Recent Opportunities


    Williamstown | Dates: 31 Dec, 2017 – 31 Mar, 2018
    The Clark Art Institute combines a public art museum with a lively Research and Academic Program (RAP). The Clark’s collections, library, visual resources, and Fellows program are located in the Manton Research Center, along with the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art, sponsored jointly with the Clark. Our campus is within walking distance of Williams College, its libraries, and its art museum, and a brief drive away from the internationally renowned MASS MoCA.
    AS A FELLOW, you will join a distinguished, international family of scholars, critics, museum professionals, and artists. Applicants propose projects that will extend and enhance the understanding of visual art and its role in culture. Clark Fellows work in offices in the Manton Research Center—which houses the Clark library’s open stack collection of some 300,000 volumes dedicated to art history—and live in spacious, beautiful apartments in a residence across the street. Clark Fellows receive stipends that take into account sabbatical and salary replacement needs, and travel expenses are reimbursed.
    AS A CONVENER, your Clark Colloquium, Conference, Symposium, or Workshop will address a vital topic in its field. RAP welcomes proposals for these events on an ongoing basis. We give preference to projects that are multidisciplinary in structure and bring to notice innovative research.
    For more information, visit or
  • Association for Art History 2018 Annual Conference

    London | Dates: 05 – 07 Apr, 2018

    2018 Annual Conference
    Courtauld Institute of Art & King’s College London
    5 – 7 April 2018, London

    The 2018 Annual Conference for art history and visual culture will be co-hosted by the Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London. Academic sessions that papers will respond to the idea of ‘looking outwards’. This international 3 day event will look at art history in the broadest sense, and will incorporate a diverse range of speakers and perspectives.

    Call for Papers
    The 2018 Annual Conference for art history and visual culture will be co-hosted by the Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London. This international 3 day event will look at art history in the broadest sense, and will incorporate a diverse range of academic sessions, speakers and perspectives.

    The close collaboration between the two institutions – involving numerous other museums and cultural partners in London – will set the tone for a conference oriented around ‘looking outwards’.

    On one hand, we will be encouraging art historians and researchers to think about their disciplinary relationships with other affiliated subjects in the arts and humanities (as indeed beyond). On the other, we will be inviting new perspectives on international collaborations within the field (particularly important in the wake of recent political events…).

    We aim to incorporate an ambitious range of perspectives – from university academics and doctoral researchers, to educators, curators, heritage partners, and not least artists themselves. We hope to deliver an event with the widest possible remit and reach.

    Academic Sessions
    The 2018 Annual Conference will host 40 academic sessions, over 3 days (approx. 13/14 sessions each day). Each one-day session will generally consist of between 4 – 8 papers (minimum 4, maximum 8); papers are usually 25-minutes, presented in 35-minute slots to allow for questions and movement between sessions. We will also accommodate alternative session formats – such as world-cafe, round-table or open discussions.

    Sessions will respond to the idea of ‘looking outwards’ by engaging with art history and visual culture in the broadest sense. You can view and download the 2018 academic sessions and abstracts(pdf).

    Conference Convenors
    Joanna Woodall and Katie Scott, Courtauld Institute of Art
    Michael Squire, King’s College London

    Conference Coordinator
    Cheryl Platt, Association for Art History

  • Rome: City and Empire

    Nashville | Dates: 23 Feb – 28 May, 2018

    The stories of Rome and its vast empire continue to captivate and intrigue people almost three thousand years after its foundation. Rome: City and Empire brings to Nashville more than two hundred of the British Museum’s most engaging and beautiful Roman objects. They tell the dramatic story of how Rome grew from a cluster of small villages into a mighty empire.

    The British Museum’s exceptionally broad collections have enabled the creation of a truly inspiring experience. Visitors will explore how the empire was won and held and learn about the rich diversity of her peoples. The exhibition is an accessible introduction to the Roman imperial period, yet also provides a range and depth of material for those with an existing interest in Roman history.

    The Frist Center is the exclusive North American venue.

