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To post a job, please visit the SAH Career Center.

  • CFP: 2nd Biennial Graduate Conference on Iranian Studies (Cambridge, 8-9 Apr 15)

    Cambridge | Dates: 29 Oct – 05 Dec, 2014

    Established as the first student and early career scholar-focused forum in the field, Symposia Iranica is an unthemed, biennial international graduate conference that brings together both groups to celebrate, encourage and stimulate their interest and engagement with Iranian studies. Having inaugurated at the University of St Andrews in 2013, the Second Biennial is hosted by the University of Cambridge at Downing College, which is located in the heart of that historic city.

    We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to ancient through to contemporary history; the history of medicine; poetry and literature; economics; political science; philosophy; archaeology; religions and theology; geography, ecology and the environment; historiography; sociology; anthropology; music; art history; architecture history; social and political theory; tangible and intangible heritage; cultural heritage; conservation and heritage management; international relations; languages and linguistics; law and legal studies; Diaspora studies; new media and communication studies; film studies; and the performing arts. Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

    The abstract is the basis for judging a proposal for acceptance. All abstracts undergo double-blind peer review by a Committee comprising two-to-three academics for each subject area, while the Organisers will group individually submitted papers into panels, with the expectation that some sessions will be interdisciplinary.

    To be considered for publication, submissions must represent original contributions to existing scholarship and an indication be made on your application that you would like to be considered. The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals should be sent using the appropriate form by 23:59 GMT on Friday 05 December 2014 to:

    submissions@symposia-iranica.com


    stablished as the first student and early career scholar-focused forum in the field, Symposia Iranica is an unthemed, biennial international graduate conference that brings together both groups to celebrate, encourage and stimulate their interest and engagement with Iranian studies. Having inaugurated at the University of St Andrews in 2013, the Second Biennial is hosted by the University of Cambridge at Downing College, which is located in the heart of that historic city.

    We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to ancient through to contemporary history; the history of medicine; poetry and literature; economics; political science; philosophy; archaeology; religions and theology; geography, ecology and the environment; historiography; sociology; anthropology; music; art history; architecture history; social and political theory; tangible and intangible heritage; cultural heritage; conservation and heritage management; international relations; languages and linguistics; law and legal studies; Diaspora studies; new media and communication studies; film studies; and the performing arts. Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

    The abstract is the basis for judging a proposal for acceptance. All abstracts undergo double-blind peer review by a Committee comprising two-to-three academics for each subject area, while the Organisers will group individually submitted papers into panels, with the expectation that some sessions will be interdisciplinary.

    To be considered for publication, submissions must represent original contributions to existing scholarship and an indication be made on your application that you would like to be considered. The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals should be sent using the appropriate form by 23:59 GMT on Friday 05 December 2014 to:

    submissions@symposia-iranica.com

    stablished as the first student and early career scholar-focused forum in the field, Symposia Iranica is an unthemed, biennial international graduate conference that brings together both groups to celebrate, encourage and stimulate their interest and engagement with Iranian studies. Having inaugurated at the University of St Andrews in 2013, the Second Biennial is hosted by the University of Cambridge at Downing College, which is located in the heart of that historic city.

    We welcome proposals that engage with any aspect of Iranian studies within the humanities and social sciences. These include but are not limited to ancient through to contemporary history; the history of medicine; poetry and literature; economics; political science; philosophy; archaeology; religions and theology; geography, ecology and the environment; historiography; sociology; anthropology; music; art history; architecture history; social and political theory; tangible and intangible heritage; cultural heritage; conservation and heritage management; international relations; languages and linguistics; law and legal studies; Diaspora studies; new media and communication studies; film studies; and the performing arts. Comparative themes and interdisciplinary approaches are also very welcome.

    The abstract is the basis for judging a proposal for acceptance. All abstracts undergo double-blind peer review by a Committee comprising two-to-three academics for each subject area, while the Organisers will group individually submitted papers into panels, with the expectation that some sessions will be interdisciplinary.

