Recent Opportunities

view-of-Edinburgh-from-castle
  • CFP // Sophia Peer Review Journal

    Dates: 01 Mar – 31 Dec, 2017
    // Call for papers // Deadline: continuously open for submission. To submit your abstract (max. 300-500 words and 2 images up to 2MB), send directly to info@cityscopio.com. Crossing Boarders, Shifting Boundaries Image, Body and Territory In the first number of our scopio Sophia magazine, we published three major essays that challenged our understanding and spread new light on several Walter Benjamin’s concepts on photography and art, at the same time we were continuously defied to think about established categories namely those of photography as document, archive, critical witness, or even as critique in itself. In the upcoming number, we would like to push further and go beyond these notions perceiving how they are critically inscribed in the works of art themselves. We are especially interested in unfolding the processes of thought present in photographic, filmic, or other works engaged with image and image making, that explore the notions of Body and Territory or use them as their own expressive matters. Body and Territory frequently appear intertwined, sometimes even suggesting metaphorical uses: the city as a body (in the multiple acceptations: political, social, cultural, etc.), the body as an experimental territory (on debates around issues of identity and gender, works involving artistic and aesthetic experimentations, works for anthropological documentation and recording), the landscape in the absence of the body, as Cézanne named it, establishing a direct link between the painted landscape (the image) and our sensitive perception. Our magazine is now accepting abstracts within these fundamental themes in order to unveil how an image, a photograph or a series, or a film critically and poetically build their own thought about the body and the territory, and, above all, how they contribute and appear engaged in architectural and/ or urban processes. More info: http://sophiajournal.net/category/call-for-papers/ *Sophia Peer Review Journal* Crossing Boarders, Shifting Boundaries Sophia collection is specifically designed to address theoretical work, and it aims to be the publishing medium for a set of exploratory and critical texts on image in the broad sense, i.e. comprehending the worlds of design, photography, film, video, television and new media. The objective is to challenge different artists and creators to publish in book format original articles, reviews and other texts of interest and value. We are interested in making Sophia a mentis instrumental capable of extending our critical knowledge and questioning the universe of image in innovative ways. The published set of theoretical and critical texts on image can either be taken from sections of scopio magazine, or from our International Conference On the Surface: Photography and Architecture, or submitted by new authors and other R&D national and international centers, through our call for abstract submissions. The title Crossing Borders, Shifting Boundaries defines the global theme for this present cycle of Sophia and conveys the interest in promoting a critical analysis around this theme, exploring how image is a medium that, on the one hand, can cross borders and shift boundaries between different subjects and disciplines where image and photography are present in a significant way and, on the other hand, in how image and photography can be used as critical instruments to better understand the real and its different realities, always questioning the universe of image in an innovative way. http://sophiajournal.net/ Editorial Organisation Editorial Coordinator Pedro Leão Neto (FAUP) Editors of Sophia 1st Number Susana Ventura Edward Dimendberg — Invited Editor Editors of Sophia 2nd Number Pedro Leão Neto Susana Ventura Iñaki Bergera — Invited Editor Editorial Assistant of Sophia 2nd Number Diana Carvalho Scientific and Editorial Commission (CEAU-FAUP) José Miguel Rodrigues Pedro Leão Neto Rui Ramos Susana Ventura Vítor Silva Reading Committee Álvaro Domingues (FAUP/ CEAU) Ana Francisca de Azevedo (DeGeoUM/Lab2PT) Andrew Higgot (AA Grad Dipl PhD) Carlos Machado (FAUP/ CEAU) Gabriela Vaz Pinheiro (FBAUP) Joana Cunha Leal (FCSH-UNL) Joaquim Moreno (FAUP/ CCRE) Jorge Figueira (FCT-UC) Marta Cruz (FAUP/ CEAU) Marco Iuliano (LSA/CAVA) Miguel Leal (FBAUP) Olívia da Silva (IPP – ESMAE) Pedro Bandeira (EAUM) Paulo Catrica (UNL) Teresa Ferreira (EAUM/ CEAU) Colaborators Diana Carvalho Maria Neto Creative Director Né Santelmo Translation Lisbeth Ferreira
  • Carter H. Manny Memorial

    Chicago | Dates: 20 – 20 May, 2017
    Please join us to celebrate the life and work of Carter H. Manny, Jr., and honor his service to the field of architecture, with family and friends:

    Saturday, May 20, 2017
    11 AM program, with a reception to follow

    S.R. Crown Hall
    Illinois Institute of Technology
    3360 S State Street
    Chicago, Illinois

    Additional details will be sent closer to the event.