  • The impact of war on urban landscape: transformations and resilience in European cities (15th-18th centuries)

    Rome | Dates: 29 Aug – 01 Sep, 2018
    Since the dawn of civilization cities had to deal with war effects through destruction, violence and fear. The deep change in artillery after the 14-15th centuries produced new impacts on the urban network and urban environment, far beyond architectural and technical transformations in warfare. In fact urban history, architectural history, military history and archaeology are correlated in this matter.
    Cities and their surrounding fields were affected by material destruction, which got more devastating as the caliber of firearms increased. How did cities recover after attack or war disaster, is the main question of this session. Though destruction was a condition to transform, not only these transformations faced many difficulties but also war scars could be either erased, concealed, exhibited or even simply left. We are interested in observing the traces that armed conflicts left in cities and the mechanisms that civil and military powers developed to recover from them. We aim to discuss these connections over the entire territory, in the framework of periods of conflict, in order to achieve a comparative approach encompassing several European cities, as we are interested in a transnational perspective.
    Historiography drew special attention to urban design solutions and the military engineers capacity to plan physical conditions in order to prepare a city to resist long sieges, including outworks in the surrounding areas, periodically adapted to the changes in the art of war. Yet, what really happened after military campaigns is somehow forgotten. Therefore the focus of this session will considerer both what happened in cities following the war campaigns, and how civil and military authorities proactively prepared the cities for them.

    We especially welcome papers that address (but are not necessarily limited to) the following topics:
    • methodology for the study of the scars of war in a city;
    • financial, management and design plans from city council and military institutions;
    • profile of the people in charge of the rebuilding processes, besides fortification military builders;
    • city council role in post-war cities;
    • nearby productive agricultural fields and water resources protection during war cycles;
    • comparative case-studies between regions or countries.

    Deadline for paper proposals submission: Oct 5, 2017
  • The Afterlife of Fascism: The Reception of Modern Italian Architecture and Urbanism

    Dates: 12 Jul, 2017 – 15 Jun, 2018
    Nearly 75 years after the regime’s end, questions about the built legacy of Italian Fascism continue to provoke polemic responses and questions. Mussolini’s government constructed thousands of new buildings across the Italian peninsula, islands, and in the colonial territories of North Africa. From government buildings, hospitals, and post offices to stadia, housing, summer camps, Fascist party headquarters, and ceremonial spaces, the physical legacy of the regime maintains a presence in nearly every Italian town. Infrastructure projects such as roads, railways and bridges bear the imprint of Fascism: manhole covers of sewer systems in small towns across Italy are still marked by the regime’s insignia today. In some areas, such as the Pontine marshes and Asmara, Eritrea, the regime built entirely new quarters or towns as part of land reclamation projects and its colonial agenda.

    Histories of Italian architecture and urbanism have documented and examined the vast body of work constructed by the regime. Scholars have debated whether these works of architecture remain worthy of study due to their remarkable form alone, because they satisfactorily symbolize a body of ideas, or both? Moreover, scholars have deliberated whether the political intention and physical form can be separated; that is, can a great fascist building be valued as art abstracted from the ideology that produced it? How do we make sense of the role of the architects who worked for the regime? Was the architect the source or merely the conduit of political and often poetic architectural expression? While these debates persist and continue to inspire scholarship about modern Italian architecture, a new dilemma has surfaced: what to do with these political constructions as they age and in the wake of change? How are they envisioned by their current constituents and citizens, and what is their destiny?

    The Afterlife of Fascism will investigate what has become of the architectural and urban projects of Italian Fascism; how have sites been transformed or adapted; and what do these sites mean today? We invite submissions that examine the afterlife of fascist architecture through studies of destruction, adaptation, debates over re-use, artistic interventions, and even routine daily practices, which may slowly alter collective understandings of a site. The volume will consider whether these structures and their material remains embody or retain some essence of the defeated political movement or, in contrast, whether they stand as reminders of the fragility of the connection between meaning and architectural form.

