Recent Opportunities

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  • Townscapes in transition. Transformation and reorganization of Italian cities and their architecture in the interwar period.

    Sorrento | Dates: 14 – 17 Jun, 2018

    38th annual conference of the American Association for Italian Studies
    Sant'Anna Institute, Sorrento (Italy), June 14-17, 2018
    Conference deadline: December 30, 2017

    Session 24:
    Townscapes in transition. Transformation and reorganization of Italian cities and their architecture in the interwar period.


    Social change after WWI led to an accelerated change in the built environment. Within a broad stylistic scope of architectural and urban design projects, the structural ‘DNA‘ of Italian historic cities offered a basic planning guideline. Historic paradigms determined not only trends in conservation but guided new approaches to architecture as well as urban and landscape design. The result was not a single strategy to ensure continuity in urban planning and architecture, but a multiplicity of formal principles and trends. The session proposes to clarify what methods Italian architects and urban planners used to take possession of a ‘Roman’ or ‘Italian’ building and planning tradition, and how they accommodated it to the modernization of their country.

    Please submit via email a 200-250-word abstract of the presentation, a brief biographical note and affiliation to Luigi Monzo (info@luigimonzo.de) by December 30, 2017. Please comply with conference guidelines: https://aais.wildapricot.org/conference_guidelines. 

    The conference languages are Italian and English.

    Session organizers and chairs: 

    Luigi Monzo, University of Innsbruck (Austria) Email: info@luigimonzo.de 

    Carmen M. Enss, University of Bamberg (Germany) Email: carmen.enss@uni-bamberg.de
  • Announcing the Publication of the SAHANZ 2017 Annual Conference Proceedings

    Dates: 01 Dec, 2017 – 01 Dec, 2018

    Gevork Hartoonian and John Ting would like to announce the publication of the SAHANZ 2017 annual conference proceedings. The conference was hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra, and held at the Shine Dome in July.

    The online version of the proceedings is  available at: http://www.canberra.edu.au/about-uc/faculties/arts-design/newsandevents/upcoming-fad-conferences/sahanz-2017/papers

    Printed versions of the proceedings are available on a print-on-demand basis - please email John Ting at john.ting@canberra.edu.au

  • GLI 2018 - Executive Education for Museum Leaders

    Claremont | Dates: 14 May – 23 Jun, 2018

    The renowned Getty Leadership Institute for executive leaders is entering its 39th year. The program is designed to help experienced top-level executives become better leaders to strengthen their institutions’ capabilities and advance the field.

    This intensive management program is for CEOs, Directors, COOs, and senior-level museum executives who influence policy, effect change, and are in the first two to seven years of their position. Program participants take four weeks of intensive courses that address current trends and challenges in the museum field. The program blends two weeks online and two weeks of residency at CGU, and includes practicum sessions at Los Angeles area institutions. Academically rigorous, the program emphasizes leadership, strategy, organizational culture, and change management.

    The selection process aims at creating a class of participants that fosters the best peer learning experience for all. GLI strives to include participants with a range of specializations, sizes, budgets, and geographical locations. We actively seek the participation of museum professionals from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds. Selection preference will be given to qualified candidates from art institutions.

    Have questions about GLI 2018 and the application process? Join us for an informational webinar. Click here to learn more.

    Applications due January 24, 2018.
  • Workshop on Vernacular Balkan Architecture: Rhodope Mountains

    Dolen | Dates: 25 – 25 May, 2018

    Dates: 14 - 28 July 2018 

    Southeastern Europe, also known as the Balkans, has been a crossroads of human migration and a pivot point of civilizations since the dawn of time. Here, central and eastern Europe have met the Mediterranean and western Asia for many millennia, sometimes resulting in conflict, but above all bringing together a unique blending of cultures, religions, languages, folklore, traditions and crafts. Traditional architecture in Bulgaria is part of the common Balkan heritage. More preserved in the mountain areas, it’s characterized by its harmonic connection with nature, fascinating interior features and picturesque settlement configurations. Bulgarian traditional architecture stems from ancient Thracian and Roman tradition, and has evolved through the centuries within the Byzantine, medieval Bulgarian and later the Ottoman world, coming in contact with many influences in these vast and diverse empires. From the Middle Ages onward, itinerant Bulgarian builders and craftsmen have crisscrossed the Balkans and the Eastern Mediterranean, spreading their work throughout three continents, but also gathering and exchanging knowledge and techniques as far as Italy to the west, Armenia to the east, Vienna to the north and Egypt to the south. Closely and sustainably interacting with nature, combining functional simplicity, comfort of use and delicate and harmonious aesthetics perfected through the ages, Bulgarian traditional architecture is not only interesting to discover and study, but also very compatible with modern building practices tending toward a sustainable, ecological way of life.

    Today, the Rhodope Mountains mark the border between Bulgaria and Greece, but have also acted as an interface as well as a boundary throughout the ages. Here, in Orpheus’ homeland, all the influences that have swept the Balkans over the centuries have accumulated and interwoven rather than wiping away one another, giving birth to a unique amalgamation of architectural traditions and techniques, but also of cultures and beliefs. Here, coexisting with their modern lifestyle, the sturdy mountain people still preserve knowledge and ways of life that have long been forgotten elsewhere. The village of Dolen, an architectural reserve with remarkable authenticity, is a particularly interesting illustration of the rich, multi-layered history of the Rhodopes and the Balkans in general. Within the tiny boundaries of this village, one can discover key elements and processes that have shaped the Bulgarian and Balkan traditional architecture, approach traditions and folklore still carrying the echo of ancient times and feel the magic of the Rhodope Mountains.

