Recent Opportunities

  • “Paris – Capital of Modernity”: Spring Seminar in Paris for Chinese Scholars

    Paris | Dates: 09 – 26 May, 2017
    Paris, May 9 - 26, 2017
    Deadline: Feb 19, 2017

    Call for Applications
    “Paris – Capital of Modernity”: Spring Seminar in Paris for Chinese Scholars

    The German Center for Art History in Paris welcomes applications from junior scholars and doctoral students from Greater China for a spring seminar titled “Paris – Capital of Modernity,” which will focus on French 19th- and 20th-century art. The seminar will take place from May 9th to May 26th, 2017 in Paris at the German Center for Art History and at several museums and research institutes in the French capital. 
    Participants will receive funding for transportation, lodging, and meals. 
    Scholars interested in participating are invited to attend a two-day introduction to the program on March 23th and 24th, 2017, in Beijing, China. Limited funding is available for prospective participants who attend the Beijing meeting.  Attendance at the introductory meeting in Beijing is not required for admission into the seminar, but is strongly encouraged. 
    The seminar is possible thanks to generous support from the Getty Foundation through its Connecting Art Histories initiative.

    Paris – Capital of Modernity

    Paris serves as an outstanding example of Western modernism, since the city met the challenges that came with industrialization and developed a new infrastructure. The seminar’s temporal scope will be defined by the first and last world’s fairs in Paris: 1855 and 1937. The 1855 world’s fair marked the beginning of a new era, which dedicated itself to modernity; the exhibition of 1937—with, among other aspects, the strengthening of totalitarian systems on the eve of World War II and its decidedly anti-modern self-representation—marks its end. 
    With the electrification of the city and the construction of the metro system, Paris created the infrastructure of a smoothly running modern metropolis. Modern Art flourished in Paris, and the influence of the avant-garde can still be seen today in the neighborhoods of Montmartre and Montparnasse as well as in the city’s many museums devoted to modernism. Along with visits to Montmartre and Montparnasse, the seminar will include special visits to such museums as the Petit Palais, the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the national Musée d’Orsay, and the Musée National d’Art Moderne in the Centre Georges Pompidou. These trips will be guided by specialist scholars and curators.
    The academic content of the program will be presented through lectures and discussions held at the German Center for Art History and through the aforementioned visits to museums, where original works of art will be examined and discussed.  Additional site visits will include guided walks through Paris designed to help to contextualize modernity within the city itself.  
    The seminar’s co-directors are Thomas Kirchner (Director of the German Center for Art History in Paris) and Godehard Janzing (Deputy Director of the German Center for Art History in Paris). Lecturers include Hollis Clayson (Northwestern University) and Jean-Louis Cohen (New York University).
    The seminar aims to facilitate dialogue between participants, lecturers, museum curators and members of the German Center for Art History in Paris and to enrich and strengthen study of French Art in China.

    To be eligible, candidates must:
    1.    be citizens of Greater China (Mainland, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and 
    Macau), and have a passport from one of these areas. Scholars who are currently residing outside of Greater China are also eligible and are encouraged to apply.
    2.    teach or study Western art or culture. Preference will be given 
    to art historians, architectural historians and historians of applied art, but scholars and students of other fields are welcome to apply.
    3.    be able to follow a lecture and participate in class discussions 
    in English, the languages used in all lectures and discussions. 
    Shortlisted applicants will be interviewed via Skype.
    4.    be enrolled in a PhD program, or have completed a PhD over the 
    last five years
    a.    students must have already completed their Master’s degree.
    b.    recent graduates must have a PhD certificate that bears a date 
    after January 1st,  2012.

    The application deadline is February 19th, 2017.

    -    Applications, in English, must include the following documents: 
    o    a letter of interest explaining why participation in the seminar 
    will advance your scholarly career (1 page)
    o    a curriculum vita
    o    one letter of reference

    -    Applicants seeking funding for the Beijing introductory meeting 
    should include an additional letter indicating their anticipated transportation, accommodation, and meals costs.

