Recent Opportunities

  • Architecture & Design Film Festival 2015

    New York | Dates: 13 – 18 Oct, 2015

    The Architecture & Design Film Festival, celebrates the unique creative spirit that drives architecture and design. With a curated selection of films, events and panel discussions, ADFF creates an opportunity to entertain, engage and educate all types of people who are excited about architecture and design. With well-attended screenings, legendary panelists, vibrant discussions and events in New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, it has grown into the nation’s largest film festival devoted to the subject. The ADFF also programs for international film festivals as well as cultural institutions and private venues.

    ADFF runs October 13-18, 2015.

    For more information, visit the website: The Architecture & Design Film Festival

  • CCA Formations Summer Workshops 2015

    San Francisco | Dates: 03 – 14 Aug, 2015

    The Architecture Division at California College of the Arts presents FORMATIONS SUMMER 2015: a series of workshops for college students, professionals, and members of the broader design community. 

    Led by CCA faculty, these workshops will expose students to innovative methods and techniques of 3D modeling, model-making, computational design, and digital fabrication.

    Intro to Digital Modeling (8/3-8/7/15) - 3d modeling with Lian Eoyang of VIF Studio
    Intro to Design Computation (8/3-8/7/15) - Parametric design / Grasshopper with Adam Marcus of Variable Projects
    Architectural Model-Making (8/10-8/14/15) - Physical model-making with Megan Werner of ZDP Models
    Intro to Digital Fabrication (8/10-8/14/15) - Digital fabrication with Adam Marcus of Variable Projects
    Architectural Robotics (8/10-8/14/15) - Robotic fabrication with Andrew Kudless of Matsys

    Each workshop is 1 week long, runs from Monday through Friday 9am to 5pm and will have access to studio space, computer labs, woodshops and fabrication labs. This is a great opportunity for students who would like some additional exposure to new techniques, or a “refresher” on certain skills before the fall semester starts. It’s also the perfect opportunity for professionals looking for exposure to new skill sets.

    Cost: 
    Student rate: $395 for 1-week workshop
    Professional rate: $595 for 1-week workshop

    Registration is now open. Visit the Formations website (http://formations.cca.edu) for further details, workshop descriptions, and registration information.

    For questions or more info, please contact Adam Marcus at amarcus2@cca.edu.

  • AIANY Housing Awards Winners Symposium

    New York | Dates: 23 Jun, 2015

    The AIA New York Chapter 2015 Housing Design Awards, organized by the AIANY Housing Committee, and co-sponsored by the Boston Society of Architects (BSA) were established to recognize design excellence and innovation in housing design. These are the first Housing Awards led by the AIANY in nearly a decade.

    The program concentrated on multi-family housing located anywhere in the world if designed by a member of the AIA New York or the Boston Society of Architects. In addition any registered architect anywhere in the world could submit projects located in New York City or Boston.

    Design excellence was the jury’s primary criterion. Affordability, social impact, sustainability innovation, resiliency, and meeting the specific needs of the client were also considered.

    On May 9, jurors Philip Casey, AIA; Tom Kundig, FAIA; Nancy Ludwig FAIA; Michael Maltzan, AIA; and Michael Sorkin convened at the Center for Architecture and selected the five winners below:

    39 Social Housing Units Inaqui Carnicero
    West 53rd St. Smith Miller + Hawkinson
    The Stack, Gluck +
    One Madison, CetraRuddy
    Navy Green, Architecture in Formation

    The symposium is intended to honor the winners and present their work to a wider audience.

  • Design Marfa 2015 Symposium and Home Tour

    Marfa | Dates: 18 – 19 Sep, 2015

    The Symposium spans Friday, September 18 and Saturday, September 19, and will host discussions on building and living in a desert climate including both personal and community actions. 

    Topics include:  Harvesting Rainwater, Marfa’s Multi-Family Housing Competition,  Marfa Modular, Earthen Structures, Bikesharing & Community, Marfa’s Hotel St. George, Marfa Design + Build.