    The Field School is comprised of:

    • - Fieldwork in surveying & recording of vernacular architecture. In the course of the Workshop, participants will have the opportunity to work on the analytical architectural documentation of Rhodopean architecture in the village of Dolen. They will be able to acquire skills in architectural documentation, material and historical research and analysis.
    • - Specialized lectures on southeast European late medieval history, architectural typology, traditional building techniques and natural materials
    • - Study visits to significant historical and natural sites in the Rhodopes and the Pirin mountains      
    • - Workshops in conservation and restoration of vernacular architecture - Building techniques and the specific use of materials in the Balkans have been developed by generations of craftsmen. Large bands of builders (called “tayfi”) used to travel across the Ottoman Empire, trading their craft. These groups applied their knowledge wherever they went, but they had to also conform to the wishes of their clients. Still, improving structural efficiency and spatial functionality were the main vectors of development for the building principles. During the workshops supervised by local craftsmen, specialized in the restoration of traditional architecture participants will be able to try working with different traditional building techniques and materials, characteristic to the region – wood, stone and clay   




  • Generosity: an international conference at the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff, UK

    Cardiff | Dates: 27 – 29 Jun, 2018

    GENEROSITY An international conference to be held at the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff, Wales, UK, from 27-29 June 2018

    GENEROSITY is associated with the act of giving or sharing more than is necessary, with gifting, with bravery, with notions of a benefactor and a recipient, and with a quality of being plentiful or expansive. From an architectural perspective, interpretations are many and various.  Alberto Perez Gomez writes of poïesis in architecture as ‘signifying the sort of technical making proper to humans: a poetic making in the sense that it always aimed at more than preserving life.’ Eileen Grey is more explicit, stating that ‘a house is not a machine-à-habiter. It is man’s […] continuation, his spreading out, his spiritual emanation.’  George Bataille, meanwhile, suggests that ‘everything conspires to obscure the basic movement that tends to restore wealth to its function, to gift-giving, to squandering without reciprocation…’

    From a stance of celebrating and questioning architecture’s potential for generosity, this call for papers invites academics and creative practitioners to explore ways in which architecture aspires to, or may be expected to, give more than is necessary. This could be considered within the current economic context of austerity or within the broader historic context of a discipline often working in frameworks focused on cost and quantitative measurement. Reflections are welcomed which critically examine themes of GENEROSITY as related to architecture and related fields, whether they be from a conceptual or theoretical position, embedded in everyday processes and expectations of practice, or from considerations of procurement, regulation, and policy. Possible themes include, but are not limited to:

     
    Generosity and Delight

    Architects have long argued that good design demands qualitative as well as quantitative appreciation, and goes beyond the scale of a space or materials specifications etc. With time, attitudes to measuring value and good practice are re-articulated and new forms of generosity arise. This theme calls for papers that explore how the concept of generosity is achieved and how it changes in the built environment, whether this be through an exploration of new forms of communicative value, design of ornament, or other, alternative means of measuring such a construct.

    Generosity and Procurement

    The Artistic Directors for the 16th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice (2018) have announced that the festival will be concerned with ‘generosity, thoughtfulness and a desire to engage’. Meanwhile, the British Council call for proposals (2017) questioned: “How can British architecture demonstrate ‘generosity and thoughtfulness’ towards its users, citizens and the public?” If the state of the built environment is governed by developer’ appetites and procurement processes, how might generosity be better embedded in the commissioning, delivery or ownership of architecture and public space?

    Generosity and Participation

    In the vacuum of public sector inactivity, architects (among others) have been called upon to support community-led development, regeneration and invention. Such projects often follow unconventional programmes, and redefine the role of the architect – as facilitator, mediator or advisor. Papers are invited which critique the opportunities, risks and implications of generosity in co-production and participatory design.

    Generosity of Spirit

    Architecture is regularly criticised for being elitist, and overly focussed on a tiny fraction of the global population. Architects like Dominic Stevens and Alejandro Aravena have exploited the facility to share open-access information over the internet, providing housing designs or templates as freely available, open-source resources. While it is unclear what impact these ‘gifts’ will have on the global housing crisis, they are indicative of a generosity of spirit that has potential to reach the furthest corners of the planet. We invite papers that explore issues of ownership in design, or that identify and evaluate architecture or designers working outside of established boundaries or conventional definitions.

     Generation Generosity

    Against a backdrop of socio-political uncertainty, many young practitioners are responding directly to civic and social issues through self-initiated projects and research. Debates around architectural education, the value of practice based learning and the impact of tuition fees have contributed to a surge in self-directed projects amongst young practitioners. Such projects are often nimble, independently instigated and exploratory. We invite papers from postgraduates, young creative practitioners, tutors, and early career academics, to celebrate ideas that represent communality, reciprocal care and giving.

    Confirmed keynote speakers are:

    Professor Martin Bressani, Sir William C. MacDonald Chair and Director of McGill University’s School of Architecture, Montreal

     

    Daisy Froud

    Architects of Change (AOC), London, UK

     

    Alastair Parvin

    Co-founder of WikiHouse Foundation, and a member of strategic design group 00

     

    Dr Chris L. Smith

    Associate Professor in Architectural Design and Technê, University of Sydney

     

    Nathalie Weadick

    Director, Irish Architecture Foundation

     

    Opening address at drinks reception: Sophie Howe Wales' Future Generations Commissioner for the The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act

     

    Abstracts of 300 words for a 20 minute presentation, a 3-minute film, or a workshop are invited on any topic related to themes of Generosity in architecture or related fields, and should be submitted for refereeing by 15 January 2018 to the email generosity@cardiff.ac.uk, using the template provided on the website.  We invite contributions from academics and creative practitioners. Authors will be notified of selection by 12 February 2018.  Following previous WSA conference publications Primitive, Quality, and Economy, we aim to publish an edited book of selected papers following the conference.

