Recent Opportunities

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  • Unfinished Spaces Film Screening

    Chicago | Dates: 29 Sep, 2016
    UnfinishedSpaces_PlasticArts_Porro

    Thursday, September 29, 2016. 6:00 p.m.
    FREE and open to the public but reservations are required

    MAS Context, in collaboration with the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago and the Society of Architectural Historians, is pleased to present the screening of the film Unfinished Spaces. The screening is part of MAS Context’s 2016 Fall Talks series and it will take place at the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago (31 West Ohio Street, Chicago, Illinois 60654).

    “Cuba will count as having the most beautiful academy of arts in the world.”
    Fidel Castro (1961)

    In 1961, three young, visionary architects were commissioned by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara to create Cuba’s National Art Schools on the grounds of a former golf course in Havana. Construction of their radical designs began immediately, and the school’s first classes soon followed. Dancers, musicians, and artists from all over the country reveled in the beauty of the schools, but as the dream of the Revolution quickly became a reality, construction was abruptly halted and the architects and their designs were deemed irrelevant in the prevailing political climate. Forty years later, the schools are in use, but remain unfinished and in decay. Castro has invited the exiled architects back to finish their unrealized dream.

    Unfinished Spaces, a film directed by Alysa Nahmias and Benjamin Murray, features intimate footage of Fidel Castro, showing his devotion to creating a worldwide showcase for art, and it also documents the struggle and passion of three revolutionary artists.

    In 2014, Unfinished Spaces won the inaugural SAH Award for Film and Video, established by the Society of Architectural Historians to recognize annually the most distinguished work of film or video on the history of the built environment.

    The screening of this documentary is organized by MAS Context in collaboration with the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago and the Society of Architectural Historians.

  • Historic Preservation at 50: Chicago and the Future of the Movement

    Chicago | Dates: 08 – 08 Oct, 2016
    Celebrating 50 Years of Preservation 

    Many view the loss of Louis Sullivan's Stock Exchange Building in 1971 as the launch of the preservation movement in Chicago. But in 1966, a small group of individuals formed the Chicago School of Architecture Foundation to save H. H. Richardson's epochal Glessner House from demolition. That same year, Congress passed the National Historic Preservation Act and a new historic preservation movement gained traction in cities from coat to coast, including Chicago.

    Looking Toward the Future

    Join Glessner House Museum, in partnership with Landmarks Illinois, AIA Chicago, and Friends of Historic Second Church as we present Historic Preservation at 50: Chicago and the Future of the Movement. This day-long symposium event will celebrate one of the first great preservation success stories in Chicago, explore why we continue to save old buildings in the 21st century, and generate broad input into the future of historic preservation, its role in society now and for generations to come.

    Tickets and Fees

    Members of Glessner House Museum, Landmarks Illinois, AIA Chicago, and Friends of Historic Second Church receive reduced admission. Please select at time of purchase.

    Pre-paid reservations required.

    Full Day Package - $30 / $24 members

    Keynote & Afternoon Panel - $20 / $16 members

    Keynote Address Only - $10

    Optional Box Lunch - $10
  • 2016 Dubuque Heritage Festival

    Dubuque | Dates: 07 – 08 Oct, 2016
    In 1934, the City of Dubuque was awarded $200,000 from the Works Progress Administration (WPA) to complete landscapes and shelters at Eagle Point Park in Dubuque, Iowa. They turned to the young Prairie School landscape architect, Alfred Caldwell, to design and then supervise the construction of landscapes and shelters at Eagle Point Park. Caldwell executed the first phases of his vision on the north side of Eagle Point Park in less than 18 months. He was let go in 1936 and returned to Chicago where he went on to become one of the last great masters of Prairie School landscape design.

