Opportunities

Share Your Opportunities Online

Posting an opportunity to the SAH website is free and open to members and non-members.

All posted opportunities appear on this page, the SAH homepage, and in our Weekly Opportunities Roundup email. Opportunities include awards, conferences, lectures/symposia, calls for papers/sessions, fellowships, and exhibitions. Click here to submit an opportunity.

To post a job, please visit the SAH Career Center.

  • 2015 Arizona Historic Preservation Conference

    Flagstaff | Dates: 13 – 15 May, 2015

    The Arizona State Historic Preservation Office, the Arizona Preservation Foundation, and the City of Flagstaff invite you to join them at the 13th Annual Arizona Historic Preservation Conference. This year’s conference, “Paths to Preservation” is being held in Flagstaff on May 13th-15th, 2015. The goal of the Conference is to bring together preservationists from around the state to exchange ideas and success stories, to share perspectives and solutions to preservation issues, and to foster cooperation between the diverse Arizona preservation communities.

    At this year’s conference we will analyze the different paths to preservation. Although these paths are not always defined, they still convey a direction or process to follow.  Whether a literal path, such as a historic highway, roadway or trail, or a procedural path, such as rehabilitation, adaptive re-use or the process of listing a site or property on the National Register, these paths are there to guide us to our desired location or result.  Through examples from businesses, communities, and even government agencies, we will share the pathways that guide preservationists in their efforts to save our historic and cultural heritage.

    The Preservation Awards will be the focal event of the Conference. The 33rd Annual Governor’s Heritage Preservation Honor Awards, presented by the State Historic Preservation Office and the Arizona Preservation Foundation, recognize people, organizations, and projects that represent outstanding achievements in preserving Arizona’s prehistoric and historic resources. The 29th Annual Governor’s Awards in Public Archaeology are also presented at the event. These awards, selected by the Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, recognize excellence in archaeological awareness, conservation and education. The awards make the conference more than a venue to learn, debate and network, but also a celebration of outstanding historic preservation efforts and achievements.

    As we move forward, it is imperative that we work together to build a path for the future of our valuable historic resources.

  • Science for Parks, Parks for Science: The Next Century Summit

    Berkeley | Dates: 25 – 27 Mar, 2015

    NCPTT invites you to participate in “Science for Parks, Parks for Science: the Next Century,” a unique science and technology summit organized and hosted by the University of California, Berkeley. The two-and-a-half day summit will focus on state-of-the-science research conducted by natural and cultural resources scientist, managers, and practitioners. The summit will be held on March 25-27, 2015 at UC Berkeley. The unique partnership between UC Berkeley, the National Park Service and the National Geographic Society to bring you this summit grows out of a meeting 100 years earlier that helped launch the National Park Service.

    The focus of the meeting is to bring together visionary scientists to envision and contribute to strategies for science in parks and science using parks for the coming decades. Distinguished plenary speakers and panelists include David Ackerly, Jill Baron, Steven Beissinger, Joel Berger, Ruth DeFries, Thomas Dietz, Josh Donlan, Holly Doremus, Ernesto Enkerlin-Hoeflich, Denis Galvin, David Graber, Jane Lubchenco, Gary Machlis, George Miller, Hugh Possingham, Jedediah Purdy, Nina Roberts, Mark Schwartz, Daniel Simberloff, Monica Turner, & Jennifer Wolch.

    It is critical to the future of preservation science in the National Park Service to be represented and NCPTT encourages you to submit to the contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. The deadline for abstracts is November 1, 2014. Click here to submit an abstract.

    More information, key dates, and ways to submit presentations for the summit click here.

  • PastForward 2015: Call for Ideas/Proposals for National Preservation Conference

    Washington | Dates: 18 Dec, 2014
    Submitting ideas for PastForward 2015, Nov. 3-6, Washington, D.C is currently open – share your expertise, suggestions and ideas for how we can “Wow” attendees with thought provoking content, inspiring speakers and engaging programming. Submitting ideas has been streamlined and is easier than ever. Simply fill out the brief online form and submit topic ideas for educational sessions (Learning Labs and Power Sessions), propose a Washington, D.C. area Field Study exploring on the ground preservation efforts, suggest an inspiring speaker or presenter for educational sessions or TrustLive presentations, or share a preservation film that you feel attendees should have the chance to view and discuss.

