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Posting an opportunity to the SAH website is free and open to members and non-members.

All posted opportunities appear on this page, the SAH homepage, and in our Weekly Opportunities Roundup email. Opportunities include awards, conferences, lectures/symposia, calls for papers/sessions, fellowships, and exhibitions. Click here to submit an opportunity.

To post a job, please visit the SAH Career Center.


  • The Art Deco Preservation Ball

    San Francisco | Dates: 10 May, 2014

    JOIN US FOR THE 30TH ANNUAL ART DECO PRESERVATION BALL

    Celebrating the 75th anniversary of the 1939 World's Fair

    We will be honoring those who have committed themselves to preserving the culture of the Art Deco era (1918-1941) with our 2014 Art Deco Preservation Awards and an evening of dancing and entertainment. Presented by the Art Deco Society of California [501(c)3].

    White Tie, Black Tie, and Formal Attire of the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s requested

    Please dine before the Ball. There will be light appetizers but no meals served. You can find a list of nearby restaurants here.

    Click here to download the full brochure

  • Art in Bloom: A Tribute to Art and Flowers

    Milwaukee | Dates: 27 – 30 Mar, 2014

    Celebrate the arrival of spring with friends and family, enjoying fragrant, art-inspired floral designs throughout the Museum. See what breathtaking arrangements top regional designers create to complement the art in the Museum’s Collection—and in the feature exhibition, Uncommon Folk: Traditions in American Art.

    A popular community event, Art in Bloom not only immerses you in beauty, but also provides you with opportunities to enhance your floral and gardening knowledge. Be sure to catch this year’s lecture and master class with renowned floral designer Loann Burke. Don’t miss the lecture and demonstration by floral sugar artist Ann Ruth. And in other lectures and workshops, Zannah Crowe, Heidi Hornung, Café Calatrava Chef Micah Kaufman, Kostas Koutantzis, Melinda Myers, and Michael Yanny will share additional ideas and suggestions for your home this season.

    Daily event admission is $17 adult/$5 Member, Thursday through Sunday. Programs requiring tickets and reservations are noted and tend to sell out quickly. To purchase, order online, mail the completed form with a check made payable to the Milwaukee Art Museum; or call 414-224-3803.

    Advance ticket orders must be received by Friday, March 21, 2014.

  • I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America

    Miami Beach | Dates: 28 Jun – 28 Sep, 2014
    June 28 2014 - September 28 2014
    Seventh Floor, The Wolfsonian–FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, FL

    The first major exploration of the theater and industrial designer who The New York Times dubbed “the Leonardo da Vinci of the 20th century.”

    A visionary who was equally comfortable in the realms of fact and fiction, Norman Bel Geddes (1893–1958) played a significant role in the 1920s and '30s, shaping not only modern America but also the nation’s image of itself as innovator and leader into the future. Bel Geddes most famously expressed his dynamic vision of this American future—streamlined, technocratic, and optimistic—with his unforgettable Futurama exhibition at the 1939–40 New York World’s Fair. Bringing together some 200 never-before-seen drawings, models, photographs and films of theater sets and costumes, housing projects and appliances, airplanes and automobiles, the exhibition underscores that Bel Geddes sought nothing less the transformation of American society through design.

    I Have Seen the Future is a traveling exhibition organized by th Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin.

  • An Evening of Miami Architecture and Typography

    Miami Beach | Dates: 28 Feb, 2014
    Date:  Friday, February 28, 2014 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm
    Location:  Wolfsonian-FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, FL
    Event Information

    An Evening of Miami Architecture and Typography

     

    What is the Miami aesthetic? How do architecture and design define Miami? Explore these questions and more during an evening devoted to Miami architecture and typography at The Wolfsonian-FIU.

     

    6:00 PM - CLOG: MIAMI Panel Discussion

     

    When it comes to architecture, something is definitely happening in Miami today. CLOG is an independent publication that slows things down. With a measured, multi-dimensional approach, each CLOG issue explores a single subject that is particularly relevant to architecture now. CLOG's editors and contributors will discuss the MIAMI issue and get to the bottom of this transformative moment for architecture in Miami.