    For more information please email info@grahamfoundation.org or call 312-787-4071.
  • Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Reappraisals and Revisions

    Oxford | Dates: 05 – 07 May, 2017
    As the 150th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright's birth comes round in 2017, he appears omnipresent in his familiarity but difficult to assess compared to the other founders of Modernism. Combining reappraisal and contextualisation of his work from leading scholars, this weekend also considers the nature and extent of his impact in Britain from the 1920s to the present. This raises general questions about the nature of influence in architecture, the identification of national character in the modern period, and continued capacity of Wright to surprise us with his multiplicity of faces.
  • The Culture of the Regency: Image, Reality and King George IV - Lecture Series

    Oxford | Dates: 10 May – 14 Jun, 2017
    The Regency period (c.1780-c.1830) was, for the visual arts, a time of exuberance, colour, experimentation – and fun. It was the period of Nash and Soane, of Turner and Constable, of Brighton Pavilion and Regent Street. Its vibrancy and originality took its cue at least partly from the personality of the Prince Regent himself (after 1830, King George IV). Prince George’s eclecticism in art, architecture and the decorative arts were in the van of taste: he helped to make the Regency era the first truly eclectic age, anticipating the Victorians’ love of mix-and-match, was responsible for considerable stylistic and technical innovation, and became the greatest ever royal builder and collector, erecting a stunning set of royal homes – which today still constitute the Crown’s most significant architectural assets – and creating much of the present-day Royal Collection. At the same time, however, George IV was seen by many of his subjects at best as a flawed figure of fun, at worst as a predatory and irresponsible spendthrift. Moreover, the style and taste of the Regency was by no means merely a royal creation: for the first time, middle-class families dictated the disposition and decoration of the home. Liberated by technology, householders were able to acquire what had, barely fifty years before, been regarded as unattainable, aristocratic luxuries – from chintz to chimneypieces to champagne.
  • Parting Shots: Minor White's Images of Portland, 1938-1942

    Portland | Dates: 03 Mar – 23 Dec, 2017
    Parting Shots examines nationally renowned 20th-century photographer Minor White, focusing on some of his earliest work when he was in Portland between 1938-1942 to photograph the city, from its economically depressed downtown to its opulent mansions. White’s captivating images document a city on the verge of change during the World War II era and serve as one of the few visual records of some of the city’s most significant architecture prior to its eventual demolition. For the first time, at the Architectural Heritage Center, White's photographs are presented alongside architectural artifacts rescued from many of the commercial and residential buildings that appear in his images and that are drawn from the Bosco-Milligan Foundation/Architectural Heritage Center's permanent collection. White’s work prompts us to think about how we should document and preserve historic buildings today, especially those at risk of demolition, and the power of the photograph in depicting our architectural heritage.
  • CFP: Culture on the Move in Edwardian Britain (Lancaster, 8-9 Sep 17)

    Lancaster | Dates: 21 Feb – 04 Jun, 2017
    University of Lancaster, September 8 - 09, 2017
    Deadline: Jun 4, 2017

    The Spirit of Speed: Culture on the Move in Edwardian Britain

    ‘Before us stretched the deserted road; we could trace it for miles and 
    miles, a long line of grey in a vastness of green space that faded into 
    blue, rising and falling with the rise and fall of the hills. Then the 
    spirit of speed took possession of us, the fascination and the frenzy 
    of speed for speed’s sake […] We had escaped from the fetters that bind 
    man to earth; we were intoxicated with a new-born sense of splendid 
    freedom; without exertion or effort we lightly skimmed the ground […] 
    We were rushing into infinity.’ (James Hissey, An English Holiday with 
    Car and Camera, 1909)

    The fourth annual conference of the Edwardian Culture Network will be 
    held at the University of Lancaster this coming September, in 
    association with the Edwardian Postcard Project. Taking our lead from 
    James Hissey’s 1909 evocation of travelling in a motor car, or H.G. 
    Wells’s equally-breathless sea-bound finale to Tono-Bungay – we will be 
    exploring the ‘spirit of speed’, as represented, reflected, challenged 
    or wilfully ignored by British culture c.1895-1914. We invite 300-word 
    proposals for papers on any aspect of this theme. Topics might include, 
    but are not limited to:

    - Culture on the move: the significance of postcards, advertisements, 
    newspapers, travelling exhibitions, etc.
    - Reactions to new technologies: motor cars, steam turbines, radio, 
    film, etc.
    - Speed and freedom: travel, independence and access.
    - Rushing into infinity: Speed and the representation of time in art.
    - Placing the brakes on speed: antidotes to the quickening pace of 
    life: stillness, slowness and spirituality.
    - Speed and exchange: The impact of Atlantic crossings on 
    Anglo-American culture.