    The review process will start late January, with notifications going out early spring. Submit your PastForward 2015 idea today.
  • Mid-Century Modern Structures: Materials and Preservation 2015 Symposium

    St. Louis | Dates: 13 – 16 Apr, 2015

    The Friends of NCPTT, the World Monument Fund, the American Institute for Architects St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial are partnering for a jointly organized symposium on the preservation of Mid-Century Modern Structures. The meeting will be held at the Drury Plaza Hotel in St. Louis, Missouri, April 14-16, 2015. A public lecture will precede the meeting on Monday evening, April 13 at Washington University in St. Louis.

    Focusing primarily on the history, use, and preservation of materials found in Mid-Century modern architecture, the 2015 three-day symposium will provide in-depth understanding of the complex issues associated with the preservation of these structures. Special emphasis will be on modern architectural metals, but presentations on other materials, such as concrete and curtain wall structures, will be included.

    Mid-Century Modern Structures: Materials and Preservation 2015 Symposium Schedule

  • Bridging the Nature-Culture Divide III: Saving Nature in a Humanized World

    San Francisco | Dates: 22 – 24 Jan, 2015

    The Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) is an extraordinary 80,000-acre gem with some of the nation’s most significant natural and designed landscapes. The Presidio of San Francisco, once the headquarters for the military lands that gave rise to the GGNRA, sits at its center. The interior acres of the Presidio are managed by the Presidio Trust; the National Park Service oversees the coastal areas. Both agencies partner with the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy to develop philanthropy, undertake capital improvements, and provide programs and visitor services.

    Managing this expansive cultural landscape is complex and costly.  Among the greatest management challenges is addressing the park’s inherent natural, scenic and cultural assets, while also mediating the often-passionate constituencies that represent them, which is the subject of this conference.  Landscape architects, ecologists, journalists, academics, managers of similarly diverse systems and other professionals will address sustainability, the agendas of different constituencies, diversity, the role of people, and public education.

    GGNRA is not only a place for San Franciscans to recreate and enjoy, it also provides an ideal setting for learning, helps establish a lifelong connection with nature and the environment, promotes civic engagement and a holistic stewardship ethic - all while fostering engagement with a broader national and international community.

    The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) has organized two similarly themed conferences dedicated to the Nature/Culture divide—one for New York’s Central Park, focused on its woodlands (2012) and the other for the Jay Estate in Rye, New York (2011). TCLF and co-sponsor the Presidio Trust, in conjunction with the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy and the National Park Service, have a shared interest in organizing this symposium and its related events, engaging leading thinkers and experts to convene a public program that contemplates the region’s unique and unrivaled assets, provoke discussion, push boundaries and inspire site-specific solutions.

     

  • International Low Impact Development (LID) Conference 2015

    Houston | Dates: 19 – 21 Jan, 2015

    Held at the Omni Houston Galleria Hotel, the LID Conference will highlight new and continuing work including research developments and community adoption of LID throughout the United States and internationally.  In addition, this conference will focus on the application of LID technology in the Southwest region of the US and will also include a mini-symposium on arid region LID. 

    View the Technical Program Grid and plan your time at the Conference.

  • Greater & Greener 2015: Innovative Parks, Vibrant Cities

    San Francisco | Dates: 11 – 14 Apr, 2015

    City Parks Alliance and the San Francisco Recreation & Park Department are excited to be partnering to present Greater & Greener 2015: Innovative Parks, Vibrant Cities. 

    Greater & Greener is a four-day indoor and outdoor conference designed to equip you with the tools you need to create innovative, vibrant, and sustainable parks in your city, district, community or neighborhood.

    You’ll be joining more than 1,000 global park leaders, city planning and design professionals, civic officials, and other urban park advocates at Greater & Greener in San Francisco — an inspiring network of peers from cities across the world. 

    Through outdoor workshops and tours, engaging speaker and panel discussions, volunteer opportunities and exclusive events, we’ll highlight the people and programs having a positive impact across urban park creation, management and stewardship – in the San Francisco Bay Area and globally.

    For more information, review our Schedule-At-A-Glance or the Full Schedule.