    A drinks reception will be held on the night of Wednesday 27 June and a conference dinner on Thursday 28 June. These will be included in the conference fee of £295 sterling. A reduced fee of £260 applies if payment is received by 31 March 2018. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

    Generosity is the fourth in a series of academic conferences held at the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University, following Primitive, Quality and Economy, and is organised by Dr Mhairi McVicar, Dr Ed Green, Dr Charles Drozynski, Michael Corr, Professor Stephen Kite, and Zoe Berman. For more information, contact Helen Monks at generosity@cardiff.ac.uk. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by 15 January 2018 to generosity@cardiff.ac.uk using the template on the website.  Registration will open on 12th February 2018 and additional information can be found on the conference website https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/conferences/generosity

  • HILT: June 4-8, 2018

    Philadelphia | Dates: 04 – 08 Jun, 2018
    The HILT (Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching) Institute is excited to announce that our 6th annual meeting will be held June 4-8, 2018, on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    HILT is a 5-day training institute that includes keynotes, ignite talks, and local cultural heritage excursions for researchers, students, early career scholars and cultural heritage professionals who seek to learn more about Digital Humanities theory, practice, and culture. In addition to the conference’s day-time sessions, participants can enjoy opportunities to explore the city through local dining and special events.

    Registration begins on November 20. Please visit our website (http://dhtraining.org/hilt/conferences/hilt-2018/) for more information.
  • SAH Marion Dean Ross / Pacific Northwest Chapter Annual Conference

    Astoria | Dates: 18 – 20 May, 2018

    The date and location for the annual conference of the Marion Dean Ross/Pacific Northwest Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians has been set!  The conference will be held in Astoria, Oregon, May 18-20, 2018. 

    Our conference committee is working away, planning a stellar conference, as you can imagine it would be in such a wonderful place.  Please mark your calendars.

    The Call for Papers will come out next month, in November.  Please consider submitting an abstract.  The theme will center around Astoria’s traditional maritime history.  It will also focus on the diversity of people who settled in Astoria over time and made it their home through the traditions they brought with them, the traditions they forged once arriving in Clatsop County, and of course, the resulting architecture.  As usual, papers are also encouraged that reflect other themes relevant to the chapter’s mission.

  • ''Fresco-Hunting'' Photo Research Expedition to Medieval Balkan Churches

    Sofia | Dates: 12 – 26 May, 2018
    THE EXPEDITION: The "Fresco-Hunting" Photo Research Expedition to Medieval Balkan Churches provides a unique opportunity for students and volunteers to take part in an expedition for the documentation of abandoned medieval churches/chapels and their frescos in western Bulgaria, and to visit many other Christian Orthodox churches and monasteries, museums and archaeological sites in Sofia, western Bulgaria and eastern Serbia. The number of these monuments has sadly been permanently decreasing due to the lack of effort to preserve and protect them from weather damage and vandalism. During the last ten years, specialists from Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia, USA, Canada and Japan as well as students from all over the world participating in the “Fresco-Hunting” Photo Expedition have expanded and upgraded the existing database of drawn and photographic records of twelve churches and chapels in western Bulgaria. We aim to publish a complete corpus of these medieval frescos and to develop further projects to support and record the remaining endangered sites through conservation, restoration, development and/or improvement of each site's management, and fund-raising. Our work so far has been successful in raising public awareness, and some of the sites we documented have been protected (Balsha, Kalotina, Zimevitsa). In 2017, the Balkan Heritage Foundation issued the first e-book dedicated to one of the churches documented by the Expedition, the 17th century church St. Thedore Tyro in Zimevitsa. The work on a publication of two more churches (Balsha and Golesh) is now in progress. Unfortunately, many more remain in desperate condition, awaiting either better times or continued deterioration.

    ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL CONTEXT: The decline of the Byzantine Empire, the rise and fall of the Second Bulgarian Empire and Serbian Kingdom (and Empire from 1346 to 1371), the Ottoman conquest of Southeastern Europe and the height of Ottoman power highlight the Late Medieval period in the Balkans from 13th to 17th centuries. The churches and chapels which will be visited and studied during the field school were built during these turbulent times in one of the few Balkan areas where the traditions of all the major Balkan Late Medieval art schools and guilds (those of Constantinople, Tarnovo, Ohrid, Thessaloniki, Mount Athos, Epirus, and Crete) met. What we see today from the once-flourishing medieval Orthodox art in the area are the small chapels and churches that survived the Ottoman invasion in the 14th and 15th centuries and the following social and political upheavals. Many of these monuments are characterized by humble architecture and often hide exquisite frescos behind their unattractive exterior. Most of them were abandoned long ago, and there is visible damage due to both vandalism (during the period of the Ottoman Empire by either hostile Muslims or superstitious Christians, and nowadays by looters and vandals) and/or decay due to weather and lack of maintenance following their abandonment.

    THE FIELD SCHOOL: In 2018, the project envisions to supplement the database created during the previous seasons by documenting the architecture and frescos (and their condition) of four to six medieval Christian Orthodox chapels or small churches in western Bulgarian borderlands near Tran and collect new data on their history, artifacts and environment. The region in focus is geographically and culturally very close to present-day eastern Serbia, where a photography excursion to several medieval ecclesiastic monuments will also take place. The students will be able to identify parallels and make comparisons between the churches and their murals across the border in Serbia and those that they will be working to document in Bulgaria.

    The Field School is comprised of:
    - Fieldwork that entails preliminary survey of architecture, frescos and their iconographic program; creation of textual, graphic (drawn) and photographic records of ecclesiastical edifices and their frescos (in up to six churches)
    - Specialized lectures in Southeastern European medieval history; Christian Orthodox architecture, arts and iconography; documentary photography; fresco conservation and restoration; methodology of project survey as well as introduction to photogrammetry and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)
    - Workshops for graphic (drawn) documentation and processing of digital images as well as developing archives of digital images plus free optional workshop on illustration of architectural features and frescos (using graphic software)
    - Excursions and guided tours of Sofia, Rila Monastery (UNESCO World Heritage Site), Bulgaria, as well as the 14th-century Momchilov Grad Fortress in Pirot and Poganovo monastery, Serbia
  • How to Narrate the History of Architecture? Centenary of Birth of Architectural Historian Bruno Zevi (1918-2000)

    Haifa | Dates: 07 – 12 May, 2018
    The Faculty of Architecture & Town Planning and Avie and Sarah Arenson Built Heritage Research Center, the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, is proud to announce an international conference to mark the centenary of the birth of the architect, architectural historian, critic, educator, Italian statesman and Jewish activist-Bruno Zevi (1918-2000).