    The afternoon of Saturday, September 19 will offer participants the rare glimpse of 6 diverse private homes in Marfa, Texas. This year’s tour ranges from mansion to miniature and new construction to historic adobe.

  • Becoming Clear Comfort: History of a Landmark

    Staten Island | Dates: 14 Mar – 30 Aug, 2015
    Becoming Clear Comfort: History of a Landmark brings to light the history of the museum’s National and New York City Landmark building, tracing its path from one-room Dutch farmhouse in the 1690s, to Victorian Gothic cottage and home to early American photographer Alice Austen (1866-1952), to protected landmark, to public museum. Presented upon the museum’s 30th anniversary and as part of the celebrations for the 50th anniversary of the NYC Landmarks Law, this exhibition explores the Alice Austen House’s significance in New York City history and tells the fascinating story of the saving of the house from threatened destruction.
  • Panel Discussion: Sheltering Lives

    Washington | Dates: 20 Jul, 2015

    Over the past ten years, many approaches to designing and building post-disaster shelters have been deployed internationally with mixed success. Panelists explore how architects, humanitarians, and disaster communities are working together to design better-performing and more site-appropriate shelter solutions. This program complements the exhibition Designing for Disaster, which is open to attendees before the discussion.

    1.5 LU HSW (AIA)

    $12 Members; $12 Students; $20 Non-members. Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

  • Selling Long Island: Commercial Maps of the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

    Cold Spring Harbor | Dates: 06 Jun – 22 Nov, 2015

    SPLIA’s gallery for changing exhibitions is housed in the former Methodist-Episcopal Church building, an 1842 historic landmark, which is located at 161 Main Street in Cold Spring Harbor. The gallery, outfitted for flexibility, occupies the first floor and is a venue for permanent and changing exhibitions, public programs, and meetings. Exhibits at the gallery explore Long Island’s remarkable past with particular reference to architecture, decorative arts and cultural history.

    UPCOMING EXHIBIT:
    “Selling Long Island: Commercial Maps of the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries”

    SPLIA Gallery
    161 Main Street
    Cold Spring Harbor, NY
    Gallery Hours: June 6, 2015 – November 22, 2015
    Open Thursdays through Sundays 11AM – 4PM

    Guest Curator, Robert B. MacKay, SPLIA’s Director Emeritas

    SPLIA’s latest exhibit explores how the art of cartography was used during the 19th and 20th centuries to define the geography of Long Island as a place for investment, industry and commerce, home-building, and ultimately, substantial growth and profit. Featured map-types include those created for the Long Island Railroad, large wall atlases, tax maps, scientific surveys, and bird’s-eye views that, along with related ephemera such as period real estate and travel brochures, illustrate Long Island’s transformation from rural outpost to modern suburb.

  • Frank Gehry

    Los Angeles | Dates: 13 Sep, 2015 – 20 Mar, 2016

    Frank Gehry has revolutionized architecture’s aesthetics, social and cultural role, and relationship to the city. His pioneering work in digital technologies set in motion the practices adopted by the construction industry today. The Canadian-born, Los Angeles–based architect’s work interrogates a building’s means of expression, a process that has brought with it new methods of design and technology as well as an innovative approach to materials. Gehry's innovation and ability to push the boundaries of architecture garnered him the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1989.

    Frank Gehry presents a comprehensive examination of his extraordinary body of work from the early 1960s—he established his firm in Los Angeles in 1962—to the present, featuring over 200 drawings, many of which have never been seen publicly, and 65 models that illuminate the evolution of Gehry’s thinking. Tracing the arc of his career, the exhibition focuses on two main themes: urbanism and the development of new systems of digital design and fabrication, including his use of CATIA, a software tool used in the aeronautics and automobile industries, which allows the digital manipulation of 3-D representations. This retrospective offers an opportunity to reflect on the development of Gehry’s work and to understand the processes of one of the great 

  • The City to Sea Project / Coney Island Workshop

    New York | Dates: 04 – 07 Sep, 2015

    The City to Sea Project is delighted to announce their second unique four-day visual urbanism workshop. The program will take place in Coney Island, New York City, USA over Labor Day weekend: September 4-7.