  • 2015 IDEA Journal: Call for Submissions

    Dates: 18 Dec, 2014 – 01 Mar, 2015

    EDITORS

    • Suzie Attiwill (RMIT University, Australia)
    • Luciano Crespi (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
    • Davide Fassi (Politecnico di Milano, Italy; Tongji University, China)
    • Elena Enrica Giunta (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
    • Belén Hermida (Universidad CEU San Pablo, Spain)

    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
    Academics, research students and practitioners are invited to submit design research papers and critical project works that make a contribution to the discipline of interior design/interior architecture through an engagement with the provocation of  URBAN + INTERIOR for the IDEA JOURNAL 2015.

    PROVOCATION
    Unprecedented movements of people, growth in population density and forces of capitalism and globalism shape the twenty-first century urban environment and transform how people live in the world – spatially, temporally and subjectively. In the disciplines of interior design, interior architecture, architecture, spatial design and urban design, one encounters the coupling of the conditions of ‘urban’ and ‘interior’ with increasing frequency. Urban interior, interior urbanization, urban interiority and urban interior design are used as provocations for designing, teaching and writing – researching and thinking – in cities and cultures as diverse as Milan, Madrid, Melbourne, Jakarta, Austin, London, Stockholm, Bangkok, Singapore and Bogotá.

    While some might see this as the bringing together of vastly distinct conditions and scales, the conjunction – urban and interior – seeks to engage the potential of practices and techniques of disciplines concerned with interior and urbanism in new ways involving multi-scalar, multi-cultural, multi-discipline approaches. A rethinking of the concept of interior is invited where the defining characteristics of enclosure, form and structure are opened to other possibilities than an equation with the inside of a building. ‘Interior’ is introduced here in an expanded sense. A thinking differently about urbanism and the concept of ‘urban’ is also invoked.

    The question of, and conjunction of, urban + interior is a critical one in the contemporary context where the inhabitation of urban environments and cities has exceeded the population living in rural areas; . We are keen to explore this condition through actual proposals, scenarios and solutions that address the challenges, as well as historical, anthropological, sociological and epistemological reflections.

    The aspiration for this forthcoming issue of the IDEA JOURNAL is to gather this emerging trajectory composed of practices, techniques, and genealogies for future practice. With our call for submissions, we have not specified research questions or positioned in advance what, how, when or why ‘urban’ and ‘interior’ are/might be connected. Our strategy is to be open to what comes in and from this make an arrangement of connections where the potential of urban + interior can be grasped, offered up and discussed.

    The conjunctions, conversations and debates have already begun. The editorial approach for this issue of the IDEA JOURNAL is different to the individual guest editor of previous issues. Five people from three cities are already in discussion about this emerging trajectory of urban + interior: Suzie Attiwill from Melbourne and the research group Urban Interior Laboratory; Davide Fassi, Luciano Crespi and Elena Enrica Giunta from Politecnico di Milano – Design Department and Belén Hermida from University CEU San Pablo in Madrid – who are co-directors and co-coordinators of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design, a program that is offered between POLI.Design in Milano and University CEU San Pablo in Madrid. And now we would like to invite others who are researching urban + interior – through design and projects, through historical and theoretical research, through teaching – to contribute and participate!

    THE IDEA JOURNAL ACCEPTS:

    DESIGN RESEARCH PAPERS
    that demonstrate development and engagement with interior design/interior architecture history, theory, education and practice through critique and synthesis. The focus is on the documentation and critical review of both speculative research and practice-based research

    REFEREED STUDIOS
    that present the nature and outcomes of refereed design studios which have either been previously peer reviewed in situ and/or critically discussed through text and imagery for the IDEA JOURNAL.

    PROJECT REVIEWS
    that critically evaluate design-based works which seek to expand the nature of spatial, temporal and theoretical practice in interior design/interior architecture and associated disciplines.

    VISUAL ESSAYS
    that demonstrate and present speculative research and practice-based researchthrough visual media. For examples of visual essays please refer to previous issues of the IDEA JOURNAL – for example, the visual essay by Sara Bomans and Remco Roes ‘Nothing will come of nothing, speak again’ (http://idea-edu.com/journal/2013-idea-journal/).

    BOOK & EXHIBITION REVIEWS
    to encourage debate into the emerging literature dedicated to the expression and expansion of the theory and practice of interior design/interior architecture. 