    This year’s Dubuque Heritage Festival will focus on Caldwell’s work at Eagle Point Park leading to a deeper understanding of its history and design. There will be events and sessions for all ages and all levels of interest. Please join us!
  • PhD Scholarships in "Architecture and Territory"

    Reggio Calabria | Dates: 22 Aug – 02 Sep, 2016
    The School of Architecture - Department dArTe - at the Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria is currently offering 6 fully funded PhD Scholarships in 
    "Architecture and Territory"

    The goal of this International Doctorate is a postgraduate training and research framework that has the objective of enriching "the necessary skills for carrying out highly qualified research activities at public and private entities, liberal professions, paying contribute to the European Higher Education and Research'.
    The training course aims to provide the PhD students innovative tools in architectural research and the ability to manage the project at various scales: the territory, landscape, city and building.

    The program is designed to develop the ability to control on issues of environmental and economic sustainability, energy efficiency, maintenance and management of the current questions of representation and architectural language.

    The project is conceived as a theoretical and operational spot integrating the contributions of the various scientific areas, in a complex vision that combines the most innovative research paths with layering of the territory and of the Italian and European cities. The exchange, interdisciplinary dialogue and international experiences are the necessary complement to achieve a research that is oriented to the city, territory, design, arts and architecture. 

    These results in the research thesis with original contributions oriented to investigate and develop operational control capacity regarding the issues of sustainability, energy efficiency, structural safety, restoration and regeneration intersecting with current questions of knowledge and advanced representation of built heritage.

    contact: "Angela Crucitti" <angela.crucitti@unirc.it>; Professor Marina Tornatora (mtornatora@unirc.it);
  • CFP: American Association of Geographers Conference (Boston, 5-10 Apr 17)

    Boston | Dates: 19 Aug – 14 Oct, 2016
    CFP: American Association of Geographers, 5 - 10 April, 2017, Boston (Massachusetts)

    Reconstructing Urban Natures?: Building Engagements between Green Urbanism, the Resilient City, and Urban Political Ecology. 

    Hannah Teicher, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT & Damian White, History, Philosophy and Social Science, RISD. 
     
    At first glance, the on-going debates about possible forms of an ecological urbanism in architecture and design studies, the rise of urban political ecology in geography and related fields, and literatures on “the resilient city” in planning would seem to have created a promising terrain of engagement for thinking about urban ecological futures. The fields of architecture, landscape and design studies are littered with numerous iconic proponents of urban ecological interventions from Ebenezer Howard’s Garden Cities to Ian McHarg’s layered “design with nature”, from James Corner’s infrastructural parks as evolving fields to Mohsen Mostafavi’s optimistic atlas of “bright green” design proposals dubbed “ecological urbanism”. These proposals have served as inspiration to generations of ambitious designers. Urban planning scholars advocating “the just city” (Fainstein, 2011, 2015; Agyeman, 2013) and the resilient city (Vale, 2014; Jabareen, 2013) propose uneven development and distributive justice as lenses to frame planning interventions. Extending this, Wendy Steele (2012, 2015) argues that the climate-just city must account for marginalized human and non-human actors in the urban assemblage. Urban political ecologists from Matthew Gandy, Maria Kaika to Erik Swyngedouw, Alex Loftus and their cohort have exposed urban nature as a false binary, revealing how infrastructure mediates urban metabolism over space and time and explicating the structural power relations embedded in these processes. 

     
    Despite a certain commonality of topical focus and an eagerness to diagnose the impasse (Swyngedouw & Kaika, 2014), it is also striking how discussions between these areas remain uneven and sporadic at best. There would seem to be growing awareness of the deficiencies and aporias of each subfield but attempts at more reconstructive forms of critical appropriation and synthesis have been less apparent. These three approaches, one rooted in pragmatic intervention, one in ethical framing, and the other in political critique, largely talk past each other while all seeking remedies for the socio-environmental crises that threaten the urban natures of the Anthropocene. The most radical currents of urban political ecology offer stinging post-political critiques of all these literatures but then gesture towards alternative horizons which offer largely rhetorical resolutions to political questions. Assessing the state of design and planning oriented “sustainable cities” literature, Bruce Braun (2005) rightly notes a “limited understanding of the political projects necessary for change.” However, urban political ecology to date has shown a limited capacity to creatively appropriate the better insights emerging from planning and design literatures to move the debate forward.