    Bruno Zevi holds a prominent place in mid-20th century writing on architecture. After World War II, he was among the first to publish a vision of modern architecture, adapted to the new perspectives of the postwar era. However, not only did he critique aspects of interwar modernism, he also strove to demonstrate how one could approach the entire legacy of architectural history from a modern point of view. The early books that he published in 1945-1950 (Verso un’architettura organica; Saper vedere l’architettura; Storia dell’architettura moderna; Architettura e storiografia, translated into English and other languages) add up to a historiographical construction that relates history to modernity. In that he partakes in the perennial project of retelling and remolding architectural history for contemporary needs.

    We, therefore, dedicate the conference to Bruno Zevi’s version of architectural history, as well as to constructions of the narrative of architectural history in general.
    The need to rethink the established account in history books and in the classroom, is felt again in recent years- in view of ongoing global processes and cultural change. We therefore invite papers on the general theme: “How to narrate the history of architecture?” which addresses the dilemmas, past and present, of relating the comprehensive story of architecture.

    We also welcome papers on the portrayal of specific periods that preoccupied Bruno Zevi – Classical Architecture, Renaissance and Baroque, Modern Architecture, Architecture in Modern Italy – as well as on major concepts in his writing – Space and Architecture, Anti-classicism, Organic Architecture, Judaism and Architecture. 

    Bruno Zevi actively participated in the architectural discourse, as well as in the general public debate in Italy. At the same time, Zevi was always proud of his Jewish heritage. He was also greatly interested in Israel, and contributed in various ways to the promotion of architectural design and research in the country.

    We welcome papers on Zevi’s work and biography, and on the role he played in cultural life in Italy and Israel. 



    Abstracts:
    Please send an abstract of proposed paper, no longer than 300 words in English, together with a short CV (no longer than  500 words), before 15 December, 2017.
    to: Conference Coordinator, Ms. Lena Arbov, e-mail: brunozevi100@gmail.com

    Papers:
    2,500 words in English, for a 20 mins. presentation. 

    Publication: 
    After the conference, publication of selected papers in book form will be contemplated

    Time table:
    15 December, 2017   Deadline for submission of abstracts
    15 January, 2018   Announcement on accepted proposals
    1 April, 2018              Submission of full papers
    7 May, 2018               Conference
    8 May, 2018           Tour (optional registration) 

    Place: 
    Faculty of Architecture & Town Planning, Technion Campus, Haifa

    Scientific Committee:
    Iris Aravot, Matteo Cassani Simonetti, Marina Epstein-Pliouchtch, Tzafrir Fainholtz, 
    Ron Fuchs (Chair), Ita Heinze-Greenberg. 

    Organizing Committee:
    Iris Aravot, Lena Arbov, Shamay Assif,  Matteo Cassani Simonetti, Marina Epstein-Pliouchtch, Elad Horn, Arieh Sonnino, Tzafrir Fainholtz,  Ron Fuchs (Chair).

    Honorary Chairman:
    Adachiara Zevi 

    Conference Coordinator:
    Lena Arbov, e-mail: brunozevi100@gmail.com

    Conference Internet Site:
    bruno100.net.technion.ac.il
  • Making Room: Housing for a Changing America

    Washington | Dates: 18 Nov, 2017 – 16 Sep, 2018

    The post-World War II suburbanization of America was driven by the housing needs of nuclear families, the nation’s leading demographic. In 1950, these families represented 43% of our households; in 1970, it was 40%.

    Since then, unprecedented shifts in demographics and lifestyle have redefined who we are—and how we want to live.

    Today, nuclear families account for 20% of America’s households, while nearly 30% are single adults living alone, a growing phenomenon across all ages and incomes. Supply, however, has been slow to meet the demands of this burgeoning market—or to respond to the needs of our increasingly varied mix of living arrangements: from roommates to single-parent, extended, and fluid families. Innovation has been constrained, often by deeply-rooted zoning regulations.

    A groundswell of action by housing entrepreneurs, however, is beginning to expand our options—making room for new models and design solutions. Looking beyond typical choices and layouts, they are offering alternatives at all levels of the market, from micro-units, tiny houses, and accessory apartments to cohousing, co-living, and beyond.

    Making Room: Housing for a Changing America explores these cutting-edge typologies through case studies and the presentation of The Open House—a flexible, 1,000-square-foot home designed for the exhibition by architect Pierluigi Colombo. The Open House features a hyper-efficient layout, movable walls, and multifunctional furniture, allowing the space to meet the needs of a variety of today’s growing but underserved households.

  • Jewish Architects – Jewish Architecture?

    Hamburg | Dates: 18 – 20 May, 2018
    Jewish Architects – Jewish Architecture?

    4th International Congress on Jewish Architecture
    Hamburg, Warburg‐Haus and Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden
    November 6 – 8, 2018

    A joint project of the Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden, Hamburg, and the Bet Tfila – Research Unit for Jewish Architecture, Braunschweig/Jerusalem

    Call for papers and posters
    The international congress “Jewish Architects – Jewish Architecture?” aims to re‐examine the biographies of Jewish architects from the 19th century up to the present day from an international perspective. It will deal with the question whether and to which degree Jewish self‐definition and the perception of “Jewishness” by a non‐Jewish environment has influenced and still influences the life and works of Jewish architects all over the world. During the last decades, multifaceted research on Jewish architects has been conducted, however focusing primarily either on certain persons and their oeuvre or on limited regions.

