Recent Opportunities

  • CFP: 2017 Visual Resources Association Conference Lightning Round

    Louisville | Dates: 09 – 29 Aug, 2016
    Call for Proposals for the “New Faces, New Voices: Emerging Professionals Lightning Round” Proposals due EOB August 29 Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students (VREPS) is pleased to to announce a call for proposals for lightning presentations by new professionals (within 10 years of the start of their career) and students for the 2017 Visual Resources Association’s Annual Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. The format is 24 x 7 (24 slides in 7 minutes), with 8-10 presenters. A moderator will keep talks on time and facilitate discussion. To submit a proposal, please fill out the form at: https://goo.gl/forms/7PgL5gHTTHLH9AFn2 If you have any questions, please email me at: alazet@collegeforcreativestudies.edu
  • 2016 SAH Awards Gala

    Chicago | Dates: 04 Nov, 2016
    The Society of Architectural Historians will present its 2016 Awards for Architectural Excellence at the 7th annual SAH Awards Gala on Friday, November 4, 2016. The awards represent a unique coming together of architectural practice and academic study, honoring the contributions of individual projects to our built environment. Proceeds from the gala benefit the Society's educational mission and the ongoing restoration of SAH's headquarters, the Landmark Charnley-Persky House.

    Honorees:

    Architectural Stewardship
    Richard H. Driehaus, The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation

    Public Engagement with the Built Environment
    Sarah Herda, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts

    Design, Planning and Sustainability
    Peter Landon, FAIA, LEED AP, Landon Bone Baker Architects

    Co-chairing this year's gala are John M. Syvertsen, FAIA, American Architectural Foundation; Cynthia Winter, AIA, Cynthia Winter Architects LLC; and Nicholas Weingarten, FAIA.
  • SITElines.2016 much wider than a line

    Sante Fe | Dates: 08 Aug, 2016 – 08 Jan, 2017
    SITElines.2016 much wider than a line

    SITE Santa Fe presents 
    SITElines.2016: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas

    Opening in July, this exhibition, entitled much wider than a line, is part of SITE’s ongoing biennial series with a focus on Contemporary Art from the Americas

    PREVIEW EVENTS: JULY 14 – 15, 2016
    PUBLIC OPENING: JULY 16, 2016

    #SITELINES2016
    #muchwiderthanaline

    SITE Santa Fe is pleased to present SITElines.2016 opening on July 16, 2016. This exhibition is the second installment in SITE Santa Fe’s reimagined biennial series with a focus on contemporary art from the Americas and features 35 artists from 16 countries and 11 new commissions organized around intersecting ideas brought together by a team of five curators−Rocío Aranda-Alvarado, Kathleen Ash-Milby, Pip Day, Pablo León de la Barra, and Kiki Mazzucchelli.

    This year’s biennial, entitled much wider than a line, is an articulation of the interconnectedness of the Americas and various shared experiences such as the recognition of colonial legacies, expressions of the vernacular, the influence of indigenous understandings, and our relationship to the land.

    much wider than a line takes its title from Leanne Simpson’s, Dancing on our Turtle’s Back, a book about life ways of Nishnaabeg people. In her accounts of non-colonial conceptions of nationhood and sovereignty, it is the joint care taking required in the overlapping territorial boundaries between one Indigenous nation and another that are traditionally relationship-building. The relationships that emerge are, like the borders themselves, much wider than a line.

    The organizing principles of the exhibition take their cue from the remarkable amphitheater structure in Santa Fe designed by the architect Paolo Soleri. Commissioned in the 1960s by Lloyd Kiva New, then Arts Director of the newly founded Institute of American Indian Arts, the Paolo Soleri Amphitheater was originally built to support their groundbreaking curricula in contemporary American Indian drama. The organic concrete building drew on principles of Native American design, and was host to extraordinary performances of American Indian Theater that bridged cultures and histories. The amphitheater was completed in 1970 on the campus of the Santa Fe Indian School (established in 1890 to assimilate Native American children from tribes throughout the Southwestern United States). Today, the structure stands empty, derelict, and is very much a contested site. With research contributed by Conrad Skinner, AIA, much wider than a line presents a gallery dedicated to the amphitheater that expresses its role as both a historically potent forum for the exploration of collaborative cross-cultural processes and a stand-in for complexities of geopolitical tensions that presently exist in the region and throughout the Americas.

    Key thematic threads explored in much wider than a line include:

    Vernacular Strategies The importance of vernacular sources−in design, architecture, textiles, and technique− that influence the work of artists throughout the Americas.

    Indigenous Understandings Performance, ritual, histories, and materials drawn from indigenous sources, as they relate to the natural world.

