Recent Opportunities

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  • SAH 72nd Annual International Conference

    Providence | Dates: 24 – 28 Apr, 2019
  • PICTURING RIVERSIDE: An Exhibition of a National Historic Landmark Community

    Riverside | Dates: 23 Jan, 2017 – 01 Jan, 2021
    Picturing Riverside is a permanent exhibition about the many facets of a living landmark community.
  • Docomomo US Call for Articles

    Dates: 07 Oct, 2016 – 31 Dec, 2018
    Docomomo US accepts article submissions on a wide range of issues concerning modernism. Those interested in submitting an article should send a brief description including images, drawings, etc to info(AT)docomomo-us.org. Full submissions are required 15 days prior to publication. Additional details including submission guidelines are available upon request.

    Thematic Requests
    • Lesser Known Architects/Designers
    • Endangered Landscapes
    • Corporate Campuses
    • Art + Architecture
    • "Growing up Modern": Interviews w/ various children/family members of architects/designers 
    • Off the Beaten Path/Unsung Heroes" from the National Register (featured buildings/sites of the modern listings on the National Register )
    Suggest a future theme - email us info(AT)docomomo-us.org
     
  • Scott Opler Fellowship in Architectural History

    Oxford | Dates: 01 Sep, 2016 – 31 Aug, 2018
    Worcester College, Oxford is pleased to be able to offer a two year residential Fellowship in the study of Renaissance or Baroque architectural history through the generosity of the Scott Opler Foundation. Applications are invited from scholars of any nationality and academic affiliation in the final year of their dissertation or within the first four years after the completion of their Ph.D., D.Phil. or comparable degree. Applicants are asked to demonstrate a high level of skill in research methods and practice in the field of Architectural History, demonstrated via successful completion or near completion of a doctorate in a relevant area, possibly supported by conference papers and publications revealing skills in research practice and presentation. Closing date for applications to be received is Thursday 14th April 2016 and should include an official Application Form, a statement of the proposed research programme, and a current curriculum vitae. Applicants must also arrange for two confidential letters of recommendation to be sent direct to the College by the same date. Applications and references may be sent by e-mail as PDF documents. Interviews for a final group of candidates will be scheduled in June.
  • Columbus is Not a Museum

    Columbus | Dates: 02 Jan, 2016
    Tuesday, February 2, 2016
    at 5:30 pm
    Columbus Visitors Center

    Landmark Columbus is partnering with the Columbus Area Visitors Center to present a talk by Michelangelo Sabatino, Professor and Director of PhD Program in Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology.
     
    Professor Sabatino will discuss Columbus’ unique contribution to the history of modern and contemporary architecture and its legacy in being an extraordinary community built on public-private partnerships.

    Michelangelo Sabatino is an architect and historian whose research broadly addresses intersections between culture, technology, and design in the built environment. Sabatino is professor and director of the doctoral program at the Illinois Institute of Technology College of Architecture in Chicago. www.michelangelo-sabatino.com.
  • Taliesin West Preservation Master Plan

    Scottsdale | Dates: 21 Oct, 2015
    Guided by the Foundation Board and the Taliesin West Preservation Oversight Committee, an international team of preservation experts, the Taliesin West Preservation Master Plan outlines the overarching philosophy and direction for the present and future preservation of Frank Lloyd Wright's desert masterpiece in Scottsdale, Arizona.

    At the evening event, Sean Malone, CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, will be joined by Gunny Harboe, FAIA, internationally recognized preservation architect and founder of Chicago-based Harboe Architects. Mr. Harboe, the plan's primary author, will present the tenants of the Taliesin West preservation plan. He has overseen the preservation of some of America's most significant historic buildings including Wright sites such as Chicago's Rookery, the Robie House and Unity Temple.

    Wednesday, October 21, 2015
    7:00-8:30 pm
    Lecture and community dialogue. Reception to follow.

    By reservation only. Seating is limited.

    RSVP to Sally Russell at srussell@franklloydwright.org or 480-237-8055.
  • Garden Dialogues: Vancouver

    Vancouver | Dates: 22 Aug, 2015
    In August, get exclusive access to private gardens in Vancouver and hear directly from the designers and their clients about their collaborative process.