    REGISTRATION OF INTEREST:
    Authors are invited to register their interest in making a submission via an online form (please see link below). Registrations of interest will be received until beginning of March 2015. It is important to note that the registration of interest is not refereed; acknowledgement of registration facilitates development of a proposal to full research paper, refereed studio, visual essay or project review by providing formatting guidelines and publication standards to registrants. Registrations of interest will be responded to within one week of receipt. Authors are encouraged to register sooner than later.

    link to REGISTRATION OF INTEREST FORM
    link to PDF of 2015 Call for Submissions

    For any queries please contact Suzie Attiwill (executive editor) via emailIDEAJournal2015@gmail.com or phone +61 3 9925 3498

    Important deadlines/dates:

    • Call for contributions: November 2014 to March 2015.
    • Registration of interest including 50 words and image will be acknowledged
      within one week of sending.
    • Submission of full draft for review by April 30 2015.
    • Peer review process: May to June 2015.
    • Notification to authors of acceptance late July 2015.
    • Revisions by author(s) returned to Executive Editor by 30 September 2015.
    • Journal published early 2016.

    2015 IDEA JOURNAL EDITORS:

    Suzie Attiwill practises interior design using curatorial and exhibition techniques. She is the current executive editor of the IDEA JOURNAL; associate professor in the discipline of Interior Design and deputy dean of Learning + Teaching, RMIT University’s School of Architecture and Design, Melbourne, Australia. Her research has been published nationally and internationally. Publications include: ‘interiorizt’, Brooker, G & L, Weinthal (eds), The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design, 2014 and ‘Urban and Interior: techniques for an urban interiorist’, Hinkel, R (ed), Urban Interior. Informal explorations, interventions and occupations, 2011. Suzie is a founding member of the Urban Interior Laboratory. From 2006 to 2012, she was chair of IDEA (Interior Design/Interior Architecture Educators Association). She holds a PhD (Interior Design, RMIT), Master of Arts (Design, RMIT), Bachelor of Arts Hons (Interior Design, RMIT), Bachelor of Arts Hons (Art History / Indian Studies, Uni Melb) and a Certificate in Applied Arts (Textiles).

    Luciano Crespi is an architect and full professor of design at the School of Design of Politecnico di Milano and President of the Interior Design Study Course. Luciano has been teaching at the Architecture Faculty of Politecnico di Milano since 2000; he is a member of the PhD Professor Board of Design; co-director of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design (Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano); head of Postgraduate Master ‘Exhibition Design’, Politecnico di Milano; and coordinator of DHOC, Interior Design for Hospitable Cities, Politecnico di Milano, a research group that deals with the design of interior and exterior urban spaces, aimed to set up new forms of hospitable places in the contemporary city through temporary, diffused services, new quality for public areas, and innovative models of re-use for disused buildings. Recent books include: Luciano Crespi, Da spazio nasce spazio. L’interior design nella trasformazione degli ambienti contemporanei, (Milan: Postmedia books, 2013)

    Davide Fassi, PhD, is an architect and he is currently teaching and researching in interior and product service system design both at Politecnico di Milano and at Tongji University (College of Design and Innovation). He joined DHOC (Interior Design for Hospitable Cities research group) in 2009. He is coordinator of double degree programs with universities in China and the School of Design – Politecnico di Milano, coordinator of GIDE (Group of International Design Education), co-coordinator of [MUID], the International Master in Urban Interior Design (Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano) and member of the International Coordination Committee of the DESIS Network (Design for Social Innovation and Sustainability). He has published and edited several books including: In-Trattenere (2010) and Temporary Urban Solutions (2012). His research focus is the relationship between space and service with a community-centred approach: Coltivando, the convivial garden at the Politecnico di Milano (2011) and campUS (2014) are the most recent applied research projects.

    Elena Enrica Giunta, PhD, is a designer. She has a Bachelor of Science in Interior design, and a Masters in Interior Architecture (Exhibit Design for Cultural Heritage. Elena is a research fellow and contract professor at School of Design, Politecnico di Milano; member of GIDE (Group of International Design Education) and co-coordinator of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design (Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano). Since 2003 she has been involved in research programs, both national and international, on topics addressing interior design at urban scale and design strategies for cultural heritage enhancement; she joined DHOC in 2007. Her research interest is focused on specific implications of intangible assets arising from places and artifacts. She holds a PhD in Multimedia Communication (Design, Politecnico di Milano) and a Certificate in Art-Therapy (Artea). Publications include: ‘Cities * society = scenarios of changing. Urban micro-environment between Art and Design’, PRO-OCCUPANCY. Design dei microambienti urbani contemporanei: tra performatività dell’allestimento e appartenenze, (Milan: 2012).