    To be considered for publication, submissions must represent original contributions to existing scholarship and an indication be made on your application that you would like to be considered. The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals should be sent using the appropriate form by 23:59 GMT on Friday 05 December 2014 to:

    submissions@symposia-iranica.com

  • Lecture: Mrs. Thorne's World of Miniatures

    Chicago | Dates: 13 Nov, 2014

    Thursday November 13, 2014 at 7:00pm
    $10 per person/$8 for members
    Reservations suggested to 312-326-1480

    Narcissa Niblack Thorne began collecting miniatures as a young girl.  Her fascination grew and as an adult, she gained world-wide recognition for hundreds of miniature rooms created with such exacting detail that they became educational tools for students of architecture and interior design.  She left 68 of her rooms to the Art Institute of Chicago, when they remain on permanent exhibit in a Gallery devoted solely to Mrs. Thorne's masterpieces.  Thorne Rooms are also in the permanent collection of the Phoenix Art Museum and the Knoxville Museum of Art.  Join author Sally Sexton Kalmbach as she explores the fascinating life of this artisan, who was also a one time resident of Prairie Avenue and a member of Frances Glessner's Monday Morning Reading Class.  Copies of Kalmbach's book will be available for purchase and signing.

  • Lecture: Romancing the Spoon - The Victorian Love Affair with Silver

    Chicago | Dates: 02 Nov, 2014

    Sunday November 2, 2014 at 2:00pm
    $15 per person/$12 for members
    (includes tea and light refreshments)
    Pre-paid reservations required to 312-326-1480

    Historian and author Cynthia Ogorek will share the story of our nation's silver industry and its unique position in the economy of the post-Civil War "Gilded Age."  View and learn about pieces from the collection of the Glessners and other Prairie Avenue families and find out why etiquette required such a mind-boggling assortment of forks, knives, spoons, and serving utensils!

  • Shadows on the Street: Haunted Tours of Historic Prairie Avenue

    Chicago | Dates: 31 Oct, 2014

    Friday October 31, 2014
    Tours at 7:00 and 8:15pm
    $10 per person/$8 for members
    Pre-paid reservations strong recommended to 312-326-1480

    Tales of strange sounds, unexplained sightings, and untimely endings as you explore Prairie Avenue after dark!  Learn about the mystery surrounding the death of Marshall Field Jr., the tragic events that plagued the Philander Hanford house, the spirits that cause the windows to rattle in the William Kimball mansion, and much more!

  • Smart Growth: Planning the Future of D.C.'s Oldest Neighborhood

    Washington | Dates: 04 Nov, 2014

    Georgetown 2028, an eight-month community planning initiative, was conceived as a strategic approach to plan for the historic neighborhood’s commercial evolution over the next 15 years. Will Handsfield, transportation director of the Georgetown Business Improvement District, explains the vision to build an economically sustainable commercial district while preserving the neighborhood’s strengths.

    1.0 LU HSW (AIA) / 1.0 CM (AICP) / 1.0 PDH (LA CES)

    FREE. Pre-Registration required. Walk in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Smart Growth is generously supported by the National Association of Realtors. Additional support is provided by Smart Growth America.

    Photo: The Georgetown Circulator on M St NW.  Photo courtesy of the Georgetown Business Improvement District.

    Date: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 
    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

  • Panel Talk: Rising Waters

    Washington | Dates: 06 Nov, 2014

    The Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries share 11,000 miles of shore- and coastline. Conservative estimates by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predict an 8 inch–2 foot rise in waters in the area by the end of this century. This scenario, combined with storm surge, will have a significant impact on Chesapeake Bay coastal communities in Maryland and Virginia. Panelists discuss strategies to adapt to rising waters, including wetland and reef restoration, engineering, reducing impermeable surfaces and the role of parks and other green infrastructure.

    Mark Bryer, director, Chesapeake Bay Program, The Nature Conservancy
    Sandra Cannon-Brown, adjunct professorial lecturer, American University (moderator)
    Vicky Carrasco, coastal communities specialist, Maryland Sea Grant Extension
    Dr. Victoria Chanse, assistant professor, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland

    1.5 LU HSW (AIA) / 1.5 CM (AICP) / 1.5 PDH (LA CES)

    $12 Museum and Nature Conservancy Members; $12 Students; $20 Non-members. Prepaid registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Photo: The last house on Holland Island, MD before its collapse. Credit: Jay Fleming of the International League of Conservation Photographers.

    Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014 
    Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

  • CfP: The Third Global Forum of Critical Studies: Asking Big Questions Again, 12 – 13 December 2014, Florence, Italy

    Florence | Dates: 12 – 13 Dec, 2014
    CALL FOR PAPERS The Third Global Forum of Critical Studies Asking Big Questions Again 12-13 December 2014, Florence, Italy Villa Vittoria- Palazzo dei Congressi Deadline for Paper Proposals: 9th of November 2014 The Third Euroacademia Global Forum of Critical Studies aims to bring into an open floor the reflexive and questioning interaction among academics, intellectuals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. The focus of the forum is to initiate an arena where no question is misplaced and irrelevant as long as we acknowledge that evaluation, critical thinking and contestation are accessible trajectories to better understand our past, present and alternative scenarios for the future. Conference Description: Some say that the 21st Century or modernity altogether made humans more concerned with doing rather than being. As the classical Greek civilization valued the most reflexive thinking as a form of freedom from natural necessities, contemporary times profoundly involve individuals and the imaginary accompanying social practices in a restless logic of consumption, competition and engagement that profoundly - or some would say, radically – suspends or indefinitely postpones the autonomous capacity of human beings to question and reflect upon the social order and the meaning of social practices. The fast advancement of the logic of post-industrial societies, the gradual dissolution of alternative models to the capitalist logic and a multitude of other alerting factors pushed ahead a global spread culture of one-dimensional productions of meaning that advances a closure rather than a constant reflexive re-evaluation of cultural/social practices. Many alternatives at hand are often condemned to marginality or lost in the plural practices where everything goes as long as it’s part of an intellectual market. The ‘fatal strategies’ of post-industrial societies to keep individuals captive, busy and seduced by contingent social arrangements and economic practices minimized the questioning detachment required to evaluate and give meaning through reflexive criticism and unlimited interrogation. Various labels were given to our unfolding times from apocalyptic ones to some more comforting yet not by chance lacking some vital optimism. Despite a wide-spread discontent and suspicion towards the daily realities of our current societies, most of the big questions are often left outside by the self-involved active pursuit of an imagined well-being that is no longer transgressed by harsh critical evaluation of its meaning. The academic arena itself also advances, supports, integrates and promotes limited particular methodologies that generate an effect of mainstreaming and often keeps researchers or practitioners out of the battle-ground for big questions. The ongoing economic crisis made reality even harsher and pushed ahead the need for more thinking as many habitual categories lost their meaning or relevance. New ways of thinking could transgress some inappropriate conceptions or misconceptions that preserve their centrality due to the mechanics of habits. This is a time when a call to thinking is well-placed. This is a call to arms for critical studies that promotes alternative, questioning and multi-dimensional thinking. Panels: When it’s about critical thinking and critical studies there is intrinsically an unending open list of topics to be included. The Third Forum on Critical Studies proposes the 5 sections (that are by no means exclusive): • Theory/Philosophy • Politics • Cultural Studies • Political Economy • Arts and Performance Papers on the following topics (and not only) are welcomed: ~ Diagnostics of Our Times: Where Is the 21st Century Heading? ~ Our Societies Are As Good As It Gets: How to Escape the Closure of Meaning? ~ Consumerist Societies and the Captivity of Thinking ~ The Being/Doing Nexus ~ Assessing Models of Capitalism ~ Markets, Capital and Inequalities ~ The Remains of Individual Autonomy ~ How Plural Our Societies Truly Are? ~ Debating Ideal vs. Real Multiculturalism ~ Social Narcissism and Consumerism ~ The Role of Critical Thinking: Proposing Alternative Methodologies ~ Are There Any Alternatives to Capitalism Left? ~ Social Causes and the Pursuit of Social Beliefs ~ Protest and Social Change ~ Re-Thinking Revolutions ~ Hegemony and the Remaining Possibilities for Social Criticism ~ Loneliness and Isolation in the Era of Mass Communication ~ Living Low Cost: Values, Meaning and Market Exchange ~ Ideology and Other Dominant Narratives ~ Critical Economics ~ Post-Modernism and the Critique of Modernity ~ Marx and the 21st Century ~ Debating the End of Communism ~ Non-Oppositional Societies ~ Consolation, Complicity and Passivity Today ~ Who Still Waits For A Revolution? ~ C. Castoriadis and the Project of Autonomy ~ French Thinking and Alternatives for Thought ~ Eastern Europe and the Enrollment to the School of Capitalism ~ China and the Logic of Growth ~ Crises of Culture ~ Left and Right: Political Spectrums and Pluralism Re-Discussed ~ Art as an Exchange Value ~ Originality and Complacency ~ Literatures and Authors ~ Heroes and Heroines in Electronic Literature ~ Fiction and the Fictionalization of the Contemporary World ~ Film and the Persisting Hunger for Heroic Imagination ~ The Illusory Charity and Imagined forms of Contemporary Humanisms ~ The Growing Social Irrelevance of Philosophy ~ Replacement of the Logic of Becoming by the Logic of Earning ~ How Do We Look Back at Tradition? ~ Just Wars or Unjust Thinking? ~ The Myth of Cosmopolitanism ~ Facing the Self ~ Communication, Media and Simulacrum ~ Science, Pragmatics and Vocation: Who Pays What We Can’t Sell? ~ Is There Still a Postmodern or Any Other Kind of Condition? ~ Post-Marxist Way of Looking at Facts ~ The School of Suspicion and Evaluative Thinking ~ Feminist Readings of Our Contemporary World ~ Post-Colonialism and the Refurbished Other(s) ~ Theory and Power ~ Queer Theory and Living After the Sexual Revolution ~ Subaltern Theory Participant’s Profile The conference is addressed to academics, intellectuals, researchers and professionals, practitioners and activists profoundly concerned with evaluative understandings of the world we’re living in. As the nature of the conference is intended to be multidisciplinary in nature different academic backgrounds are equally welcomed. Post-graduate students, doctoral candidates and young researchers are equally welcomed to submit an abstract. Representatives of INGOs, NGOs, Think Tanks and activists willing to present their work, research, experiences or reflections are welcomed as well to submit the abstract of their contribution. Euroacademia does not promote the byzantine association of people with their institutions. As well the distinction between senior and junior researchers is not applied as a cleavage. Abstracts will be reviewed and the participants are selected based on the proven quality of the abstract. The submitted paper for the conference proceedings is expected to be in accordance with the lines provided in the submitted abstract. For more information see http://euroacademia.eu/conference/3rd-forum-of-critical-studies/ You can apply on-line by completing the Application Form on the conference website or by sending a 300 words abstract together with the details of contact and affiliation until 9th of November 2014 at application@euroacademia.eu
  • 2014 Design Matters Conference