    How do clients and designers work together? What makes for a great, enduring collaboration? Garden Dialogues provides unique opportunities for small groups to visit some of today’s most beautiful gardens created by some of the most accomplished designers currently in practice.

    Saturday August 22, 9:30am to 5:30pm | Vancouver
  • Garden Dialogues: Boston Metro Area

    Boston | Dates: 18 Jul, 2015

    The BSA Foundation is sponsoring an opportunity to get exclusive access to private gardens in the Boston Metro Area and hear directly from the designers and their clients about their collaborative process through The Cultural Landscape Foundation's Garden Dialogues.

    Attendees will have an opportunity to tour Lowder Brook, The Macallen Building and Court Square Press Courtyard, and an empty lot turned pocket garden in Beacon Hill. Read more about the tour locations and times here.

  • Dining With Design: The Sinclair

    Boston | Dates: 17 Aug, 2015

    A restaurant/rock-club hybrid in the heart of Cambridge designed around and inspired by music

    Dine with designer Stephen Martyak Assoc. AIA, owner of studioTYAK, and Josh Bhatti, general manager of The Bowery Presents: Boston, as they talk about the music-infused design process that led to Harvard Square’s groundbreaking restaurant/rock-club hybrid, The Sinclair. Tour the space, sip a cocktail, sample the menu, and learn how a photograph of folksinger Justin Townes Earle, a playlist created by Bhatti, and an existing concrete ceiling became the inspiration for a design concept that transformed an office building into a 140-seat restaurant and a 525-person rock club.

  • Fall Book Club: Remembering Marshall Field's

    Chicago | Dates: 19 Sep, 2015

    Historian and author, Dr. Leslie Goddard, takes us back in time over 150 years ago when Marshall Field’s reigned as Chicago’s premiere department store.  Learn how a small dry goods business turned into a world-class retail destination with the latest fashions and memorable courteous service, and then the next time you shop at the flagship location you can see how far the store has come over the years. 

    The Driehaus Museum presents our annual Fall Book Club.  Discuss Gilded Age fiction, biography, and history with the authors and historians.  The books are available at the Museum Store.  Light refreshments will be provided.  A welcome email will introduce the book, the discussion leaders, and discussion topics.  Participants should arrive to each book club having read the book.  Tickets include Museum admission.

  • On the Shoulders of Giants: Lessons for Tomorrow from Our Preservation Pioneers

    New York | Dates: 08 Oct, 2015

    Historic preservation activism in New York City did not begin in the 1960s with the fight to save Penn Station and the effort to pass the Landmarks Law—it began in the late 19th century. Little-remembered preservation pioneers like Andrew H. Green and Albert Bard, as well as various women's garden clubs, and patriotic and civic organizations laid the groundwork for the generations of preservationists that would follow. Join us to recount the triumphs, failures, and tactics of these early preservationists, and discuss what they might teach us moving forward.

    Michael Miscione, Manhattan Borough Historian
    Anthony Wood, Founder and Chair, New York Preservation Archive Project
    Amy Freitag, Executive Director at JM Kaplan Fund 
    Seri Worden, Field Services at National Trust for Historic Preservation

    Free for MCNY members; $12 for students/seniors; $16 for general public.
  • Gruen Day 2015

    San Leandro | Dates: 18 Jul, 2015

    Victor Gruen (July 18, 1903 - Feb 14, 1980) was an Austrian-born visionary architect most remembered for his pioneering work popularizing the enclosed, climate-controlled shopping center in the United States. 

    On July 18, the Bay Area Infrastructure Observatory (BAIO) invites you to celebrate the lofty aspirations and historical legacy of the suburban shopping center at Gruen Day 2015. 