    Questions for consideration may include:
    • How do changes in the constructed landscapes of Fascism reflect evolving relationships among national identity, political authority and the physical landscape?
    • What happens when the modernity of fascist architecture becomes historicized alongside the monuments of popes and emperors, when modernity becomes part of tradition, or when the avant-garde becomes subject to historic preservation?
    • What do fascist constructions mean to the generations of Italians whose experience of the regime is limited to history textbooks and ancestral tales? How do the meanings of these sites change when they no longer have the power to conjure memories of the regime?
    • What do instances of preservation, adaptation or indifference to fascist sites tell us about the nature of the connection between political authority and place?
    • How does political power operate through design at scales ranging from domestic design to infrastructure? How, for example, did the constructions of fascism shape Italian culture through spatial practices? Can spatial practices be divorced from the original political intentions? Or do daily rituals shaped by the constructed spaces of fascism still bear witness to the intentions of the regime decades later?
    • After the fall of the regime, how were connections between architecture and politics renegotiated in the service of postwar political agendas? How, for example, did debates over what was fascist, anti-fascist, or Italian revise stylistic associations? How was history revised and/or redacted to serve new purposes in the postwar era?
    • How did those architects associated with fascism rewrite their own histories through design or activism in the postwar era?

    Through a critical history of the reception of fascist-era architecture and urbanism, The Afterlife of Fascism seeks to broaden our understanding of the relationships between politics and place. It aims to build on histories of the reception of politically charged sites in the modern era, which highlight how interventions, practices, and events have altered meaning even as physical forms often remain. Scott Sandage, for example, traces the evolution of our collective understanding of the Lincoln Memorial from a site intended to commemorate the preservation of the Union to one that associates Lincoln with emancipation and memorializes the civil rights movement. In Ghosts of Berlin, Brian Ladd analyzes the debates surrounding the many politically charged sites of Berlin and brings to light how the memories of each era in the city’s modern history are reflected and constructed through debates over meaning, use, and form. Kristin Ann Hass’s Carried to the Wall considers how the meaning of the Vietnam War was negotiated through the reception of the Vietnam Wall through an analysis of the objects left at the wall. In doing so, she reminds us of the power of individuals, ordinary people, to engage in these contests over meanings and of place.

    We invite papers on fascist architecture and urbanism that contribute to this discourse on reception through studies of the negotiations among politics, identity, memory, and place. Interested authors should submit an abstract of 400-500 words and a C.V. to co-editors Kay Bea Jones ( and Stephanie Pilat ( by Monday, October 16th, 2017. Decisions will be made by December 2017. Papers of 4,000 – 8,000 words will be due on June 15th, 2018. Papers from accepted abstracts will undergo peer-review before publication.
  • CFP - Historians of Islamic Art Association Biennial Symposium “Border Crossing” Yale University October 25-27, 2018

    Dates: 25 – 27 Oct, 2018
    Call for Papers Historians of Islamic Art Association Biennial Symposium
    “Border Crossing”
    Yale University
    October 25-27, 2018

    The 2018 HIAA symposium will bring together an international group of established and emerging scholars of Islamic art and architecture to present new research on the theme of “Border Crossing.” Very often the field has been defined as one centered on select regions of the Middle East, South Asia, and Central Asia, and focusing on traditional media and categories, such as the decorative arts, manuscript studies, and architecture. Less attention has been paid to regions on the so-called peripheries, including, for example, Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, or to disciplines that are not often associated with the field, such as film and anthropology. “Border Crossing” is an invitation to rethink the field of Islamic art and architecture by interrogating the ideas of translation, transmission, and transgression that are suggested by the theme. Among the questions that may be asked are: How can this lens help us rethink works that form the “canon” of Islamic art? What is at stake in crossing disciplinary borders? What is lost and what is gained in abandoning traditional academic parameters? What may be learned through literal border crossings, whether they are by conservation authorities or refugees? As the works of several contemporary artists show, border crossings are ultimately ethical positions taken to evince the human condition itself. They thus provide potential to rethink the arts and cultures of the Islamic world, as well as the ways in which we study them today.
    There are three categories of submission: Pre-arranged panels (4 papers and a discussant); individual papers; graduate student papers. Please submit your abstract/s and a brief curriculum vitae to by September 7, 2017.