    Please submit all documents as one PDF file via e-mail by no later than February 19th, 2017 to:

    seminar2017@dfk-paris.org

    Further information about the Beijing meeting, including financial awards, will be sent to applicants by March 1, 2017. Applicants selected to participate in the Paris seminar will be notified by April 1.

    For further information, please visit:
        https://dfk-paris.org/
     
  • Architectural History Field School

    Forest | Dates: 14 – 27 May, 2017
    Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest announces its annual field school for architectural history and architectural restoration
  • PICTURING RIVERSIDE: An Exhibition of a National Historic Landmark Community

    Riverside | Dates: 23 Jan, 2017 – 01 Jan, 2021
    Picturing Riverside is a permanent exhibition about the many facets of a living landmark community.
  • The London House Course

    London | Dates: 03 – 09 Oct, 2017
    A nonresidential on site course studying the development of the London house form the Renaissance to the present. Visits to private houses, artists' studios, modern and contemporary houses. Lecturers include David Adshead, Neil Burton, Caroline Dakers, Sarah Nichols, Andrew Saint, and Gavin Stamp. Application deadline 12 April 2017
  • Impressions: Explorative Journey in Ladakh

    Leh & Turtuk | Dates: 05 – 12 Jun, 2017
    Turtuk is located 175 kms west of Leh. The small village is recently opened for tourism and hence is growing in a fast pace. The inhabitants of the village are Balti people, the Muslim equivelent of Sherpas, the expert mountain climbers. The village is one of the last remaining Balti village in India, as their sister villages went to other side of the border in Pakistan, dividing famalies, homes and relations. The thick border of Inda & Pakistan has scattered the lives of Balti people. The project is a continuation of Unlock Hundarman project initiated by Roots Collective in 2015. Unlock Hundarman is a project where we are documenting lives of people living in border settlements and presenting their stories to the world. The bustling village has an old historic settlement and a mosque (recently restored). The houses in the village are made of stone and timber and their system of water distribution is outstanding. Out of many craft practises in the village, the remarkable ones are utensils made of stone and many other daily usage items made of bones and horns of ibex.
  • ARDETH 02. Bottega: Ecology of design practice (PONZO Giorgio)

    Dates: 13 Jan – 02 Oct, 2017
    BOTTEGA: ecology of design practice

    Theme Editor: Albena Yaneva

    Deadline: 10/02/2017

    "If we are to offer a sound advice about how architectural practice ought to function, we must know more about how it functions now" (Cuff 1992: 6)
    Until the 1970s architectural researchers have focused all their attention on the professional products - buildings and places. The process of design was considered as insignificant; it started receiving empirical attention rather late. The first studies that bear witness for architectural processes date from the 1980s. Two works are paradigmatic in this respect: Donald Sch?n's work on educational practice (Sch?n 1987) and Dana Cuff's work on professional architectural practice (Cuff 1992). While Sch?n argued that reflection-in-action stands against the systematic, scientific, linear way of knowing basing his observations on studio-situated ethnography of professional schools, Cuff's ethnography dug deeply into the significance of the daily professional lives of architects and offered a better understanding of architectural practice.
    In the last fifteen years we witnessed a new ethnographic wave of studies that focused on practising architecture (Jacobs and Merriman 2011). Inspired by pragmatism and Science and Technology Studies (STS), this body of research aimed at grasping the socio-material dimension of architectural practice (Callon 1996). They all relied on the assumption that architecture is collective but it is shared with a variety of non-humans. It is not a social construction, like Diana Cuff assumed, but rather a composition of many heterogeneous elements, an assemblage. These "new ethnographies" followed the principles of no hierarchy, attention to the detail, symmetry: attention to what happens between humans and nonhumans; undivided attention to words and the gestural and non-verbal language. Paying specific attention to the texture of ordinary life of deisgners, they generated "thick descriptions" of the knowledge practices of different participants in design published as monographs of ar!
    chitectural practices (Houdart 2009, Loukisass 2012, Yaneva 2009). This recent trend could be also termed as "ethnographic turn in architecture" as it is the outcome of several related processes: the emergence of a reflexivity trend among architectural professionals as a key epistemological feature of architectural studies, the growing realisation of architecture as a social practice and the social nature of outcomes of architectural production, the tendency to acknowledge the collective nature of design.
    As a methodological innovation, the reintroduction of the ethnographic methods into architecture twenty years after the pioneering work of Dana Cuff does hold remarkable potential to investigate new questions. This new development can contribute to dislodge the certainty of traditional architectural knowledge, the belief placed in the absolute authority of the historical archives and its simplifications by its practitioners reducing, even naturalising architectural research to the production of critical discourse about practices, yet taking it far from the nitty-gritty realities of design making.
    This special issue of Ardeth invites contributions that will address the ecology of contemporary architectural practice. "Ecology of practice" (Stengers 2010) is a politically sensitive concept used to capture and understand contemporary design practice. We invite contributions that will:

     *   scrutinize architectural practice as complex ecology involving actors with variable ontology, scale and politics
     *   reflect theoretically and analytically on the concept of 'practice' and trace how practice has been tackled from different perspectives: from the 'Story of Practice' of Cuff and Blau's 'Architects and Firms', to recent studies of architectural and engineering practices based on multi-sited ethnographies (OMA, Foster, FOA/AZPA, Kuma, Arup, etc.)
     *   explore empirically different formats of design (modeling, presenting, competing, exhibiting, etc.) reflecting meticulously on their specific epistemologies and their role for the 'reflective practice' of architectural design
     *   reflect on the importance of ethnography for understanding contemporary architectural practices; what is the nature, the epistemological underpinnings, the potential pitfalls, and the political dimensions and challenges of architectural ethnography?
     
  • Abaton - Spanish Journal on Architectural Representation

    Madrid | Dates: 03 Jan – 30 Oct, 2017
    This is a call for contributions to a journal on architectural representation titled Abaton, published by the Complutense University Editions.
  • CFP: 2017 Conference on Illinois History

    Springfield | Dates: 01 – 01 May, 2017
    October 5 & 6, 2017 Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Springfield The Conference on Illinois History is accepting paper or panel proposals on any aspect of Illinois’s history, culture, politics, geography, or archaeology. The Conference especially welcomes submissions exploring the upcoming bicentennial of statehood. We encourage submissions from professional and avocational historians, graduate students, and those engaged in the study of Illinois history at libraries, historic sites, museums, and historical societies. Proposals are also being accepted for teacher workshops. If you are a teacher who has created an innovative, comprehensive, or timely curriculum on an aspect of Illinois’s history, culture, politics, geography, or archaeology, please share your expertise with other teachers at the conference. The deadline for proposals is May 1, 2017.
  • EAHN 2017 in JERUSALEM: HISTORIES IN CONFLICT: CITIES | BUILDINGS | LANDSCAPES