     

    Moderator

    Jean-Francois LeJeune, Professor, University of Miami, School of Architecture

     

    Panelists

    Ray Fort, Designer, Arquitectonica

    Nick Gelpi, Founder and Design Principle, GELPI PROJECTS/ PALEO STUDIO and Assistant Professor, Florida International University, College of Architecture

    Andrew Kenney, photographer

    Jacob Brillhart, Assistant Professor, University of Miami School of Architecture and Principle, Brillhart Architecture

    Melissa Brillhart, Principle, Brillhart Architecture

    7:30 PM - How Culture Affects Typography

    Designer, blogger and "typophile" Nikki Villagomez explores Miami typograhy and the impact of culture on the design process. Using a compliation of publicity-submitted images, Villagomez compares Miami's typographies to those used in other cities, revealing the impact space and place have on typographical choices. Co-presented with AIGA.

    For more information, click here.

    Sponsored by Perrier.

    Free and open to the public.

  • Finland: Designed Environments

    Minneapolis | Dates: 10 May – 17 Aug, 2014

    Marvel at the explosion of creativity in Finnish design over the last 15 years. “Finland: Designed Environments” presents a selection of the most elegant, artistic, and thought-provoking objects and projects by Finnish designers, craftspeople, and architects. These objects share an inherent practicality, but are thoughtfully designed for an elevation of the user’s experience.

    The exhibition encompasses furnishings, fashion, and craft, as well as architecture and urbanism. It also includes submissions from the World Design Capital Helsinki 2012 (a bi-annual international designation awarded by the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design).

    Organized by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Support provided by the Consulate General of Finland in New York and the American-Scandinavian Foundation.

  • Save the Date: CCSAH Summer Bus Tour of the Fox River Valley, Elgin, Batavia, Geneva, and Aurora

    Chicago | Dates: 07 Jun, 2014
    What: All-day bus tour of architectural highlights.

    Where: Leaving as usual from downtown at Adams and Michigan Avenue, from 8:00am to 8:00pm.

    When: SAVE THE DATE: Saturday, June 7th, 2014.

    Cost: Around $105.00, still to be determined. Come join us for an intriguing tour of architectural sites: the 1931 Venetian Art Deco Paramount Theatre by Rapp and Rapp in Aurora in the morning; after lunch, the Elgin Historical Society, the Wing Mansion and Elgin Watch Company Observatory, several sites in Batavia and St. Charles, a historic house in Aurora, and much more (to be announced). Restauraunt lunch included. 

    CCSAH details flyer still to be mailed.
  • Mecca Flat Blues

    Chicago | Dates: 15 Feb – 25 May, 2014

    It’s been more than 60 years since the Mecca Flats building stood at 34th and State Street, yet it remains a prominent story in both architectural and sociological discussions. Mecca Flat Blues, which opens February 15 in the Sidney R. Yates Gallery on the fourth floor, is an exhibition that clearly demonstrates the two distinct identities of that building.

    It was initially interpreted as a building for the rich, a reputation burnished by its use as a hotel during the 1893 World’s Fair. While the apartments were large, that was not an accurate description as residents were generally middle-class. In 1912, the building transitioned from all Caucasian residents to African American residents, and still housing middle-class professionals such as hotel clerks and Pullman Porters.

    The building’s design of a skylight interior court with ornately-designed railings was distinctive, but it also contributed to the building’s reputation as having no secrets. Resident’s behaviors were less than pious which led songwriter/pianist Jimmy Blythe to write the song from which the exhibition takes its name, “Mecca Flat Blues.”

    The apartment complex inspired more than a song especially when an aspiring writer went to work for one of its residents. Called upon to deliver goods door-to-door, the writer became familiar with all the residents, getting to know them in her line of duty. Eventually the writer, Gwendolyn Brooks, would publish her poem, “In the Mecca.”

    As the Illinois Institute of Technology began to expand, Mecca Flats stood in its way, but residents fought to keep their building, only losing the battle when it fell into disrepair in 1951. While preservationists often lament that replacement buildings never live up to the original beloved building, Mecca Flats was replaced by Mies Van der Rohe’s Crown Hall (a site of a Jan Tichy video display.).