    Tutors include: Peter Marlow (Magnum Photos), David Kendall (Goldsmiths, University of London) and Rebecca Locke (Goldsmiths, University of London). In addition, the workshop program will be accompanied by contextual presentations and discussions with New York City and Goldsmiths, University of London based researchers and artists. Students will work alongside guest presenters including Paul Halliday (Course Leader of the international MA program in Photography and Urban Cultures, Goldsmiths, UOL) and Konstantin Sergeyev (NYC Documentary Photographer and Photo Editor at New York Magazine).

  • Architecture on Display: The Architecture Exhibition as Model for Knowledge Production

    Delft | Dates: 12 Jun – 31 Aug, 2015
    We now recognize the architecture exhibition as a medium of its own, including its own history. It cannot therefore be treated as a neutral vehicle for the presentation of best practices, the dissemination of innovative ideas, or for the propagation of a singular architectural style or ideology. Exhibitions have a power to frame architectural discourse by exploring the larger cultural conditions that shape the discipline. In the same way as a world's fair communicates a global condition, an exhibition of architectural drawings communicates the existence of archives and their institutional memory, while a model interior of a house conveys that the private, everyday realm also belongs to the sphere of culture and its politics. Architecture exhibitions come in many variants, as we know. A dominant exhibition format has tended to showcase the latest developments of masterpiece architecture to a larger audience, as was the case with the now iconic Modern Architecture: International Exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1932, which launched the International Style. Other formats such as biennials stage debates on the state of architecture in relation to urgent societal or urban issues, e.g. The Greater Number at the Milan Triennale in 1968 curated by Giancarlo De Carlo. Last year’s Venice Biennale entitled Fundamentals, curated by Rem Koolhaas, proposed another kind of format that dominated the various presentations: the exhibition as a platform for the presentation of research. From Beatriz Colomina’s Radical Pedagogies to the Korean pavilion by Minsuk Cho of Mass Studies that won the Golden Lion, the exhibition was not simply a product of research: research itself was on display. For its second annual conference, The Jaap Bakema Study Centre, in collaboration with TU Delft and Het Nieuwe Instituut, wants to look closer into this relationship between research and the exhibition medium. We are interested in contributions that bring to the conference a wide variety of perspectives, both historical and theoretical in nature, and which address, but are not limited to the following questions. Formats and Typologies Which formats and typologies of display can play a key role in establishing a profound relationship between exhibition and research? Where and who is the audience, and what is its role within the exhibition as a site of knowledge production? What are the classical and innovative narratives, what are the successful formats? What sort of exhibition design is involved? From installations and 1:1 models to chronologies, from archive presentations to 3D-animations. Archives and Knowledge Production Exhibitions often combine original sources such as historical drawings, photographs and models, with new materials that are especially produced for the exhibition. If the exhibition is a site of knowledge production, what is the relation between original sources and newly produced material? What kind of objects and materials are put on display? What is the role of institutional archives and private collections when making an exhibition? What sort of products are the specially produced materials in terms of didactics, analysis, mapping, documentation, survey, data-mining, synthesis, or even propaganda? How are the different modes and standards of 'research' (e.g. scholarly research, design research) compatible with the exhibition format? Analysis and Speculation Exhibitions as platforms of research seem to hold the capacity to alternate between analysis and speculation. How can exhibitions combine the accumulation of historical experience in the archive with speculations about the future? Does the exhibition as a site of knowledge production play a special role in relating historical and archival research to contemporary questions of architecture and urban planning? And finally, what does turning an exhibition into a platform for research tell us about the state of the discipline and where it is heading? Abstracts of 300-500 words plus a short bio (300 words max) should be sent to Dirk van den Heuvel: d.vandenheuvel@tudelft.nl Dates: Deadline: Monday 31 August 2015 Notification of selection: Monday 14 September 2015 Dates of the conference: 30 November – 1 December 2015 Organizing Committee: Dirk van den Heuvel (Jaap Bakema Study Centre) Tom Avermaete (TU Delft) Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen (Yale University) Guus Beumer (Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam) Dick van Gameren (TU Delft)
  • Le Corbusier - What Moves Us ...?