    Jerusalem | Dates: 13 – 15 Jun, 2017
    The European Architectural History Network (EAHN) is pleased to announce the EAHN’s third thematic conference Urban Histories in Conflict, to be held at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute on June 13-15 2017. On the 50-year anniversary of the Israeli occupation of East Jerusalem and the contentious unification it legislated, the conference aims to open up questions about the purpose of writing histories of urban conflicts. We ask how historians can account for the predicaments of violence and uneven distributions of power in the built environment, particularly in the face of current worldwide geo-political crises. At the heart of the conference will be the question of how eruptions of strife shape architectural and urban histories; and reciprocally, how larger architectural and planning processes, along with the histories that register their impact, intervene in the predicament of conflict. The aim of the conference is to bring together different responses to this predicament from both regional architectural and urban historians and worldwide members of the EAHN.  We interrogate the inextricable ties between the history of cities and urban conflict through several complimentary questions. First, we examine how situations of socio-political conflict affect research. How does the temporality of spatial conditions stirred by conflict influence concepts of history, heritage, preservation and urban renewal? Bitter national, ethnic or class conflicts often inspire dichotomized readings of history, or conversely, generate pleas for “symmetry” or “moderation” that put the rigors of research at risk. What are the implications for architectural praxis (historiography, design, and their critical extensions) in either case? A second set of questions focuses on the architect/ historian/preservationist operating from a particular “side” of conflict, facing palpable restrictions in the form of inaccessible national, physical and moral boundaries that may put them at physical risk, or might raise questions of legitimacy, even as they may strive for scholarly rigor. Can one set claims on a “legitimate” practice from any particular perspective? Reciprocally, should architectural/urban history actively assume a civic responsibility towards conflict? How does the disparity of power affect historical analysis? And how does it affect practice, and the meaning of urban citizenship? Can history become a platform of negotiation regarding urban justice and democracy? Moreover, conflict has lingering effects. How does conflict inspire the post-traumatic histories of places such as Mostar, Famagusta and Dublin? How do these accounts intervene in current realities, such as the one we encountered in embattled Jerusalem? Situations of conflict often compel interventions that put into question disciplinary autonomies and make the issue of agency particularly pertinent. We therefore wish to explore the seam between the historian and the activist, because this is where architecture/history/heritage are negotiated, contested and pulled apart by different forces. On the one hand are scholars, and on the other hand are the state/ the market/ human rights activists—yet all of them claim a stake in the “public good”. Who is posing the rules of the game, according to which the historian as activist works? The study of this tension necessitates disciplinary exchanges between historiography and political theory, which we aim to address in this conference. Conference sub-themes: 1. The “positioning” vs. the “autonomy” of the historian 2. Agency and the seam between historiography and activism 3. The collapse of former geo-political boundaries between North/ West/ center/ metropole and South/ East/ periphery/ colonies within European cities; alternative conceptualizations of the cross-cultural, beyond the modes of area studies 4. Urban conflict resulting from labor migration and the refugee crisis 5. Preservation of conflictual sites, their impact and interpretation of the “public good” 6. The persistence of conflict schemas within historiographic/ design practices that engage with the prospect of consensual peace or halted violence 7. Strategies for advancing research on (and funding for) histories in conflict so that history/historiography can impact the realm of praxis around issues of conflict We welcome papers that consider urban conflict and urge investigation into its related aspects of change and heterogeneity. Papers should be based on well-documented research that is primarily analytical and interpretative rather than descriptive in nature. Abstracts of 500 words and all queries should be addressed to conference chairs and the organizing committee: Alona Nitzan-Shiftan, Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning, Technion, Technion City, Haifa 32000, ISRAEL; Tel: (+972) 4-8294048, Fax: (+972) 4-8294617, Email: alona@technion.ac.il; Panayiota Pyla, University of Cyprus, Department of Architecture, PO Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia, CYPRUS; Tel: (+357) 22892963,  Fax: (+357) 22895330, Email: pyla@ucy.ac.cy. Important Dates: Abstract submission: January 3, 2017 Abstract selection and notification of speakers: January 13, 2017 Full papers due: May 1, 2017 Conference: June 13-15, 2017 Scientific Committee: Alona Nitzan-Shiftan, Technion Panayiota Pyla, University of Cyprus Hilde Heynen, Catholic University Lueven Mark Crinson, Birkbeck, University of London Sibel Bozdogan, GSD Harvard and Kadir Has University Istanbul Daniel B. Monk, Colgate University Tawfiq Da’adli, The Hebrew University Haim Yacobi, Ben Gurion University Organizing committee: Alona Nitzan-Shiftan, Technion Panayiota Pyla, University of Cyprus Fatina Abreek-Zubiedat, Technion Petros Phokaides, National Technical University of Athens Yoni Mendel, Van Leer Institute Jerusalem Els Verbakel, Bezalel Academy of Arts
  • VAF 2017: Two Utahs: Religious and Secular Landscapes in the Great Basin West

    Salt Lake City | Dates: 31 May – 03 Jun, 2017
    The 2017 VAF Conference will be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The focus of the conference is on the Great Basin and how the vast interior of the western United States was transformed beginning in the nineteenth century into one of the world’s most distinctive regional landscapes.

    Our goal, reflected in the Two Utahs conference title, is to highlight the central role the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, more widely known as the Mormon Church, played in this place-making process, while at the same time acknowledging the significant contributions of non-Mormon groups as well. Rather than framing the narrative within a simple Mormon/non-Mormon opposition, however, we have chosen to break the story down into a more fundamental dialogue with religious and secular forces: both Mormons and non-Mormons had to find ways of making a living and they did this by utilizing and exploiting the ample natural resources of the region.

