AN OASIS IN THE METROPOLIS

SAH Study Day at The
New York Botanical Garden

September 25, 2015

AIA CES: 4 LU
Fellowship Deadline July 15

Register Now
SAH AWARD FOR FILM & VIDEO

2015 Winner: The Best Planned City in the World: Olmsted, Vaux and the Buffalo Park System 

Submission deadline for the 2016 award is August 3, 2015

Learn More
SAH FIELD SEMINAR

Architecture in the Rio de la Plata Basin: Between Tradition and Cosmopolitanism

September 1-12, 2015

AIA CES 45 LU/HSW

Register Now

Blog

Hanoi: An Evolving Capital

By Amber N. Wiley | June 19, 2015



Saigon is to New York City as Hanoi is to Washington, D.C. Or at least that was what I was told. Yes, Hanoi and Washington, D.C., are both capital cities. Ho Chi Minh City (commonly referred to as Saigon in Vietnam) and New York City are booming financial centers for their respective countries. This analogy, while seemingly straightforward, implies heavy cultural criticism and assumptions that were later elucidated in conversation. The main assumption was that the capital cities were stagnant and dragging behind socio-cultural and financial development because of their heavy bureaucratic functions as seats of national government.

Opportunities

  • Preservation in Global Cities: New York/ Mexico City/ Paris/ Shanghai

    New York | Dates: 10 Sep, 2015
    Every global city today faces the challenge of protecting their unique urban architectural heritage (often a core component of their tourist brand) while encouraging continuing economic development and growth. But the theory and practice of preservation can differ greatly on different continents and according to different cultures. While in older world cities like Paris and New York preservation laws have tended to guard historic districts for decades, Asian and Latin American global cities of more recent vintage face a different set of issues. Join an international panel of architects, planners, and academics to explore the contrasting approaches and strategies faced by global cities in Europe, Asia, and America. This program delves into the themes of our exhibition Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks.
    View Details
  • Tales of the City: New York’s Landmark Interiors

    New York | Dates: 20 Oct, 2015
    We enjoy looking at historic interiors, but there’s more to them than meets the eye. Behind the walls, below the floors, and underneath the painted surfaces are the back-stories few people have heard about the city’s known and not-so-known landmarks. The authors of Interior Landmarks: Treasures of New York will take us behind the scenes of some of the City’s most interesting spaces. They will tell little-known and fascinating stories about places like City Hall and the Tweed Courthouse, Loew’s Paradise Theater, the Four Seasons Restaurant, the Dime Savings, and Manufacturers Trust bank buildings. They will share stories of the political wrangling, financial skullduggery, design competitions, preservation challenges, and restoration problems that designers and builders dealt with to provide insight into why these venues are so special and how even being a landmark doesn’t guarantee that a great space will remain safe from damage, or change. This program delves into the themes of our exhibition Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks, on view through September 13.
    View Details
  • On the Shoulders of Giants: Lessons for Tomorrow from Our Preservation Pioneers

    New York | Dates: 08 Oct, 2015
    Historic preservation activism in New York City did not begin in the 1960s with the fight to save Penn Station and the effort to pass the Landmarks Law—it began in the late 19th century. Little-remembered preservation pioneers like Andrew H. Green and Albert Bard, as well as various women's garden clubs, and patriotic and civic organizations laid the groundwork for the generations of preservationists that would follow. Join us to recount the triumphs, failures, and tactics of these early preservationists, and discuss what they might teach us moving forward.
    View Details