    Aarhus | Dates: 12 Jun – 01 Aug, 2015
    This call invites students and scholars of architecture and art history to contribute to the following three sections: Section A: Turnabout: Le Corbusier, Architect Artist in Postwar Europe Section B: Crossroads: Le Corbusier and Asger Jorn Section C: Transgressions: Le Corbusier in Danish Architecture and Urbanism The purpose of this conference is to instigate a discussion and to draw up perspectives for further research on the specific subject matters listed above. Your abstract (500 words)must give an overview of a proposed 20 minute paper presentation. Abstracts will undergo a review process. Submissions should be saved in Word or PDF format and be submitted by 1 August 2015 via the conference email address: Lecorbu@aarch.dk Any queries about the format of submissions etc. can be addressed to Ruth Baumeister and Hanne Foged Gjelstrup via the conference email address. For more information read the full call on www.aarch.dk
  • Miles Through History

    Dates: 21 Jun, 2015

    See the southern end of the Rogue Valley as it was in 1872 through the lens of Jeff LaLande’s research and experience. Jeff LaLande, archaeologist and historian, dusts off the layers of modern times with his words and reveals historic landscapes at 10 historic sites including Tunnel 13, the Siskiyou Toll Road Gatehouse, the Dollarhide House, Steinman’s Loop and others.

    Caravan is limited to eight vehicles because some of the stops are on narrow byways and historic roads. Participants will meet up at the start of the road trip and drive their own vehicles in a caravan. Preregistration and prepayment is required, $40/vehicle for members and $50/vehicle for nonmembers. For more information and to register, call 541-773-6536 x202.

  • After Hours at Robie House - Nights at the Museums

    Chicago | Dates: 20 Aug, 2015

    Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural masterpiece will open its doors this summer for a special After Hours event. Gather with friends for a festive and casual evening of music, drinks and light hors d’oeuvres. Enjoy this icon of modernism and wander its celebrated spaces. Guides will be available to give tours and answer questions.

    Frederick C. Robie House is one of six Chicago South Side cultural institutions opening their doors after regular hours this summer for Museum Campus South’sNights at the Museums series, which marks the inauguration of the Museum Campus South Passport: a project designed to encourage visitors to explore all that Museum Campus South has to offer. Visitors who receive passport stamps from Robie House, the DuSable Museum of African American History, Oriental Institute Museum, the Renaissance Society, Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts and Smart Museum of Art by December 31, 2015 will receive an exclusive Museum Campus South mug. Passports will be available at all Nights at the Museums series events and downloadable here.

  • 25th International Sculpture Conference: New Frontiers in Sculpture

    Phoenix | Dates: 04 – 07 Nov, 2015
    The International Sculpture Center will travel to Phoenix, Arizona this November 4-7, 2015 for its first conference in the American Southwest. Inspired by exploration in art and architecture in desert landscapes, the 25th International Sculpture Conference will bring together artists, arts administrators, curators, patrons, students, and sculpture enthusiasts for new discoveries in the field of sculpture. Registration opens soon! This four day conference will include 14 conference sessions including panels, keynotes, mentor sessions, and ARTSlams; evening receptions at Bentley Gallery, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, and the David and Gladys Wright House, among others; a gallery and studio hop on Grand Avenue and Roosevelt Row; and much more. Pre- and post-conference hands-on workshops and optional trips will also be available (additional fees apply). Visit www.sculpture.org/az2015 to register and for more information.
  • Architecture 101: Newport Mansions

    Washington | Dates: 26 Jul, 2015

    Newport County, Rhode Island, one of the most historically intact cities in North America, is home to fourteen historic properties and landscapes, of which seven are National Historic Landmarks. Trudy Coxe, CEO and executive director of The Preservation Society of Newport County, discusses the “Newport Mansions,” which represent three centuries of America’s architectural, social, and landscape history.