    We will accept proposals for 15 minute presentations and panels; we are 
    also happy to consider experimental approaches and poster ideas. Please 
    e-mail proposals (not exceeding 500 words) to 
    edwardianculture@hotmail.co.uk. The closing date for applications is 
    June 4th, 2017. Participants from inside and outside academia are 
    equally welcome!
     
  • Frank Gehry’s MasterClass on Design & Architecture

    Dates: 21 Feb – 30 Jun, 2017
    The legendary architect is best known for his trailblazing, modern structures, and pioneering vision for what architecture can and should achieve. His designs - including the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Guggenheim in New York, the Dancing House in Prague, and 8 Spruce Street in New York - have reshaped our cities’ skylines, and the imaginations of artists and designers around the world. Gehry has been awarded with several honors for his work including the Pritzker Architecture Prize and most recently the Presidential Medal of Freedom. 

    In his first-ever MasterClass, Frank Gehry will share his unconventional philosophy on design and architecture. Students will be invited into Gehry’s never-before-seen model archive for a peek into his creative process. In the class, Gehry will use case studies, progressive models, and storytelling to illuminate the universal lessons learned during his 50+ year career as an artist and architect.

    “I have tried to give the students insight into my process – how and why I did things.  I hope this gives them the wings to explore and the courage to create their own language,” said Frank Gehry, MasterClass instructor.

    MasterClass provides online classes from world-renowned instructors, making it possible for anyone to learn from the best. Each class offers a unique learning experience which includes video lessons from the instructor, interactive exercises, course materials, peer interaction, and more. All classes are available online for individual purchase at www.masterclass.com for $90 each.
     
  • San Gemini Preservation Studies Program

    San Gemini | Dates: 29 May – 04 Aug, 2017
    Now in its 19th year, with alumni from over 170 colleges and universities worldwide, SGPS is dedicated to the preservation of cultural heritage. We offer students the opportunity to study and travel in Italy where they acquire hands-on experience in preservation and conservation.
     
    Session One (May 29 – June 23)
    Building Restoration – Touching the Stones
    Restoration of Traditional Masonry Buildings and Sketching and Analyzing Historic Buildings
    (Program includes lectures and field projects*)
    Archaeological Ceramics Restoration 
    Analysis and Restoration of Archaeological Ceramics in Italy 
    (Program includes lectures and workshop)
    Book Bindings Restoration
    The Craft of Making and Restoring Book Bindings 
    Introduction to the Conservation of Books and Bindings 
    (Program includes lectures and workshop)
     
    Session Two (July 10 - August 4)
    Paper Restoration
    Restoration and Conservation of Paper in Books and Archival Documents
    (Program includes lectures and workshop)
    Traditional Painting Techniques
    Traditional Materials, Methods of Painting and Art Restoration Issues
    (Program includes lectures and workshop)
    Preservation Theory and Practice in Italy 
    Restoration Theory, Ethics and Issues 
    (Program includes lectures and discussion)
     
    *Field Projects:
    Restoration of the façade of the Church of San Carlo (13th century)
    Analysis of medieval buildings in San Gemini as part of an urban study of the city
     
    Short Intersession Programs (June 24 – July 7)
    Preservation Field Trip – Italy (June 25 – July 4)
    A ten-day trip visiting Siena, Florence and Rome: places of cultural interest, the urban and historical development of each town, and specialized visits to places of interest to restorers.
    Coexistence of Memory and Modernity – Athens (June 25 - July 6)
    A twelve day visit of Athens: an exploration of the history of preservation and conservation issues facing the city led by some of the top Athenian experts in their field.
    The History and Culture of Food in Italy (June 26 – July 7)
    A two-week course giving an overview of the history and cultural traditions of food in Italy. The course will include lec¬tures, field trips and an experimental cooking workshop.
     
    To find out more about our program and review the syllabi, please visit our WEBSITE.
     