    The 2018 Symposium Committee:
    Christiane Gruber
    Yael Rice
    Kishwar Rizvi
    Ünver Rüstem
  • CFP: Créer à plusieurs? Collaborations littéraires, artistiques et scientifiques au Grand Siècle

    Princeton | Dates: 10 – 12 May, 2018
    XVe Colloque du CIR 17 – Centre International de Rencontres sur le XVIIe siècle (
  • A New Scholarly Society is Doing the Urgent Work of the Past - African American Intellectual History Society

    Dates: 30 Mar, 2017 – 30 Mar, 2018
    A combination of factors — elections, funding scarcity and funder mandates, metrics for “impact” — has helped produce among scholars a burst of enthusiasm for public engagement. But in the last few years it may be that the urge to advocate and teach eclipses them all. Things that seemed obvious and of clear public benefit are newly vulnerable:  science now needs a march on Washington.

    But the very thing that required the March on Washington in 1963 still demands advocacy and teaching. In a compelling turn, and at a moment when older scholarly societies worry about membership declines and formulating new sustainability models, a new scholarly society exemplifies a fresh approach to the history and meaning of race in America. The African American Intellectual History Society began in early 2014 as a group blog, founded by Professor Christopher Cameron of the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. Cameron undertook this work to “provide a space for scholars in disparate fields to discuss the many aspects of teaching and researching black intellectual history.” The blog soon acquired an organization, which begat some familiar scholarly society structure including officers, bylaws, and a program for scholarly communication. AAIHS officers are mostly early career, but also have a depth of experience as scholars and writers. The society held its second annual conference this past weekend at Vanderbilt University.

    Continue reading at The Scholarly Kitchen.
  • SAH 73rd Annual International Conference

    Seattle | Dates: 29 Apr – 03 May, 2020
    Save the date!
  • SAH 72nd Annual International Conference

    Providence | Dates: 24 – 28 Apr, 2019
  • SAH 71st Annual International Conference

    Saint Paul | Dates: 18 – 22 Apr, 2018
  • Research Assistant

    Philadelphia | Dates: 06 Feb, 2017 – 01 Jun, 2018
    Assist a Philadelphia architect/author in completing research and writing for a book that traces the evolution of the geometry in the built environment from ancient Egypt to the present. The focus of the book is a particular geometric motif in 20th century architecture. Developments in the world of art are also involved. Must have excellent computer skills, analytic skills, and use of a MAC laptop.
  • PICTURING RIVERSIDE: An Exhibition of a National Historic Landmark Community

    Riverside | Dates: 23 Jan, 2017 – 01 Jan, 2021
    Picturing Riverside is a permanent exhibition about the many facets of a living landmark community.
  • Docomomo US Call for Articles

    Dates: 07 Oct, 2016 – 31 Dec, 2018
    Docomomo US accepts article submissions on a wide range of issues concerning modernism. Those interested in submitting an article should send a brief description including images, drawings, etc to info(AT) Full submissions are required 15 days prior to publication. Additional details including submission guidelines are available upon request.

    Thematic Requests
    • Lesser Known Architects/Designers
    • Endangered Landscapes
    • Corporate Campuses
    • Art + Architecture
    • "Growing up Modern": Interviews w/ various children/family members of architects/designers 
    • Off the Beaten Path/Unsung Heroes" from the National Register (featured buildings/sites of the modern listings on the National Register )
    Suggest a future theme - email us info(AT)
  • Scott Opler Fellowship in Architectural History