    The real duality here may be between idealism (religious utopia, Edenic nature, sustainable development) and pragmatism (individual enterprise, outdoor recreation, economic growth). Conference tours have been designed to introduce attendees to the intricacies of the region’s built environment, and to raise questions about how landscapes are constructed, maintained, contested, and changed.

    The 2017 VAF Conference in Salt Lake City features two days of architectural tours.
  • 54th International Making Cities Livable Conference

    Santa Fe | Dates: 02 – 06 Oct, 2017
    Public places – our streets, plazas, squares, and green spaces – belong to ALL of us! They are our democratically shared common wealth - the most important aspect of every city. How we treat the public realm demonstrates how we value our fellow citizens, our democratic principles, and our community.

    If we treasure our plazas and main squares as beautiful places for community festivals and celebrations, we are embracing our unity and the power of our shared identity as a city.

    If we hold a daily farmers market on a square next to city hall, government representatives can demonstrate they value democratic dialogue, and civic engagement flourishes.

    If we create lively, hospitable neighborhood plazas, we exhibit our faith in the benefits of social life and community, and the opportunity to raise our children within a village of sustained adult relationships.

    If we make our streets safe for walking and biking, and provide good public transit, we show that we recognize that health is important, and that we care for our children and elders as much as for those in cars. If we make our streets beautiful, hospitable, and lively with active street facades, we encourage strolling, lingering at outdoor cafes, and the sociable interaction that can follow.

    Public places are the essential key to a livable city. Join us in Santa Fe to share your achievements and learn from others how we can take back our streets and squares - and in the process, strengthen community, civic engagement, health, and equity.

    See you in beautiful Santa Fe - “The City Different”!
  • Richard Guy Wilson Prize

    Dates: 14 Dec, 2016 – 25 May, 2017
    The Study of Buildings, Landscapes, and Places
  • SAH MDR Conference 2017 in Victoria BC

    Victoria | Dates: 16 – 18 Jun, 2017
    SAH MARION DEAN ROSS / PACIFIC NORTHWEST CHAPTER ANNUAL CONFERENCE, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA JUNE 16-18, 2017 This year's conference theme is "Commemorations." According to the National Park Service, a commemorative property is important not for association with the event or person it memorializes, but for the significance it has acquired after its creation through age, tradition, or symbolic value. Please join us in Victoria, B.C., June 16-18, 2017, to celebrate commemorations, especially the Canada 150 celebrations (1867-2017), the 100th anniversary of the US National Park System (2016), the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (2016), and the Parks Canada's Centennial (2011). We will also be recognizing Victoria's Centennial (1962) by reflecting on the on-going significance of Victoria's 1965 Centennial Square. A Call for Papers has been issued for the conference. Topics germane to the theme will be encouraged, but those covering any aspect of the built environment of the Pacific Northwest or beyond will be welcome. Abstracts will be blind peer-reviewed by the SAHMDR Review Committee. Details on how to submit a paper are in the Call for Papers. Submissions are due on or before March 15, 2017. Go to our website at www.sahmdr.org for further details.
  • Final Call for Proposals - Deadline Dec 2, Midnight

    Burlington | Dates: 12 – 12 May, 2017
    The Association of College and Research Libraries, New England Chapter (https://www.acrlnec.org/) invites you to submit a proposal to present at the 2017 ACRL-NEC Annual Conference: Reframing Librarianship in the 21st Century Friday, May 12 @University of Vermont Conference Center, Burlington, VT. http://conference2017.acrlnec.org/
  • CFP: Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics - Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century

    Dates: 22 Nov, 2016 – 22 Nov, 2017
    Routledge Taylor & Francis have announced a genre establishing book, Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics - Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century.


