UNFINISHED SPACES

By Alysa Nahmias and
Benjamin Murray

Winner of the 2014
SAH Award for Film and Video

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CALL FOR PAPERS

SAH is accepting abstracts
for the 2015 Annual Conference
in Chicago, April 15-19

Deadline June 6, 2014

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JOIN SAH IN PARIS

Experience the Maison de Verre, Villa Savoye & the Maison Louis Carré
 
Special event to 
benefit SAH Archipedia

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Members in the News


SAH Deadlines & Dates


Awards & Fellowships   Deadline 
SAH/Mellon Author Awards     6/1
H. Allen Brooks
Travelling Fellowship
 
 
10/1 
     
Call for Papers
  Deadline 
2015 Annual Conference
  6/1
     
Events
  Dates
SAH in Paris    7/11-7/12
Croatia Study Tour
  8/18-8/29


Blog




By Jennifer Ball and Lauren Kilroy-Ewbank

Recently we participated in a workshop on Team-Based Learning (TBL) at Brooklyn College, a process where your students are divided into permanent teams for the entire semester. The teams work during class on activities based on readings. You can read more about it in a short article in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Also take a look at the TBL website. Similar to the ‘Flipped Classroom’ students do the reading (yes! they actually do it) BEFORE the subject is taught in class and are quizzed on that material before each unit of study (typically 4-7 units a semester). Classroom time, then, is spent on active learning activities in teams that are meant to promote deeper learning than a typical lecture. 



Opportunities


  • How To Make Waste Public: Experiments With Infrastructure

    Los Angeles | Dates: 19 Apr – 25 May, 2014
    How to Make Waste Public is a curatorial residency about architectural and artistic experiments with the consequences of society’s waste-making. Culturally, waste is understood as a largely private dilemma—a moral and technological responsibility of private individuals and increasingly large private corporations. Furthermore, its smells, toxins and byproducts are bagged, pressed and sent to the periphery of cities and economies. In these and other ways, waste remains an open secret, a process that society participates in but rarely acknowledges. In response, the residency examines artistic, architectural and scholarly practices that question this veil of secrecy. Seen together, these practices propose that waste is a cultural and spatial problem as much as a technical issue. Alongside a salon of design research conducted in collaboration with architecture students at Woodbury University and the Buffalo School of Architecture, it will explore practices such as architecture, video and land art from the past few decades, examining the aesthetic and spatial possibilities of making waste public.
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  • Lecture: Momoyo Kaijima, “The Found”

    Princeton | Dates: 30 Apr, 2014
    In the Spring term of 2014, the Princeton School of Architecture will continue the series of lectures and public debates about the aesthetics of the Rarefied: what is the architecture that grows in a resource-depleted environment? Rarefied aims to capture an environment, an atmosphere of asphyxia which surrounds a practice driven by the lack of financial credit and natural resources. Which are the practices and the aesthetics that will succeed these decades of excess, and the architecture that results from them?
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  • Lecture: Koichi Suzuno

    Los Angeles | Dates: 05 May, 2014
    Since founding Torafu Architects in 2004, Suzuno Koichi and Shinya Kamuro employ a working approach based on architectural thinking. Works by the duo include a diverse range of products, from architectural design to interior design for shops, exhibition space design, product design, spatial installations and filmmaking. Key works include NIKE 1Love, House in Kohoku and airvase. Light Loom (Canon Milano Salone 2011) was awarded the Grand Prize of the Elita Design Award.
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