    Shared Territories The complexity of networks and affinities in the Americas through questions around identity, race, borders, and emerging de-colonial practices.
  • CFP: Landscapes of Pre-Industrial Cities (Washington, 5-6 May 17)

    Washington | Dates: 05 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    LANDSCAPES OF PRE-INDUSTRIAL CITIES 
    GARDEN AND LANDSCAPE STUDIES SYMPOSIUM 2017
    DUMBARTON OAKS, WASHINGTON, D.C.
    MAY 5-6, 2017

    CALL FOR PAPERS (DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2016)
     
    The use of the word “landscape” to describe the formation and infrastructure of cities—as reflected, for example, in current theories of landscape urbanism—largely seems to express contemporary preoccupations with the post-industrial urban condition. Indeed, the Industrial Revolution is often seen as a turning point in the emergence of the urban landscape of the modern metropolis. The large city as commonly experienced today in the world—whether vertical or horizontal, congested or diffused, and divorced from productive nature—is certainly dependent on a range of recent (or quite recent) breakthroughs in construction technology, climate control, communication, and transportation. In this view, urban landscapes appear as a historically late development and are therefore seen to embody an essentially modern and Western concept.  

    Yet, features associated with contemporary urban landscapes—most notably the forms of human adaptation to and reshaping of the sites where cities develop and expand—can also be found in pre-industrial contexts in different time periods and across the globe. Pre-industrial urban settlements generally occupied land that had been used for other, mostly productive, purposes, and their development involved complex and dynamic relationships with the management of natural resources, especially food and water. While ancient cities are traditionally studied as the centers of commerce, trade, and artisan production as well as the seats of secular and religious authorities, questions of how the original clusters of agrarian communities evolved into urban formations, how they were spatially organized, and what their specific landscape characteristics were deserve further analysis and discussion. Another closely related question concerns the role of environmental factors and the presence or lack of particular natural resources in enabling this process of urbanization.

    To explore these questions, the Garden and Landscape Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks is planning a symposium, Landscapes of Pre-Industrial Cities. Organized by Georges Farhat (University of Toronto) and John Beardsley (Dumbarton Oaks), it will be held on May 5–6, 2017. Topics will be drawn from a wide range of historical periods and a global geographical perspective; it is anticipated that presentations will represent a wide range of disciplines and include both scholars and practitioners. In order to integrate this discussion into the current debate on the sustainable city, the speakers will be asked to address the following questions:

    How was the modern dichotomy between the urban and the rural historically expressed in the relationship between cities and the natural environment—especially with respect to land use, environmental control, and resource management?  

    To what extent was the ability to exert control over the natural environment and its resources through territorial expansion, hydraulic management, and land reclamation a determinant factor in the design, evolution, and historical fortunes of pre-industrial cities?

     What sense can we make of the contemporary concepts of urban sprawl, biodiversity, climate change, connectivity, and integrated management of natural resources if applied to pre-industrial urban landscapes? What implications does this understanding have for current scholarship, design strategies, and planning policies in an age of ecological transition? 

     Please send proposals including a 200-word abstract and a short CV (with five most significant publications), by September 15, 2016, to Georges Farhat, georges.farhat@daniels.utoronto.ca, and John Beardsley, BeardsleyJ@doaks.org.
  • City in a Garden: Alfred Caldwell's Eagle Point Park

    Dubuque | Dates: 07 – 08 Oct, 2016
    Heritage Works Inc. is hosting a symposium:  "City in a Garden:  Alfred Caldwell's Eagle Point Park" as part of its inaugural Dubuque Heritage Festival on October 7 & 8, 2016. This year’s festival will highlight Alfred Caldwell’s work at Dubuque’s Eagle Point Park.

    In 1934, the City of Dubuque, Iowa, turned to a young Prairie School landscape architect, Alfred Caldwell, to design and then supervise the construction of landscapes and shelters at Dubuque’s Eagle Point Park.  It was Caldwell’s first large scale commission.  Over 80 years later, we are now celebrating his work with a two-day symposium and community celebration focusing on Caldwell’s work. 

    The symposium: “City in a Garden:  Alfred Caldwell’s Eagle Point Park” is designed for those interested in learning more about Caldwell’s work through the lens of his designs for Eagle Point Park. A list of speakers can be found on our website. Additionally, 6.0 hours of AIA CEUs and LA CES are pending approval.