    Belén Hermida is a licensed architect in Spain since 1990. She holds an Artium Baccalaureate in Studio Art and Architecture, Wellesley College (1986) and a Master of Architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT (1988). She is currently a PhD candidate at Universidad de Zaragoza with a thesis on the Prado Museum Extension. Her PhD research is based on her extensive experience in museum design in collaboration with Rafael Moneo with whom she worked between 1989 and 2007. Since 2005 Belén has taught Form Analysis and Architectural Design and researches in the group Re-Thinking Cities at Universidad CEU San Pablo in Madrid, Spain. She is coordinator of International Relations, coordinator of the Bilingual Program in Architecture and co-director of [MUID] the International Master in Urban Interior Design: Design of the Public Realm in Contemporary Cities taught at University CEU San Pablo in Madrid and Politecnico di Milano, where she is also visiting faculty. Since 2013, she is a partner at Urban Networks in Madrid, a firm specialized in the conceptual design of urban and architectural initiatives. Urban Networks main task is the creative transformation of cities.

    IDEA JOURNAL is published by IDEA (Interior Design / Interior Architecture Educators Association)

  • LEGO© Architects

    Chicago | Dates: 20 Dec, 2014

    Inspire your budding architects’ creativity at the Robie House as they use LEGOs to create a 3D model of their own floor plan design. A youth educator will facilitate the workshop, guiding participants on window and door placement as well as design concepts such as scale and proportion. Participants take home their floor plan design and receive a photo of their LEGO model.  A brief tour of the Robie House interior is included. 2 hours.

    Workshop appropriate for ages 6 and up with an adult.

    Advance tickets required.  Space is limited.

  • Dumbarton Oaks Garden and Landscape Studies Symposium - River Cities: Historical and Contemporary

    Washington | Dates: 08 – 09 May, 2015

    Resilience and adaptability are key elements of viable urbanism. But how have these concepts been understood historically? And how do they shape the design and stewardship of urban landscapes today? The dynamic relationships between cities and their rivers, a landscape of potentially critical adaptability and resilience, is the focus of the 2015 Garden and Landscape Studies Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks.  Building on the emergence of urban humanities and urban landscape history, we propose to consider the urban river as a city-making landscape deserving of careful reading and analysis: past, present, and future.

    The subject of this symposium builds on a new multi-year initiative in urban landscape studies, which Dumbarton Oaks is launching in 2015 with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Its principal goal is to create a dialogue between designers and scholars to address the landscape consequences of advancing urbanization. With this task in mind, the 2015 symposium aims to bring together the work of contemporary designers with the historical perspectives of scholars, encouraging practitioners and historians to bridge the gaps between their modes of thinking.

    Cities have emerged on the banks of rivers throughout history. Rivers are multi-faceted ecological, cultural, economic, and political agents, providing resources such as food, water, irrigation, sanitation, and transportation—and liabilities including flooding, drought, and occasional changes in their locations. While many cities share the history of rivers running through their cores, the relationships between rivers and cities are shaped by unique circumstances. New Orleans and Cairo, for example, were both located on the silt deposited by floods; yet, as these cities grew, one used a dam and the other levees to harness their rivers. While describing the river as part of urban infrastructure, how can we read the river landscape as a dynamic catalyst in the urban process? What is the role of the river, beyond its performance as a transportation corridor and a water source? How do its place, its flow, its speed, and its dynamic character shape the development of cities and the experience of the urban landscape spatially, geographically, and temporally? What landscape elements are distinctive to these urban river contexts—bridges, parks, ports, weirs, mills, various defensive structures—and how might the landscapes of inland river cities differ from those in deltas and on estuaries?

    Another aspect of the relationship between cities and rivers that this symposium will explore concerns its representation in human experience, practice, and imagination. How do rivers frame the urban experience? Do they offer a connection to nature in the city as so many have claimed we need? What are their cultural and ritual uses? What can we discover by investigating the historical role of the river and city-making that might offer an alternative perspective on contemporary issues of access to clean water, public space, transportation, and the challenges of climate change are addressed? How might a historical investigation offer a means to re-imagine the way we think about and use our urban rivers today? Conversely, how can the spatial thinking of designers today revise our historical understandings of rivers and cities?