    Washington | Dates: 12 – 13 Nov, 2014
    At this year's AAO Conference, we’ll take a close look at how architectural organizations can construct more effective program narratives, from easy to consume stories fit for broadcast to memorable first person appeals to enriching curator-driven museum format presentations. Learn how to better engage audiences and inspire them to share your message with others. Hear from leading practitioners whose messages consistently rise above the fray and inspire devoted followers. Leave the Conference armed with new ideas for strengthening your own organization’s programs.
  • 2015 Buell Dissertation Colloquium

    New York | Dates: 24 Oct, 2014 – 12 Jan, 2015

    Submissions due: January 12, 2015

    The Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture invites submissions for its biennial Dissertation Colloquium, to be held on May 8–9, 2015, at Columbia University. This event brings together a select group of doctoral students from diverse institutional and disciplinary backgrounds working on dissertation topics related to the history, theory, and criticism of American architecture, urbanism, and landscape.

     

    Ten to twelve students from universities worldwide will be invited to present a twenty-minute talk drawn from their dissertation research. The presentation is to be based on a self-contained chapter or portion of the student’s dissertation research, and should not be an overview or synthesis of the dissertation as a whole. “American” is construed to mean any part or aspect of the American continents, including all of North and South America. Comparative and cross-disciplinary approaches are encouraged.

    Students must be enrolled in an accredited doctoral program and have completed their coursework and at least one year of dissertation research. Submissions must include a complete draft of the intended presentation, including illustrations. Submissions must also be accompanied by the following: a cover sheet specifying the student’s institutional affiliation, postal and e-mail addresses, and phone number; a 150-word abstract describing the paper’s relationship to the overall dissertation topic; and a brief statement from the student’s principal adviser certifying the applicant’s status (stage of completion) in the doctoral program.

    Papers selected for presentation will be announced by February 4, 2015. Each participating student will receive hotel accommodation for two nights and funding toward travel expenses on an as-needed basis.  A dinner and reception with associated students and faculty will be included in the colloquium.