    The symposium is part of a community event that will include the opening of an exhibit on Friday evening, October 7th at the Dubuque Museum of Art featuring original Alfred Caldwell drawings and artifacts from his time in Dubuque. There will be docent-led tours of Caldwell’s shelters and landscapes at Eagle Point Park on Saturday, October 8th. We hope that you will attend and also invite your colleagues and constituents to attend. 
  • Getty Research Institute Grants: Iconoclasm and Vandalism (2017-2018)

    Los Angeles | Dates: 04 Aug – 03 Oct, 2016
    Every year since 1985 the Research Institute has welcomed scholars, artists, and other cultural figures from around the world to work in residence at the Institute on projects that bear upon its annual research theme. While in residence, they pursue their own research projects, make use of Getty collections, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty Center and the Getty Villa.

    2017/2018 Theme: Iconoclasm and Vandalism

    Iconoclasm raises contentious questions that transcend cultural and temporal boundaries. It can be understood as vandalism, destruction, or a means of repression, all of which fundamentally put culture at risk.

    However, iconoclasm can also be a form of protest or a vehicle for creative expression. Iconoclasm is transformative, creating entirely new objects or meanings through alterations to existing artworks. Charged with symbolism, these remains testify to a history of reception, offering clues about the life and afterlife of an object. To a certain extent, all radical changes in cultural production can be described as iconoclastic. 

    Applicants are encouraged to adopt a broad approach to the theme by addressing topics such as religious and political iconoclasm, protection of cultural heritage, use of spolia, damnatio memoriae, street art, graffiti, performance art, or activism. 
  • African Humanities Program Fellowships 2016-17

    Dates: 04 Aug – 02 Nov, 2016
    The African Humanities Program (AHP) seeks to reinvigorate the humanities in Africa through fellowship competitions and related activities in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. In partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which has generously provided funding, AHP offers African scholars an integrated set of opportunities to develop individual capacities and to promote formation of scholarly networks. The African Humanities Program supports the Carnegie Corporation’s efforts to develop and retain African academics at universities in Africa.

    Goals of the African Humanities Program
    to encourage and enable the production of new knowledge and new directions for research
    to strengthen the capacity of early career researchers and faculty at African universities
    to build the field of humanities by establishing networks for scholarly communication across Africa and with Africanists worldwide.

    Fellowship stipends allow recipients an academic year free from teaching and other duties for completion of the PhD dissertation, for revising the dissertation for publication, or for the first major research project after the PhD. Fellows are also eligible for additional benefits such as residential stays for writing, manuscript development workshops, and publication support.

    Each Fellow may request a residential stay at an African institute for advanced study. Residencies have proved to be extremely popular and productive, granting Fellows time and space to concentrate on writing. Because residencies must be taken at an institute outside the home country, they foster international communication. Currently AHP Fellows may take residencies at six institutes from South Africa to Senegal, Ghana to Tanzania.

    Fellows are invited to submit their manuscripts to the AHP Publications series, a collaboration with UNISA Press in Pretoria, South Africa. The rigorous development and peer-review process of AHP Publications is overseen by series co-editors, Kwesi Yankah, Central University College, Ghana, and Frederick Hendricks, Rhodes University, South Africa.

    Fellows may apply to attend a Manuscript-Development Workshop to discuss their manuscripts with AHP mentors and other Fellows in a weeklong, intensive retreat. Many authors use these discussions to guide their final revisions before submitting manuscripts for publication.

    AHP also partners with the African Studies Association every year to bring select AHP Fellows to the ASA Annual Meeting as ASA Presidential Fellows.
  • Organicism, Open Systems, and Technology in Feminist Art (New York, Feb. 15-18, 2017), Deadline Aug. 30

    New York | Dates: 04 – 30 Aug, 2016
    For the CAA session “Organicism, Open Systems, and Technology in Feminist Art” we seek papers that shed new light on the theoretical origins of process, growth, and collaboration in feminist art that derive from the sciences. We are particularly interested in how women artists re-conceptualized scientific theories of organicism and open systems, and notions of technological progress in support of their social and utopian aims. We welcome papers focusing on feminist practitioners in art, architecture, and design working in the US and internationally.  The scientific theory of open systems put forth by biologist Ludwig von Bertalanffy, for example, became a model for artists conceptualizing an ever-changing relationship between humans and their social, political and “natural” environment. Also rooted in the natural sciences, notions of organicism were taken up by many twentieth century designers, architects, and urban planners, including Frank Lloyd Wright and Buckminster Fuller. They conceived human-made structures and new technologies in analogy to naturally growing forms. Among other questions, this session asks: How did feminist artists incorporate science and technology as theory, process, or media to convey ideals that were in many ways opposed to the notion of scientific objectivity undergirding a rationalized, male-dominated society? In what ways did women’s involvement with the art and technology movements of the 1950s and 60s impact their subsequent feminist practices? How did women artists engage with the utopian rhetoric centered on science and technology in the context of the space race or New Left criticism of the military-industrial-complex? Please submit a paper abstract (250 words max.), CV, and session participation form by August 30 to Susanneh Bieber, Texas A&M University, bieber@tamu.edu, and Christine Filippone, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, cfilippone@millersville.edu See http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2017-call-for-participation.pdf for more information including the session participation form (last page of the pdf).
  • CFP: Building Technology Educators' Society 2017 Meeting (Des Moines, 8-10 Jun 17)