    The conference emphasizes the need to provide a more extensive view, drawing
    comparisons between different times and regions – from the late 18th century to present days, in Europe, America, Israel and other countries. A new focus will be set on biographic networks, on the cultural and economic preconditions for Jews in the professional field of architecture, and on the role of Jewish women‐architects. This will also lead to the question of defining “Jewishness” in architecture as based on respective contemporary perspectives.

    The congress intends to examine the subject in different methodological ways. Architectural and art historians are invited as are historians and scholars from other fields to contribute to the debate, herewith developing new and trans‐disciplinary approaches to Jewish culture and history.

    The eight panels of the conference will address the following topics:

    1) Discovering a New Professional Field: Jews and Architecture before 1900
    2) Jews Studying Architecture: Schools, Teachers, and Networks
    3) Jewish Architects, Their Non‐Jewish Colleagues, and Their Contractors: Partnership and/or
    Competition?
    4) Jewish Women as Architects: a Multiple Emancipation – a Double Exclusion?
    5) Jewish Architects in Migration: Transfers and Transformations of Architectural Ideas
    6) Jewish Architects: Zionism, Palestine, and Israel
    7) “Jewish” Architects? Self‐Definitions of “Jewishness”
    8) In Search of a “Contemporary” Jewish Architecture?

    The conference is embedded in a research project of the Institut für die Geschichte der
    deutschen Juden, Hamburg: “Jewish Ways to Architecture”, funded by the German Research Council (DFG). It will be the Fourth International Congress on Jewish Architecture, following three congresses organized by the Bet Tfila – Research Unit for Jewish Architecture in Braunschweig with its partners in 2007, 2014, and 2016.

    This call asks for papers for talks (15 minutes) and for posters for a posters‐section. It is also open for young researchers who want to present their ongoing research projects. The members of an international and interdisciplinary academic board and the organizers will decide on the acceptance of the papers and the posters.

    The conference language is English.

    The publication of selected papers and posters is scheduled for 2019.

    Provisions to refund travel expenses will depend on the approval of running applications.

    The congress is organized by the Bet Tfila – Research Unit for Jewish Architecture,
    Braunschweig/Jerusalem (Prof. Dr. Alexander von Kienlin, Dr.‐Ing. Katrin Keßler, Dr. Vladimir Levin) and the Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden, Hamburg (PD Dr.‐Ing. Ulrich Knufinke, Dr. Miriam Rürup, PD Dr. Andreas Brämer).

    Academic Board: Dr. Eleonora Bergman, Warsaw, Prof. Dr. Ita Heinze‐ Greenberg, Zurich, Prof. Dr. Rudolf Klein, Budapest, Prof. Dr. Carol Herselle Krinsky, New York, Dr. Vladimir Levin, Jerusalem, Dr. Sylvia Necker, Munich, PD Dr. Martin Papenbrock, Karlsruhe, Prof. Dr. Regina Stephan, Mainz

    Papers

    Please, send an abstract of up to 1.500 characters for a lecture of 15 minutes and a short‐CV of up to 500 characters in English to the following addresses until January, 29th, 2018:

    ulrich.knufinke@igdj‐hh.de
    synagogen@tu‐bs.de

    Posters
    Please, send a poster (PDF‐file, 5 MB max.) for the poster presentation in English to the following addresses until August, 31st, 2018:

    ulrich.knufinke@igdj‐hh.de

    synagogen@tu‐bs.de
  • Chicago Design: Histories and Narratives

    Chicago | Dates: 08 – 10 Nov, 2018

    Chicago Design: Histories and Narratives

    On November 8-10, 2018, the Department of Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago will host the first international scholarly conference devoted to Chicago’s design history. Renowned as a center of architectural innovation, Chicago has an equally rich history as a center of design activity. To explore that history is to reckon with both grand narratives and complex realities; taking a broad view of design, the conference aims to consider that history from a diverse range of topical and methodological viewpoints. The operations and outputs of retailers such as Sears, Roebuck, manufacturers such as Western Electric, and publishers such as the Johnson Publishing company are all desired subjects for the conference, as are more established figures and institutions in the city’s design history, including Frank Lloyd Wright and Hull-House, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy and the New Bauhaus, and Massimo Vignelli and Unimark. Chicago’s later twentieth-century history also remains virtually undiscussed, despite the city fostering creative cultures that often diverged from dominant coastal narratives. The conference aims to consider the prospect of a local design history for a city that has often been outward-looking, and will ask: Is Chicago only ever a second city, a microcosm of broader trends, or are there distinctive threads to be connected in its diverse communities, its tensions and interconnections, that shed light on developments elsewhere? What contribution can design history give to Chicago’s social and cultural histories by considering how design shapes a city, not only in terms of its skyline, but also in terms of its economic and social character? And more broadly, what are the stakes of exploring the relationship between design and place in our current age of pressing globalization?

    Organized by Jonathan Mekinda (Assistant Professor, Art History and Design, UIC) and Bess Williamson (Assistant Professor, Art History, Theory, and Criticism, SAIC), “Chicago Design: Histories and Narratives” is part of Art Design Chicago, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art exploring Chicago’s art and design legacy, The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation presenting sponsor. Additional support is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. The call for papers will be published in early 2018, with proposals due in spring, 2018. Funding will be available to support participants’ travel and accommodation.

  • CFP: Emerging Identities in the Future of Places: Neo-cultures, Place Multi-mediation and Intersubjectivities

    Dates: 08 – 10 Nov, 2018
    How is the development of future places in cities shaping new place-based identities, defined by the intertwined and entangled nature of socio-cultural, technical and spatial practices of people?. Comprehending the resultant complexities of place-related identity demands the need to identify new directions that evolve progressively by embracing a renewed understanding of identity. The proposed book aims to facilitate an interdisciplinary approach towards unravelling emerging place- related identities that are caught in a labyrinth created by contemporary urban spatialities. By keeping place as the main frame of enquiry, we seek to comprehend the ephemeral nature of ongoing spatial negotiations within the ecology of urban and media practices. We are interested in examining the intertwined and interrelated concepts of culture, place and identity amidst the technology pervaded urban living that is enabling new forms of place-related identities to emerge. The chapters should reflect on the three themes of "Placing Media", "Spatial Representation", and "Identity interrogation".