    Public Programs

    Chicago Cultural Historian Tim Samuelson will lead a series of exhibition events that will include curator-led gallery talks, and musical concerts recreating the music of Chicago's South Side jazz and blues scene of the 1920s. The concerts will feature a vintage player piano and authentic recordings played on antique phonographs. Sidney R. Yates Gallery

     

    Gallery Talks

    February 27 and March 27 at 12:15pm

     

    Musical Concerts

    March 6 and May 3 at 12:15pm

     

    The Battle for the Mecca

    Lecture by Thomas Dyja

    April 8 at 12:15pm

    One square block on the Near South Side inspired both Gwendolyn Brooks' greatest poem and one of Mies van der Rohe's finest structures, S.R. Crown Hall. Thomas Dyja will explore this half-acre of confluence and connection, where Chicago's past met its future in ways that touched race, urban planning, politics, poetry and architecture. Mr. Dyja is a Chicago-born author whose book, The Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream won the Chicago Tribune's 2013 Heartland Prize for non-fiction and was named one of the New York Times' 100 Notable Books of the Year. Sidney R. Yates Gallery

    Dates: 
    February 15-May 25, 2014

    Chicago Cultural Center Hours:
    Chicago Cultural Center 
    Monday–Thursday, 9 am–7 pm
    Friday, 9 am–6 pm
    Saturday, 9 am–6 pm
    Sunday, 10 am–6 pm

    Sidney R. Yates Gallery Hours: 
    Monday–Thursday, 10 am–7 pm 
    Friday–Sunday, 10 am–6 pm

    Location:
    Chicago Cultural Center, Sidney R. Yates Gallery, 4th Floor
    78 E. Washington St.
    Chicago, IL 60602

    Admission:
    FREE

  • Wright Before the "Lloyd"

    Chicago | Dates: 28 Feb – 15 Mar, 2014
    Mention the name Frank Lloyd Wright, and modern architecture immediately comes to everyone’s mind. But as a young Chicago architect of the 1890s, signing his work with a less dramatic “Frank L. Wright” his early work included many and diverse influences – some of which look back to classical antiquity, English tudor and other unexpected sources. This exhibit explores seldom discussed early projects that demonstrate how Wright’s path to becoming a modern architect had deep and far-reaching roots.

    Dates: 
    Until mid-March 2014

    Location:
    Chicago Cultural Center, Landmark Chicago Gallery, 1st Floor
    78 E. Washington St.
    Chicago, IL 60602

    Admission:
    FREE

  • Thirty-Five Years of Public Art

    Chicago | Dates: 22 Feb – 02 May, 2014
    This exhibition will include a selection of artwork from various satellite locations including libraries, police stations and other public buildings. Highlights of the installation include many maquettes (models) including Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate, Jacob Lawrence’s mosaic, Events in the Life of Harold Washington and Mary Brogger’s Haymarket Memorial. The exhibition will also feature a chair and ottoman from Suite Home Chicago and a mural from the Legler Branch Library by Kerry James Marshall. The mural celebrates the library as a source of mystery and wonder.

    Also featured from the District 23 police headquarters at 850 W. Addison is a work of public art by Todd Palmer, a Chicago-based curatorial design and museum planning consultant. His wall mural, entitled CODESWITCH, features the hands of diverse Chicagoans, gesturing in sign language, and representative of the human diversity of the neighborhoods served by this police station.

    Chicago Cultural Center Hours:
    Chicago Cultural Center 
    Monday–Thursday, 9 am–7 pm
    Friday, 9 am–6 pm
    Saturday, 9 am–6 pm
    Sunday, 10 am–6 pm

    Exhibit Hall Hours: 
    Monday–Thursday, 10 am–7 pm 
    Friday–Sunday, 10 am–6 pm

    Location:
    Chicago Cultural Center, Exhibit Hall, 4th Floor
    78 E. Washington St.
    Chicago, IL 60602

    Admission:
    FREE

  • Building Tops Tour Number Four

    Chicago | Dates: 14 May, 2014
    When: Afternoon of Wednesday, May 14th, 2014, from 2:20pm to about 5:30pm.