    PUBLICATION CALL:

    The book has been produced in conjunction with the scholarly journal Architecture_MPS who are preparing a special Issue on the themes of the book for late 2017. Articles should in some way respond to one of the features and /or themes of the book (see below). If you are interested in submitting an article send an initial enquiry to info@architecturemps.com<mailto:info@architecturemps.com>
    Visit: http://architecturemps.com/
    The book contains the first ever extended comments on architecture by Noam Chomsky.
    Other architects included are Daniel Libeskind, Kenneth Frampton, Michael Sorkin and others.
    It takes on the critical issues of the day of architectural design and practice from a social and political perspective.
    It presents a new genre in academic writing, the ?interview-article?.

    -

    The book is by Dr. Graham Cairns, Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. He is the author of eight books.

    Routledge information: https://www.routledge.com/Reflections-on-Architecture-Society-and-Politics-Social-and-Cultural/Cairns/p/book/9781472456083

    Reflections on Architecture, Society and Politics - Social and Cultural Tectonics in the 21st Century
    This book brings together a series of thirteen interview-articles by Graham Cairns in collaboration with some of the most prominent polemic thinkers and critical practitioners from the fields of architecture and the social sciences, including Noam Chomsky, Peggy Deamer, Robert A.M. Stern, Daniel Libeskind and Kenneth Frampton. Each chapter explores the relationship between architecture and socio-political issues through discussion of architectural theories and projects, citing specific issues and themes that have led to, and will shape, the various aspects of the current and future built environment. Ranging from Chomsky?s examination of the US?Mexico border as the architecture of oppression to Robert A.M. Stern?s defence of projects for the Disney corporation and George W. Bush, this book places politics at the center of issues within contemporary architecture.
    The ?interview-article? is a variation on the interview format that deepens the scholarly potential of that particular mode of dialogue. Extensive notation - often narrative in tone - is interwoven within the text to offer supplemental information and alternative argumentation and in this regard it represents a continuation of the evolving scholarly tradition of the footnote as academic tool laid out by Anthony Grafton. In addition to these narrative commentaries, these interview-articles are accompanied by full bibliographies and specific references entwined within the text. Contributors are also encouraged to develop discursive answers to questions that they are subsequently given the opportunity to mould into more considered essay type responses.
     
  • ATTINGHAM STUDY PROGRAMME Palaces and Villas of Rome and Naples

    Rome and Naples | Dates: 18 – 26 Sep, 2017
    September 18-26, 2017 Directed by Andrew Moore and run in association with the British School at Rome this programme considers palaces and villas with their collections in the light of papal patronage. Visits will include some of the most important Roman palaces still intact, including a number still in private hands, such as the Palazzo Corsini and the Palazzo Colonna. Travelling through the Roman Campagna to Naples visits will include the Pio Monte della Misericordia, the newly opened Museo Civico Gaetano Filangieri, the Villa Caserta just outside the city and Herculaneum. Some scholarship funding may be available. Application information at http://www.americanfriendsofattingham.org/studyprogramme.html Deadline for applications: February 12, 2017
  • Attingham Trust Summer School

    Dates: 29 Jun – 16 Jul, 2017
    THE 66th ATTINGHAM SUMMER SCHOOL June 29-July 16, 2017 Directed by David Adshead and Elizabeth Jamieson, and accompanied by specialist tutors and lecturers, this intensive 18-day course will include visits to approximately 25 houses in Sussex, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Oxfordshire. The Summer School will examine the country house in terms of architectural and social history, and the decorative arts. Applications are invited from those working in related fields and some partial scholarships are available.
  • Extreme: Rethinking the Limits to Community, Architecture and Urbanism

    Longyearbyen | Dates: 21 – 25 Jan, 2018
    EXTREME: Rethinking the Limits to Community, Architecture, and Urbanism
    Longyearbyen, Svalbard, 21-25 January 2018
    http://www.islanddynamics.org/extreme.html

    Density and sparsity, height and depth, hot and cold, centre and periphery, wet and dry, war and conflict: People the world over have adapted their living practices, architectures, and landscapes to extreme conditions. In our globalised era, local conceptions of the ideal dwelling, city, and community are increasingly exposed to alternative understandings. How do the house in the country and the flat in the skyscraper, the remote mountain village and the hyper-dense world city, the frigid arctic science station and the blazing desert financial district differ from and resemble one another? Can extreme environments foster innovative lifestyles that are conducive to community and inspire beneficial future urbanisms? Or do the technical solutions relied upon to help people cope with extremes of population, climate, light, height, and other factors necessarily distance people from each other and from the natural environment?

