Recent Opportunities

Here you'll find the latest opportunities posted to the SAH website. Click the title for more information on an opportunity. You can submit your own opportunity or search opportunities.


  • Gather Up The Fragments

    chicago | Dates: 07 Feb – 26 Apr, 2015
    February 7–April 26, 2015 This exhibition will present the Shakers’ history and religious philosophy through 190 objects drawn from the Andrews Shaker Collection at Hancock Shaker Village in Pittsfield, Massachusetts and local Chicago Shaker collectors. the exhibition explores the relationship of Shaker faith and beliefs and their aesthetic in architecture, furniture and the applied arts. Works on view will not only include historical costumes, but also reels, spool racks, looms, furniture, architectural elements, woven baskets, steamed wood boxes, and kitchen implements. The exhibition will also tell the story of Faith and Edward Deming Andrews, pioneers who built the most comprehensive collection of Shaker artifacts in the country. The exhibition is generously supported by the American Folk Art Society, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and Terry Dowd, Inc.
  • Civic Foundation Legends in Italian Art

    Kalamazoo | Dates: 14 – 17 May, 2015
    Nearly every Italian civitas created one or more foundation narratives that glorified and advertised its origins. In Florence, for example, an anonymous writer drafted a chronicle circa 1200 that recounted the city’s ancient past and the heroic exploits of its early leaders. In the trecento, Giovanni Villani expanded upon the story and embellished it with the addition of fanciful anecdotes. Other major centers, such as Arezzo, Perugia, and Bologna, formulated similar narratives, which told of conquering Romans or the noble Etruscans before them. In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, civic legends—typically a conflation of history and myth—were already being promoted and disseminated through art and architecture, long before the age of Coluccio Salutati and Flavio Biondo. In cities that had actually been founded in antiquity, such artworks commonly served to enhance or exaggerate the historical truth, often with propagandistic intent. Other cities, such as Siena and Venice, were not established until the Middle Ages and thus found themselves in the difficult position of having to invent their ancient pasts. In Siena, the communal authorities adopted the Roman she-wolf as the primary symbol of the Republic by the middle of the duecento, and it was systematically replicated in painting and sculpture, including on the exterior of public buildings, until the end of the Renaissance period.

    The Italian Art Society will host three sessions in which scholars investigate the artistic programs of Italian cities in the medieval and early modern eras as they relate to their foundation legends. These sessions aim to advance our understanding of the interrelation between civic identity and visual culture while exploring the complex sociopolitical circumstances underlying the manufacture and propagation of historical narratives. Papers addressing questions of patronage, historiography, iconography, political ideology or cultural interchange would be especially welcome.

    Please submit a paper proposal to the organizer, Max Grossman (megrossman@utep.edu) Deadline: September 15, 2014
    Please include the following materials in your application:
    1) A one-page abstract
    2) Completed Participant Information Form available at the website of the Medieval Congress: http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF
    3) A one-page CV
  • The Art History of Architectural History

    Norwich | Dates: 09 – 11 Apr, 2015
    Call for Papers for this session in the Association of Art Historians (UK) 41st Annual Conference & Bookfair
    Sainsbury Centre for Art, UEA, Norwich 9 - 11 April 2015
    Deadline for submission of papers - 10 November 2014

     Art history and architectural history are sister disciplines… or are they? How many art history departments regard architectural history as a core component of their provision? What might art history students miss if architectural history were not part of their curricula? Perhaps art objects and architectural objects are so radically different their study cannot be shared. Or perhaps there are modes of enquiry that can be developed to mutual benefit. This session reviews the art history/architectural history relationship in several ways. One way is to excavate those moments when art and architectural history were tightly bound together: in the very formation of art history as a discipline, for example, when both art and architecture were natural objects of study. Other ways might be: investigations of the parallel developments of formalism in art and architectural history; of architectural history’s relation to the ‘new art history’; of the ways in which architectural history might adopt recent developments in object studies, global art history, and art writing. Academics dealing with contemporary architecture find themselves wrestling with debates that in other disciplines may be more abstract or indirect: How does money or power represent itself in visual form? How does the general public (whoever they may be) understand form? How does government use aesthetics to communicate? All of these things are, and always have been, live in architecture. Perhaps this might be part of a case for making architectural history more central to art history. If so, what implications would it have for our curricula and our pedagogy?
  • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Makes 30,000+ Images Free to Download

    Dates: 03 Jun, 2014
    The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa is pleased to announce there are now over 30,000 images downloadable, for free, in the highest resolution we have them. You can search for and download them at Te Papa's Collections Online http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/

    17,000 images are have no known copyright restrictions so are downloadable for any use, free of charge. Another 14,000 images are available under a Creative Commons licence CC BY-NC-ND<http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>.

    We hope that by making these images available for reuse, we are empowering people to use images of the collection in teaching and learning, research, innovation and new forms of creativity.

    Visit the Te Papa website http://www.tepapa.govt.nz.
  • Hartwick Pines Memorial Hall--Grayling, Michigan

    Grayling | Dates: 15 Jul, 2014 – 15 Jul, 2016
    Hartwick Memorial Hall is a large log structure (architect Ralph Herrick of Lansing, Mich., 1928) standing on the grounds of Hartwick Pines State Park near Grayling, Michigan. Since 1994 it has been on the National Register of Historic Sites. However, it has stood empty and in disuse since then. It desperately needs a thorough cleaning within and without, not to mention the necessary stabilization, preservation and restoration that it needs as well. It resembles the great log cabin hotel built in 1910-11 in Yellowstone National Park, and this rustic appearance nicely complements its setting of magnificent virgin white pines. In short, Hartwick Memorial Hall needs attention urgently if it is to survive.
  • Fifth International Congress on Construction History

    Chicago | Dates: 03 – 07 Jun, 2015
    We invite researchers and practitioners from all aspects of the history of construction to submit paper abstracts for the 5th International Congress on Construction History, to be held in Chicago and hosted by the Construction History Society of America June 3-7, 2015. The congress follows on successful interdisciplinary congresses held in Madrid (2003), Cambridge UK (2006), Cottbus (2009), and Paris (2012). Submission: Submit proposals to https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=icch5 by June 1, 2014.
  • The American Research Center in Egypt Fellowships 2014-2015

    Dates: 01 Oct, 2014 – 30 Sep, 2015

    ARCE administers research fellowships for students enrolled in doctoral programs at North American universities, and for American post-doctoral scholars and professionals affiliated with universities and research institutions worldwide.

    ARCE Fellowships are awarded for a minimum of three months and a maximum of twelve months depending on the funding source. Fellowships provide sufficient funding to cover round-trip air transportation, a living allowance, mentoring and a home base in Egypt for doctoral candidates in the all-but-dissertation stage and senior scholars conducting more advanced research.
     
    Post-doctoral scholars are invited to indicate their interest in serving as the ARCE Scholar-in-Residence on the fellowship application. The Scholar-in-Residence may serve for a period up to 12 months depending on the length of his/her fellowship. In addition to conducting his/her research, s/he agrees to advise junior scholars and organize a workshop, conference, or other scholarly activity in consultation with the Director. An additional modest per diem is available for the Scholar-in-Residence for these concurrent duties. Interested and qualified candidates are identified during the Fellowship Committee Meeting and recommendations made to the ARCE Director, who makes the final selection.

SAH2015