     
    In this session, we would like to invite a wide variety of contributions from colleagues who are seeking to think about the design-politics of green urbanism, planning and urban political ecology. We would like to consider: 

     
    ·      Interventions which account for the intellectual/political and strategic impasses reached by green urbanism design/green urban planning/urban political ecology;

    ·      Papers which investigate ongoing pathologies and problems (from green gentrification to green governmentality) that are emerging with the materialization of green urban strategies across the planet;

    ·      Conceptual and political interventions which might point to more robust modes of integrating urban political ecology, green urban design and architecture, and planning for resilience;

    ·      Explorations of the utopian and dystopian geographies of historical and contemporary modes of eco-design and design activism –from counterculture ventures to contemporary forms of community design and architecture;

    ·      Examples and discussions of urban social movements and eco-urban social movements and other design activist movements that might help us productively rethink the design politics of urban ecological futures;

    ·      Ways of developing a more political and strategic design politics of urban sustainability.

     
    Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words via email to Hannah Teicher hteicher@mit.edu and Damian White 

    dwhite01@risd.edu by 14 October 2016.
  • Vernacular Architecture Forum 2017 Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 31-June 3, 2017

    Salt Lake City | Dates: 19 Aug – 30 Oct, 2016
    Call for Papers: Vernacular Architecture Forum 2017 Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 31-June 3, 2017 Deadline – October 30, 2016 The Vernacular Architecture Forum (www.vafweb.org) invites paper proposals for its 36th Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 31-June 3, 2017. Papers may address vernacular and everyday buildings, sites, or cultural landscapes worldwide. Submissions on all relevant topics are welcome but we encourage papers exploring western American themes, including ethnic settlement, landscapes of ranching, mining, and agriculture, urbanization, religious expression, Native American identity, and the creation of vacation and recreation landscapes. Additionally, the VAF is launching a multi-year program of inquiry into the distinctiveness of the VAF and the vernacular architecture movement. To this end, we encourage papers that consider this field over time. How does the wide range of VAF projects (tours, guidebooks, book and article awards, field schools, annual conference papers, publications, etc.) demonstrate how our questions, concerns, and methods have changed and evolved? Where do we see evidence of that history in our current work, and what might our future look like? Proposals might focus on a particular building type (i.e. houses, barns), a research strategy (fieldwork), political or theoretical convictions (Gender, Marxism, the Everyday, etc), or particular approaches to presenting our work and engaging colleagues and the public. Students and young professionals may also apply for the Pamela H. Simpson Presenter’s Fellowships offering support of up to $500 to presenting papers at VAF’s annual conference. SUBMITTING AN ABSTRACT Papers should be analytical rather than descriptive, and no more than twenty minutes in length. Proposals for complete sessions, roundtable discussions or other innovative means that facilitate scholarly discourse are especially encouraged. At least one session will be devoted to Field Notes – shorter papers (five to eight minutes in length) that introduce new techniques, innovations, and discoveries in documenting vernacular buildings and landscapes. Proposals should clearly state the argument of the paper and explain the methodology and content in fewer than 400 words. Make sure to indicate if it is a regular paper proposal or a shorter fieldwork proposal. Please include the paper title, author’s name, email address, a one-page c.v. You may include up to two images with your submission. Note that presenters must deliver their papers in person and be VAF members at the time of the conference. Speakers who do not register for the conference by March 1, 2017, will be withdrawn. Please do not submit an abstract if you are not committed to attending the papers session on Saturday, June 3rd. THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS OCTOBER 30, 2016. The abstracts and c.v. should be emailed as a PDF attachment to the VAF Papers Committee Chair, Daves Rossell, at papers@vafweb.org. For general information about the Salt Lake City conference, please visit the conference website at the www.vafweb.org/saltlakecity-2017 or contact Alison Flanders at saltlakecity@vafweb.org. Pamela H. Simpson Presenter’s Fellowships: VAF’s Pamela H. Simpson Presenter’s Fellowships offer a limited amount of financial assistance to students and young professionals presenting papers at VAF’s annual conference. Awards are intended to offset travel and registration costs for students, and to attract developing scholars to the organization. Any person presenting a paper who is currently enrolled in a degree-granting program, or who has received a degree within one year of the annual conference is eligible to apply. Awards cannot exceed $500. Previous awardees are ineligible, even if their status has changed. Recipients are expected to participate fully in the conference, including tours and workshops. To apply, submit with your abstract a one-page attachment with "Simpson Presenter’s Fellowship" at the top and the following information: 1) name, 2) institution or former institution, 3) degree program, 4) date of degree (received or anticipated), 5) mailing address, 6) permanent email address, 7) telephone number, and 8) paper title.
  • Louis Sullivan Reconsidered