    Where: Santa Fe Building, 224 S. Michigan Avenue-- please meet in lobby prior to 2:30pm start time. 

    What: The tour starts at our first stop, the gorgeous sky-lit offices of Goettsch Partners Architects, on the 17th and topmost floor of Daniel Burnham's Santa Fe Building at 224 S. Michigan Avenue. Then, on to a 4:00pm visit to the new Wabash Tower, added to Roosevelt University in 2012 by Chicago architects Vickery, Ovresat and Awsumb; this tour by arrangement with firm leader architect Vic Vickery, and led by Leslie Slavitt of Roosevelt. We'll see the lobby and bookstore, a higher floor dormitory room in the new tower, faculty offices, dining facilities, science and business classrooms and other educational spaces. Please do come join us for two very impressive architectural tours on high (thanks to our organizers).

    Tour Capacity: Past Building Tops tours have been very popular, and they tend to sell out quickly. 

    Cost: $10.00 (Please reserve a space by phone or email.) This tour is limited to thirty persons. 

    RSVP: For further details, please contact Judy Freeman: jrfree3500@aol.com / Tel: 773-929-0329.
  • Upgrade: Chester Arthur, Louis Tiffany and the White House

    Chicago | Dates: 30 Mar, 2014

    Sunday, March 30
    2 p.m.
    Museum Members $15; Public $25   Buy tickets

    Note: To receive the member discount, members must log in after clicking through to the ticket purchase screen. Please place the tickets you would like to purchase in your cart and the discount will be applied when you check out. For information about Driehaus Museum memberships, please see the Join section on the website or call 312 482 8933, ext. 21.

    In 1882 the new president, Chester A. Arthur, brought in the young New York decorator Louis C. Tiffany to upgrade the haut-bourgeois interiors of the White House.  As a New Yorker and a socially connected man, Arthur would have been aware of the ground-breaking artistic interiors that the heir to the Tiffany & Co. fortune had created in the late 1870s. 

    As the Gilded Age flourished, Arthur wanted his presidential mansion to reflect the newest taste and the most artistic impulses of the New York metropolis.  Louis Comfort Tiffany gave the White House some of the most dramatic, cutting-edge modern interiors of the day.  The problem with cutting-edge interiors is that they become passé very quickly, and Tiffany’s legacy was all too short-lived. Mr. Dietz will also sign copies of Dream House:  The White House as an American Home after this lecture.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER
    Ulysses Grant Dietz is the Chief Curator, Curator of Decorative Arts at The Newark Museum, where he began his career in 1980. He received his BA from Yale in 1977, and his MA in Early American Culture from the University of Delaware’s Winterthur Program in 1980. Mr. Dietz restored the centerpiece of the Newark Museum, its 1885 Ballantine House. He has published numerous articles on decorative arts and books on the Newark Museum’s Studio Pottery, Art Pottery and 19th century furniture collections.  Mr. Dietz also presented a 2012 Nickerson Lecture at the Driehaus Museum:  “Beauty, Money and Power:  The Transformation of Taste in America’s Gilded Age.”

    Image: Chester A. Arthur, 1885. Creator: Daniel Huntington. Credit: White House Historical Association (White House Collection).

    Image: White House Interior, 1882. Creator: Frances Benjamin Johnston. Credit: Francis Benjamin Johnston Collection, Library of Congress .

    Please note that in exchange for your reservation and/or ticket, you have authorized the Driehaus Museum to photograph, record, film, video tape, or otherwise use your likeness, performance, image, and/or voice for use in general and/or program-related Driehaus Museum promotional materials. If for any reason, you do not wish to be photographed, please provide your name(s) at registration that evening.

  • Consumer’s Metropolis: The Loop in the Age of Daniel Burnham

    Chicago | Dates: 20 Mar, 2014

    Thursday, March 20
    6 p.m.
    Museum Members $5; Public $15   Buy tickets

    Note: To receive the member discount, members must log in after clicking through to the ticket purchase screen. Please place the tickets you would like to purchase in your cart and the discount will be applied when you check out. For information about Driehaus Museum memberships, please see the Join section on the website or call 312 482 8933, ext. 21.