    For further information, contact the Program Coordinator, Jacob Moore, at jrm2031@columbia.edu, consult www.buellcenter.org, or follow us on Twitter @buellcenter. Please send electronic submissions in PDF format and no larger than 3MB, to buellcenter@arch.columbia.edu, by Monday, January 12, 2015.

  • ARIT fellowships for research in Turkey

    Philadelphia | Dates: 22 Oct – 01 Nov, 2014
    The American Research Institute in Turkey offers fellowship support for dissertation research and advanced projects in Turkey.
  • Over There: World War I Overseas Cemeteries and Memorials of the American Battle Monuments Commission

    Washington | Dates: 11 Nov, 2014
    A Lecture by Lisa Pfueller Davidson, PhD

    November 11, 2018 will mark the centennial of the Armistice ending the Great War. In its aftermath, the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) was established to enhance the overseas military cemeteries for the fallen and erect memorials to the combat accomplishments of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). Just as the events of World War I are largely forgotten by the American public, the original commemorative program of the ABMC has been overshadowed by its massive World War II American cemeteries in places like Normandy. 

    Initially the War Department established eight World War I cemeteries in France, England, and Belgium. ABMC was created in 1923 to improve these cemeteries and manage an ambitious program of overseas monument building. Paul P. Cret became their consulting architect and subsequently guided every aspect of the AMBC construction program. Cret brought in an impressive roster of his architectural contemporaries, including John Russell Pope, Ralph Adams Cram, and George Howe. The architecture and landscapes of the ABMC display a sophisticated Beaux Arts approach, with the Art Moderne, Neoclassical, or Gothic Revival details and forms that characterized some of the best civic architecture of the 1920s and 30s. This lecture will examine overseas military cemetery policy after World War I, the social and political role of the ABMC sites in creating a public memory of the war, and design practices and ideals of the time. 

    Lisa Pfueller Davidson, Ph.D., is a historian with Heritage Documentation Programs of the National Park Service. Her work on ABMC is part of a multi-year documentation effort by ABMC and the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) leading up to the World War I Centennial.

    The First Congregational United Church of Christ
    945 G Street NW, Washington, DC 20001 
    6:30 pm – reception, 7:00 pm – brief Annual Meeting and lecture
     
    Reservations are not required. $10.00 for Latrobe Chapter members, student members (full time) free with ID, $18.00 for non-members.
  • Architecture and the Arts from 1945-1968: Comparisons and Intertexts

    Rome | Dates: 29 – 31 Oct, 2014

    This scholarly conference, convened by Bruno Reichlin and Letizia Tedeschi, seeks to illuminate the complexity inherent to the notion of the “synthesis of the arts,” which emerged in the years 1945-1968 in Europe and America. This two and a half day conference will define its specific characteristics and theoretical moorings, and trace similarities and differences compared with analogous situations in the past. Soon after World War II, architects, artists and visual operators active in many different art forms, together with influential critics began to promote a new form of collaboration that affected their work on the level of programs, practices, contents, artistic languages, materials, production strategies, potential synergies and much else. Despite certain critical problems, the term that more than any other most clearly expresses this period, when viewed from this standpoint, is “synthesis of the arts,” sometimes equated with the rebirth in other forms of the “Gesamtkunstwerk” which had ushered in the art of the twentieth century. Speakers include: Yves-Alain Bois, Jean-Louis Cohen, Dietrich Neumann and Giorgio Ciucci.

    Locations of event:
    Wednesday 29 October
    American Academy in Rome

    Thursday 30 October
    American Academy in Rome

    Friday 31 October
    Istituto Svizzero
    Villa Maraini, Via Ludovisi, 48

    The event is organized in collaboration with the Archivio del Moderno at the Università della Svizzera Italiana (www.arc.usi.ch/archivio) and the Istituto Svizzero (www.istitutosvizzero.it).

  • American Academy in Rome 2015 Rome Prize Fellowship

    Dates: 01 Nov, 2014

    Each year, the Rome Prize is awarded to about thirty emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence and who are in the early or middle stages of their working lives. The deadline for the nation-wide Rome Prize competition is 1 November 2014.  Applications will also be accepted between 2-15 November 2014 for an additional fee.

    Fellows are chosen from the following disciplines:

    • Architecture
    • Design
    • Historic Preservation and Conservation
    • Landscape Architecture
    • Literature (awarded only by nomination through the American Academy of Arts and Letters)
    • Music Composition
    • Visual Arts 
    • Ancient Studies
    • Medieval Studies
    • Renaissance and Early Modern Studies
    • Modern Italian Studies

    Rome Prize recipients are generally invited to Rome for eleven months (some design fellowships are six months and some pre-doctoral art history fellowships are two years).