    Des Moines | Dates: 03 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    Building Technology Educators’ Society 2017 Meeting
    Des Moines, IA 8-10 June 2017 Call for Papers

    TOPIC: Poetics and Pragmatism.

    “Talk is cheap and easy; making dreams real takes hard, humble work. Dreams in the Midwest are acceptable, just keep them to yourself. Maybe tell your family, but don’t just talk—do something about it.”             Peter Jenkins, Looking for Alaska

    Iowa opened to European-American settlers in 1834, and ever since it has been a place where Americans have held a tenuous grip on the land and against a climate that resists occupation.  Its soil produces grain for the entire continent; its legendary work ethic has fueled generations of farmers but also writers, poets, musicians, and astronomers.  It is a place that takes the real world seriously, but that has also raised the products of such engagement to poetic levels; the novels of Marilynne Robinson, the music of Greg Brown, and the paintings of Grant Wood all speak to this possibility among the sublime landscapes of our state.  But it is also a place of technological engagement and advancement: Iowa State can make a legitimate claim to be the birthplace of digital computing, a legacy reflected in its investment in fabrication and analysis initiatives today.

    BTES’ first meeting in the Midwest offers an opportunity to ask how building can address both practical and poetic desires.  The ‘hard, humble work’ of constructing in an indifferent environment can balance our needs with what that environment has to offer while touching our deeper sensibilities.  Indeed, cognitive science has produced evidence suggesting that beauty, in the words of Denis Dutton, is “nature’s way of acting at a distance,” an instinctive preference for objects, landscapes, and sustenance that can leverage our relations with the world.

    How do the pragmatics and the poetics of building coincide?  How do they resist, challenge, or provoke one another?  How do buildings and the ways in which we build bridge realms of material performance and aesthetics?  And how does a new generation of tools collide with, enhance, or critique these traditions?  We seek papers on a broad range of topics that address how and why we build, that examine technology and techne in the contexts of function, beauty, and poetics, and that reveal these links both in contemporary practice and throughout history.  Papers that address Midwestern traditions are particularly welcome, but we seek a broad mix of geographical, conceptual, and disciplinary approaches.

    Submit abstracts of no more than 500 words via EasyChair. Papers will be reviewed in a two-stage process.

    Deadline for abstracts: 15 September 2016
    Notifications to Authors:  1 November 2016
    Final Papers Due: 1 March 2017
    Notification of Paper Acceptance:  15 April 2017
  • CFP: The Architect as Active Reader (15-17 Jun 17)

    Vicenza | Dates: 03 Aug – 15 Sep, 2016
    The Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio will organize an international conference on the theme of The Architect as Active Reader, 15-17 June 2017.

    Printed treatises and texts have been the main vehicle for the communication of architectural ideas. Architects and builders, as owners of these texts, have left records of their thoughts in the form of subsequent annotations, comments, and drawings within the texts or closely connected to them. In developing the notion of the architect as an “active reader” who absorbs new information for future practical application, the conference seeks to bring out examples of architects in dialogue with texts.

    Geographic area and time period are open. Scholars may apply individually or propose a theme to be carried through in a single session by a group or team. (Such a theme might address a single architect’s varied reading practices; multiple approaches to a single work; the collecting practices revealed in an architect’s library). Contributions from scholars and librarians are welcome. 

    Those interested in participating with a contribution (20 minute limit) should send an outline (no more than 250 words) and brief CV (no more than 100 words) to Ilaria Abbondandolo (ilaria.abbondandolo@cisapalladio.org) by 15 September 2016. Speakers will be notified by 31 October 2016.
  • National Humanities Center Fellowships 2017-2018

    Research Triangle Park | Dates: 02 Aug – 18 Oct, 2016
    The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2017 through May 2018. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career scholars as well as senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work are also invited to apply. The Center does not normally support the revision of a doctoral dissertation. In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects. The Center is international in scope and welcomes applications from scholars outside the United States.