    A century ago Chicago was suddenly beset by a traffic crisis in the Loop. The streets and sidewalks were clogged with consumers seeking pleasure in the city’s elegant new department stores, hotels, restaurants, soda fountains, and theaters. In their search for a solution, civic officials and influential industrialists raised a particular outcry against lady shoppers. Emily A. Remus examines campaigns to sweep ladies out of the public space of Chicago’s downtown and illustrates how Daniel Burnham’s new plan for development ultimately created a consumers’ metropolis that pushed industry to the margins and opened up the Loop to the leisure class.

    This lecture is part of the Driehaus Museum’s 2014 Samuel M. Nickerson Lecture Series, a program which serves to situate the Nickerson Mansion within the context of social artistic developments of the period and against the wider background of America’s Gilded Age.

    Doors open at 5 p.m. for any attendees who would like to explore the Museum and its collections. The lecture begins at 6 p.m. As space is limited, advance reservations are highly recommended.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER

    Emily A. Remus is a doctoral candidate in American history at the University of Chicago. She researches and teaches courses on urban history, gender history, and the history of capitalism. Her current project explores Chicago’s transformation into a modern consumer city in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. An article drawn from this work is forthcoming in the Journal of American History.

    Please note that in exchange for your reservation and/or ticket, you have authorized the Driehaus Museum to photograph, record, film, video tape, or otherwise use your likeness, performance, image, and/or voice for use in general and/or program-related Driehaus Museum promotional materials. If for any reason, you do not wish to be photographed, please provide your name(s) at registration that evening.

  • The First American Skyscrapers: Chicago & New York

    Chicago | Dates: 17 Apr, 2014

    Thursday, April 17
    6 p.m.
    Museum Members $5; Public $15   Buy tickets

    Note: To receive the member discount, members must log in after clicking through to the ticket purchase screen. Please place the tickets you would like to purchase in your cart and the discount will be applied when you check out. For information about Driehaus Museum memberships, please see the Join section on the website or call 312 482 8933, ext. 21.

    Perennial rivals Chicago and New York are noted for their majestic skylines, first defined in the 19th century.  Its island location encouraged Manhattan architects to build vertically.  The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 drew established and aspiring architects to a city that required complete rebuilding. 

    Barry Lewis will contrast the work of New York’s Richard Morris Hunt, Cass Gilbert and McKim, Mead & White and Chicago’s Louis Sullivan and Burnham and Root.  The evolution of the New York skyscraper from the first elevator buildings of 1870 to Rockefeller Center and the Seagram Building will be discussed.  Chicago’s 10-story Montauk building of 1882, designed by Burnham and Root, was also a significant contribution in skyscraper design and will be placed in the context of American skyscraper engineering.

    This lecture is part of the Driehaus Museum’s 2014 Samuel M. Nickerson Lecture Series, a program which serves to situate the Nickerson Mansion within the context of social artistic developments of the period and against the wider background of America’s Gilded Age.

    Doors open at 5 p.m. for any attendees who would like to explore the Museum and its collections. The lecture begins at 6 p.m. As space is limited, advance reservations are highly recommended.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER
    Barry Lewis is an architectural historian who focuses on the evolution of modernism in European and American architecture of the 18th to 20th centuries.  Educated at the University of California at Berkeley, the Sorbonne, Paris, and the New School for Social Research in NYC, he teaches at Cooper Union Continuing Education and has recently retired after 23 years of teaching at the New York School of Interior Design.  Lewis co-hosted the Emmy award nominated 42nd Street, Broadway and Harlem as well Brooklyn, Greenwich Village and Central Park video walks for WNET Channel Thirteen.  His tips on Paris sites will be included in the soon to-be-released City Secrets: Paris.

    Please note that in exchange for your reservation and/or ticket, you have authorized the Driehaus Museum to photograph, record, film, video tape, or otherwise use your likeness, performance, image, and/or voice for use in general and/or program-related Driehaus Museum promotional materials. If for any reason, you do not wish to be photographed, please provide your name(s) at registration that evening.