    Our courses are open to students from various disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate. All lessons are taught in English.
     
  • In the Tower: Theaster Gates

    Washington | Dates: 05 Mar – 04 Sep, 2017
    Over the past decade, American artist Theaster Gates (b. 1973) has explored the built environment and the power of art and culture to transform experience. For the second exhibition in the reopened East Building Tower 3 galleries, Gates will present a new body of work—The Minor Arts—featuring several pieces created for the Gallery. The installation will examine how discarded and ordinary objects, including the floor of a Chicago high school gym and the archives of Ebony magazine, acquire value through the stories we tell.
  • Cultural Sustainable Tourism (CST)

    Thessaloniki | Dates: 04 – 06 Sep, 2017
    Cultural Sustainable Tourism (CST- 2017) discusses the complex relations between Culture, and tourism, and how planners, architects, and main actors and help in conveying and spreading the right perspective of the importance and role of Cultural tourism and how to maintain it.
  • Architects and Interior Decoration in France in the 18th Century

    Dates: 15 Feb – 28 Apr, 2017
    This video records a public talk given at the Frick Collection on the role of architects in interior design in France in the 18th Century. http://www.frick.org/interact/basile_baudez_architects_and_interior_decoration_age_gouthiere
  • TransPositions Summer School 2017: Sensible Objects, Material Engagement, Skilled Expertise (deadline 22 February)

    Zeist | Dates: 21 – 25 Aug, 2017
    Please download the full call here: http://artechne.wp.hum.uu.nl/transpositions-summer-school-sensible-objects-material-engagement-skilled-expertise/ DEADLINE 22 FEBRUARY The TransPositions Summer School 2017: Sensible Objects, Material Engagement, Skilled Expertise will be held from Monday 21 August through Friday 25 August 2017 in the Woudschoten Hotel & Conference Centre near Utrecht, The Netherlands. This edition of the TransPositions Summer School focusses on material culture and the senses. How can we investigate sensory experiences of past material cultures or cultures that are not our own? And how can we reconstruct in our studies the experiential richness of ephemera and material practices “lost in transmission” or only preserved in textual sources? The summer school approaches these questions across different disciplines including art history, archaeology, anthropology, conservation, musicology, performance and media studies, cognitive science, and religion- and science studies. We invite doctoral and postdoctoral researchers from the humanities, the social sciences, and related disciplines with a strong interest in material culture and sensory experiences to apply via e-mail to j.briggeman@uu.nl. Keynote speakers (confirmed): Ulinka Rublack (Faculty of History, Cambridge University) Lambros Malafouris (Kebble College and Institute of Archaeology, Oxford University) Rachel Prentice (Dept. of Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University) Shigehisa Kuriyama (Dept. of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University)
  • CFP: ARCHTHEO '17 International Theory and History of Architecture Conference (Istanbul, 3-4 Nov 17)

    Istanbul | Dates: 10 Feb – 28 Jul, 2017
    CFP
    ARCHTHEO '17
    XI. INTERNATIONAL THEORY AND HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE CONFERENCE

    3-4 NOVEMBER 2017
    ISTANBUL, TURKEY

    All abstracts are going to be selected according to double blind reviews and accepted papers will be published in the Conference Proceedings E-Book with an ISBN number that will be given to you in a DVD box during conference registration.

    We invite you to join us at the event in Istanbul and would like to emphasize that proposals from different parts of the world are welcomed.

    The first of the theory of architecture conference series ARCHTHEO has been held since 2011 at Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University focusing on the possibility of the theory without the backing of the practice or built environment. The title was, therefore, "Theory for the Sake of the Theory" in an emphatic fashion. In 2012, the discussion centered on the Living and space, the main has been chosen as "House&Home' in particular. ARCHTHEO '13 focused on the two leading roles in architecture, the architect and the so-called 'user' and  'Creativity, Autonomy and Function' has proved to be fruitful discussion theme. In 2014, 'Architecture and Text' has been discussed. Last year, 'Architecture and Criticism' was the main theme. The conferences, which has the focus on history rather than theory has started even earlier, in 2010. Architecture and Media, Architecture and Art, Interactions in the History, Architecture and Politics have the main themes of the events.