    Chicago | Dates: 13 – 13 Sep, 2016
    Louis Sullivan Reconsidered
    Tuesday, September 13, 2016 
    5:30 p.m. Reception, 6:30 p.m. Lecture

    Location: 
    The Richard H. Driehaus Museum 
    40 E Erie St, Chicago, IL 

    New York Architect Steve Bass puts the practical and theoretical work of early Twentieth Century American architect Louis Sullivan in the context of the Platonic tradition. We consider the famous maxim 'Form follows Function' to understand it does not necessarily mean what is has typically been taken to mean, but is rather a contemporary restatement of a Platonic cosmological vision. We will additionally look at Sullivan's book on ornament and find that far from hardheaded reductionism and functionalism, Sullivan calls overtly for a magical approach familiar to ancient and Renaissance esotericism. This presentation relocates Sullivan within the classical tradition rather than modernism, to which he is presently associated. 

    Cost/Reservation: 
    $15 ICAA & Driehaus Museum Members 
    $25 General Public
     
  • James Strickland Talk at Pella Crafted Luxury

    Chicago | Dates: 22 – 22 Sep, 2016
    James Strickland of Historical Concepts LLC, Atlanta will speak about the work of his firm, Thursday, September 22 at the Pella Crafted Luxury Showroom Suite 100 at the Merchandise Mart. The lecture is cosponsored by the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art.  Reception at 5:30, Lecture at 6:00. RSVPs required at www.pellacraftedluxury.com /events  

    James L. Strickland founded Historical Concepts in 1982. A graduate of Yale University’s Graduate School of Architecture, he began his career with real estate development in Florida, later moving back home to Georgia to establish a design build firm that built over 200 traditionally inspired homes in the Atlanta area. Looking to both the vernacular architecture of the region with its links to craftsmanship and available materials, and America’s Greco-Roman architectural heritage, the work of Historical Concepts adapts the forms of historic houses for contemporary living, preserving their traditional spirit and their idiosyncrasies. Strickland and his firm are among the most inventive architects designing traditional architecture today. Sharing his knowledge, experience, and passion for architecture, Jim has taught at Georgia Institute of Technology, and served as guest critic at the Universities of Miami and Notre Dame. The work of Historical Concepts is the subject of Coming Home: The Southern Vernacular House, published by Rizzoli in 2012.
     
  • Architecture Intelligence

    Detroit | Dates: 18 Aug – 21 Sep, 2016
    Panel session to the 105th ACSA Annual Meeting: Brooklyn says "Move to Detroit," March 23-25, 2017, Detroit, Michigan
  • Shifts in the 19th Century American Cultural Landscape

    Bronx | Dates: 09 – 09 Sep, 2016
    Colloquium - Shifts in the 19th Century American Cultural Landscape
    Humanities Institute
    Luesther T. Mertz Library
    Friday, September 9, 2016
    2-4 p.m.