    In "Placing Media" we seek to explore how numerous forms of media practices and technologies (mobile phones, smart screens, screen projections, etc) adapted and used in the context of our everyday life has brought with them debates and discussions over their socio-spatial and cultural implications in our urban context. Placing Media, investigates these implications of media for rethinking the relationship among users, spaces, information, as well as interfaces and the impact which these reconfigurations have upon culture, place experience and identity. Discourses and debates over socio-cultural and epistemological implications of media practices have begun to attract attention, since it provides new platforms for communication, engagement and making sense of urban environments.

    With media entering the scene at the very moment of perceiving and experiencing places, memories, become de-situated, belonging to shared domains of representation in which individual experiences diffuse, overlap and merge into acts of collective experience of different cultures . In "Spatial representation" we aim to explore the role and nature of contemporary spatial representation in the fluctuating intersubjective terrain nascent with the pervasiveness of media. New forms of representations through citizens lens have emerged from open-ended city-building video games such as SimCity, Cities:Skylines and as well as practitioner-based representations of proposed changes to places - using City Information Modelling (CIM) and other virtual tools for promoting new development / regeneration. The chapters will investigate the how these new spatial representations offer different matrices for neo-cultural identity performances and manifestations.

    In "Identity Interrogation", we aim to explore how new forms of contemporary spatiality interact with neo-cultures to open up new trajectories for understanding emerging (personal and group) identities in cities. For instance, given the accelerating pace of life, and more frequent changes of citizen locations, personal and social relations defined and experienced more through virtual co-implacements, higher levels of home-working and individual startups ? are technology and media platforms steering a paradigm shift in our relational existence and experience in places? The multi-dimensional and multi-layered nature of place-based community relationships in contemporary urban contexts also makes identity negotiating / reconstituting into a restless activity often marked by discordant and/or agreeable spatial complexities. By embracing the notions of complex people-place relationships in  cities evolving as a result of  developing  mediating technologies, the chapters strives to examines how these technologies challenge the ways in which planning, designing and place-related identities can be understood, perceived, engaged and constructed in the contemporary urban contexts and the potential future of places..

    Target Audience
    The book will be of interest to academic (researcher, teacher, students) audiences seeking to gain a deeper understanding of the identity and city in the context of emerging sociotechnical geographies. The main fields include: sociology, media studies, history, psychology, cultural studies, human geography, urban design and planning, architecture, and anthropology. It will also be useful to a number of professionals involved in planning, designing and transforming cities, including: design practitioners, policy makers, urban planners and designers, and architects. The book will be particularly relevant for undergraduate, Masters and PhD students who are engaging in socio-technical analysis of urban practices in cities.

    If you are interested in contributing to the book, please send us an abstract of 300-500 words outlining the proposed paper and containing your main argument(s), your main conceptual and theoretical approaches results (if applicable)and key references, the research themes the proposal fits in. Please also include authors name, current affiliation, and e-mail address

    Please, submit proposals as in Word or pdf format document to lakshmi.rajendran@anglia.ac.uk  and Delle.Odeleye@anglia.ac.uk.

    Submission deadlines and guidelines:

    1 Nov 2017       An abstract of up to 300 words is to be submitted to the editors by email.
    15 Jan 2018      Editors will select chapters on the basis of the following criteria: relevance to the theme and goal of the book, originality of the contribution, theoretical rigour and wealth of the empirical material. All authors of submitted abstracts will be informed about the editorial decision via email.
    31 May 2018    First draft of all chapters is to be submitted to the editors by email. Chapters need to be 6000-8000 words in length and written in English. Authors of chapters are responsible for the language and style editing. The guidelines for the editing style, references and bibliography will be sent to authors of selected chapters with the editorial decision.
    1 Aug 2018    Feedback and comments of the 1st review of chapters will be emailed by editors to authors of all chapters.
    30 Sep 2018     Second draft of all chapters is to be submitted to the editors by email.
    15 Nov 2018   Feedback and comments of the 2nd review of chapters will be emailed by editors to authors of all chapters.
    24 Dec 2018     Final editing of chapters and book submission.
    Jun/July 2019   Book publication.

    Enquiries
    Please, contact Lakshmi Priya Rajendran (Lakshmi.rajendran@anglia.ac.uk and/or NezHapi Dell? Odeleye (Delle.Odeleye@anglia.ac.uk) if you have any inquiries about the book project.
  • From Building to Continent: How Architecture makes Territories

    Canterbury | Dates: 28 – 29 Jun, 2018
    Bi-Annual Conference, Centre for European Architecture, Kent School of Architecture (UK)

    From Building to Continent: How Architecture makes Territories

    Cultural landscape refers to landscapes shaped by humans through habitation, cultivation, exploitation and stewardship, and has influenced thinking in other fields, such as architecture. Generally, architecture has been subsumed within cultural landscape itself as a comprehensive spatial continuum. Yet standard architectural histories often analyse buildings as isolated objects, sometimes within the immediate context, but typically with minimal acknowledgement of wider spatial ramifications. However, buildings may become spatial generators, not only in the immediate vicinity, but also at larger geographic scales. ‘Buildings’ in this case include architectural works in the traditional sense, as well as roads, bridges, dams, industrial works, military installations, etc. Such structures have been grouped collectively to represent territories at varying scales.
    In the context of this conference, the term ‘territories’ is appealed to rather than ‘landscape’, for the latter is associated with a given area of the earth’s surface, often aestheticized as a type of giant artefact. Territories by contrast are more abstract, and may even overlap. Discussions in this conference may consider varying territorial scale relationships, beginning with the building, moving to the regional, and even to the global. For example, at the level of architectural detailing, buildings may represent large-scale territories, or obscure others, themselves acting as media conveying messages. How tectonic-geographic relationships are represented may also be considered. Various media, primarily maps but also film and digital technologies have created mental images of territories established by buildings, and are all relevant to these discussions. Geopolitical analysis may provide another means towards understanding how architecture makes territories. Governments are often the primary agents, but not always, for religious and special interest groups have played central roles. Mass tourism and heritage management at national and international levels have reinforced, or contradicted, official government messages. Organisations dedicated to international building heritage, such as UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) also are implicated in such processes.
    Paper proposals may cover anytime period, continuing into the present. Relevant proposals from all disciplines are welcomed.