    The 2015 symposium will consider river cities from the earliest settlements to contemporary metropolitan regions around the globe. Just as rivers flow across continents, we are looking broadly to engage in a discussion of urban rivers, past and present, nationally and internationally.

     

     

  • 2015 Reclaiming Vacant Properties Conference

    Detroit | Dates: 19 – 21 May, 2015
    The sixth national Reclaiming Vacant Properties Conference will come to Detroit, Michigan, May 19-21, 2015. The conference will be held at the Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center and is expected to draw 700-1,000 professionals to the city.

    Through the Reclaiming Vacant Properties (RVP) Conference, Community Progress educates, energizes, and empowers community revitalization professionals and stakeholders from across the country to tackle one of the most pressing issues facing our cities and towns.  

    Themed “Beyond Blight: Building a Bold Movement,” the conference will explore the latest tools to combat vacancy and move beyond neighborhood blight, as well as how government officials, community leaders, and others in the field can join forces across departments, cities, and even states to achieve wide-scale positive change. Conference sessions will highlight work from around the country, including efforts in Michigan.  

    Held every eighteen months, the Reclaiming Vacant Properties Conference is the sole national conference dedicated to helping communities overcome vacant, blighted properties. It attracts and connects professionals from many interrelated fields, including community development, urban policy, code enforcement, affordable housing, urban planning, economic development, and public safety.  

    Who should attend?  

    RVP is a great opportunity for government, nonprofit and private sector leaders  who are interested in exploring the challenges and opportunities presented by vacant and abandoned properties and learning the latest strategies and tools to revitalize America’s cities and towns.  

    What will I get out of it?  

    With in-depth sessions, field workshops extensive networking, and knowledge-sharing opportunities, attendees will leave with practical tools and ideas for their communities.  
    About the Center for Community Progress:

    Founded in 2010, the Center for Community Progress is the only national 501(c)3 nonprofit organization solely dedicated to building a future in which entrenched, systemic blight no longer exists in American communities. The mission of Community Progress is to ensure that communities have the vision, knowledge, and systems to transform blighted, vacant, and other problem properties into assets supporting neighborhood vitality. As a national leader on solutions for blight and vacancy, Community Progress serves as the leading resource for local, state and federal policies and best practices that address the full cycle of property revitalization. Major support for Community Progress is generously provided by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and the Ford Foundation.  
  • The Artist's Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement, 1887-1920

    Philadelphia | Dates: 15 Mar, 2015

    Speaker: Anna O. Marley, Curator of Historical American

    SUNDAY, MARCH 15 | 2:00pm
    Free; pre-registration required.

    Curator of Historical American Art Anna O. Marley will lecture on Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Art's 2015 exhibition and catalogue The Artist's Garden, which intertwines stories of American artists, Impressionism, and the growing popularity of gardening as a middle-class leisure pursuit at the turn of the 20th century. Diverse fine art and material culture - including paintings, sculpture, books, and gardening ephemera - will be illustrated, revealing how the horticultural and visual arts in this period were manifestations of an emerging national Progressive era middle-class American identity. Represented will be gardens across the United States and Europe, with special emphasis on the importance of the Philadelphia area, which served as the originator of the Colonial Revival Garden movement with the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. Moreover, the Philadelphia area was the center of the publishing industry in the early 20th century, which led to the creation of magazines aimed at middle class suburban gardeners like House and Garden (founded here in 1901). By employing the interdisciplinary perspectives of horticultural history and art history, The Artist's Gardenwill reveal the far-reaching effects of the ideas of Impressionism on not just painting, but American culture at large.

    Anna O. Marley is a nationally-recognized authority on American art and material culture from the colonial era to 1945. She and holds a B.A. in Art History from Vassar College, an M.A. in Museum Studies from the University of Southern California and a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. Since joining PAFA in March 2009, Dr. Marley has curated more than 10 exhibitions. Currently, Dr. Marley is organizing the nationally touring exhibitionThe Artist's Garden, with an accompanying catalog to be published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. She is also working on exhibitions on Thomas Eakins photography and nineteenth-century history painting in the Americas. Prior to PAFA, she worked for the National Gallery of Art and the National Park Service, and held research fellowships at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Winterthur Museum, the Maryland Historical Society, and Colonial Williamsburg. Dr. Marley's professional affiliations include serving as Co-Chair of the Association of Historians of American Art, and as a member of the Association of Art Museum Curators, the College Art Association, and the Society of Early Americanists. She is also a member of the Morris Arboretum and an avid gardener!