    THEMES

    TRACK 01:
    ARCHITECTURE AND CRITICISM

    Criticism
    - Criticism and History of Architecture
    - Architectural Criticism, Critical Theory and ?Critical Architecture?
    - Essential Texts on Architectural Theory
    - Architect as Author: Texts by the architects

    Commenting on Space
    - Multidisciplinary Studies on architecture
    - A structural relationship between architecture and text
    - Traveling, dairies and urban space
    - Philosophy and architecture

    Book and architecture
    - History of architectural publishing
    - Book and architecture: Architectural Writing
    - Case studies on terminology and points of view
    - Definition and concepts by architectural movements or periods

    TRACK 02:
    ARCHITECTURE AND CRITICAL APPROACHES

    - Design as a Critical Tool
    - Architectural History as Critical Practice
    - Critical Theory and Space
    - Ideology and Architecture
    - Architecture and Capitalism
    - Reformism and Radicalism
    - Architecture and political art
    - Controversies, counterparts and confrontations in architecture (This track is connected to the Critical Approaches Research Direction of DAKAM)

    TRACK 03:
    EVERYDAY LIFE AND SPACE

    - Everyday life, ideology and culture
    - Phenomenology and architecture
    - Anthropology, locality and 'low' architecture
    - Body, movement and space
    - Perception, feeling and space
    - Metaphors, symbols and people
    - Lives of Buildings
    - Public and private life
    - Objects and interiors
    - The problem of scale in architecture
    - Buildings, urban life and environment
    (This track is connected to the Everyday Life Research Direction of DAKAM)

    AGENDA

    Abstract submission:
    JULY 28, 2017

    Registration:
    SEPTEMBER 22, 2017

    Full papers submission:
    SEPTEMBER 29, 2017
     
  • "Exploring Architectural Form: A Configurative Triad"

    Delft | Dates: 10 Feb – 01 May, 2017
    This issue of Footprint aims to explore the discussions that currently gravitate around the question of architectural form, by inviting architects to reflect on the latest developments in the field of formal studies within architectural and urban theory, design, research, and pedagogy. Footprint 22 aims to collect a comprehensive set of state-of-the-art approaches to the question of architectural and urban form, and thus provide an updated examination of formal, morphological and typological investigations. As editors, we welcome a broad spectrum of interpretations, ranging from theoretical and practical applications of form-based analyses, to epistemological and pedagogical implementations of these formal analyses in diverse contexts. Aware of the weight that form-centred theories have had in postmodern architectural research, and in order to establish a historical landmark for this edition, the emergence of neo-rationalism in the early 1960s will serve as a point of departure. However, we deem this a landmark that is meant to be superseded. The neo-rationalist aim to overcome the shortcomings of modernist functionalism by contesting the idea that a building’s form resulted from its use, certainly marked a shift within architectural theory, and favoured the emergence of a strain of architectural thinking that currently offers multiple and contradictory approaches to the way architectural form is generated, understood, and communicated. Beyond their neo-rationalist predecessors, architects and authors like Peter Eisenman, Fumihiko Maki, Nicolas Bourriaud, Carlos Martí Arís and Antonio Armesto, Mario Carpo, Pier Vittorio Aureli, and Sanford Kwinter, have more recently reclaimed important parts of the form-centred architectural discourse, with diverse intentions, and from different vantage points. Furthermore, multiple lines of inquiry which depart from the question of architectural form, still orient the production of knowledge in universities and institutes throughout the world, far beyond Western Europe, where neo-rationalism originated and thrived. Designers, scholars, researchers and teachers throughout the globe have found in the definition of a formal basis of architecture a valuable practical and intellectual tool, while morpho-typological approaches are still broadly used in architectural education. Within such a diversified field of studies, form-centred approaches to architecture have been severely criticised, especially for their reductive consideration of matter, with many contemporary theorists asking for a formal theory which resists taxonomies. With these antecedents in mind, we wish to examine architectural form today, from a threefold perspective. First, we would like to study the way in which form is produced, dealt with, or confronted by contemporary designers. Secondly, we would like to know how architects examine and study form in discursive (i.e communicative, theoretical, historiographical, but also representational) terms. Finally, we would like to evaluate the way in which innovative formal analyses affect architectural form at all scales within the built environment. Footprint 22 will follow a tripartite trajectory, advancing an understanding of formal studies which transverses ontological, epistemological and onto-epistemological perspectives. These perspectives directly correspond to the notions of morphogenesis, formalism and in-formation. Following this sequence, from an ontological perspective, morphogenetic studies deal with the processes in which matter actively co-produces its various formal expressions. Synchronously, formal discourse and morpho-typological studies function as an analytical tool for the examination of these processes. Both morphogenetic explorations and formalist approaches, while imperative for any formal study, do not suffice unless complemented with their intensive in-between: in-formation, or the way in which formal discourses and their outcomes influence form itself, and vice versa. We trust that by interrelating these three approaches, we can contribute to contemporary formal explorations by substituting an object-based approach with one that examines the reciprocity of formal emergence. Emulating Joseph Kosuth’s well-known triptychs, we aim to situate the question of architectural form in our time between a series of interpretations that transcend a supposed autonomy as well as a univocal cultural or epistemological origin. With these objectives in mind, we encourage various types of contributions. We welcome contributions consisting of full scientific articles that examine formal studies in pedagogy and research, critical reflections on the question of form in contemporary architecture, and theoretical and historiographical approaches that assess the formal discourse of architecture. In addition, we are expecting graphic and/or textually reasoned analyses of projects and buildings which suggest innovations in architectural form. Finally, we invite contributions in the form of review articles that critically reassess key literature related to this topic. Footprint #22 will be published in Spring 2018. Authors of full articles (6000-8000 words) are requested to submit their contributions to the editors before 1 May, 2017. Full articles will go through a double blind peer-review process. Review articles (2000–4000 words) and reasoned analyses (2000 words, 2 – 5 images) will be selected by the editors on the basis of a short summary (maximum 500 words) which must also be submitted before 1 May, 2017. All authors should include a short bio (300 words) with their submissions. We ask authors to refer to Footprint Author Guidelines, available at footprint.tudelt.nl. For submissions and inquiries, please contact editors Stavros Kousoulas and Jorge Mejía Hernández at fp22@footprintjournal.org.
  • SAH 73rd Annual International Conference