    Logistics

    Conference organisers: Dr. David H. Haney, and Dr. Luciano Cardellichio.

    Conference webpage address: https://research.kent.ac.uk/frombuildingtocontinent/

    Paper abstracts: 150-200 words in length.
    Paper abstract submission due date: 15th of January, 2018.
    Paper selection announcement date: 31st of March, 2018.
    Please send paper abstracts as a Word doc (without images): frombuildingtocontinent@kent.ac.uk

    Conference dates: 28th and 29th of June, 2018
    Location: Canterbury, Kent, UK
    Venue: The Cathedral Lodge: https://www.canterburycathedrallodge.org/meeting-and-conference-facilities-in-canterbury/
    Daily Schedule: to be published
    Conference Fee: £140 per person. Includes coffee/tea and refreshments, and buffet lunches on both days.
    To pay the registration fee online, please click here: http://store.kent.ac.uk/product-catalogue/faculty-of-humanities/school-of-architecture/events/conference-from-building-to-continent-how-architecture-makes-territories

    A conference publication containing selected essays is planned.

    Keynote Speaker Lectures:

    Professor Lucia Allais, Princeton University (US): ‘Maps of monuments and scales of design: Strategic bombing and the postwar international order’.
    Professor Mark Bassin, Södertörn University (Stockholm): ‘Nature as State: Geopolitics and Landscape Monuments’.
    Professor Kenny Cupers, University of Basel: ‘The Earth that Modernism Built’.
    Professor Tullia Iori, The University of Rome Tor Vergata: ‘Engineering the Italian Landscape: the Autostrada del Sole as Territorial Construct for a New Post-War National Identity’.
  • Rome: City and Empire

    Nashville | Dates: 23 Feb – 28 May, 2018

    The stories of Rome and its vast empire continue to captivate and intrigue people almost three thousand years after its foundation. Rome: City and Empire brings to Nashville more than two hundred of the British Museum’s most engaging and beautiful Roman objects. They tell the dramatic story of how Rome grew from a cluster of small villages into a mighty empire.

    The British Museum’s exceptionally broad collections have enabled the creation of a truly inspiring experience. Visitors will explore how the empire was won and held and learn about the rich diversity of her peoples. The exhibition is an accessible introduction to the Roman imperial period, yet also provides a range and depth of material for those with an existing interest in Roman history.

    The Frist Center is the exclusive North American venue.

  • The impact of war on urban landscape: transformations and resilience in European cities (15th-18th centuries)

    Rome | Dates: 29 Aug – 01 Sep, 2018
    Since the dawn of civilization cities had to deal with war effects through destruction, violence and fear. The deep change in artillery after the 14-15th centuries produced new impacts on the urban network and urban environment, far beyond architectural and technical transformations in warfare. In fact urban history, architectural history, military history and archaeology are correlated in this matter.
    Cities and their surrounding fields were affected by material destruction, which got more devastating as the caliber of firearms increased. How did cities recover after attack or war disaster, is the main question of this session. Though destruction was a condition to transform, not only these transformations faced many difficulties but also war scars could be either erased, concealed, exhibited or even simply left. We are interested in observing the traces that armed conflicts left in cities and the mechanisms that civil and military powers developed to recover from them. We aim to discuss these connections over the entire territory, in the framework of periods of conflict, in order to achieve a comparative approach encompassing several European cities, as we are interested in a transnational perspective.
    Historiography drew special attention to urban design solutions and the military engineers capacity to plan physical conditions in order to prepare a city to resist long sieges, including outworks in the surrounding areas, periodically adapted to the changes in the art of war. Yet, what really happened after military campaigns is somehow forgotten. Therefore the focus of this session will considerer both what happened in cities following the war campaigns, and how civil and military authorities proactively prepared the cities for them.

    We especially welcome papers that address (but are not necessarily limited to) the following topics:
    • methodology for the study of the scars of war in a city;
    • financial, management and design plans from city council and military institutions;
    • profile of the people in charge of the rebuilding processes, besides fortification military builders;
    • city council role in post-war cities;
    • nearby productive agricultural fields and water resources protection during war cycles;
    • comparative case-studies between regions or countries.

    Deadline for paper proposals submission: Oct 5, 2017
  • The Afterlife of Fascism: The Reception of Modern Italian Architecture and Urbanism

    Dates: 12 Jul, 2017 – 15 Jun, 2018
    Nearly 75 years after the regime’s end, questions about the built legacy of Italian Fascism continue to provoke polemic responses and questions. Mussolini’s government constructed thousands of new buildings across the Italian peninsula, islands, and in the colonial territories of North Africa. From government buildings, hospitals, and post offices to stadia, housing, summer camps, Fascist party headquarters, and ceremonial spaces, the physical legacy of the regime maintains a presence in nearly every Italian town. Infrastructure projects such as roads, railways and bridges bear the imprint of Fascism: manhole covers of sewer systems in small towns across Italy are still marked by the regime’s insignia today. In some areas, such as the Pontine marshes and Asmara, Eritrea, the regime built entirely new quarters or towns as part of land reclamation projects and its colonial agenda.