  • Hearst Ranch: Family, Land, and Legacy

    Chicago | Dates: 15 May, 2014

    Thursday, May 15
    6 p.m.
    Museum Members $5; Public $15   Buy tickets

    Note: To receive the member discount, members must log in after clicking through to the ticket purchase screen. Please place the tickets you would like to purchase in your cart and the discount will be applied when you check out. For information about Driehaus Museum memberships, please see the Join section on the website or call 312 482 8933, ext. 21.

    One of the legendary American residences, Hearst Ranch has also been described as one of the most beautiful places on Earth.  Drawing on a vast archive of private family records and extensive personal correspondence, Victoria Kastner shares new stories and rare historic images, transporting you back to early 20th century California.

    This lecture is part of the Driehaus Museum’s 2014 Samuel M. Nickerson Lecture Series, a program which serves to situate the Nickerson Mansion within the context of social artistic developments of the period and against the wider background of America’s Gilded Age.

    Doors open at 5 p.m. for any attendees who would like to explore the Museum and its collections. The lecture begins at 6 p.m. As space is limited, advance reservations are highly recommended.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER
    Victoria Kastner, Hearst Castle’s historian, has written and lectured about San Simeon’s land and buildings for more than thirty years. She is the author of Hearst Castle: The Biography of a Country House (Abrams, 2000); Hearst’s San Simeon: The Gardens and the Land (Abrams, 2009); and coauthor of The Beverly Hills Hotel: The First 100 Years (2012). She has a master’s degree in public history with an emphasis in architectural history from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and a master’s degree in museum management from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Kastner lives in Los Osos, California.

  • The Glessner House 4th Annual Mother-Daughter Tea

    Chicago | Dates: 03 May, 2014
    4th Annual Mother-Daughter Tea
    Saturday May 3, 2014
    Seatings at 11:30am and 2:00pm

    Glessner House Museum dining room
    $35 per person / $30 for museum members
    Pre-paid reservations required to 312.326.1480

    The museum offers a rare opportunity to dine in the historic dining room. Surrounded by beautiful oak paneling, a gilt ceiling, and a fireplace clad in exotic Persian tiles, attendees will be treated to a traditional high tea with fine china, silver, and an assortment of delicious treats. Curator William Tyre will discuss the beautiful objects on display in the newly restored silver closet in the dining room. This is a very special event not to be missed. Invite your mother, grandmother, daughter, sister, or good friend for what promises to be a most memorable experience. Tickets sell out fast, so don't delay!
  • ICAA Chicago-Midwest Chapter's Membership Event

    Chicago | Dates: 12 Mar, 2014

    The Chicago-Midwest Chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art is kicking off its First Annual Membership Drive! As part of our new member initiative, we ask that each current member invite a potential new member to join us for a lovely evening of drinks & hors d’oeuvres. To register please visit http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/584616

    Date:

    March 12, 2014 6:00pm-8:00pm

    Location:

    Chicago Art Source 
    1871 N. Clybourn Ave
    Chicago IL. 60614

    *Free parking directly accross the street.

  • Designing the Classical Interior Seminar with James S Collins

    Chicago | Dates: 12 – 13 Apr, 2014

    The Chicago Chapter of the ICAA presents Designing the Classical Interior, a course with James S. Collins, Architect. This seminar will provide 9 AIA/CES LUs and 0.6 CEUs for ASID, IDC and IIDA Members.

    The morning session of the course will introduce the philosophy and elements of classical architecture and their interiors. The session will focus on the application of the design principles that are common to the great buildings and interiors of the past.

    Topics will include:

    • - Learning the appropriate use and configuration of columns, cornices, wainscoting, windows and doors.
    • - Time tested methods of creating baseboards, wainscoting, chair rails, door and window casings.
    • - The elements, proportional systems, and composition of interior spaces.
    • - Measured drawings of traditional buildings and interiors.

    ***Lunch will be provided along with presentation by seminar sponsors Hyde Park Moulding***

    Participants will receive rare handouts that have been used by craftsman for centuries to aid in creating timeless interiors.

