Buildings of the United States Volumes


Published Volumes


Buildings of Vermont

Buildings of Vermont
Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson (2014)

Most picture Vermont with handsome barns overlooking rolling pastures, white country churches punctuating hillsides of blazing maples, and small villages clustered around gracious greens. While not inaccurate, this image does little justice to the architectural richness of a state that retains so significant a variety of building types, landscapes, and historic environments that it was declared a national historic treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Buildings of Vermont looks beyond the stereotypes to explain the remarkable range, quality, humanity, and persistence of a built landscape that has a compelling appeal to visitors and residents alike.






Buildings of Texas: Central, South, and Gulf Coast
Gerald Moorhead, with James W. Steely, W. Dwayne Jones, Anna Mod, John C. Ferguson, Cheryl Caldwell Ferguson, Mario L. Sánchez, and Stephen Fox (2013)

This award-winning book, the first of two volumes devoted to the Lone Star State, covers the central, southern, and Gulf Coast regions (the earliest areas of Spanish and Anglo settlement and the majority of the counties that won independence from Mexico in 1836) and includes four major cities--Austin, Corpus Christi, Houston, and San Antonio. More than 1,000 building entries canvass the most important and representative examples of Spanish missions, log cabins, German stone houses, Victorian courthouses, Moderne stores, contemporary ranch houses, modern skyscrapers, postmodern retail strips, and incursions by internationally renowned architects.


Buildings of Alaska
Alison K. Hoagland (1993)

Buildings of Alaska 
traces Alaska’s architecture from the earliest dwellings made of sod, whalebone, and driftwood to the glass and metal skyscrapers of modern-day Anchorage.  Focusing on the various cultural traditions that have helped shape the state’s architecture, the volume also explores how Alaska’s buildings reflect Alaskans’ attempts to adapt to the unique conditions of their environment. 


Buildings of Colorado
Thomas J. Noel (1997)

Buildings of Colorado charts the architectural history of Colorado – the nation’s highest state – from the eastern High Plains to the Rocky Mountain backbone that melts into the canyons of the west.  Both a historical resource and a quick-reference guidebook, this volume reflects the remarkable topographical diversity of the state, a full one-third of which is designated as federal land. 

Buildings of Delaware
W. Barksdale Maynard (2008)

Buildings of Delaware
is the first book to document the state's architectural history from all periods. The volume covers buildings of many styles, types, and materials, from grand mansions to vernacular structures, and from urban to rural settings.

Buildings of the District of Columbia
Pamela Scott & Antoinette J. Lee (1993)

The public architecture of Washington, D.C. is well known throughout the world.  The Capitol, the White House, and other major monuments are familiar to millions of people who have never visited the city. Less familiar are many notable public and private buildings located in the central city and scattered throughout Washington’s residential neighborhoods, ranging from the eighteenth-century port city of Georgetown to the mid-twentieth-century urban renewal area known as the Southwest Quadrant.

Buildings of Hawaii
Don J. Hibbard (2011)

Buildings of Hawaii presents the architecture of the six major islands in the Hawaii chain. The first in-depth examination of the architecture of the Islands, the book covers structures from the early nineteenth century through the first decade of the new millennium. Included are Japanese temples, Chinese society halls, the only royal palaces in the United States, and vernacular single-wall building traditions of the plantation period.  

Buildings of Iowa
David Gebhard & Gerald Mansheim (1993)

Buildings of Iowa traces Iowa’s architecture from the earliest Native American influences to the present. The image of Iowa as the breadbasket and agricultural center of the nation often overlooks the unity of urban and rural that is reflected in Iowa’s buildings and landscape.


Buildings of Louisiana
Karen Kingsley (2003) 

Buildings of Louisiana provides a comprehensive guide to Louisiana’s built environment. Organized by parish, it begins with New Orleans and moves on to cities, towns, and rural areas in each of eleven regions around the state. It encompasses architecture in the broadest sense, from Native American burial mounds to nineteenth-century plantations to the striking twentieth-century industrial landscape along the lower Mississippi. 

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston
Keith N. Morgan; Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, and Roger G. Reed, contributing editors (2009)

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston
 represents a new way of envisioning the built environment of Boston and the greater Boston area. Although Boston entries are still organized by familiar city regions such as Government Center or Beacon Hill, neighborhoods such as Jamaica Plain or South Boston, and outlying towns such as Lexington, Lincoln, or Waltham, the book also considers the more recent built environment, including entries focused on various portions of the Route 128 corridor.

Buildings of Michigan
Kathryn Bishop Eckert (revised, 2012)

This revised edition of Buildings of Michigan (first published in 1993) by Kathryn Eckert presents the architecture of the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan. From the nineteenth century to the green and sustainable buildings of the twenty-first century, this book covers the full spectrum of high-style and vernacular architecture and the building materials particular to the state.

Buildings of Nevada
Julie Nicoletta (2000)

Although dominated by its wild and dramatic landscape, Nevada boasts both colorful human history and a rich – and fascinating – architectural heritage. Buildings of Nevada catalogues the best of the state’s built environment. Ranging across every part of Nevada, from the desert south to the green shores of Lake Tahoe in the north and everywhere in between, Buildings of Nevada is a comprehensive, informative tour of one of America’s fastest growing and most rapidly changing states.

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania
George E. Thomas with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas (2010)

This latest volume in the SAH Buildings of the United States series follows the Pennsylvania migration narrative: Philadelphia and its surrounding counties of the original quaker settlement zone, the Piedmont and German agricultural zone, the Scots-Irish frontier beyond the Blue Mountain, the coal country with its trade connections to New York City and its East European coal miners, and the Norther Tier claimed and settled by New Englanders.

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania
Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker (2010)

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania considers the architecture, landscape, and town plans of thirty-one counties west of Blue Mountain and north to Lake Erie, including cities and communities big and small, from Pittsburgh, Beaver Falls, Johnstown, and Altoona to Bellefonte, State College, Lock Haven, Clarion, and Erie, and scores of places in between. 

Buildings of Pittsburgh
Franklin Toker (2007)

At the forefront of national and international change, Pittsburgh has long been portrayed as a place for innovative architecture. From its origins as a fort built in 1753 at the urging of a twenty-one-year-old George Washington, through its industrial boom, and into contemporary times, when it has become a pioneer for the ideals and philosophy of environmentally friendly architecture, the city has a history of development that exemplifies the transformative nature of America's built environment.

Buildings of Rhode Island
William H. Jordy; Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward, contributing editors (2004)

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the Union: slightly more than 1,200 square miles, 14 percent of which is taken up by the waters of Narragansett Bay. Yet this tiny enclave contains one of the richest concentrations of important historical architecture to be found anywhere in the United States.

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont
Richard Guy Wilson & Contributors (2002)

Home to many of the founding fathers and early political leaders of the nation, focal point of the Confederacy, and at various times a financial, industrial, commercial, and suburban center, Virginia claims its architecture as its greatest artistic and cultural legacy.

Buildings of West Virginia
S. Allen Chambers, Jr. (2004) 

West Virginia, site of John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry and a child of the Civil War, is almost alone of all the states in having representations of architecture and engineering on its state seal. Yet, perhaps in part because of the diversity that formed them, West Virginia's architectural history and engineering heritage have not been fully explored and assessed until now.