    Areas of Special Interest. Most of the Center’s fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research, including fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian Studies, theology, and a young woman in philosophy. The Center also invites applicants from scholars in inter-disciplinary fields, including African American Studies, area studies, Cultural Studies, and Media Studies.  

    Stipends. The amounts awarded are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center’s ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide at least half salary and covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents.  

    Facilities and Services. The Center provides a rich environment for individual research and the exchange of ideas. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. The stunning Archie K. Davis building includes private studies for Fellows, conference rooms, a central commons for dining, lounges, and reading areas. The Center's unparalleled, comprehensive library service supports Fellows by fulfilling thousands of requests for books and other research materials from out partner institutions in the Triangle, usually within 24 hours, and libraries around the world. Library staff also provide reference assistance and instruction in new online research tools. 

    Support. Fellowships are supported by the Center’s endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    Deadline and Application Procedures. Applicants submit an application form, a curriculum vitae, a 1000-word project proposal, and three letters of recommendation. The application form and instructions may be found at the Center’s website: http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org. Applications and letters of recommendation must be submitted online by October 18, 2016.

    http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org            e-mail <nhc@nationalhumanitiescenter.org>

    The National Humanities Center does not discriminate on the basis of
    race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation, or age. We are dedicated to fair treatment, diversity, and inclusion.
     
  • SESAH Conference Registration

    New Orleans | Dates: 01 Aug – 28 Sep, 2016
    Early Registration for the SESAH Conference ended July 31; Good news though! Registration is open into September! See you in New Orleans.
  • Irving J. Gill: Simplicity and Reform

    Santa Barbara | Dates: 10 Sep – 04 Dec, 2016
    Irving J. Gill (1870-1936) created a distinctive architecture in Southern California, using a refined and abstracted architectural vocabulary which he described as “the straight line, the cube, the arch, and the circle.” This exhibition examines Gill’s architectural language and his experiments with materials and construction. The roots of his idealistic achievement are traced to the social and moral concerns of the Progressive era and the Arts and Crafts movement, and the influence of Chicago architect Louis Sullivan (1856-1924), who argued for a “new architecture in America,” unaffected by the past and based on a transcendental view of Nature.
  • CFP: Institutional Modernism: Public Art and Architecture (Canberra, 1-3 Dec 16)

    Canberra | Dates: 29 Jul – 26 Aug, 2016
    The Annual Conference of the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ) will be held in Canberra from 1 to 3 December 2016.

    Session: INSTITUTIONAL MODERNISM: PUBLIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

    Session chairs: Janina Gosseye & Hannah Lewi

    In 1948 Siegfried Giedion suggested that 'no real civilization exists which did not fulfil the irrepressible longing for institutions where ... a kind of broader [community] life could develop'. He continued: 'In different periods these institutions [have] had different aims, but whether they were called the Greek gymnasion [sic.], the agora, the Roman Thermae or fora, the guilds, the medieval market places or cathedrals, they all contributed in developing human values.' The Swiss architectural historian and exponent of modernism thereby added to his 1943 argument that 'people desire buildings that represent their social, ceremonial, and community life.'

    In the second half of the 20th century, as Australia progressively suburbanized, government and religious institutions responded. An impressive array of new institutional buildings were commissioned and built which were deemed capable of shaping citizens' 'social, ceremonial and community life': municipalities built kindergartens, local public libraries, civic centres and swimming pools; state governments built campuses for mass tertiary education; and the church - seeking to reinvigorate worship - invested in modern church buildings. According to Giedion a close collaboration between architects, landscapers, painters and sculptors was required to ensure that these buildings would function as true civic centres, where the artist's talent 'could touch the great public [and] form the people.'As a result, many of these new institutional spaces featured public artworks that sought to engage the community in interactive and expressive ways.

    This session seeks proposals that critically re-examine how public art developed in conjunction with a new wave of 'institutional' modernism in Australia in the second half of the 20th century, and the ways in which this intended symbiosis between architecture and art was thought capable of representing and indeed coercively forming a new kind of humanist and civil society.

    Send abstracts to: j.gosseye@uq.edu.au<mailto:j.gosseye@uq.edu.au> until 26 August 2016.

    Proposals  should consist of the following:

    1. Completed session participation proposal form, or an email that provides the required information.

    2. A letter or email briefly outlining expertise and interest in the topic of the session and the conference theme.

    3. An abstract of the proposed paper, of no more than 400 words.

    4. A brief cv (last 5 years/ one page maximum).

    More information can be found on: http://aaanz.info/aaanz-home/conferences/2016-conference/work-art-2016-call-papers/
  • CFP: VIRAL, Inaugural Issue of Technology | Architecture + Design

    Dates: 29 Jul – 01 Sep, 2016
    The Call for Papers for the inaugural issue, VIRAL, is open and accepting submissions at editors@TADjournal.org until September 1, 2016. 
     