    Festivities will include an afternoon of talks, tours, and hanging out in the food court at Bay Fair Center, which opened in 1957 as one of the first Gruen designed shopping centers in the country. Speakers to include:

    • Pam White: Pam is Vice President of Development for Madison Marquette, which purchased the Bayfair Center in 2003 and coordinated a massive overhaul of its facilities. Pam has over 25 years of design, retail, leasing and real estate experience across a range of different properties throughout California. She will be discussing the history and design of the Bay Fair Mall, and the thinking that guided its renovation in the 2000s. 
    • Mathias Crawford: Mathias is a PhD Candidate and Graduate Fellow in the Department of Communication at Stanford University, where he studies the intersection of architecture and ICT design. During his graduate studies he has worked for Herman Miller on the future of office design, taught game design at Stanford, and led design thinking workshops around the world. Mathias will be talking about the role that shopping centers played in re-shaping contemporary conceptions of the public sphere. Specifically, he will explore the way in which these centers were conceived with respect to another mid-century architectural phenomena: the community center.

    All attendees will also receive a beautiful set of limited edition Victor Gruen lapel pins and a commemorative poster, designed by our friends Helen Tseng and Justin Carder (depicted below). 

    While it's easy nowadays to dismiss enclosed shopping centers as boring eyesores, Gruen Day celebrates the important role they were originally intended to play in civic life. As Gruen wrote in 1960:

    By affording opportunities for social life and recreation in a protected pedestrian environment, by incorporating civic and educational facilities, shopping centers can fill an existing void. They can provide the needed place and opportunity for participation in modern community life that the ancient Greek Agora, the Medieval Market Place and our own Town Squares provided in the past.

    We hope you'll join us for a day to enjoy San Leandro's very own modern Agora. 

    Gruen Day 2015 is a production of Tim Hwang and Avery Trufelman, and is co-sponsored by SPUR.

    Give us a shout if you have any questions - tim@infraobservatory.com and avery@99pi.org

  • Spotlight on Design: Rob Rogers of Rogers Partners

    Washington | Dates: 22 Sep, 2015

    Robert M. Rogers, FAIA, partner at Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers and recent author of Learning Through Practice (ORO Editions, 2015), discusses the principal desires that guide his practice. He is intrigued by the impact of small things, pursues delight as an experience, and seeks authenticity in realizing projects for buildings, landscapes, and the public realm. A book signing will take place after the lecture.

    1.5 LU (AIA) 

    $12 Members; $12 Students; $20 Non-members. Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability. 

  • Seeking New York: Tom Miller Book Talk

    New York | Dates: 15 Jul, 2015

    Beautifully illustrated with line drawings and photographs, engagingly presented, and organized by neighborhoods, this richly detailed guide takes a narrative approach, telling stories that illuminate the architectural, personal, and social histories of Manhattan, building by building. Alongside details about each architect, dates, and styles, author Tom Miller reveals the joys, tragedies, and scandals of those who lived within. In addition to iconic structures, the book includes many off-the-beaten-path buildings, as well as notable buildings that no longer stand but remain key to Manhattan’s architectural history.

    Tom Miller moved to New York City in 1979 from Dayton, Ohio, bringing with him a passion for buildings. He currently holds the rank of deputy inspector within the NYPD’s Auxiliary Police Force. In 2009 he started a blog, "Daytonian in Manhattan", which has now reviewed over a thousand buildings, statues, and other points of interest.

    All book talks are free and open to the public. The Gallery opens at 6:00pm. 
    All guests must RSVP to programs[at]skyscraper[dot]org to assure admittance to the event. Please be aware that reservation priority is given to members of The Skyscraper Museum.

  • Architecture on Film: The Iron Ministry + Songhua

    London | Dates: 14 Jul, 2015

    An exploration of China through the lens of filmmaker and anthropologist J.P. Sniadecki. 

    A researcher from Harvard’s revered Sensory Ethnography Lab (from which has come films such as Leviathan (2012) and Manakamana (2013)) Sniadecki’s singular, experimental and engaging work continually breaks its own fourth wall, blurring the line between documentary and art in its search to reveal the construction of places, people and film itself. This screening presents two of Sniadecki’s works in London for the first time, using a pair of infrastructural arteries – one ecological, one industrial – to reveal keen insights into the labour, life and economy of a nation on the move.

    The Iron Ministry


    The Iron Ministry
     offers a vital armpits-and-all social portrait of China via the mobile microcosm of a journey on what will soon be the world’s largest railway network.