    During the Afternoon, the class will tour the interiors of Howard Van Doren Shaw's Second Presbyterian Church, H.H. Richardson's Glessner House, and the oldest house in Chicago, the Greek Revival Henry B. Clarke House; the tour will focus on the application of design principles in real context learned in the morning session.

    The Sunday morning class will design and draw a classical interior, applying the information presented during the previous day's presentation. The class will be assisted by the instructor in generating a floor plan and elevations using class discussion, handouts and measured drawings.

    Date:

    Session One: Saturday April 12th, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm 
    Session Two: Sunday, April 13th, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

    Location:

    The Glessner House Museum 
    1800 S. Prairie Ave 
    Chicago Il 60616 
    http://www.glessnerhouse.org

    Pricing:

    $200.00 for ICAA Members 
    $250.00 for non-ICAA Members

    Please, click here to register

    Or through Brown Paper Tickets at: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/470600

  • Symposium: Architecture, Starting with the Brain

    Toronto | Dates: 07 – 08 Mar, 2014
    The decade of the brain is now decades past, and its effects have rippled through all disciplines. The time has come to consolidate its gains. What relevance do the discoveries of neuroscience have for architecture, a culture and a discipline with its own matters of concern? Skepticism of “scientism,” born of a half-century of critical acuity, has held back efforts at theorization, no matter how reasonable and even necessary they may be. This symposium takes as its premise that “the brain” – as a discursive object, material reality, and perceptual apparatus – belongs to architecture as much as any other field. The lessons of the decade of the brain can help us rethink central aspects of architectural expertise and reformulate elements of its conceptual foundation. Can “universal” commonalities coexist with culturally-constructed differences? What means do we have of combining the conceptual with the affective? What agency do we have in the way we are molded by our environment? How can the mechanisms of “experience” be used as a basis for design? The symposium is structured around panel presentations and discussions with architecture theorists, historians, philosophers, and artists. It is free and open to the public, and will be held at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at 230 College Street, Toronto.
  • Cultural Landscape Report Course on-line & on site: Malta

    Landscape Institute at Boston Architectural College | Dates: 02 Jun – 24 Jul, 2014
    The Landscape Institute at Boston Architectural College is offering an 8 week, 3 credit online course on preparing a Cultural Landscape Report, as part of its Landscape Preservation curriculum. The Cultural Landscape Report is an important tool for landscape preservation planning. This course provides students with a working knowledge of the methods and approaches for producing cultural landscape reports. Using the site of the Villa Bologna in Malta, a significant eighteenth century Baroque villa, students will conduct on-site historic research, document existing site conditions, and create period plans, historic narratives, determine character-defining features of the landscape, and generate goals/priorities for the continued preservation of the landscape to accommodate future uses of the property. The course is open to undergraduate or graduate students, as well to professionals seeking CEUs or certificate credit. (AIA, RIBA, APLD). A deposit of $700 is required to reserve a space: due by March 28, 2014.
  • 2014 French Decorative Arts Symposium: French Style in the New World

    Chicago | Dates: 24 Apr, 2014
    Thursday, April 24, 2014
    11:00 AM Coffee / Lecture 11:30 AM
    54 W. Chicago Avenue
    Individual Lecture Tickets: $45

     

    The Alliance Française’s 2014 Decorative Arts Symposium series, French Style in the New World, will explore French Style, the people who participated in its evolution in France, and the way it was interpreted, adapted and used in the New World in the 19th and 20th centuries.


    Jason Busch, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and Museum Programs at the Saint Louis Art Museum, will explore the artistic and cultural panorama of the Mississippi River Valley as the conduit for transmitting art, fashionable objects, and ideas about design, especially those emanating from France in the mid-19th century that found a home along the river in places like Natchez and New Orleans.


    Opportunities are still available for Grand Patron and Patron sponsorships. Please call Tom Driscoll at 312 337-1070 for more information on sponsorship benefits.


    For reservation information call: (312) 337-1070
    Please note that registrations for cultural programs are non-refundable.

    Register for this event!