    In conjunction with the exhibition, Impressionism: American Gardens on Canvas, this afternoon's discussion will highlight the cultural-philosophic forces and changing perceptions of nature that impacted American landscapes, garden design, and horticulture during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Three experts in American history, art, and horticulture will guide the audience through these rapidly shifting realities and thoughts, as expressed in actual and painted American landscapes, from grandiose wildernesses to suburban scenes and more intimate garden settings. Following the program participants will have the opportunity to visit the exhibition in the Mertz Library Art Gallery and the Conservatory.
  • CFP: Sequitur Issue 3, 1, Self + Portrait

    Dates: 18 Aug – 09 Sep, 2016
    SEQUITUR, the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture graduate student journal, invites current graduate students in art history, architecture, fine arts, and related fields to submit content for the Fall 2016 issue titled Self + Portrait. This issue explores the ways in which art objects and artistic endeavors influence perceptions of the self—and vice versa. While art and identity may seem inseparable, we seek submissions that highlight the power and importance of the mutually constitutive relationship between the two. Possible subjects include, but are not limited to, the following: reflections of the self in the built environment such as museums, funerary architecture, and domestic spaces; manifestations of self through art objects, collections, display, commissions and patronage; expressions of identity across media platforms; explorations, interrogations, or critiques of traditional portraiture; artistic journeys of self-discovery; identity politics. We encourage submissions that take advantage of the online format of the journal. We invite full submissions for the following pieces: Featured essays (1000 words) Essays must be submitted in full by the deadline below to be considered for publication. Content is open and at the discretion of the author, but should present original material that is suitable to the stipulated word limit. Please adhere to the formatting guidelines available here. Visual Essays An opportunity for M.Arch. or M.F.A. students to showcase a selection of original work. The work must be reproducible in a digital format. Submissions should include jpegs of up to ten works, and must be prefaced by an introduction or artist’s statement of 250 words or less. All images must be captioned and should be at least 500 DPI. We invite proposals (200 words max) for the following pieces (Note: Reviews of any type are not required to adhere to the issue’s theme): Exhibition reviews (500 words) Exhibitions currently on display or very recently closed are especially sought. Book or exhibition catalogue reviews (500 words) Reviews of recently published books and catalogues are especially sought. Interviews (750 words) Preference may be given to those who can provide audio or video recordings of the interview. Field reports/Research spotlights (500 words) This is an opportunity for students conducting research to summarize and share their findings and experiences in a more casual format than a formal paper. All submissions and proposals are due September 9. Please direct all materials to sequitur@bu.edu Text must be in the form of a Word document, and images should be sent as jpeg files. Please include “Sequitur Fall 2016” and type of submission/proposal in the subject line, and your name, institution and program, year in program, and contact information in the body of the email. Authors will be notified of the acceptance of their submission or proposal no later than September 16 for December 2 publication. Please note that authors are responsible for obtaining all image copyright releases prior to publication. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the SEQUITUR editors at sequitur@bu.edu. We look forward to receiving your proposals.
  • Architectural Theory Review Call for new editors in 2017

    Sydney | Dates: 16 Aug – 04 Oct, 2016
    Dear Colleague, The editorial committee for the journal Architectural Theory Review, published by Taylor & Francis/Routledge, is seeking expressions of interest for two editors who will be responsible for running the journal alongside one selected colleague from the University of Sydney in 2017. Architectural Theory Review is one of the leading architectural history and theory journals in the Australasian region as well having expanded international coverage regarding cotemporary topics of design discourse. Founded almost twenty years ago at Sydney, this journal has held a longtime position in shaping views on architectural history and theory. Interested applicants should hold a PhD in architecture or architectural history/theory, or an equivalent area of study, and an academic position at an international university. We welcome those with experience in architectural history/theory, critical theory, and aesthetic theory and philosophy. Through the Scholar One portal, editors will be responsible for creating new content for the journal, organizing and managing special and open issues, coordinating peer review, recruiting reviewers, and finalizing work for proofing and copyediting. Editors will need to report to the ATR editorial committee several times a year about the operations of the journal. Editors will also work with copyeditors from Sydney and Melbourne to assure that editorial content is properly presented. Please send a brief cover letter, a 1 page proposal for future content, and a short CV to research manager Jen Ryan at jennifer.ryan@sydney.edu.au. For any inquiries regarding the journal or editorial positions, please email Jennifer Ferng at jennifer.ferng@sydney.edu.au. All expressions of interest will be due by Tuesday 4 October 2016. Decisions will be made sometime in late November 2016. Kind regards, Jen Ryan Acting Research Development Manager On behalf of Jennifer Ferng Lecturer in Architecture Editor, Architectural Theory Review
  • HPEF Partners in Training Fall 2016 Call for Proposals