    Register Online Now

  • Gardens of the Jazz Age

    Philadelphia | Dates: 18 Jan, 2015

    SUNDAY, JANUARY 18 | 2:00pm
    Free; pre-registration required.

    In this light-hearted, yet serious lecture, Jenny Rose Carey, Director of the Ambler Arboretum at Temple University, and a member of the Garden Club of Philadelphia, investigates the fascinating gardens of the Jazz Age. Using images from magazines, books and glass lantern slides from the Archives of American Gardens at the Smithsonian, she weaves garden history, design, social history and women’s history into a tale of the times. At its height in the 1920s, the Jazz Age was known for music, dancing, liberation, and fun. Influences from Europe and America’s own garden past combined to produce some of the most creative and opulent gardens in American Garden History. Gardens, like art and music, reflect their time of creation.

    Register Online Now

  • Evolving Strategies for Evolving Landscapes: Beyond the Garden Bed

    Blue Bell | Dates: 08 – 09 Jan, 2015

    This two-day conference will explore how to interact with the complex, evolving realities of today’s landscapes and those of the future. To work with the land today means dealing with dramatic change. Factors from landscape fragmentation to accidental species introductions have made it difficult to establish resilient plant communities. Yet increased interest in ecology, landscape performance, and natural aesthetics has created significant need to establish these landscapes successfully and consistently.

    Featured Speakers:

    • Warren Byrd, Jr., landscape architect and founder of Nelson Byrd Woltz, will discuss how his firm is evolving to incorporate ecology, conservation, and agriculture, and how this broad knowledge base is being passed from one generation of practitioners to the next.
    • Tom Christopher,  principal of Connecticut-based Smart Lawn LLC, will focus non-traditional turf grasses and planting techniques that require only several annual mowings.
    • Robert Askins,  biology professor at Connecticut College, will explore how studies of remarkably similar forests in Europe and East Asia provide new insights into how practitioners can protect and manage forests on their own projects.
    • Bernd Blossey, associate professor in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University will discuss the impact habitats in the northeast face from fragmentation, climate change, invasive species, and increasing deer populations.  He will discuss which native species can we assume to be safe, which may   go extinct and what role can designers play.

    CEUs available for landscape architects, APLD members, arborists, and horticulturists, click here for details.

  • Order in All Things: Community and Identity in Shaker Architecture

    Chicago | Dates: 07 Feb – 26 Apr, 2015
    LUMA will present a survey of buildings constructed by or for the Shakers, from the 18th to the 20th century. Shaker spirituality sought to order one's life away from the temptations of the world and towards heaven. This was expressed in Shaker architecture and varied from community to community. The exhibit will explore a variety of Shaker styles found in 15 of its past and current communities throughout the United States and highlight their similarities and differences. The exhibit will demonstrate how the Shakers' built environment reflected their desire to promote piety, prosperity, and a communal identity.
  • Gather Up the Fragments: The Andrews Shaker Collection and As It Is in Heaven: The Legacy of Shaker Faith and Design

    Chicago | Dates: 07 Feb – 26 Apr, 2015

    This dual exhibition will present an overview of the history of theUnited Society of Believers for Christ’s Second Appearing, more commonly known as the Shakers. The exhibitions will comprise objects from the Faith and Edward Deming Andrews Collection at Hancock Shaker Village as well as pieces from local Chicago collections. The uniqueness of 18th- and 19th-century Shaker design and industry, and the religious tenants that underlay life in Shaker villages, particularly the philosophy of “hands to work and hearts to God” will be explored. Programs will examine aspects of the Shakers’ cultural legacy in music and dance.

    Gather Up the Fragments is organized by Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, MA and toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC. Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Art and Faith of the Crèche: The Collection of James and Emilia Govan

    Chicago | Dates: 08 Nov, 2014 – 04 Jan, 2015

    Join LUMA for the seventh year of the museum’s annual holiday exhibition. The story of Mary, Joseph, and the Christ Child has great appeal throughout the world as a story of a family facing hardship with hope. See how artists across the globe depict the Nativity. From Armenia to Zimbabwe, learn how artists recreate the scene with clothing, architecture, and figures from their native lands. Remarkable in its variety of media and scale, this generous gift from James and Emilia Govan is a memorable tradition for families of all nationalities.