    TAD is a peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to the advancement of scholarship in the field of building technology, with a particular focus on its translation, integration, and impact on architecture and design. TAD will solicit, capture, and share new knowledge in the ways we think, make, and use technology within the building arts. Published articles will feature primary research in emerging materials, construction techniques, design integration, structures, building systems, energy, environmental design, information technology, digital fabrication, sustainability and resiliency, project delivery, the history and theory of technology, and building technology education. Aimed at researchers, educators, and practitioners, the journal advances and transforms the current discourse on building based technologies with the goal of expanding, reimagining, and challenging its role for architecture and design.

    Editorial Board 
    Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Chris Ford, Stanford University
    Kyle Konis, University of Southern California
    Clare Olsen, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
    Jeane Ripple, University of Virginia
    Franca Trubiano, University of Pennsylvania
    Marci Uihlein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Andrzej Zarzycki, New Jersey Institute of Technology
     
  • Hidden Traces of Shared History: Rethinking Asia Pacific through 19th and early 20th Century Photographs

    Melbourne | Dates: 29 Aug, 2016
    This symposium brings together leading researchers who are working on 19th and early 20th century collections of Asia Pacific photographs. Alongside a broader consideration of the significance of the history of photography in the region, explorations of visual and built traces of identity formations, globalised trading and agricultural industrialisation, and the envisioning of modernity and nationalism during the late colonial era will be highlighted. The projects featured in the symposium demonstrate different modes of archival research and interpretation methods and a spectrum of geographical connections showcasing different pathways into the photographic collections. As a cross disciplinary platform of research exchange, the symposium aims to generate an overview of new approaches to research into the 19th and early 20th century history of the Asia Pacific region. These are developing through working with the era’s arguably most captivating and rich visual traces.
  • CFP: MD Journal: Synapses. Design and Connectivity

    Dates: 28 Jul – 01 Sep, 2016
    CALL FOR PAPERS
    Dear Distinguished Colleagues and Friends,
    We are delighted to announce the second Issue of the  MD Journal focused on “Synapses. Design and Connectivity, Networks and Interactions among objects, services, environments and people”.
     
    For this MD Journal call, we seek to engage the ongoing design changes on issues of connectivity between objects and environments at different size levels and to promote new ideas on a broad user experience across social interactions and networked systems. The MD Journal second issue aims to reflect on the connectivity as a design focus in the contemporary culture by bridging various stimuli coming from design, architecture and networks sciences. This issue try to emphasise emerging paths and scenarios that are shaping a wider connectivity.
    Adopting the synapses’ concept - often used to indicate the flow among neurons stimuli- we are particularly interested in underpinning those studies and projects that are transforming the ways we design today, merging more and more communication, interaction and technology contexts. The field of Connectivity has been originally practiced for years into the human-machines interaction discipline in response to an increased miniaturization of data transmission technologies. This progression are now radically changing the configuration of the communication and interactions between objects and people as well as possible design concepts and related practices. Moving from the classical Machine to Machine (m2m) ground, the Internet of Things (IoT) design field is becoming a very wide influential phenomena. Nowadays, this evolution lacks the constructive energy between conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches that we really need to increase the awareness of such connectivity development and on what this overall body of design knowledge offers. At the same time, the increasingly growing of mobile pervasive devices and wearable interactions  has opened innovative ways to design everyday objects.
    This call invites diverse communities of theorists and practitioners. We welcome contributions from a range of emphasis: scientific papers, critical review, design methodologies, conceptual and experimental approaches, case studies, prototypes and pilot projects. Areas of interventions could include small and large design sizes. Specifically, with this issue, we hope to explore multidisciplinary approaches across two sides: theoretical and materials. On one side we aims to extend the IoT field of study from the general approach to the more scientific one, bridging research areas on digital objects, services and environments, user-centered design, smart objects, social platforms and networked systems. 
    Possible topics of exploration include, but are not limited to:
    •              Ecosystems of networked objects;
    •              Networked interfaces and new materials for smart buildings;
    •              Wearable technology;
    •              Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environment;
    •              Energy management and networked systems;
    •              Biohacking, healthcare and wellbeing;
    •              Personal informatics and quantified self;
    •              Open source and open hardware;
    •              Open data and infoviz systems;
    •              Interactive experiences in smart exhibition and cultural heritage;
    •              Transportation and public spaces;
    •              Privacy, security and ethics in a connected world;
    •              Social platforms for data sharing.
     