    Oxford | Dates: 01 Sep, 2016 – 31 Aug, 2018
    Worcester College, Oxford is pleased to be able to offer a two year residential Fellowship in the study of Renaissance or Baroque architectural history through the generosity of the Scott Opler Foundation. Applications are invited from scholars of any nationality and academic affiliation in the final year of their dissertation or within the first four years after the completion of their Ph.D., D.Phil. or comparable degree. Applicants are asked to demonstrate a high level of skill in research methods and practice in the field of Architectural History, demonstrated via successful completion or near completion of a doctorate in a relevant area, possibly supported by conference papers and publications revealing skills in research practice and presentation. Closing date for applications to be received is Thursday 14th April 2016 and should include an official Application Form, a statement of the proposed research programme, and a current curriculum vitae. Applicants must also arrange for two confidential letters of recommendation to be sent direct to the College by the same date. Applications and references may be sent by e-mail as PDF documents. Interviews for a final group of candidates will be scheduled in June.
  • Columbus is Not a Museum

    Columbus | Dates: 02 Jan, 2016
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016
    at 5:30 pm
    Columbus Visitors Center

    Landmark Columbus is partnering with the Columbus Area Visitors Center to present a talk by Michelangelo Sabatino, Professor and Director of PhD Program in Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Professor Sabatino will discuss Columbus’ unique contribution to the history of modern and contemporary architecture and its legacy in being an extraordinary community built on public-private partnerships.

    Michelangelo Sabatino is an architect and historian whose research broadly addresses intersections between culture, technology, and design in the built environment. Sabatino is professor and director of the doctoral program at the Illinois Institute of Technology College of Architecture in Chicago.
  • Taliesin West Preservation Master Plan

    Scottsdale | Dates: 21 Oct, 2015
    Guided by the Foundation Board and the Taliesin West Preservation Oversight Committee, an international team of preservation experts, the Taliesin West Preservation Master Plan outlines the overarching philosophy and direction for the present and future preservation of Frank Lloyd Wright's desert masterpiece in Scottsdale, Arizona.

    At the evening event, Sean Malone, CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, will be joined by Gunny Harboe, FAIA, internationally recognized preservation architect and founder of Chicago-based Harboe Architects. Mr. Harboe, the plan's primary author, will present the tenants of the Taliesin West preservation plan. He has overseen the preservation of some of America's most significant historic buildings including Wright sites such as Chicago's Rookery, the Robie House and Unity Temple.

    Wednesday, October 21, 2015
    7:00-8:30 pm
    Lecture and community dialogue. Reception to follow.

    By reservation only. Seating is limited.

    RSVP to Sally Russell at or 480-237-8055.
  • Garden Dialogues: Vancouver

    Vancouver | Dates: 22 Aug, 2015
    In August, get exclusive access to private gardens in Vancouver and hear directly from the designers and their clients about their collaborative process.

    How do clients and designers work together? What makes for a great, enduring collaboration? Garden Dialogues provides unique opportunities for small groups to visit some of today’s most beautiful gardens created by some of the most accomplished designers currently in practice.

    Saturday August 22, 9:30am to 5:30pm | Vancouver
  • Garden Dialogues: Boston Metro Area

    Boston | Dates: 18 Jul, 2015

    The BSA Foundation is sponsoring an opportunity to get exclusive access to private gardens in the Boston Metro Area and hear directly from the designers and their clients about their collaborative process through The Cultural Landscape Foundation's Garden Dialogues.

    Attendees will have an opportunity to tour Lowder Brook, The Macallen Building and Court Square Press Courtyard, and an empty lot turned pocket garden in Beacon Hill. Read more about the tour locations and times here.

  • Dining With Design: The Sinclair

    Boston | Dates: 17 Aug, 2015

    A restaurant/rock-club hybrid in the heart of Cambridge designed around and inspired by music

    Dine with designer Stephen Martyak Assoc. AIA, owner of studioTYAK, and Josh Bhatti, general manager of The Bowery Presents: Boston, as they talk about the music-infused design process that led to Harvard Square’s groundbreaking restaurant/rock-club hybrid, The Sinclair. Tour the space, sip a cocktail, sample the menu, and learn how a photograph of folksinger Justin Townes Earle, a playlist created by Bhatti, and an existing concrete ceiling became the inspiration for a design concept that transformed an office building into a 140-seat restaurant and a 525-person rock club.

SAH 2018 St Paul Conference

SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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