    Histories of Italian architecture and urbanism have documented and examined the vast body of work constructed by the regime. Scholars have debated whether these works of architecture remain worthy of study due to their remarkable form alone, because they satisfactorily symbolize a body of ideas, or both? Moreover, scholars have deliberated whether the political intention and physical form can be separated; that is, can a great fascist building be valued as art abstracted from the ideology that produced it? How do we make sense of the role of the architects who worked for the regime? Was the architect the source or merely the conduit of political and often poetic architectural expression? While these debates persist and continue to inspire scholarship about modern Italian architecture, a new dilemma has surfaced: what to do with these political constructions as they age and in the wake of change? How are they envisioned by their current constituents and citizens, and what is their destiny?

    The Afterlife of Fascism will investigate what has become of the architectural and urban projects of Italian Fascism; how have sites been transformed or adapted; and what do these sites mean today? We invite submissions that examine the afterlife of fascist architecture through studies of destruction, adaptation, debates over re-use, artistic interventions, and even routine daily practices, which may slowly alter collective understandings of a site. The volume will consider whether these structures and their material remains embody or retain some essence of the defeated political movement or, in contrast, whether they stand as reminders of the fragility of the connection between meaning and architectural form.

    Questions for consideration may include:
    • How do changes in the constructed landscapes of Fascism reflect evolving relationships among national identity, political authority and the physical landscape?
    • What happens when the modernity of fascist architecture becomes historicized alongside the monuments of popes and emperors, when modernity becomes part of tradition, or when the avant-garde becomes subject to historic preservation?
    • What do fascist constructions mean to the generations of Italians whose experience of the regime is limited to history textbooks and ancestral tales? How do the meanings of these sites change when they no longer have the power to conjure memories of the regime?
    • What do instances of preservation, adaptation or indifference to fascist sites tell us about the nature of the connection between political authority and place?
    • How does political power operate through design at scales ranging from domestic design to infrastructure? How, for example, did the constructions of fascism shape Italian culture through spatial practices? Can spatial practices be divorced from the original political intentions? Or do daily rituals shaped by the constructed spaces of fascism still bear witness to the intentions of the regime decades later?
    • After the fall of the regime, how were connections between architecture and politics renegotiated in the service of postwar political agendas? How, for example, did debates over what was fascist, anti-fascist, or Italian revise stylistic associations? How was history revised and/or redacted to serve new purposes in the postwar era?
    • How did those architects associated with fascism rewrite their own histories through design or activism in the postwar era?

    Through a critical history of the reception of fascist-era architecture and urbanism, The Afterlife of Fascism seeks to broaden our understanding of the relationships between politics and place. It aims to build on histories of the reception of politically charged sites in the modern era, which highlight how interventions, practices, and events have altered meaning even as physical forms often remain. Scott Sandage, for example, traces the evolution of our collective understanding of the Lincoln Memorial from a site intended to commemorate the preservation of the Union to one that associates Lincoln with emancipation and memorializes the civil rights movement. In Ghosts of Berlin, Brian Ladd analyzes the debates surrounding the many politically charged sites of Berlin and brings to light how the memories of each era in the city’s modern history are reflected and constructed through debates over meaning, use, and form. Kristin Ann Hass’s Carried to the Wall considers how the meaning of the Vietnam War was negotiated through the reception of the Vietnam Wall through an analysis of the objects left at the wall. In doing so, she reminds us of the power of individuals, ordinary people, to engage in these contests over meanings and of place.

    We invite papers on fascist architecture and urbanism that contribute to this discourse on reception through studies of the negotiations among politics, identity, memory, and place. Interested authors should submit an abstract of 400-500 words and a C.V. to co-editors Kay Bea Jones (kaybeajones@gmail.com) and Stephanie Pilat (spilat@ou.edu) by Monday, October 16th, 2017. Decisions will be made by December 2017. Papers of 4,000 – 8,000 words will be due on June 15th, 2018. Papers from accepted abstracts will undergo peer-review before publication.
  • CFP - Historians of Islamic Art Association Biennial Symposium “Border Crossing” Yale University October 25-27, 2018

    Dates: 25 – 27 Oct, 2018
    Call for Papers Historians of Islamic Art Association Biennial Symposium
    “Border Crossing”
    Yale University
    October 25-27, 2018


    The 2018 HIAA symposium will bring together an international group of established and emerging scholars of Islamic art and architecture to present new research on the theme of “Border Crossing.” Very often the field has been defined as one centered on select regions of the Middle East, South Asia, and Central Asia, and focusing on traditional media and categories, such as the decorative arts, manuscript studies, and architecture. Less attention has been paid to regions on the so-called peripheries, including, for example, Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, or to disciplines that are not often associated with the field, such as film and anthropology. “Border Crossing” is an invitation to rethink the field of Islamic art and architecture by interrogating the ideas of translation, transmission, and transgression that are suggested by the theme. Among the questions that may be asked are: How can this lens help us rethink works that form the “canon” of Islamic art? What is at stake in crossing disciplinary borders? What is lost and what is gained in abandoning traditional academic parameters? What may be learned through literal border crossings, whether they are by conservation authorities or refugees? As the works of several contemporary artists show, border crossings are ultimately ethical positions taken to evince the human condition itself. They thus provide potential to rethink the arts and cultures of the Islamic world, as well as the ways in which we study them today.
    There are three categories of submission: Pre-arranged panels (4 papers and a discussant); individual papers; graduate student papers. Please submit your abstract/s and a brief curriculum vitae to presidentelect.hiaa@gmail.com by September 7, 2017.

    The 2018 Symposium Committee:
    Christiane Gruber
    Yael Rice
    Kishwar Rizvi
    Ünver Rüstem
  • CFP: Créer à plusieurs? Collaborations littéraires, artistiques et scientifiques au Grand Siècle

    Princeton | Dates: 10 – 12 May, 2018
    XVe Colloque du CIR 17 – Centre International de Rencontres sur le XVIIe siècle (http://www.cir17.info)
  • SAH 73rd Annual International Conference

    Seattle | Dates: 29 Apr – 03 May, 2020
    Save the date!
SAH 2018 St Paul Conference

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