    The Museum’s Architecture 101 lecture series, which provides professionals, students, and the general public alike with the opportunity to learn about historical architectural movements every summer, continues this year with a dip into a few types of beach architecture in celebration of the Museum’s summer installation. Come to class in 2015 to learn about lighthouses on July 12the Sea Ranch on July 19, and Newport Mansions on July 26.

    1.5 LU (AIA)

    $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member.
    Special series pricing for all three lectures:  $30 Member | $25 Student | $50 Non-member.

    Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Photo: Marble House, exterior. Photo by Gavin Ashworth, courtesy of The Preservation Society of Newport County.

    Date: Sunday, July 26, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

  • Architecture 101: The Sea Ranch

    Washington | Dates: 19 Jul, 2015

    Recently having celebrated its 50th anniversary, the Sea Ranch development in coastal Sonoma County, California, is internationally known for its distinctive architecture and ecologically-sensitive land planning. Donlyn Lyndon, FAIA, Eva Li Professor Emeritus of Architecture and Urban Design and Professor of the Graduate School (Architecture) at UC Berkeley, discusses the unique aspects of this development.

    The Museum’s Architecture 101 lecture series, which provides professionals, students, and the general public alike with the opportunity to learn about historical architectural movements every summer, continues this year with a dip into a few types of beach architecture in celebration of the Museum’s summer installation. Come to class in 2015 to learn about lighthouses on July 12, the Sea Ranch on July 19, and Newport Mansions on July 26.

    1.5 LU (AIA) / 1.5CM (AICP) / 1.5 PDH (LA CES)

    $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member.
    Special series pricing for all three lectures:  $30 Member | $25 Student | $50 Non-member.

    Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Date: Sunday, July 19, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

  • Architecture 101: Lighthouses

    Washington | Dates: 12 Jul, 2015

    Lighthouses are familiar sights along coastlines around the world. James Hyland, president and founder of The Lighthouse Preservation Society, presents a stylistic and functional history of lighthouses, which have assisted seafarers as entrance markers for ports and as warning signals for dangerous conditions and underwater geography and which represent a wide variety of styles and designs.

    The Museum’s Architecture 101 lecture series, which provides professionals, students, and the general public alike with the opportunity to learn about historical architectural movements every summer, continues this year with a dip into a few types of beach architecture in celebration of the Museum’s summer installation. Come to class in 2015 to learn about lighthouses on July 12, the Sea Ranch on July 19, and Newport Mansions on July 26.

    1.5 LU (AIA)

    $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member.
    Special series pricing for all three lectures:  $30 Member | $25 Student | $50 Non-member.

    Pre-registration required. Walk-in registration based on availability.

    Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Registration is for event planning purposes only and does not guarantee a seat. Online registration for Museum programs closes at midnight the day before the scheduled program.

    The Museum's award-winning Shop and Firehook Café are open for one hour prior to the start of the program. Shop and Café hours are subject to change.

    Date: Sunday, July 12, 2015 
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

  • Facing East: Chinese Urbanism in Africa

    New York | Dates: 17 Jun – 01 Aug, 2015

    Facing East: Chinese Urbanism in Africa
    June 17th – August 1st, 2015

    Exhibition Opening: June 16th, 2015
    Storefront’s Members’ Preview: 6 to 7 pm
    Discussion with the Curators and Global Experts: 7 to 8 pm
    Opening Reception: 8 to 9 pm

    China’s influence in Africa is growing quickly on many levels. All across the continent, Chinese companies are creating new highways, light rail systems, Special Economic Zones, and mass housing developments. Cities have received brand new skylines “made in China”: designed by Chinese architecture firms, financed by Chinese banks, and built by Chinese contractors. From foundational elements such as concrete, window frames, and fire extinguishers, to decorative ones such as carpets and curtains, many of the basic items used to construct these skylines have been sourced directly from China.