    We seek the presentation of unique, ground breaking, significant case studies, practice of design, prototypes and the review of pilot projects from an academic and not perspective.
    Prospective authors are encouraged to submit an electronic version of original, unpublished manuscripts in English or Italian language. Contributions will be archived digitally on a web-based Open Access publication.
    Deadline for abstract September 1st, 2016. Please submit for a peer review to materialdesign@unife.it.
    Important dates:
    Abstract submission September 1, 2016
    Notification of Abstract Review September 6, 2016
    Submission paper October 30, 2016
    Notification of Peer Review Results November 20, 2016
    Submission of final version December 10, 2016
    Publication December 2016
    For further details, see the Call for Submission announcement 
    http://www.materialdesign.it/en/journal-md//call-for-paper_60.htm.
    Vanessa De Luca, Editor
    SUPSI, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland
    Michele Zannoni, Editor
    Università della Repubblica di San Marino
     
  • CFP: The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture, ICMS (Kalamazoo, MI, May 11-14, 2017) Deadline September 15

    Kalamazoo | Dates: 28 Jul – 15 Sep, 2016
    Call for Papers: The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017 Organized by Lindsay Cook (Columbia University) and Zachary Stewart (Fordham University) Citation, understood in its earliest legal sense, refers not to the act of reiterating or to the act of repeating but rather to a formal process of assembling parties separated by space and time. It is therefore best understood as a complex procedure for forging new relationships between people, places, and things that, though highly structured, are by no means inherently stable. Over the past several decades, a growing number of scholars—including, most notably, Wolfgang Schenkluhn, Hans-Joachim Kunst, Dieter Kimpel, Robert Suckale, Dany Sandron, and Arnaud Timbert—have examined, in explicit terms, the role of citation in architectural production during the Middle Ages. On the one hand, their work has been of great benefit to the field, demonstrating that citation is a productive paradigm for understanding the ways in which isomorphic relationships enable spatial environments to create, support, or subvert social orders. On the other hand, their work has also raised troubling questions about the capacity of buildings to convey meaning, assuming as it does that architecture, like language, functions as a coherent semiotic system. Vitruvius laid the groundwork for the application of this logocentric analogy to classical architecture, but does it necessarily obtain within all modes of architectural production, particularly those considered un- or anti-classical? What are the advantages or disadvantages of choosing citation—versus imitation, replication, appropriation, influence, or habit—as a discursive frame for studying the recurrence of formal elements within architectural ensembles? How does such a visually oriented method address issues of production, perception, technology, function, and value? How might it alter current accounts of the design, construction, and meaning of buildings modeled after famous precedents such as St. Peter’s in Rome, the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, the Great Mosque of Damascus, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, or the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris? This session invites papers that pursue these kinds of questions as they pertain to the diverse building cultures of the Middle Ages, West and East, between c.300 to c.1500. Highly encouraged are contributions that investigate the stimuli for citation, the media that make it possible, and the agents that make it productive. Especially welcome are papers involving case studies that consider the potential volatility of architectural citation across cultures, regions, institutions, audiences, materials, architectural types, art-historical styles, or chronological periods. Contact Lindsay Cook (lsc2140@columbia.edu) and Zachary Stewart (zdstewart@gmail.com) to propose a 20-minute paper. Submissions must include a title, a one-page abstract, a short CV, and a completed Participant Information Form (available here: wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions). Proposals will be accepted through September 15, 2016.
  • CFP: 5th International Conference on Civil, Architectural and Transportation Engineering (CATE-16) (Hong Kong, 17-18 Nov 16)

    Hong Kong | Dates: 27 Jul – 05 Aug, 2016
    5th International Conference on Civil, Architectural and Transportation Engineering (CATE-16) HONG KONG
    17th to 18th November 2016
    Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    Deadline of New Full Paper/Poster/Abstract Submissions: Aug. 5, 2016

    All the submitted conference papers will be peer reviewed. All accepted papers of the conference will be published in the printed conference proceedings with valid International ISBN number & DOI-CROSSREF Indexed. 