    Dates: 14 Aug – 10 Oct, 2016
    The Historic Preservation Education Foundation (HPEF) is currently accepting proposals for the Fall 2016 round of its Partners in Training initiative. HPEF established Partners in Training to provide training opportunities on technical topics associated with preservation technology. Partners in Training seeks to replicate the success HPEF has enjoyed working with other institutions and organizations in the past. HPEF is inviting educational institutions and nonprofit organizations based in the United States to submit training proposals that address specialized topics associated with the technical aspects of preservation projects. For grant recipients, HPEF’s contribution may include administrative as well as initial financial support. Administrative support can include participation in event planning, registration functions, and, as appropriate, assistance in online or print publication of materials prepared for the initiative. Initial financial support includes seed money to fund initial tasks. Grant recipients will assume all other responsibilities including marketing; coordination of onsite aspects associated with the venue; project budget; and staffing. The deadline for submissions is October 10, 2016. Grant recipients will be announced on/around December 10, 2016. Additional information can be found on the HPEF website: www.hpef.us or by writing submissions@hpef.us.
  • Purity and Contamination in Renaissance Art and Architecture

    Cambridge | Dates: 01 – 01 Oct, 2016
    October 1, 2016
    9:30am-6:00pm
     MIT, Bartos Theater (Cambridge, Mass.)
    Registration required

    Purity and contamination have long figured in the accounts of the European Renaissance. Scholars, in the last few decades alone, have mapped the role these ideas have played in debates about godliness and sin, cleanliness, gender, and ethnicity, among other domains. Less thoroughly studied, though, is how these two intertwined categories informed European approaches to art and the built environment, both as it was created and experienced. It is precisely this lacuna that our conference aims to address. This one-day conference plots some of the myriad ways in which concerns for material purity—and contamination—shaped the artistic and architectural pursuits of early modern Europeans. The aim is not to treat these phenomena comprehensively, or to fit them within a coherent framework, but rather to recover historical instances in which they assumed particular salience: in the materials that practitioners adopted; in how they manipulated them; and in the responses (physiological, verbal, textual) that such activity provoked. To this end, participants will present case studies drawn from diverse periods and places in multiple practices, teasing out the contradictions and complexities inherent in early modern approaches to matter, but also the broader conceptual and ideological conditions that determined how matter was defined and understood. A concluding roundtable brings together a distinguished group of scholars and museum curators to debate the methodological strengths and limitations of the two categories, as well as their relevance beyond the domain of Renaissance studies.

     Participants: Joseph Ackley, Amy Bloch, Rachel Boyd, Lorenzo Buonanno, Michael Cole, Jodi Cranston, Lauren Jacobi, Caroline Jones, David Karmon, Joseph Leo Koerner, Stephanie Leone, Jessica Maier, Carolina Mangone, Christopher Nygren, Pamela Smith, Luke Syson, Jane Tylus, Michael Waters, Carolyn Yerkes, and Daniel Zolli.