    The Rome Prize consists of room and board, a stipend and separate work space, and privileged access to Rome.

    Rome Prize winners are the core of the Academy's residential community, which also includes Affiliated Fellows, Residents and Visiting Artists and Visiting Scholars.

    Owing to the fluctuating dollar/euro exchange rate and the high cost of living in Rome, the stipends offered may not cover all expenses. This is especially true for Rome Prize winners who come to Rome with families. The American Academy in Rome welcomes spouses/companions and children of Rome Prize winners. However, Fellows with families live in subsidized apartments for which they pay rent, and pay for meals of family members. Thus they often incur expenses that exceed the Fellow’s stipend, so those wishing to bring their families are advised to supplement their stipends with additional funds. 

    Eleven-month fellowships generally begin at the Academy in early-September and end at the beginning of August. Winners of six-month fellowships may choose to begin in early-September and end in early-March or begin in early-February and end in early-August. 

  • Restoration Celebration

    Portland | Dates: 05 Nov, 2014

    Beyond the bricks and mortar, Oregon’s historic buildings ignite our imaginations.  More than relics from the past, these treasured places add palpable depth to our living, breathing story.

    Join us for a festive evening in celebration of Oregon’s historic places – the beautifully restored, and the urgently at risk.

    Wednesday, November 5, 2014

    5:30pm

    The Historic Sentinel Hotel, Portland

    The celebration begins with a champagne reception followed by dinner and an inspiring program:

    • Be the first to learn what’s on our 2015 list of Oregon’s Most Endangered Places
    • Toast recipients of the 2014 DeMuro Awards for extraordinary preservation, reuse, and community revitalization
    • Hear keynote remarks on Oregon’s historic assets byState Treasurer Ted Wheeler

    Purchase tickets below or phone 503 243-1923 ext. 3

    $100/Members ~ $125/Non-Members

    Proceeds from the Restoration Celebration defend and rehabilitate Oregon’s historic places.  After all, we’re Oregonians, and these buildings are our treasures.

    Please note tickets are non-refundable.

  • Community Builders: Fraternal Lodges in America and Portland

    Portland | Dates: 01 Nov, 2014

    In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, fraternal lodges played an important societal role across America as community builders and as a virtual financial “safety net”. While since that time, private and public organizations have largely taken over these roles, many of the lodge buildings and temples, including those in Portland, are still standing, all too often hidden in plain sight and suffering from a mostly forgotten past.

    Thanks to a grant from the Oregon Heritage Commission, architectural historian and AHC education committee member Eric Wheeler will take a broad look at the fraternal lodge movement in America and the architecture it inspired, both nationwide and right here in Portland. Included in the story are well-known examples of Portland’s fraternal lodge buildings, such as the downtown Elks Temple (now part of the Sentinel Hotel) or the Hibernian Hall (Wonder Ballroom) in the Eliot neighborhood. You’ll also learn about some of the not-so-well-known buildings in the region like the Red Men Hall on Hawthorne or the Lents Odd Fellows Lodge. You’ll learn about the context in which these fine, yet sometimes quite modest, buildings were constructed, and discover how many have been re-purposed, rehabilitated, and put to new uses, while others have been lost or have an uncertain future.

    This presentation is the first of a two-part series; the second installment will premier in early 2015.

    Seating is Limited

    Pre-Registration is Strongly Suggested

  • Vocabulary of Architecture and Architectural Styles

    Portland | Dates: 25 Oct, 2014

    Do you find yourself describing the elements of buildings in terms of thing-a-ma-jigs and what-cha-ma-call-its? Join us as Eric Wheeler, member of our AHC Education Committee, helps demystify the language of architecture as it relates to some of the common architectural styles found in the Portland area.

    This updated program is a great follow-up to the House History research program and is ideal for anyone interested in architecture. After this session you’ll be able to impress your friends, family, co-workers, and contractors with your new-found knowledge of architectural terms such as gambrel, oculus, lintel, corbel, and quoin. From pilaster to pediment, there’s sure to be a little something for the architectural nerd in all of us!