    A montage of multiple rail journeys into one, the film offers audiences a trip in a cinematic carriage, in which ongoing changes in China’s society and economy, technology and development, hopes and fears, all ride. Both painting sensorial pictures and engaging passengers in intimate dialogue, the camera becomes a fellow passenger of the train – both a participant and an observer – in the film’s non-narrative investigation into the realities of contemporary China, the passage of modernity, and the possibilities of documentary form.

    “[The film’s accomplishment is found in the encounters between the many elements that went into the making of the film...] The classic, iconic, and clichéd encounter between the railways and cinema; the encounter between human beings and the physical/architectural space of each train car (and how that encounter shapes bodies, postures, gestures, interactions, etc); the encounters between passengers – and between passengers and the filmmaker – within the fleeting social space that each train car creates; the encounters between ideologies, motivations, aspirations, and values within those encounters; and the encounter between a filmmaker and a small hand-held consumer camera and the cinematography that it produced.”
    – J.P. Sniadecki

    China/USA, 2014, J.P. Sniadecki, 82 mins. Mandarin with English subtitles.

  • Junior Architects: Designing and Building My New Home

    Chicago | Dates: 30 Jul, 2015

    In 1908, Frederick Robie, a young Chicago businessman, hired Frank Lloyd Wright to build a modern home for his family. Robie wanted a house with wide open rooms filled with light, and great views of the surrounding neighborhood. Robie described his new home as “the most ideal place in the world.”

    What would your ideal home look like? Would it have a pool, a green roof, lots of windows, or how about an indoor slide instead of stairs? Let your imagination run wild and try your hand at constructing your perfect home from cardboard and found objects. Supplies will be provided, but participants are encouraged to bring their own objects to add to their constructions. 

  • Free Summer Open House at the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio

    Oak Park | Dates: 17 Jul, 2015
    July 17 is the anniversary of the first public tour given in 1974 at the landmark Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Join us for a free Open House from 5 pm to 8 pm. Enjoy free tours and refreshments, work on an art project in the courtyard, and pose for pictures with Frank.
  • Saturday Studio: Surface

    Chicago | Dates: 25 Jul, 2015
    Work with great architects, designers, engineers and mentors from the Chicago area! Our hands-on, studio-based workshops offer design challenges and real-life problem-solving. Come explore the exciting worlds of architecture, engineering and construction with the CAF team. These events are free and open to all teens.
  • Design Dialogues: Downtown Hotel Boom

    Chicago | Dates: 14 Jul, 2015

    Many long-vacant historic office buildings are benefiting from Chicago’s ambitious tourism goals, as hotel conversions are popping up all over the loop. Will we continue to see more hotels like the Virgin, LondonHouse at the London Guarantee, and the Chicago Athletic Association step in and bring new life to historic buildings?

    Panelists:

    • John Rutledge, Founder, President & CEO, Oxford Capital Group, LLC; developer converting the London Guarantee Building into LondonHouse
    • Cindy Chan Roubik, ALA, LEED AP, Preservation Architect, City of Chicago Historic Preservation Division
    • Paul Alessandro, LEED AP BD+C, NCARB, Principal, Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture; architect of Chicago Athletic Association Hotel and the Hampton Inn at the Chicago Motor Club Building
    • Moderator: Chris Bentley, Midwest Editor of Architect’s Newspaper and WBEZ contributor
  • What is New is Old: A History of The New School

    New York | Dates: 08 Jul, 2015

    A lecture and slideshow with Julia Foulkes, Associate Professor of History, The New School.

    In 1919, the New School for Social Research opened with courses in the social sciences, social work, and public affairs in New York “because it is the greatest social science laboratory in the world.” The school was not quite a university: it did not offer formal degrees. The founders thought that people would come to the school for “no other purpose than to learn.” It sought to make education relevant to the issues of the day, to remain ever new.

    Nearly 100 years later, the school is now a multi-faceted university and a hub in the political, intellectual, and cultural life of New York City and Greenwich Village. This event will be dedicated to commemorating the dynamic history of The New School and the Greenwich Village neighborhood where it resides.

    Admission: Free, reservations required at 212.475.9585 x35 or rsvp@gvshp.org

    This event is sponsored by the Bachelor's Program for Adults and Transfer Students (BPATS) at The New School and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

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for its operating support.
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