    This interdisciplinary conference probes the limits to community, architecture, and urbanism from the perspectives of urban studies, geography, design, architecture, anthropology, sociology, and other fields and disciplines.

    About Longyearbyen, Svalbard.
    Longyearbyen (population 2200) is the world's northernmost town, the main settlement in Norway's vast, icy Svalbard archipelago. The polar night, when the sun never breaches the horizon, lasts from late October until mid-February. Most residents stay for only a season or a few years, and even those who remain must eventually return to their homelands: Because Norway provides no health and social care, it is colloquially said that 'In Svalbard, it is illegal to die.' Furthermore, the risk of attack by polar bears means that people are only permitted to leave town in the company of someone with firearms training.

    Although Longyearbyen is iconically remote, the town is highly cosmopolitan, hosting citizens of over 40 nations and an economy based on tourism and mining.

    About the conference.
    Delegates will arrive in Longyearbyen on 21 January. On 22 and 25 January, delegates will take tours out into Svalbard's spectacular arctic landscape: a hike to an ice cave and a trip out into the polar night on by dog sled. Conference presentations by delegates will be held on 23-24 January at Radisson Blu Polar Hotel Spitsbergen. Full registration covers five dinners and all conference activities.

    How to make a presentation.
    Presentations are welcome on all aspects of life in extreme conditions. Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes' question time. The early deadline for abstracts is 28 February 2017, but to take advantage of early registration rates and ensure that you have time to seek funding from your institution or government, we recommend that you submit your abstract early. You can submit an abstract here: http://www.islanddynamics.org/extreme/cfp.html

    If you have any questions, please e-mail convenor Adam Grydehøj (agrydehoj@islanddynamics.org). 
     
  • Restore a Greenhouse to Grandeur

    Moray, Scotland | Dates: 04 – 17 Jun, 2017
    Travel to northern Scotland with Adventures in Preservation to help save one of the last remaining Edwardian glasshouses. Delight in the area’s unique microclimate – both warmer and drier than the rest of Scotland – while you explore the Burgie Estate’s unique story: ruins of a medieval castle, an Edwardian greenhouse and elegant country home, and a man named Hamish who is dedicating his property to conservation. The focus of this hands-on experience is rescue of the greenhouse, which is deteriorating and in dire need of conservation. Survival of the greenhouse is key to Hamish Lochore’s efforts to establish an arboretum of trees from around the world. A network of international volunteers hand selects seeds and sends them to Scotland where they are nurtured in the greenhouse. It’s time for action from those passionate about preservation. Project attendees have the opportunity to learn and apply skills involving documentation, carpentry, masonry and glazing. The project is open to all regardless of experience. You will have the option of dividing your time between building conservation and plant conservation. Details and registration at: http://bit.ly/AiPinScotland
  • The Arts of Spinoza + Pacific Spinoza

    Auckland | Dates: 26 – 31 May, 2017
    Interstices Under Construction symposium, 26-28 May 2017
    Auckland University of Technology and University of Auckland, New Zealand
    www.interstices.ac.nz œ
     
    Plenaries / keynotes include:
    Moira Gatens Challis Professor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
    Michael LeBuffe Baier Chair, Early Modern Philosophy, University of Otago
    Susan Ruddick Professor, Geography & Planning, University of Toronto
    Anthony Uhlmann Professor, Writing and Society, University of Western Sydney Plenary panel
    Jacob Culbertson Visiting Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Haverford College
    Albert Refiti Senior Lecturer, Spatial, Auckland University of Technology
    Carl Te Hira Mika Tuhourangi, Ngati Whanaunga Senior Lecturer, Education, University of Waikato
    By Skype
    Beth Lord Reader, Philosophy, University of Aberdeen
    Peg Rawes Professor, Architecture, Bartlett, University College London 

    We invite scholarly submissions on the philosophy of Benedict de Spinoza (1632-1677), for a special issue of Interstices journal and the annual Interstices symposium to be held in Auckland, New Zealand, 26-28 May 2017. The intent is to further consolidate the recent revival of interest in Spinoza’s thought, and to reaffirm his status as an enormously powerful thinker of contemporary relevance. Papers on any aspect of Spinoza studies are thus welcomed. But the more specific aim of the symposium and journal issue is twofold: firstly, to extend the burgeoning scholarship on Spinoza into the domains of study parsed by Interstices, namely arts and architecture, and secondly, to situate Spinoza’s philosophy within the particular locus of New Zealand, Australasia, the South Pacific, and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Each of these aspects will be tackled in separate sessions or separate days of the symposium.