    Seattle | Dates: 29 Apr – 03 May, 2020
    Save the date!
  • SAH 72nd Annual International Conference

    Providence | Dates: 24 – 28 Apr, 2019
  • Call for Authors for History of Human Spaces Series

    Dates: 02 Feb – 01 May, 2017
    RESTAURANT and OFFICE
    History of Human Spaces series
    Praeger Publishing

    Praeger Publishing, an academic publisher, based in Santa Barbara, California (praeger.com<http://praeger.com/>) is seeking authors for two titles in our History of Human Spaces series. This series explores the history of spaces, both public and private, and the objects typically associated with those spaces. Each 70-80,000 word volume will utilize those objects and spaces to reflect on larger social, economic, and cultural themes. Each volume will focus on North America from colonial times to the present-day, but will include an introductory chapter tracing the history of the space from the beginnings of Western (or, in some cases, world) history. The series will start with eight titles: bedroom, bathroom, kitchen (private); office, school, factory, bar/tavern, and restaurant. Six titles have thus far been assigned. We are looking for authors for the RESTAURANT and OFFICE titles.

    We are seeking academics in the fields of material culture, social history, and related fields. Interested parties should contact acquisitions editor James Ciment at james.ciment@ca.rr.com<mailto:james.ciment@ca.rr.com>. Please attach a CV.
     
  • MIT Thresholds 46: SCATTER!

    Dates: 02 Feb – 01 May, 2017
    Thresholds 46: SCATTER!
    Editors: Anne Graziano and Eliyahu Keller

    From treatises to TED talks; postcards to propaganda; etchings to drawings, films, and blogs, architecture moves in diverse and curious ways. It is these currencies, which give architecture its agency, its authority and life. And yet, despite the varied modes of its circulation, the majority of architecture’s discursive knowledge reaches only a familiar audience. While contemporary means of information production and dispersal continue to exponentially grow and quicken, the circle of professional and discursive associations remains confined. Circulation, distribution, and access to knowledge are not exclusive matters of the discipline. Rather they extend past architectural limits to catalyze inquiries into hidden geographies and infrastructure, restricted access, and equity. 

    The history of architecture has consistently seen innovation and subversion expand not only architectural theory and practice, but also the ways in which ideas are dispersed beyond established systems of circulation. With the understanding that architecture indeed moves within ever-changing boundaries, Thresholds 46 looks to investigate, expand and imagine the histories, futures, means and methods by which architecture gets around.

    If half a century ago the medium was the message, now, after dozens of new mediums have expanded the manner of conversation, we wish to ask: is the equation still so simple?  Was and is the message exclusively a product of its medium? What are the architectural histories that can inform future inventions of dispersal and distribution? And how have architects, designers, artists, and scholars employed medium with message to interrogate fields of conversation and suggest new and provocative platforms for the discussion of ideas?