    This event is the Fall 2016 New England Renaissance Conference. It is co-organized by Lauren Jacobi and Daniel Zolli.
  • PhD Scholarship: 'Architectural design to improve Indigenous health outcomes', UQ School of Architecture

    Brisbane | Dates: 11 – 21 Aug, 2016
    The School of Architecture at the University of Queensland invites applications for the following research project: 'Architectural design to improve Indigenous health outcomes' The goal of this research project is to improve the experience and use of healthcare architecture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The aim is to identify the best design principles and practices through an analysis of existing clinics and hospitals and surveys of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander users. The overarching research question is: “When it comes to health service engagement, does design matter to Indigenous people, and how does it affect their decisions around accessing health care?” Professor Paul Memmott (p.memmott@uq.edu.au) and Tim O'Rourke (t.orourke@uq.edu.au) are the Chief Investigators. For enquiries please contact: Brit Winnen, Research and Projects Manager (b.winnen@uq.edu.au). Please apply online: https://scholarships.uq.edu.au/scholarship/uq-apa-special-round-support-arc-nhmrc-projects Scholarship Applications and Details APA scholarships are funded by the Commonwealth Government to provide assistance for living costs to domestic students during completion of a PhD. This special APA round offers scholarships for projects which are aligned with recently awarded ARC and NHMRC projects. Work with leading researchers, and learn to conduct research independently and think critically, while contributing to large projects of national significance. Scholarship value: $26,288 per annum, indexed annually. Tuition fees do not apply. Closing date: Sunday 21 August (Asutralian Time). Offers will be sent to successful applicants in late September or very early October. Commencement: Monday 3 - Monday 31 October, 2016. Apply Online: UQ APA Special Round to Support ARC & NHMRC Projects http://www.architecture.uq.edu.au/launch-your-research-career-phd-scholarships-available-now
  • PhD Scholarship: 'How Meston's 'Wild Australia Show' Shaped Australian Aboriginal History', UQ School of Architecture

    Brisbane | Dates: 11 – 21 Aug, 2016
    The School of Architecture at the University of Queensland invites applications for the following research project: "How Meston's 'Wild Australia Show' Shaped Australian Aboriginal History" The Wild Australia Show (1892-93), staged by a diverse company of Aboriginal people for metropolitan audiences, provides the focus for an interdisciplinary study of performance, photography, collections, frontier environments and race relations in colonial Australia. Using archival and visual records, and in partnership with key cultural institutions and Indigenous communities, the research seeks to produce an authoritative and original interpretation of the Show situating it within local, national and transnational narratives informed by contemporary Indigenous perspectives. It aims to illuminate Aboriginal agency in the ensemble, reconnect Aboriginal kin to performers, and chart changing concepts of race at a critical juncture in Australian history. Students with backgrounds in history, architecture, anthropology and related disciplines are encouraged to apply. Professor Paul Memmott is the Chief Investigator (p.memmott@uq.edu.au) . For enquiries please contact: Dr. Brit Winnen, Research and Projects Manager (b.winnen@uq.edu.au). Please apply online: https://scholarships.uq.edu.au/scholarship/uq-apa-special-round-support-arc-nhmrc-projects Scholarship Applications and Details APA scholarships are funded by the Commonwealth Government to provide assistance for living costs to domestic students during completion of a PhD. This special APA round offers scholarships for projects which are aligned with recently awarded ARC and NHMRC projects. Work with leading researchers, and learn to conduct research independently and think critically, while contributing to large projects of national significance. Scholarship value: $26,288 per annum, indexed annually. Tuition fees do not apply. Closing date: Sunday 21 August (Australian Time). Offers will be sent to successful applicants in late September or very early October. Commencement: Monday 3 - Monday 31 October, 2016. Apply Online: UQ APA Special Round to Support ARC & NHMRC Projects See: http://www.architecture.uq.edu.au/launch-your-research-career-phd-scholarships-available-now
  • Shore to Core: A research competition to understand how cities impact wellbeing

    West Palm Beach | Dates: 10 – 21 Aug, 2016
    You're invited to submit a proposal to Shore to Core: A research competition to understand how cities impact wellbeing

    This summer, help us understand how we can build better cities! Create a framework for measuring relationships between cities and wellbeing using West Palm Beach as a model.

