of children and families to the building and neighborhood annually.

    Inspiration for this year’s tour is the now famously saved and soon to be restored Goldsmith Home. 2015 has been the year of the demolition of “good old houses”, a recurrent wave of hasty destruction that comes with a renewed economy.

    With half dozen demolitions, proposed, or near misses this year just North of Lovejoy alone, this tour shows the public that North of Lovejoy is rich with historic resources and possesses criteria to merit special designation just like the Alphabet District South of Lovejoy.

    The Goldsmith Home, the family home built by Portland’s first Jewish mayor, Bernard Goldsmith was designed by one of Portland’s most gifted architects, Edgar Lazarus (U.S. Customs  House, Vista House at Crown Point and Pioneer Courthouse). Losing the Goldsmith Home would have been an unspeakable tragedy, but thanks to 10 neighbors that pooled funds in chunks of $100-$800,000, this home was saved.

    This tour includes these homes:

    1. The Kyer Home (1909, Architect: Emil Schacht)
    2. The Wilson Home (1904, Architect: David Williams)
    3. The Barlow Home (1896, Architect unknown)
    4. The Bernard Goldsmith Home (1892)
    5. The Ladd Home (1898, Architect: Whidden & Lewis)
    6. The George T. Willett Home (1911, Architect: Josef Jacobberger)

    This year’s tour is dedicated in honor and in memory of Mike Ryerson (1940-2015), former committee member, founder of Mike’s History Tours, local NW historian and preservation advocate.

    NWCT and NNCC thanks fellow event presenters, The Dan Volkmer Team and Windermere Stellar and event sponsors: Antoinette Antiques & Estate Jewelry, Arciform, Caffe Mingo, Fidelity National Title, Mark Benham Mortgage Express, NNCC Board, Pearl Med Spa, Slabtown Tours, Uptown Hardware and World Cup Roasters.

    For more information call NWCT at 503-222-4480.

  • Women designers and architects between 1918 and 1945

    Leiden | Dates: 23 – 24 Sep, 2015
    From 23 to 25 September 2015, the project MoMoWo Women’s Creativity since the Modern Movement, will organize a historical conference-workshop on women designers and architects between 1918 and 1945. The MoMoWo conference-workshop aims for presentations of research papers in conjunction with dialogues, discussions and interviews with designers. This call invites the presentation of research papers which address one of the following themes and subjects regarding activities and lives of women designers, craftswomen and architects between 1918 and 1945: 1 Concepts: avant-garde; traditionalism; modernism 2 Exposure: general exhibitions; women’s exhibitions; solo exhibitions 3 Persons: pioneers; duo’s; canonical designers 4 Historiography: ego documents; journals/magazines; visual sources; archive; website communication power 5 Politics and regimes: women designing under socialism, communism, fascism 6 Industries: women in factories; women and war industries 7 Education: private schools; art schools; design schools; polytechnics 8 Environment: the landscape; the city; the countryside 9 The home: women designing for household appliances; or for the kitchen; or for interior design 10 Organizations and networks: galleries; women’s clubs We welcome papers which explore critical perspectives, such as the performativity of women; women’s interactions with public and private spaces; women’s operations under political regimes; women’s negotiations with gender bias in their profession. We will organize the conference-workshop around a limited number of paper-sessions with two papers each and attended by all to join the discussion and share visions and knowledge. Paper presentations may take 25 minutes; final length of written papers is 5000 words max. Papers will be peer reviewed before acceptance and as well as for publishing in a conference e-book. The conference will be held in English; use of English is the responsibility of the authors.
  • Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy Annual Conference

    Milwaukee | Dates: 30 Sep – 04 Oct, 2015
    Registration is now open for Wisconsin: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Laboratory, Sept. 30-Oct. 4, headquartered at The Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee. The conference features private tours of 15 Wright works, as well as special events at architecturally significant houses throughout the metropolitan area.
  • Shifting Cities: Urban Heritage in the 21st Century

    New Brunswick | Dates: 12 – 14 Nov, 2015
    Please save the date for the international conference "Shifting Cities: Urban Heritage in the 21st Century", hosted by Rutgers University's Program in Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies (CHAPS) Program.
  • The Power of Symbols. The Alhambra in a Global Context

    Zurich | Dates: 04 Jun – 01 Sep, 2015
    International Conference, Zurich, September 16th-17th 2016 Organizers: Prof. Dr. Francine Giese / Dr. Ariane Varela Braga (University of Zurich) In view of the current international globalisation debate this two-day conference intends to foster a re-interpretation of the Alhambra. Topics like the positioning of the Nasrid architecture in a global Islamic context, the phenomenon of cultural exchange on the Iberian Peninsula, the controversial debate of Orientalism after Said’s Orientalism (1978) or the political instrumentalisation of architecture will be the centre of attention.