    On June 16th, 2015, Storefront for Art and Architecture will open 
    Facing East: Chinese Urbanism in Africa, an exhibition by journalist Michiel Hulshof (Tertium, Amsterdam) and architect Daan Roggeveen (MORE Architecture, Shanghai). Facing East investigates the impact of Chinese development on fast-growing African cities, and is built around personal stories of individuals involved in the urbanization process.

    Hulshof and Roggeveen have traveled to six African cities, from Accra to Addis Ababa to Kigali, in order to research the Chinese impact that exists on the ground. They interviewed over a hundred Chinese and African architects, politicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, students, developers, artists, and individuals who are involved in or touched by Africa’s rapid process of urbanization.

    China’s influence in Africa often goes even further than what we perceive through the lens of the built environment. China’s state-owned CCTV Africa is broadcasting throughout the continent, and many African capitals have Confucius Institutes, in which an increasing number of African students are learning Mandarin Chinese.

    Facing East
     allows visitors to experience the fascinating consequences of shifts in geopolitical power from the perspectives of those living it. The visitor finds himself in the same unstable position as Hulshof and Roggeveen during their research trips, and is forced to make associations between narratives, navigate existing and new relationships, and attempt to tie these together to comprehend the next chapter of globalization: one in which many African cities are beginning to face eastward.

  • LADF River Series: Riverly Reflections with Carol Armstrong, Mia Lehrer, Deborah Weintraub

    Los Angeles | Dates: 13 Jun, 2015

    Planners, designers, real estate developers, engineers, and anyone with a vested interest in Los Angeles are buzzing with ideas on how to restore the LA River to it former glory, turning it into an urban greenway and opening it up to new recreational opportunities, leading to potentially billions of dollars of investment and eventually transforming it into a regional amenity for Los Angeles. 

    The LA Design Festival is curating a three-part series of conversations with some of the leading designers who are re-imagining what the LA River could be, hosted at locations along the LA River that showcase its diversity and variation.

    Industrial designer Brendan Ravenhill will host LARiverWorks Director Carol Armstrong, ML+A’s Mia Lehrer, and City of LA Chief Deputy City Engineer Deborah Weintraub at his riverside studio for a conversation about their perspective on urban ecology and the future of our river, moderated by editor of Planetizen and contributor at The Architect’s Newspaper, James Brasuell.

  • Call for Papers: Architecture and Experience in the Nineteenth Century (17 and 18 March 2016)

    Oxford | Dates: 10 Jun – 05 Nov, 2015
    Call for Papers: Architecture and Experience in the Nineteenth Century 17-18 March 2016 - St John’s College, University of Oxford Submission deadline: 5 November 2015 Victorians constructed their buildings to be more than just seen; they were made to be inhabited. This seemingly obvious statement raises an important but often overlooked question: how was architecture experienced in the nineteenth century? This period witnessed unprecedented urban growth, radical new materials, invented building types and sometimes dangerous technologies. Now more than ever buildings embodied the cultural values of their patrons, architects, and builders. The aesthetics of churches were shaped by desires to secure particular responses from congregations. The architecture of scientific laboratories could be intended to guide specific approaches to knowledge production. Of course once complete, the meanings of such works were unstable and subject to an audience’s interpretation. Architectural history has traditionally focused on questions of style and form. However in recent years the discipline has demonstrated a growing interest in the social history of architecture, with attention paid to how buildings were used. This has led to the analysis of building as more than merely a passive background to human activity. The question that this conference addresses is, what were the purposes of architectural projects and how did they perform? Clubs, debating chambers, schools, cathedrals, houses, hotels and laboratories were all built to perform specific functions. Once constructed, they were all experienced by audiences who inhabited these spaces. At a basic level, how did people hear, breath, see, and smell these structures? Ventilation, acoustics, and lighting were all vital considerations for architects. But also, how did these buildings convey meaning? How did they instruct and educate? Nineteenth-century buildings were not just works of art, but mechanisms of function, utility, and performance. We welcome submissions from all disciplines, and are keen to encourage interdisciplinary applications from scholars and architectural practitioners. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length. Please send proposals of up to 250 words and a one page CV to victorian.architecture@history.ox.ac.uk by 5 November 2015.
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