    Yesterday, Van Alen Institute and the West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency launched Shore to Core, a research competition to develop a framework for studying and measuring how changes in the urban landscape affect the wellbeing of individuals over time. One winning team will create a pilot study that identifies:

    • The existing relationships between the built environment and residents’ physical health, mental health, and social capital
    • An approach to measuring how distinct elements of the built environment affect wellbeing
    • Tools to engage the study participants and/or residents of West Palm Beach

    One research team will be selected to participate in a three-month process to develop and implement a subsequent pilot study. The research team will receive a $40,000 stipend to develop the study, and a $10,000 stipend to implement the pilot study. Finalists will be notified in September. Download the full project brief on the competition website! 

    Teams are encouraged (but not required) to pre-register their interest by 11:59 PM ET on Wednesday, July 27. Project updates and any answers to questions submitted about the request will be emailed to team leads who have pre-registered.
    The deadline for registration and electronic submission of the Request for Qualifications is 11:59 PM ET on Sunday, August 21, 2016.  
     
  • ACLS 2016-17 Competitions

    Dates: 09 Aug, 2016 – 31 Mar, 2017
    The online application system (OFA) is now open for many ACLS programs with fall 2016 deadlines.

    ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships
    ACLS Digital Extension Grants
    ACLS Fellowships
    African Humanities Program
    Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society
    Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars
    Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
    Luce/ACLS Program in China Studies
    Luce/ACLS Program in Religion, Journalism & International Affairs
    Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships
    Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows
    The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies
  • 2016 Design Matters Conference: Miami Rising

    Miami | Dates: 02 – 04 Nov, 2016
    The Design Matters Conference presented by the Association of Architecture Organizations is the world’s only dedicated annual meeting that seeks to bring top designers, journalists and civic leaders into exploratory dialogue with those not-for-profit professionals and volunteers charged with creating cultural programs (exhibitions, tours, lectures and symposia, festivals and films, youth outreach) to spur broader public interest in architecture and design.

    If you’re involved with a not-for-profit architectural, design or educational institution, come join your peers at the Design Matters Conference and enjoy 2.5 days of workshops, presentations, tours and networking events. See below for preliminary Schedule, initial list of Featured Speakers, Open Call for Presenters, Lodging and Registration information.

    Conference Theme: Miami Rising
    Comparatively speaking, Miami is a young city. It is a place beset with urban challenges, but a place on the make, and evolving much more rapidly than your average American city—therein lies the excitement. At this year’s Design Matters Conference, we investigate four Miami experiments that point to realities all urban centers are certain to face sometime soon. Let’s get out and explore and meet the designers and civic leaders pushing Miami into the future. 
  • The Secret Life of Buildings

    Austin | Dates: 20 – 22 Oct, 2016
    SYMPOSIUM: OCTOBER 20-22, THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN CAMPUS
     
    October 17, Goldsmith Hall Loggia
    OBJECTS Exhibition Opening 
     
    October 19, Jessen Auditorium
    Prologue Lecture by Matthew B. Crawford, “In Defense of the Attentional Commons”
     
    October 20, Goldsmith Hall Wood Shop
    Lectures by Jorge Otero-Pailos, PhD, and Albena Yaneva, PhD
    Evening reception in honor of the people who maintain The School of Architecture buildings and grounds
     
    October 21, Utility Spaces
    Morning tours

    October 21, Battle Hall Library Reading Room
    Lectures by Professor Michael Benedikt and Graham Harman, PhD

    October 22, Goldsmith Hall *(this event is closed to the public)*
    Roundtable Discussion: "Do 'Objects' and 'Relations' Make Space for Architecture?"
    Benedikt, Bieg, Harman, Otero-Pailos, Yaneva, with Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant, Timothy Morton, Craig Dykers
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SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
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