    With regard to the first aim, we welcome submissions that put Spinoza’s philosophy in productive proximity with a particular artform or an individual work of art, whether literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, music, dance, performance, etc. — or that have an especial focus on any of the numerous artistic and literary figures who are known to have read Spinoza appreciatively and in whose works Spinozist shadings might be discerned (Goethe, Coleridge, George Eliot, Thomas Hirschhorn, etc.). Contributors might like to think of this event and journal issue as extending, in the direction of arts and architecture, the very fine work done by the anthology Spinoza Beyond Philosophy (2012, ed. Beth Lord).

    Since Interstices’s particular interest is in architectural studies, we would be keen to see contributions that consider Spinoza as helpful for thinking any of the design and spatial disciplines (architecture, urban design, landscape, geography, interior design, and so on). Contributors might also choose to take ‘architecture’ in the sense of ‘structure’, in which case not only would built environments and tectonics be the subject of analysis, but also the very structure of Spinoza’s texts, the extraordinary way in which his texts are wrought (the famous geometric architecture of the Ethics, for example).

    We also invite submissions that don’t necessarily fall under any of the artistic disciplines listed above, and that interpret “arts” in the broadest possible sense. Spinoza’s philosophy predates the modern idea of a differentiated domain of the arts, and so the Latin word that Spinoza uses — ars — has the older and broader sense of skill or craft or ability or proficiency.[1] We thus welcome submissions that are about ‘arts’ in this more general sense — for example, about what Spinoza teaches us about the arts of living (ars vivendi) or the arts of constructing a liberal polity (ars politica, government, statecraft).

    With regard to the second aim, we invite submissions on any aspects of Spinoza studies that have a connection to New Zealand, Australia, the South Pacific, or Asia-Pacific and the Pacific Rim more broadly. Such papers might, for example, examine the historical reception and interpretation of Spinoza in New Zealand, Australia, the Oceanic “sea of islands”, or any proximate sister region.[2] The idea is to give geographic concreteness and local specificity to the interpretation of Spinoza — to see how Spinoza might be or has been read in New Zealand and the Pacific, and inversely to see how our ways of thinking about New Zealand and the Pacific might be productively inflected by reading Spinoza.

    A fuller Call for Papers / Discussion Document is attached as a PDF file, or available online at www.interstices.ac.nz/news-events/ 

    Abstracts of 300 words, along with a short biographical statement of 100 words, to be sent to pacificspinoza@gmail.com, by midnight nzst, 30th January 2017. For purposes of peer review, the abstract should be sent in a separate self-contained file with no identifying information in it. Please send Microsoft Word files only (doc or docx). Abstracts will be vetted through a process of blind peer review.

    Selected papers from the symposium will be invited for revision, peer review, and publication in the subsequent issue of Interstices. If you are unable to attend the symposium in New Zealand, but wish to submit a paper for the journal issue, please send the full and completed paper to pacificspinoza@gmail.com by 31st May 2017.

    Further inquiries can be directed to the convenor Eu Jin Chua, echua@aut.ac.nz, Farzaneh Haghighi, F.Haghighi@auckland.ac.nz, or to Susan Hedges, the Coordinating Editor of Interstices, shedges@aut.ac.nz. www.interstices.ac.nz [1] See Moira Gatens, “Spinoza on Goodness and Beauty and the Prophet and the Artist”, European Journal of Philosophy 23, no. 1 (2015), p. 3. [2] The reference is to Epeli Hau’ofa’s “Our Sea of Islands”, The Contemporary Pacific 6, no. 1 (1994), 147–161.
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