    Click here to sponsor a crèche!


    Since the first Art and Faith of the Crèche in 2007, the Crèche Sponsorship Program has become increasingly popular amongst our LUMA friends. We are happy to extend to you an early opportunity to participate, so you get your first country of choice!

    Sponsoring a crèche in the exhibition is the perfect way to honor your heritage, a friend, or loved one during the upcoming holiday season. The $150 sponsorship gives you the ability to have the name(s) of your choosing displayed on the label of your sponsored crèche. Your sponsorship helps us to care for this special collection and present this wonderful exhibition each year.

    Click here to learn more.

  • NEH Summer Institute in Granada

    Granada | Dates: 15 Jun – 10 Jul, 2015
    “The Alhambra and Spain’s Islamic Past” uses the magnificent 13th-14th-century Alhambra palace complex in Granada to study Spain’s engagement with its diverse cultural and religious history. The Institute begins with the palaces, gardens, and courtyards remaining from the Islamic period and proceeds to observe how over time the Alhambra was variously represented in traveler’s accounts, prints, paintings, and photographs as Orientalist fantasy, picturesque playground, and most recently as celebrated national monument. Through the specific history of the Alhambra, the Institute explores the culturally complex history of Muslim-Christian relations in Europe. More broadly, it considers the relationship between nationalism and memory—how a nation like Spain frames its Islamic past—and the importance of architectural monuments in the making of community identity. Application deadline: March 2, 2015.
  • Lewis Walpole Library 2015-2016 Fellowships and Travel Grants in Eighteenth-Century Studies

    Farmington | Dates: 17 – 17 Dec, 2014

    Located in Farmington, Connecticut, the Lewis Walpole Library offers short-term residential fellowships and travel grants to support research in the Library’s rich collections of eighteenth-century materials (mainly British), including important holdings of prints, drawings, manuscripts, rare books, and paintings. Scholars pursuing postdoctoral or advanced research, as well as doctoral candidates at work on a dissertation, are encouraged to apply.

    Recipients are expected to be in residence at the Library, to be free of other significant professional obligations during their stay, and to focus their research on the Lewis Walpole Library’s collections. Fellows also have access to additional resources at Yale, including those in the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Yale Center for British Art. Residential fellowships include the cost of travel to and from Farmington, accommodation for four weeks in an eighteenth-century house on the Library’s campus, and a per diem living allowance. Travel grants cover transportation costs to and from Farmington for research trips of shorter duration and include on-site accommodation. This year the Lewis Walpole Library and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library are offering a joint Fellowship award to support up to eight weeks of research in both collections.

    Application details and requirements: http://www.library.yale.edu/walpole/research/visiting_fellowships.html

    The application deadline is January 12, 2015.

    Awards will be announced in March.

  • CFP: Journal of Architectural Education, 70:1

    Dates: 17 – 17 Dec, 2014

    Open 
    Journal of Architectural Education, 70:1

    JAE 70:1 will be a non-themed issue. We will accept essays across a range of topics to include, but not limited to, the following:

     ...agency . atmosphere . beginningdesign . body . construction . color . designbuild . demolition . energy . education . fabrication . form . global . ground . health . house . interiors . intention . journals . joint . knowledge . kitsch . line . labyrinth . making . meaning . narrative . notation . order . operation . place . precedent . quality . quantifiable . representation . responsibility . structure . sustainability . technique . technology . urbanism . utopia . vernacular . void . wallpaper . watershed . x-axis . xeric . yard . yoke . zoning . ziggurat...

    The JAE accepts Scholarship essays, Design essays, as well as Micro-Narrative essays. Design essays may also be considered across a range of frameworks.

    The submission deadline for all manuscripts for this theme issue is August 01, 2015, 5 pm US Eastern Time Zone. Accepted articles will be published in issue 70:1 (March 2016). For author instructions please consult the submission guidelines.

    Refer all inquiries to:
    Marc J Neveu
    Executive Editor
    eeditor@acsa-arch.org        

    - See more at: http://www.acsa-arch.org/publications/journal-of-architectural-education/submit-to-jae/current-calls/submit-to-jae-70-1#sthash.5ZaJO54W.dpuf