    REGISTRATION FEE 
    Author (Student): USD 190
    Author (Faculty/Academic)*: USD 225
    Listener/Co-Author: 175 USD
    Additional Paper(s): 150 USD
    Extra Proceeding: 50 USD

    TOPIC/SCOPE
    Topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to:
    ---transportation 
    ---urban studies 
    ---landscape architecture 
    ---architecture 
    ---archaeology 
    ---museums and heritage 
    ---water 
    ---disaster management 
    ---rehabilitation 
    ---GIS 
    ---building design 
    ---sustainable development 
    ---transport 
    ---smart materials 
    --Structural Engineering
    --Construction Engineering 
    ---Urban Planning 

    SUBMISSION METHODS
    1. Electronic Submission System; ( .doc/.docx/.pdf formats): 
    OR
    2. Using Email: cs@caeer.org 

    Enquiries: cs@caeer.org
    Web address: http://caeer.org/conference.php?slug=CATE-16&sid=3&catDid=91
    Sponsored by: International Association of Civil, Agricultural & Environmental Engineering Researchers 
     
  • CFP: Preserving Transcultural Heritage: Your Way or My Way? (Lisbon, 5-8 Jul 17)

    Lisbon | Dates: 27 Jul – 31 Aug, 2016
    The ARTIS – Institute of History of Art, School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon and the ICOMOS Portugal are pleased to invite all the researchers, specialists and other stakeholders involved in the process of safeguarding of architectural heritage created in the meeting of cultures, to participate in the International Congress Preserving transcultural heritage: your way or my way?, which will take place in Lisbon, between 05 and 08 July 2017.
    Paper and poster proposals are welcome until 31 August 2016. Please submit your paper or poster by sending the proposal to the email congress.artis@letras.ulisboa.pt (see the submission guidelines below). The proposals will be selected by the session organisers and the Scientific Committee on the basis of the following criteria: relevance, innovation, scientific quality and theme of the session. On 15 September proposers will be notified regarding acceptance of their paper or poster and will receive further instructions.
    The organisation encourages multidisciplinary and international research on the safeguarding of transcultural heritage (architecture, urbanism, archaeology, landscapes and decorative arts in built heritage).

    Sessions
    Session 1: Heritage values and management of African and American historic cities and sites with European influences
    Session 2: Transcultural heritage, musealisation and memory: preservation of the Indigenous minorities’ heritage in Americas and in the Pacific region formerly under Western rule
    Session 3: Contextualizing the (un)wanted: tourism and management of the architecture of totalitarian regimes in Europe
    Session 4: Globalisation as generator of new transcultural heritages: preserving migrants’ architectural heritage
    Session 5: Greeks, Romans and Byzantines in the Mediterranean region and Near East: guarding transcultural remains containing ancient classical influences
    Session 6: Preserving shared heritage along the Silk Road, a major creator of cultural encounters
    Session 7: Memories to remember and (not) forget: slaves’ heritage outside their homelands
    Session 8: The “Indian melting pot” for religions and cultures: challenges concerning transcultural heritage preservation
    Session 9: West versus East: differences and difficulties to the conservation of their shared heritage (European colonies in Far East / “Asiantowns” in the West)
    Session 10: The discovery of ancient cultures: safeguarding of native architectural heritage in European colonies
    Session 11: Religious, political and ideological fanaticisms as destroyers of “different” heritages throughout History
    Session 12: European heritage as Imperialist statements in colonies: (un)desirable memories whish must be protected or to be forgotten?
    Session 13: Between Far East and the Indian Sea: Indochinese and Insulindian cultures (influences, fusions and heritage safeguarding)
    Session 14: The Ottoman Empire in the crossroad between Europe, Asia and Africa: fusion of cultures and heritages to preserve
    Session 15: Questions, controversies, idiosyncrasies and case studies on authenticity between different cultures, when focusing the safeguarding of transcultural architectural heritage
    Session 16: Should be followed or ignored? Reception of European heritage theories within non-Western cultures
    Session 17: Safeguarding of architectural heritage belonging to ethnic and religious minorities inside countries with dominant cultures
    Session 18: Other relevant themes

    SUBMISSION  GUIDELINES
    Download the submission template, and fill it with the following data:
    Paper or poster?
    Name of the session (only for papers)
    Title of the paper, with 15 words maximum;
    Abstract with 250 words maximum;
    Three to five keywords;
    Personal data (name, professional affiliation, mail and email addresses, and telephone contact of the authors);
    The acceptance notification for submitted papers and posters will be known by 15 September 2016. After being accepted, preliminary versions of paper texts and poster drafts should be submitted until 30 November 2016, for peer-review.
    Researchers can submit simultaneously a paper and a poster, but only with different subjects (paper and poster cannot be both about the same subject). Therefore, it must be submitted an abstract for each proposal.
    Dimension of posters should be AO (841 x 1189 mm) vertical. Posters should be printed by their authors and delivered in the first day of the congress (in the registration) or by mail (should arrive until 30 June 2017).
    For further questions, please contact the organisation. Download here the pdf of the call for papers and posters.
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