    We wish to look at the history of architectural dissemination, while holding our gaze to a swift, saturated and scattered connectivity. Asking, what modes of circulation were employed in various periods of history to elevate and publicize an architecture? How was architecture distributed by actors and vehicles that are both foreign to its discourse or an essential part of it?  What is the power of non-architectural documents such as cartographies, letters, stamps or money in the distribution of architectural knowledge? And what can we learn from accidents in which architectural knowledge broke loose from its constraints, reaching unimagined publics and scattering to unintended realms?

    Aiming to examine the scholarship, discourse and possibilities of publication, Thresholds 46 invites submissions of scholarly articles, creative contributions, and interdisciplinary investigations from art, architecture and related fields.  Topics can range from explorations of classical treatises, through architectural representations on money or postage and inquiries into divergent or accidental practices of dissemination such as agitation-vehicles, kiosks or comic books.  Furthermore, Thresholds 46 seeks an array of scattered content, welcoming innovative approaches and projects, in which architectural knowledge is to be shared and accessed. Videos, online platforms, interactive maps, posters, and postcards, augmented and virtual spaces and more – Thresholds 46 will provide a medium that welcomes content liberated from the historical format of the journal. 

    Submission Deadline: May 1, 2017

    Essay submissions should be in English, approx. 3,000 words, and formatted in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style.  Submission should include a brief cover letter, contact information and bio of under 50 words for each author.  Text should be submitted in MS Word.  Images should be submitted at 72 dpi as uncompressed TIFF files. Other creative proposals are not limited in size or medium and will be considered to be included both in the journal as well as in the multiplicity of adjacent platforms.
  • CFP: Troubling Histories: Public Art and Prejudice

    Johannesburg | Dates: 15 – 18 Nov, 2017
    Troubling Histories: Public Art and Prejudice 15 - 18 November 2017 This is a call for papers, a selection of which will be identified for further development into 5000-word articles for a themed issue of De Arte, a Taylor & Francis journal published with the University of South Africa. The conference will take place at the offices of the Research Chair of South African Art and Visual Culture at the University of Johannesburg between the evening of 15 November and lunchtime on the 18 November 2017. The keynote address will be by well-known scholar of public art, Prof Erika Doss from the Department of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame, whose publications include Spirit Poles and Flying Pigs: Public Art and Cultural Democracy in American Communities (1995), The Emotional Life of Contemporary Public Memorials: Towards a Theory of Temporary Memorials (2008), and Memorial Mania: Public Feeling in America (2010). THE THEME In March 2015, a small-scale protest against Marion Walgate’s sculpture of Cecil John Rhodes at the University of Cape Town developed into the “Rhodes Must Fall” movement and culminated in the work’s removal from campus a month later. The protest had widespread impact. Raising questions about not only Rhodes’ representation in the public domain but also those of other individuals associated with values and ideologies that have fallen from favour who are commemorated in South Africa, it had the additional impact of reigniting a long-standing international concern: whether focused on sculptures of Lost Cause heroes in the United States, European monuments commemorating individuals revealed to have been Nazi sympathisers or Australian monuments memorialising events associated with the suppression of aboriginal peoples, for example, art historians and other citizens concerned about visual discourse in the public domain have long-since debated what steps, if any, should be taken to negotiate ‘problematical’ public art inheritances. The contention around the representation of Cecil Rhodes also highlighted longstanding concerns about how art in the public domain has tended to recognise some histories and experiences while marginalising others. Unsurprisingly, endeavours to negotiate prejudicial art from the past has been simultaneous with endeavours to create new monuments and memorials which recognise the victims of oppression and atrocities. Some of these new public works have been successful, and the reasons for their success are worth exploring. Others, however, have proved controversial. Raising debate about not only about who or what is commemorated but also sometimes the designs deployed for such commemorations, some have additionally involved contention about the locales in which these works are placed, consultations that may or may not have taken place in the process of developing them, as well as a host of other issues. .
  • SAH 71st Annual International Conference

    Saint Paul | Dates: 18 – 22 Apr, 2018
Driehaus_SH_Horizontal_RGB_275_100
SAH thanks The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Fund at The Chicago Community Foundation for its operating support.
Society of Architectural Historians
1365 N. Astor Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
312.573.1365
Copyright - (c) 2012