    Program participants are encouraged to bring photographs of their homes or any building details that you can’t seem to identify. There will be a short break midway through the presentation.

    Seating is Limited

    Pre-Registration is Strongly Suggested

     

  • Inside the New Whitney Museum

    New York | Dates: 29 Oct, 2014

    The Whitney Museum of American Art – one of the only museums in New York City dedicated to American art – will move to its new home in the Meatpacking District in spring 2015. Scott Newman, partner at Cooper, Robertson & Partners and partner-in-charge of the new Whitney Museum in collaboration with the Renzo Piano Building Workshop, will provide a sneak preview of the building’s interiors. He will touch on how the design reflects the museum’s unique mission and how that informs the display of art while actively engaging with the needs of a growing audience, the surrounding community, the city, and the environment.

    Presented in association with Archtober, Architecture and Design Month New York City, October 2014.

    NYSID Auditorium, 170 East 70th Street, NYC
    Tickets: $12 general public, $10 seniors and non-NYSID students
    NYSID students, faculty, and staff are free.

  • We Heart Garden Apartments!

    Los Angeles | Dates: 01 Nov, 2014

    Los Angeles has one of the country’s largest collections of historic garden apartment communities: “villages in the city” that used new planning principles of the Garden City Movement. Their innovative design and garden-like settings put people first, connecting people to nature and with each other. Yet their low density and vast open spaces now make them increasingly vulnerable to demolition and redevelopment.

    The Los Angeles Conservancy will host a one-time-only tour of three garden apartment communities: The Village Green in Baldwin Hills (1941), Chase Knolls in Sherman Oaks (1948), and Lincoln Place in Venice (1951). Enjoy rare access to beautiful interiors, see firsthand why these places are so special, and learn about efforts to preserve them for future generations.

  • Unfinished: The Future of Regional Architecture

    Venice | Dates: 25 Oct, 2014

    Unfinished is an ongoing series of public discussions which have now been held in more than 10 European countries. Local architects, stretching across three generations shed new light on the legacy and status quo of regional architecture. In Venice, these protagonists from different countries will meet at the Serbian Pavilion for the first time and share their experiences and points of view. In an informal setting they will discuss the relevance of regional trends and if and how these will shape architecture in the next 100 years. The discussion will be moderated by Ivan Rašković, the Serbian National Commissioner, and by Bostjan Bugaric and Christian Burkhard, editors of Architectuul.

    Unfinished at the Serbian Pavilion will take place in the form of a colloquium following ‘Open Space’ principles. Participants are invited to prepare short statements on architectural issues that are particularly relevant in their home country. Topics include unsolicited architecture, semi-public spaces, hybrid use, ‘small scale -large impact’, informal architecture, ‘growing’ architecture, improvisations and user-enhanced design, among many others. Ideas will be shared in parallel 15-minute breakout sessions and summarised thereafter. No seating is required. The participants are invited to walk around freely and listen or debate on the topics they choose. All the discussed topics will be documented and made available online. With the Venice get-together, Unfinished will be able to make a giant step towards the facilitation of cultural, economic and political exchanges in architecture from a local point of view with the hope to establish the groundwork for a more nuanced locally rooted but globally informed architectural language.

    Partner: Architectuul has moderated the Unfinished country talks and is the event’s media partner. Architectuul.com is an international open text, online catalogue of architectural works and architects founded in 2010 in Estonia and operated out of Berlin. It covers buildings throughout history, with a broad collection, from archetypal classics to contemporary projects. The website’s content is sourced by the Architectuul community and curated by an editorial team. Architectuul currently has a reach of over 200,000 monthly site visits with more than 1.5 million social media impressions every month.


  • Native Modernism: Chicago Architecture & Design before Mies And Moholy

    Chicago | Dates: 04 – 04 Nov, 2014
    Robert Bruegmann, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Art History, Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Thomas Leslie, AIA, Pickard Chilton Professor of Architecture at Iowa State University, will present their research on the interplay between innovative technologies, and the cost of materials, utilities, and land affect the design of buildings and consumer products in Chicago during the interwar period. They will focus on the period from 1925 to 1938, when a homegrown modernism developed before the arrival in Chicago of the Bauhaus designers circa 1938. How did product design become established as a discipline through the growth of mass market consumer items designed, manufactured, and distributed from Chicago in this period? How did changes in building and zoning codes during the period affect the forms of buildings?